Page 1

DECEMBER 2015 Published by the Maryland State Horticultural Society in cooperation with University of Maryland Extension

DECEMBER 2013

MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION Dr. Joseph Fiola, Specialist in Viticulture and Small Fruit, University of Maryland Extension

The 2016 Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention is held each year to provide the latest updates and important information to fruit and vegetable growers from Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and surrounding states. The conference will be held at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center in Hershey, PA on February 2-4, 2016. The program will consist of six or more concurrent educational sessions offered during the three days. Sessions on tree fruits, small fruits, wine grapes, organic and general vegetables, pesticide safety, and too many others to mention. This year, Elaine Froese a professional speaker, writer and farm family coach who specializes in succession planning will provide the keynote presentation. The full program is provided at the end of this newsletter. As usual, there will be an extensive trade show, including displays of horticultural equipment, marketing merchandise, packaging, seed companies, fruit nurseries, as well as pesticides and other supplies and services for commercial growers. Pesticide applicator credits will be available for Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey growers that attend the sessions. The program is jointly sponsored by Maryland State Horticultural Society, University of Mary-

land Extension, State Horticultural Association of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Association, Pennsylvania State University Cooperative Extension, New Jersey State Horticultural Society, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, Virginia Horticultural Society, and Virginia Cooperative Extension. Maryland growers are reminded to pre-register (form on page 23) through the Maryland State Horticultural Society. Pesticide credits will be available at the meeting. And just a reminder, updates on the latest research and extension for the commercial fruit and vegetable industry are presented in monthly issues of the Vegetable and Fruit Headline News from UME. If you would like to view archives or the latest edition, please go to: Vegetable & Fruit Headline News https://extension.umd.edu/anne-arundelcounty/agriculture/vegetable-fruit-headlinenews Special Research Edition—Oct. 23, 2015 https://extension.umd.edu/sites/default/files/ _docs/VegetableFruitHeadlines6-7.pdf I look forward to seeing you in Hershey !

Inside this issue: Mid-Atlantic Fruit & Vegetable Convention Information and Registration The Summer Orchard Tour 2015 Your Dues Dollars at Work—Funding Research Proposals for 2015 Passages Asian Pear Tree Performance, Taste Test Results and Internal Breakdown Getting Ready for FSMA: Research and Education Programs in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) Facilitating Intergration and Adoption of Risk-based Fungicide Programming to Promote Sustainable Strawberry Disease Management in the Mid-Atlantic High-Density Orchard Systems for Maryland: Field-testing Advanced Selections from the Geneva Apple Rootstock Breeding Program Pollination and Yield Enhancement for High Tunnel Tomatoes Incorporating Surround® into an IPM Program for Control of BMSB in Apples Harry G. Black Distinguished Service Award Arthur H. Thompson Travel Fellowship

MSHS WEBSITE REVAMPED The Maryland State Horticultural Society is proud to announce a new and improved website. The URL has remained the same and we hope you will visit the site (http://www.mdhortsociety.org/) and navigate the various pages to obtain the latest news, upcoming events, membership information, awards, and MSHS history.

Maryland State Horticultural Society Meetings Held at MAFV Convention


PAGE 2

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

THE SUMMER ORCHARD TOUR 2015

MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL

Lynn Moore, MSHS Secretary

Annual Dues If you are not planning to attend Hershey this year, please consider renewing your Maryland State Horticultural Society membership.

High Tunnel Cherry Production at Walnut Springs Farm

This summer on July 8, the Maryland State Horticultural Society visited the northeast corner of Maryland. The first stop was Walnut Springs farm on Blue Ball Road in Elkton, Maryland. The farm is owned and operated by Phil Johnson and his daughter Molly Brumbley. We were treated to coffee and doughnuts while Phil showed us his rather impressive planting of black raspberries, along with matted row strawberries and elderberry plantings. Molly had a chance to take us into the two high tunnels of sweet cherries. It was exciting to see such a large example of season extenders and crop protectors in production.

