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A newsletter for students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends

PGA golf program receives gift from energy company

Pictured, from left, are: Young Lee of UMES, Scott Nersten and Rick Maiello of Caves Valley Golf Club, and Josephina Oh of UMES.

INSIDE

A Baltimore-area utility company that sponsored a major pro golf tournament this past summer has made a donation to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s PGA golf management program. The $20,000 gift from Constellation, an Exelon Company, will be used to purchase computerized teaching equipment and to pay for upgrades to irrigation for the on-campus practice green. “We are humbled that Constellation named our program as a charity beneficiary of the 2017 SENIOR PLAYERS Championship,” UMES’ Billy Dillon said. “They have noticed the work that we have done in producing productive members of the PGA of America and in growing diversity throughout the association.” “Building these types of relationships are crucial in advancing our mission as a program,” said Dillon, the golf management program director. Dillon headed a 16-member delegation from UMES that volunteered to serve as caddies during a July 12 pro-am competition prior to the 2017 tournament at Caves Valley Golf Club. UMES was among eight Maryland organizations chosen by the utility as beneficiaries of its philanthropy tied to corporate sponsorship of the PGA Senior Tour event, one of the sport’s most noteworthy tournaments for players 50 years or older. “Giving back to the communities we serve is one of Constellation’s most important responsibilities and an important part of the Constellation SENIOR PLAYERS Championship,” said Joseph Nigro, CEO of Constellation. “This year, we are especially proud to be supporting organizations that are making a positive difference in our hometown of Baltimore” and Maryland. In addition to Dillon and faculty colleagues Chris Prosser and Jamila Johnson, 13 golf management students shadowed amateur golfers who

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Historical Marker at UMES Parents’ Weekend

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All-Star at Capitol Hill Student Vies for City Council Seat

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October 6, 2017

“Best of Awards” Coastal Cleanup Pharmacy Faculty Presents in Seoul

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played alongside such PGA Senior Tour pros as Bernhard Langer, Jay Haas, Corey Pavin and Scott McCarron, the 2017 tournament winner. UMES student caddies were: Harry Early, Bryce Young, Brian Musgrove, Young Lee, Max Marshall, Brian Huber, Lane Dillon, Andy Hewitt, Matt Stitcher, Wesley Samuel, Demarkis Cooper, Josephina Oh and Marquis Usher. “It was really a fun experience,” Usher said. “I knew a lot about Caves Valley because of all the scholarship support they’ve provided UMES students and I thought it would be a great way to see how the professionals approach the game.” The pros, Usher said, didn’t disappoint. “Being able to watch them up close was a great opportunity. I learned a lot,” the senior from Fort Washington, Md. said. Oh and Cooper earned full-ride scholarships out of high school to attend UMES courtesy of generous donations from the Caves Valley Golf Club Foundation. All told, the foundation has underwritten scholarships that currently support four UMES golf management students. The gift to the golf program is the second UMES has received from an Exelon Company in the past year. Delmarva Power donated $1 million to UMES in the summer of 2016 to support “green energy initiatives” and science, technology, engineering and mathematics instruction. It is the largest single corporate gift in university history. “The Exelon Company’s confidence in UMES is a life-changing experience for our university and more importantly, our students,” said UMES executive Vice President Kim Dumpson, who oversees fundraising. “We are grateful for its generous support of our academic programs.”

Mosely Design Show

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Hallie Gregory Legacy

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Green Entrepreneurial Program Chesapeake Housing Volunteers Health Care Speaker

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A&E Calendar WESM Fall Pledge Drive


2 The Key / October 6, 2017

Circling the Oval

United Methodist Church designates UMES historic site The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (originally the Delaware Conference Academy) has been named “United Methodist Historic Site # 536” by the Peninsula-Delaware Conference. It is a national recognition and one that was overdue, according to Russell McCabe, president of the Conference’s Commission on Archives and History. One or two sites over all of Delaware and the Eastern Shore of Maryland are selected per year. “That’s a lot to select from,” he noted. “We were sitting at a meeting discussing eligible sites and when the University of Maryland Eastern Shore came up—it was a slam dunk,” he said. “There is a great connection with the university, how it started and the back story of the deeper history in 1864 of how the Delaware Conference originated.” UMES “is something we are particularly proud of in our history,” McCabe said. “Even 150 years ago, educational opportunities, regardless of a person’s color, were limited. The Methodist Church realized it was good not only for a person’s spiritual well-being but for their general wellbeing to be educated. A lot of effort was then devoted to getting people educated.” He along with other representatives of the Commission were on hand Sept. 14 for the university’s 131st Founders’ Day Convocation and Summer Commencement to present a plaque (pictured) and a resolution which reads:

Whereas the Delaware Conference was established as “the first Conference for Colored Preachers, under the rule of the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church” in 1864; and whereas the members of the Conference, wishing to provide opportunities for higher education, established the Delaware Conference Academy in Princess Anne, Maryland in 1886; and whereas the Delaware Conference Academy was the forerunner of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. On recommendation of the Commission on Archives and History, the Peninsula-Delaware Conference designated the Delaware Conference Academy/University of Maryland Eastern Shore as a Conference Historic Site. “When we (the commission members) left the other day, we met for lunch and talked about it (the historic designation) right away and how happy we were to do it,” McCabe said. “What a great event Founders’ Day was.” Commission members, including Jessie Cottman Smith, alumna (’50) and UMES librarian emerita, all agreed about the connection between the church and the university: “Look how things turned out.” “We were really impressed with what we saw,” McCabe said. “Boy, it looks great.”

Parents’ Weekend

(Oct. 20-22) festivities planned De’Aira Johnson of Baltimore, Md. and Aswan Mangrum of Cheverly, Md., the 2017-18 Miss and Mr. UMES, along with their Royal Court (a male and female from each class) invite parents for the main event of Parents’ Weekend—coronation. The event, which has been an HBCU tradition on the Princess Anne campus since the first queen was crowned in 1948, takes place Sat., Oct. 21 from 6-9 p.m. in the Ella Fitzgerald Center. A coronation ball for students follows the ceremony. Parents can partake of a host of activities or simply enjoy spending time with their student, meeting their friends and getting more familiar with the campus community, said Louise Gaile, coordinator of UMES’ Parents Association. Hawk Hysteria opens the festivities Fri., Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. in the William P. Hytche Athletic Center with the Lady Hawks volleyball team taking on Delaware State. Basketball scrimmages, give-a-ways, contests, autographs and Harry the Hawk’s birthday party round out the evening. Parents can meet fellow parents and members of the Student Affairs office Saturday (Oct. 21) at a 9:30 a.m. complimentary breakfast in the Student Services Center Multi-purpose room followed by an 11 a.m. meeting of the Parents’ Association (SSC, room 2149). All parents are welcome, Gaile said. Other options Saturday include free souvenir family photos (noon to 4 p.m., SSC Rotunda) campus tours, visits to the UMES bookstore, free fitness workouts and more. Registration and parent check-in at the SSC Information Desk is from 9 a.m- 7 p.m., Sat., Oct. 21 and from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. Call 410-651-7850 or visit www.umes.edu for more information.


UMES People

The Key / October 6, 2017

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HBCU All-Star shares Capitol Hill experience

Zoe Johnson, a doctoral student in UMES’ toxicology program, is representing the university as a White House Initiative on HBCUs Ambassador and All-Star. An initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Johnson traveled to Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 for the two-day 2017 National HBCU Week Conference. “I had a remarkable experience in the (nation’s) Capital,” Johnson said. “I was especially awed by the size and operations that occurred in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.” Johnson was challenged with “marathon meetings (along with other student ambassadors) from dawn to night with the Secretary of Education, top entrepreneurs, representatives from federal agencies and culminated with a dinner at the Association of American Medical College, where I gave a closing remark.” A highlight was an interaction with Dr. Jerome Adams, the U.S. Surgeon General, in the East Wing of the White House. Adams’ father, Richard, is a 1969 UMES alum. Johnson lists the experience of representing UMES as an honor. “Even as UMES recently got recognition as one of the top 20 HBCUs (by U.S. News & World Report), it can only take a collective effort to keep