Photo: Molly Brumbley

the entertainment area with a rather spectacular goat walk, animal barns, lots of kid activities and the new tunnel mountain. All of these activities supplement the large fruit operation of apples, cherries, peaches, table grapes, blueberries, and primocane raspberries. Both Nathan and Evan were generous enough to give a pruning demonstration on cherries. Their pedestrian orchards are very pick-your-own friendly. The tour was well attended and enjoyed by all. Please join us next year. I know you will have a good time and learn something new!

Membership dues for 2016 is $50. All you need to do is fill out line 2 of Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention registration form and send payment to:

Then we went right down the road and spent the afternoon at Milburn Orchards. The Milburn family treated us to an elaborate and delicious lunch and a tour of their newly expanded market. They did a nice job expanding the market in a tight spot and making it look like it has always been like that. Just past the market is Milburn Orchards

Raspberry Production at Walnut Springs Farm Photo: Molly Brumbley

The dues are used to promote much needed research for production problems facing commercial growers. As funds continue to be cut at our Land Grant Universities, the local horticultural societies have been able to fund research projects. These funds are then used for matching grants. Because they are grower-funded, they are very effective levers for obtaining additional funds. Like it or not, research these days requires outside funding, and we need to step it up if we’re going to get meaningful results when we need them.

Photo: Dr. Christopher S. Walsh

Nathan Milburn discussing Milburn Orchards tall spindle apple planting. Photo: Dr. Christopher S. Walsh

University of Maryland Extension—WMREC Attention: Susan Barnes 18330 Keedysville Road Keedysville, MD 21756


HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EXTENSION DEMONSTRATION WINES RECEIVE MEDALS FROM AMERICAN WINE SOCIETY

PAGE 3

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK—FUNDING RESEARCH PROPOSALS FOR 2015 Lynn Moore, MSHS Secretary

Each year the Maryland State Horticultural Society funds research projects designed to improve the profitability of fruit producers and support family farming in Maryland. Grants are awarded to projects that are relevant to the industry and will benefit Maryland growers. These grants are frequently used as seed money to attract other monies to fund the research projects.

Wines from the University of Maryland Viticulture & Enology Research and Extension Program were entered in the 2015 National American Wine Society Amateur (non-commercial) Wine Competition that took place on November 3-5, 2015 in Tysons Corner, Virginia. Eleven wines were entered all of them received medals: 3 gold, 6 silver and 2 bronze.

Year Name of Wine

Research Center Medal

Three projects were funded in 2015:

2012

Carmenere/Cabernet Franc

WREC/CMREC

Gold



2012

Chambourcin/Cabernet Savignon Ripasso

WMREC

Gold

2013

Petit Verdot/Cabernet Sauvignon

GRV

Gold

Improving Diagnosis and Control of Black Root Rot in Mid-Atlantic Perennial Strawberries by Dr. Cassandra Swett, University of Maryland.

NV

Pinot Gris/XX15-15-51/Albarino

WREC/WMREC/GRV Silver

2012

Chambourcin

WMREC



NV

Amarone Kit

Effect of Kaolin Clay on Pesticide Residues Preliminary Study by Dr. Jane DuBois, University of Maryland.

2012

Teroldego/Malvesia Negra

WMREC

Silver



2012

Linae Ice

WREC

Silver

2012

Cabernet Sauvignon/Petit Verdot

Silver

2012

Cabernet Sauvignon/Petit Verdot

Bronze

Continuation of Monitoring for Fungicide Resistance in Maryland for Small Fruit and Stone Fruit Orchards. Dr. Guido Schnabel, Professor and Extension Specialist, Clemson University.