my institution on that pedestal,” Johnson said. “Through my ambassadorship, I can contribute from my level and use this platform to create an extra support structure for our students to realize their educational and career potentials.” The 62 All-Stars serve as ambassadors by providing outreach opportunities and communication to their fellow students about the value of education and the initiative as a networking resource. Johnson, who has demonstrated a passion for student academic and career success, has launched a campaign on campus in collaboration with the UMES Center for Access and Academic Success to increase college completion rates. “The Sophomore Success Initiative” is designed to engage sophomores and rising juniors in attending International Affairs conferences, networking with federal agencies and in other development programs to maximize college opportunities, Johnson said. In addition to his pursuits as an HBCU All-Star, Johnson also is an education policy analyst for the Maryland Higher Education Commission, president of UMES’ Graduate Student Government and the founding president of UMES’ International Graduate Students’ Association.

Student vies for city council seat

help those around you, give back to your community DaJuan Gay began his studies at the University and educate yourself.” of Maryland Eastern Shore with more on his mind Heaven White says DaJuan, her eldest child, was than his challenging curriculum.       destined to help people. At age 20, when most college kids anticipate the By Debra Driscoll “Since he was a three year olds, he’s just always social life of school, Gay focused his extracurricular been that way. He always volunteered for jobs in activities on his run for Annapolis Alderman in the classroom, and his teachers told me they could Ward 6. “I decided my senior year in high school depend on him. All his life, he’s been about helping.” that I’d run,” he said. “But I had known since I Life has been challenging for White’s family. was in seventh grade that I wanted to be involved in Born in Baltimore, Gay and his family moved to Annapolis more government.”  than eight years ago. They bounced around to any housing his Gay credits two strong male role models for the direction mother could afford, spending time in Sarah’s House, a shelter his life has taken. Preston Hartman, his seventh-grade history at Fort Meade. teacher at Bates Middle School, “really inspired me,” Gay said. “Thanks to a bus that shuttled students back and forth “He always talked about government and how important it is to Annapolis, I was able to continue my education here,” Gay for us to get involved to make positive changes.” said.   Hartman had such impact that Gay made him the subject At Annapolis High School, Gay was a four-year member of of his college aspiration essay. Caleb Wolf of the Boys and Girls the track team. But what meant most to him were his last two years as class Club of Annapolis was the other motivating force. “He was integral in instilling a strong sense of community service, president. “I always felt comfortable in leadership roles and helping others,” he leadership and work ethic in me,” Gay said.  “Up until my involvement with said. “I never particularly stood out academically, but I knew that college Mr. Hartman and Mr. Wolf, I had no positive male figures in my life. They GAY / continued on page 5 changed my life forever. They told me the only way to be successful is if you


School News

4 The Key / October 6, 2017

Pharmacy alums named “Best Of” in area Kudos to UMES pharmacy alums Natalie Hemphill and Zack Sherr for being named best pharmacists in The Metropolitan Magazine’s 2017 “Best Of Winners Circle.” Hemphill (Class of 2013) was listed under the heading “Best People” in Southern Delaware. She has been a pharmacist at Harris Teeter in Selbyville since 2013. Sherr (Class of 2014) took the same award for Berlin to Ocean City. He joined the family business at Apple Discount Drug in 2001. “We are all justifiably proud within the School of Pharmacy and Health Professions when our graduates are recognized for their professional accomplishments,” said Jim Bresette, Pharm.D., associate dean for development and external relations. “However, to be recognized publicly by patients and community members as positively affecting their lives and health—well that’s exactly what motivates us as pharmacists.”

Pharmacy faculty present in Seoul Drs. Yen Dang and Hoai-An Truong (pictured center right) pharmacy faculty in UMES’ School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, presented at the 77th FIP World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Sept. 10-14 in Seoul, South Korea. The symposium theme was “Medicines and beyond!” Sessions demonstrated that “tradition and dedication to patients’ health – the true soul of pharmacy – can be coupled with innovation in technology, education and practice to deliver care for the 21st century.” Dang’s presentation was “Assessing student pharmacist’s intercultural competency skills using international scenarios.” Truong addressed “Interprofessional global health experience: lessons learned from implementation and community partnerships for Haiti medical missions.” Dr. Frank Nice (pictured center left) has worked with UMES’ pharmacy program through the Haiti mission trip.

Pharmacy society holds Coastal Cleanup The Delta Nu chapter of Phi Lambda Sigma, UMES’ School of Pharmacy’s leadership society, gathered in Ocean City, Md. Sept. 16 for International Coastal Cleanup, an activity organized by the Ocean Conservancy. Some 27 student and faculty volunteers cleaned up beach and boardwalk areas, including tediously picking up cigarette butts—the number one item in a list of the Ocean Conservancy’s top 10 items collected at such events. State Sen. Jim Mathias attended the event to offer support of the group’s efforts and to give them a social media shout-out. Tony’s Pizza supplied volunteers with cold drinks. “Harnessing the Power of People to Fight Ocean Trash” was the theme of this year’s observance of International Coastal Cleanup, said Emily Diseroad, the society’s historian and student pharmacist Class of 2019.


The Key / October 6, 2017

5

Mosely Gallery hosts graphic designers and illustrators promoting social change

“Design/Connection,” opening Oct. 19 with a reception in the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Mosely Gallery from 4-6 p.m., is an invitational show featuring the works of four contemporary artists and educators who use visual communication as a means to “connect, elevate and inspire.” The artists, Aldrena Corder, Adison Landers, Fred Pellum and Tasheka Arceneaux Sutton, Mosely Gallery director Susan Holt said “highlight the potential of graphic design and illustration as a tool for social progress.” “They strive to apply their skills to higher values,” Holt said. “Building community through teaching and addressing pressing societal ills such as violence and discrimination, their work transcends the aesthetic and commercial realms and delves more deeply into the human.” A graphic designer and educator at Southeastern Louisiana University, Tasheka Arceneaux Sutton will give an 11 a.m. portfolio review and discussion of her work on opening day of the exhibit in Hazel Hall, Room 2040. Her projects, Holt said, “reflect her interest in social concerns such as deconstructing the visual representation of black victims of violence as portrayed by media.” Corder’s project, “The Skin I Am In,” resulted from her research into the history and effects of colorism; prejudice or discrimination based on social meanings attached to skin color. She is a freelance designer and instructor from South Carolina who works with legal services, nonGAY / continued from page 3

was the only way to break the cycle.” He was accepted to Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania, a public, master’s-level university that was also affordable. “I was excited to be away from home to focus on my studies,” he says. But that dream shattered. On November 7, of 2015 — a date Gay says he’ll never forget — “this guy bolts into our room and yells ‘I’m going to hang a (expletive deleted) tonight.’” Gay, who shared his dorm room with five roommates, was the only black on the floor and one of two in the 600-student dorm. “This was during the time of Freddie Gray, and things were boiling up between whites and blacks,” he said. “I was afraid for my life.” The university, Gay says, took no action other than offering him a room in a different dorm. He finished the semester, then enrolled at Anne Arundel Community College. There, his GPA took a hit. “I was living at home and was spending more time trying to make money to help my family out than I was studying,” he says. “It was a very difficult, depressing time.” Well into his sophomore year, he found a new sense of purpose, deciding to continue his education at UMES. He’s majoring in criminal justice with an

“Faces” by Adison Landers

“Black Woman Blue” by Tasheka Arceneaux Sutton

School News

profit industries and community serviceoriented businesses. Landers of Hanover, Md., says in his artist statement “designers and artists are purveyors of cultural change. At its best, visual work empathizes with its audience, brings people together and breaks down barriers. Creating benevolent work is necessary in our digital age as it serves to remind us of the inter-connectedness of all life.” Interactive, public art projects with the theme, “Love as a response to violence, police brutality and the negative effects of incarceration,” is the focus of Pellum’s works. With over a decade of commercial design and marketing, the professor of digital media at Alabama State University lists his goal as an artist is “to focus on those individuals or events largely unknown to the masses that aspire to bring about positive change in their communities.” “Bringing these artists and their works to UMES provides examples to our students of successful professionals whose busy lives incorporate care for community, society and the world,” Holt said. At a point in their lives where students are working toward academic and personal goals to launch their careers, she said, it is also a time to “plant the seeds of social awareness that in the years following graduation will continue to grow and enrich us all,” “Design/Connection” will be on exhibit in UMES’ Mosely Gallery through Nov. 22. Call 410-651-7770 or visit www.moselygallery.com for more information. interest in public policy — all chosen, he says, “to advance my political and community service aspirations.” Through it all, Gay has been proving his mother right. This summer, he was an intern with the District Court of Maryland. During the height of the oppressive heat and humidity, he used social media to raise money to buy air-conditioners for people sweltering in his community, Eastport Terrace. Within a week, more than $10,000 was raised and 50-plus airconditioners were installed. Gay also organized a Back to School Block Party at the Wiley H. Bates Boys and Girls Club in Annapolis where students left supplied for school.  On the campaign trail, he applied the rules he’s learning in college and his natural inclination, knocking on doors, showing up at community events and setting up a webpage. Editor’s note: This lightly edited article originally appeared in the Bay Weekly newspaper prior to the Annapolis City Council primary election Sept. 19 and is reprinted here with permission of the publication’s editor / publisher. Gay had hoped to win a seat on the Annapolis City Council, but lost Sept. 19 to Shaneka Henson, also a first-time candidate.