2015

Kozma 55 Nouveau

Silver Silver

WREC

Bronze

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND LOCATIONS: WMREC: Western Maryland Research & Education Center, Keedysville, MD WREC: Wye Research & Education Center, Queenstown, MD LESREC: Lower Eastern Shore Research & Education Center, Salisbury MD CMREC: Central Maryland Research & Education Center, Upper Marlboro, MD For more information about University of Maryland Research Centers go to: http://agresearch.umd.edu/locations OTHER LOCATIONS: AREC: Alson H. Smith Jr. Agricultural Research & Education Center, Winchester, VA (Virginia Tech) www.arec.vaes.vt.edu/alson-h-smith/ GRV: Golden Run Vineyard, Hans & Jenny Schmidt, Sudlersville, MD

Each scientist is happy to discuss their project with any grower. Project results are presented to the Maryland State Horticultural Society and are available on request. Frequently projects are presented at the twilight tours sponsored by University of Maryland, and/or the winter meetings at WMREC and WyeREC and/ or the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention held at Hershey, PA.

PASSAGES Elmer “Lee” Black (92) born near Thurmont, Maryland, passed away on November 9, 2015 in Burlington, NC. He was the son of the late Willis G. & Maude Baker Black. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his brother Harry Black, sister, Betty Seiss, son, Jeffery Black, and a grandson Jason Fizer. He is survived by his wife, Frances; daughters, Wanda Fizer and Lana Gladhill; sons Terry, Ronald and Jerry Black; 13 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren.

Elmer graduated from Thurmont High School, enlisted in the Army Air Corps, started a photography business in Thurmont and Emmitsburg, and then bought an abandoned farm and orchard which established Blacks Hilltop Orchard, which he ran until his retirement. During this time he worked closely with his brother, owner of Catoctin Mountain Orchard. To view the obituary you can go to: http:// www.legacy.com/obituaries/fredericknewspost/ obituary.aspx?n=elmer-black&pid=176471773


PAGE 4

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

ASIAN PEAR TREE PERFORMANCE, TASTE TEST RESULTS AND INTERNAL BREAKDOWN Chris Walsh, Mike Newell, Kathy Hunt, and Brianne Redman

We organized a field trial of commercially available Asian pear cultivars in 2010. Trees were set in Maryland at the WyeREC and in eight other research stations in the eastern United States. The goal of this coordinated trial was to test the adaptation of this crop to the typical management practices used by direct-market producers in the region. Asian pear trees are quite precocious and productive. Trees in this study began flowering and fruiting in their second leaf, and measurements of yield and postharvest quality began in 2012 and continued through 2015. In Maryland, we have already seen a great variability in tree survival. Two European cultivars set as controls each lost 3 of 5 trees to a severe blossom blight infection that began in the third leaf. The blight-resistant European cultivar, Potomac, showed good tolerance to blight, but was not precocious. Potomac trees only began to crop significantly in their fifth leaf. While blight affected some Asian pear trees, about half of the Asian cultivars had good tree survival at this location. (See table) Unlike European (buttery) pears which are harvested firm and then ripened in cold storage, Asian pear fruits are harvested tree-ripe. During this study fruit were picked at Wye and then held in refrigerated storage for a few weeks. After short-term storage they were evaluated at a series of Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station Open Houses. Consumers are immediately drawn to our Asian pear evaluations. In 2015, we presented taste testers with slices of three varieties and asked for their preference. That data are shown in the table above. At Keedysville, Shinsui and Kosui did well, while Isiiwase was not well received. At the Wye Twilight Meeting, attendees appeared to like the three varieties

ASIAN PEAR RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 2015 Taste Testing Results Keedysville and Wye Twilight Meetings and the Terp Farm Open House CULTIVAR

FIRST PICKING

TREE SURVIVAL (%)

TASTE TEST RESULTS % PREFERRED Keedysville 8/19/2015 (44 Participants)

Wye 9/8/2015 (29 Participants)

Upper Marlboro 10/9/2015 (122 Participants)