Athletics

6 The Key / October 6, 2017

Former Hawks Athletics Director Hallie Gregory passes away MEAC Hall of Famer held job from 1989-2000

Former UMES Athletic Director Dr. Hallie

The hire was instrumental and the Hawks

Gregory passed away Sept. 17 in Salisbury, Md.

went on to win national titles in 2008 and 2011

He was 78.

under her leadership.

A member of the Maryland Eastern Shore

Gregory also hired former track and field

Athletics Hall of Fame and the Mid-Eastern

and cross-country coach Ernest Barrett, who

Athletic Conference Hall of Fame, Gregory was

went on to win seven MEAC championships

the Hawks Athletics Director from 1989-2000.

as the head coach of the Outdoor Track and

In his first biography written for the 1989-

Field, Indoor Track and Field and Cross Country

1990 media guides, it stated “his task is to

squads.

expand the facilities and to enhance the athletic

Before he came to Maryland Eastern Shore,

programs.”

Gregory was a professor and coach at the U.S.

Responsible for the planning and building

Coast Guard Academy from 1971 to 1989. In

of the William P. Hytche Athletic Center, Gregory

1980, Coast Guard Academy Athletic Director

advanced the program into a facility that today

Otto Graham appointed Gregory — then the

still stands as one of the jewels of the conference.

Academy’s assistant track and basketball coach

In his tenure with The Shore, Gregory was instrumental in the addition

— as the Academy’s head track coach, making Gregory the first African-

of bowling, soccer and tennis, while also overseeing MEAC championships in American head coach in the history of the Academy. women’s outdoor track and field (1992), men’s cross country (1995), and men’s indoor track and field (1996-97). “Dr. Gregory was an innovator and a forward thinker, who was concerned about the welfare of student athletes with preparing our student athletes for the future,” Hawk Athletics Director Keith Davidson said. “He was a man of integrity and fair play. He was a respected and accomplished figure in the industry of intercollegiate athletics.” “It was my great fortune that he took an interest in me personally and

Gregory, a 2001 inductee to the Coast Guard Academy Athletic Hall of Fame, was head men’s track and field coach from 1980-1984 and the men’s basketball head coach from 1984-1989 while also serving as assistant director of Athletics in 1989. From 1967 to 1971, Gregory served as an assistant professor of physical education and head track coach at Central State University in Ohio. Gregory earned a Doctorate of Education in higher education administration from Indiana University. He held a Master of Science in

professionally and his advice, council and encouragement served as comfort physical education from Morehead State College in Minnesota and a to me. Dr. Gregory will be sorely missed by the entire Hawk Family and our

Bachelor of Arts in health, physical education and recreation from Dakota

thoughts go out to Nydia and his family.”

Wesleyan University in South Dakota.

While he was athletic director for more than a decade, Gregory will

After his tenure at Eastern Shore, Gregory continued his success at

forever be most linked to the creation of the women’s bowling program at

another MEAC institution — Delaware State University — from 2000-

the institution.

2003. He was instrumental in developing long-term strategies for each

Just two years into the program’s existence, he hired Maryland Eastern

of the Hornets’ 17 sports, placing special emphasis on affirming the

Shore and MEAC Hall of Famer and two-time National Coach of the Year

university’s commitment to provide equal opportunities for all student-

Sharon Brummell.

athletes.

Upon her induction to the MEAC Hall of Fame — one year before his

Gregory remained a fixture on the Eastern Shore after leaving

own — Gregory said: “As an administrator, you do a lot of hiring of people,

Delaware State. He served as athletics director at Holly Grove Christian

some you get right some you don’t, and when I look at the whole span of my

School from 2006 to 2014, where he also worked as a physical education

career, one thing is for sure, I did get one right, I hired Sharon Brummell. I

teacher with the middle school and launched and coached the school’s

can rest my entire career on that hire.”

track team as well as helping with other sports.


School News

The Key / October 6, 2017

7

Volunteers lend their support to community members in need Student volunteers in UMES’ Office of University Engagement & Lifelong Learning joined forces Saturday, Sept. 23 with Salisbury Sunrise Rotary members for a community service project. The two groups spent the day building a wheelchair ramp in Mardela Springs for a neighbor in need identified by the Chesapeake Housing Mission. UMES volunteers pictured from left are: Kingsley Asonye, Kahleo Smith, Cy’Anna Scott, Justin Auffarth and Janayne Johnson.

Green entrepreneurship program receives funding UMES has received a subcontract of $60,000 from Rutgers University to nurture “green” entrepreneurship in bioenergy and sustainability studies for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and non-STEM majors. Dr. Madhumi Mitra, a biology and environmental sciences professor, is principal investigator from UMES. She is also UMES’ co-principal investigator on a $500,000 U.S. Economic Development Administration i6 Challenge grant, “Clean Energy Proof of Concept Center and Accelerator Program,” from the U.S. Department of Commerce. Mitra’s research specialties are algal biofuels, sustainability and environmental stewardship. A Green Entrepreneurial Education Program – with a focus on sustainability – will be developed with an emphasis on research/internship experience, Mitra said. “UMES participants will work in start-up companies associated with Rutgers’ Ecolgnite programs and companies in the region to gain experience in applied research and innovation” as well as challenges clean-energy startups face, Mitra said. Dr. Abhijit Nagchaudhuri, Dr. Xavier Henry and Dr. Monisha Das are project collaborators. A unique undergraduate/graduate-level four-credit course will be developed during the first year. Topics will include renewable energy such as wind, solar, sustainable biomass, waste-based energy and energy efficiency sectors. UMES students also will be exposed to concept assessment, business-model assessment, technology verification, scale-up and commercialization. Based on the coursework, student groups will develop green-energy business models for start-up companies as an end-of-semester capstone project. The two best proposals, Mitra said, will receive seed funding to start companies in the summer of 2018.

Rep. Andy Harris is speaker for health care series

From left, are: Michael Franklin, Atlantic General Hospital’s president; Rep. Andy Harris, M.D.; UMES President Juliette B. Bell; UMES School of Pharmacy and Health Professions dean Rondall Allen; Steven E. Leonard, president-elect of Peninsula Regional Medical Center and Owanaemi Davies, UMES Student Government Association president.

The fiscal challenges the nation faces in affording health care was the topic Rep. Andy Harris, M.D. brought from his front-row perspective as a member of Congress and a practicing physician to the second annual Nicholas Blanchard Health Care Speakers Series Sept. 18. Harris narrated a 45-minute slide presentation outlining the enormous fiscal challenges confronting Congress as it looks for affordable solutions to the nation’s health care needs during an appearance at UMES’ Student Services Center theater. Roughly one of every six dollars spent in America is on health care, a trend Harris worries is not sustainable at its current pace. The speaker series is possible through a generous fund established a year ago by Blanchard, the former founding pharmacy school dean. “The endowment was established to create a forum for all of the health professions students, the UMES campus and the greater community to hear about and freely discuss important health care issues,” said Dr. Veronique Diriker, UMES’ director of development. To show his appreciation for being invited to speak, Harris presented Blanchard and UMES President Juliette B. Bell with American flags that flew over the U.S. Capitol.


arts & entertainment calendar fall 2017

OCTOBER

19

Art Exhibit Opening Reception

4-6 p.m., Mosely Gallery Invitational show of contemporary graphic illustrators who use visual communication as a tool for social progress. Hours: Mon. through Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Show on display through Nov. 22. 11 a.m., Hazel Hall 2040 Portfolio review with guest artist Tasheka Arceneaux-Sutton. www.moselygallery.com / 410-651-7770