… …

Isiiwase

August 6

100

5

Shinsui

August 6

100

45

Kosui

August 10

100

50

27

Hosui

August 20

40

38

Yoinashi

September 11

80

49

Atago

September 18

60

27

Shinko

September 18

100

Ya Li

October 7

40

Olympic

October 15

100

35

24

tested about the same. In our third tasting, Yoinashi did particularly well. Since these testings used fruit from earlier harvests, Olympic and Yali were not used in the 2015 testings. In earlier years, ‘Olympic’ was ranked as the best tasting fruit at Clarksville (data not shown), probably due to its high soluble solids (sugar) content. This result is similar to many grower observations and particularly notable as this cultivar has also shown good field tolerance to fire blight. As we worked with this crop, we have noted that there is a tendency for some cultivars to develop flesh disorders. In 2014, many growers reported internal browning and breakdown (IBB) in Olympic. Some ‘Olympic’ Asian pear fruit harvested at WyeREC showed IBB symptoms in 2015. The flesh browning and water-

Internal browning and breakdown in Olympic fruit harvested in late September at WyeREC.

soaked flesh tissue occurred just outside the core line (See photo). We believe the breakdown may be induced by hot, dry weather in August and September. While some fruit damage is visible at the time of harvest, this damage also increased during cold storage. In 2015, Mike Newell found that after one Continued on page 5


PAGE 5

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

ASIAN PEAR TREE PERFORMANCE, TASTE TEST RESULTS AND INTERNAL BREAKDOWN continued from page 4 week of storage, breakdown increased from 40% to 70%. The Chinese variety Yali, exhibited internal browning at harvest in 2014. In 2015, no browning was observed at harvest, but after three weeks of cold storage, 100% of the fruit had internal browning. In a preliminary trial, we tested whether fruit color and fruit size of ‘Olympic’ pears could be used to identify fruits with these flesh disorders. Larger fruit were more prone to IBB while greener fruit, as measured using the Delta A meter, were less prone. Based on these two observations, we recommend that growers pick Olympic fruit two weeks earlier to avoid problems in future years, minimizing consumer complaints and ensuring adequate storage life.

GETTING READY FOR FSMA: RESEARCH AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN GOOD AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES (GAPS) Chris Walsh, Donna Pahl and Justine Beaulieu The produce rules implementing the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) passed by Congress in 2010 will be published in their final form in 2015. While this may come as a surprise to some farmers, many researchers, educators and auditors have been working since 2010 to assist farmers in implementing Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs). In Maryland, we have worked hard to help fruit and vegetable growers in two ways: 1) Training farmers to develop and implement GAPs plans and 2) Developing scientific ‘metrics’ needed for farmers to implement produce safety programs. When FSMA was passed five years ago, only a few farmers in Maryland were GAPcertified. Most of those farms were wholesale producers who needed to comply with buyer requests for third-party audits. Today there is a large number of growers who sell directly to consumers through farmers markets, roadside stands, pick-your-own farms and communitysupported agriculture. These producers are equally interested in GAPs certification, but a wholesale-GAPs farm audit is not aligned with the needs of direct-market producers. Using funds from a Specialty Crops Block Grant, the Maryland Department of Agriculture and the University of Maryland teamed together to develop the MDA GAP Audit Program. That program was developed in 2011 by Deanna Baldwin at the Maryland Department of Agriculture along with Donna Pahl and Chris Walsh at the University of Maryland. Deanna manages the regulatory component of the program, while Donna has provided oneon-one assistance with local growers as a GAPs educator.