20

Hawk Hysteria

“Strawberry Wine” poster by Nicole Harris

29 27&28

Fall Theatre Production*

2 p.m., matinee UMES Drama Society presents the musical, “Strawberry Wine,” by Takeisha Jackson. $5 general admission, students free w/ID. www.UMEStickets.com 410-651-6552

7:30 p.m., Ella Fitzgerald Center

30

International Education Week (Oct. 30-Nov. 3)

“Black Woman Blue” by Tasheka Arceneaux-Sutton

6 p.m., William P. Hytche Athletic Center Women’s volleyball vs. Delaware State. Men’s and women’s basketball scrimmage. Give-a-ways, contests, games, autographs and Harry the Hawk’s birthday party. 410-651-8471

UMES’ Center for International Education extends an open invitation to experience events focusing on cuisine, dance, music, film and art from different cultures. www.umes.edu/CIE or FB at oiss@umes.edu for schedule. 410-651-8385

The Key / October 6, 2017

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national origin, disability, marital status, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Inquiries regarding the application of Federal laws and non-discrimination policies to University programs and activities may be referred to the Office of Equity & Compliance/Title IX Coordinator by telephone (410) 651-7848 or e-mail (titleix@umes.edu).

The Key is published by the Office of Public Relations umesnews@umes.edu, 410-651-7580 An archive is available at www.umes.edu/TheKey

Submissions to The KEY are preferred via email. All copy is subject to editing. The Key is written according to the Associated Press stylebook.

Call 410-651-8001 or go online at WESM913.org. great music and in-depth news we feature every day. Please consider making a pledge and supporting the

Listener support is vital!

Fall Pledge Drive University Relations 30665 Student Services Center Lane Princess Anne, MD 21853 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID MAIL MOVERS


OCTOBER

arts & entertainment calendar fall 2017 p.m., matinee 29 2UMES Drama Society

19

4-6 p.m., Mosely Gallery Invitational show of contemporary graphic illustrators who use visual communication as a tool for social progress. Hours: Mon. through Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Show on display through Nov. 22. 11 a.m., Hazel Hall 2040 Portfolio review with guest artist Tasheka Arceneaux-Sutton. www.moselygallery.com / 410-651-7770

20

Hawk Hysteria

“Strawberry Wine” poster by Nicole Harris

Art Exhibit Opening Reception

presents the musical, “Strawberry Wine,” by Takeisha Jackson. $5 general admission, students free w/ID. www.UMEStickets.com 410-651-6552

27&28

Fall Theatre Production* 7:30 p.m., Ella Fitzgerald Center

30

International Education Week (Oct. 30-Nov. 3)

“Black Woman Blue” by Tasheka Arceneaux-Sutton

6 p.m., William P. Hytche Athletic Center Women’s volleyball vs. Delaware State. Men’s and women’s basketball scrimmage. Give-a-ways, contests, games, autographs and Harry the Hawk’s birthday party. 410-651-8471

UMES’ Center for International Education extends an open invitation to experience events focusing on cuisine, dance, music, film and art from different cultures. www.umes.edu/CIE or FB at oiss@umes.edu for schedule. 410-651-8385

The Key / October 6, 2017

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national origin, disability, marital status, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Inquiries regarding the application of Federal laws and non-discrimination policies to University programs and activities may be referred to the Office of Equity & Compliance/Title IX Coordinator by telephone (410) 651-7848 or e-mail (titleix@umes.edu).

The Key is published by the Office of Public Relations umesnews@umes.edu, 410-651-7580 An archive is available at www.umes.edu/TheKey

Submissions to The KEY are preferred via email. All copy is subject to editing. The Key is written according to the Associated Press stylebook.

Call 410-651-8001 or go online at WESM913.org. great music and in-depth news we feature every day. Please consider making a pledge and supporting the

Listener support is vital!

Fall Pledge Drive University Relations 30665 Student Services Center Lane Princess Anne, MD 21853 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID MAIL MOVERS

The Key October 6, 2017 Edition