In general, obtaining a GAPs certification is a multi-step process that can take over a year to complete, whether the farm produces for wholesale or for retail markets. In the first year, farmers learn about GAPs through brief talks at winter meetings and decide to pursue further knowledge on the subject. They then attend a one-day training session to learn about produce safety practices and regulations, and in the afternoon begin developing their own farm GAPs plan using provided resources. If the farm is interested in pursuing a certification, it can request an MDA audit once the GAPs plan is complete. Costs associated with the MDA GAP inspection are covered by the Specialty Crops Block Grant. So far, more than 800 Maryland farmers have attended GAPs training programs, highlighting the interest and need for such trainings. In the following year, farms seeking USDAAMS audits for wholesale markets learn more about risk assessments and are then readied to meet Harmonized GAP standards, which is a certification required by many wholesale buyers. This stepwise approach has been very effective. Since we began these trainings, we have watched a number of farms move through these steps to improve food safety, with over 50 Maryland farms currently certified through the GAP programs and many others who have modified their practices, even if they do not plan to obtain a certification. In addition to these farmers certified by the MDA programs, many others have passed a variety of private third-party audits required by their wholesale buyers. Aside from the time required to develop and complete the GAPs paperwork, there are two major requirements for a GAPs

certification: 1) Adding worker training programs in food safety and 2) Conducting a water testing program for indicator organisms. By attending GAP trainings, farmers quickly learn what is needed for an effective worker training program. Taking water samples is a bit more complicated. While soil testing for fertilizer recommendations is routine, taking water samples for microbiological quality is not. When monitoring agricultural water sources for microbial quality, nonpathogenic generic E. coli is used as an indicator organism (to test for the presence of fecal matter). Generic E.coli is used for several reasons: it is not normally present in the environment, is relatively easy and cost-effective to monitor, and it is used in EPA recreational water standards. Donna Pahl posted a video on You Tube, which is easily accessed on the Walsh and Pahl Lab Food Safety web page http:// psla.umd.edu/research/research-labpages/food-safety-fresh-fruits-andvegetables showing how to take a water sample for E. coli testing. To better assess the quality of agricultural water sources in Maryland, Donna Pahl worked with Dave Martin, University of Maryland Extension, Baltimore County and four other Extension educators to conduct a statewide assessment of agricultural waters. This project took monthly water samples during the 2013 and 2014 growing seasons, testing farm wells and surface waters on the Eastern Shore and in Central and Western Maryland. Cooperating farmers benefitted from this project. They received monthly information on the quality of water they were using on their farms which helped them comply with the water testing requirements Continued on page 6


PAGE 6

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

GETTING READY FOR FSMA: RESEARCH AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN GOOD AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES (GAPS) continued from page 5 needed for their GAPs plans. In cases where E. coli levels were above the suggested guidelines, the farmers were quick to take the measures needed to reduce their risks. Additionally, this project allowed UM Extension to assess the overall quality of irrigation water sources in Maryland and comment on the draft FSMA regulations when they were first published.

For the last few years, our lab has also participated in a USDA NIFA-funded SCRI project sampling commercially produced leafy greens and tomatoes. After taking field samples, leafy greens and tomato fruit were tested for their microbial load. Much of the 2015 field and laboratory studies were conducted by Donna Pahl and Justine Beaulieu. In the photos above, Donna (left photo) and Justine (right photo) are preparing tomato samples for coliform and E. coli testing, following the protocols specified in the SCRI project. Shortly after these photos were taken, Donna was hired by Cornell University to fill a new position in southern California as the Southwest Regional Extension Associate for the Produce Safety Alliance. Donna has done a fantastic job during the past five years in her position as a Maryland GAPs Educator. While it’s hard for all of us to see her leave, it’s great to know her efforts in Maryland have led to a promotion as a regional trainer for the Produce Safety Alliance. Justine Beaulieu was hired to continue with our food safety research and assist in the University of Maryland - Maryland Department of Agriculture GAPs education and certification programs. Justine comes to the lab with a strong background. She received her MS degree in May from the University of Maryland in plant pathology, where she spent two years conducting fungicide-resistance research on Phytophthora in Maryland nurseries. Prior to attending graduate school, Justine received a BS degree in Environmental Science and Policy from the University of Maryland, and then went on to a two-year Peace Corps assignment to Vanuatu.

NEW FACT SHEETS RELEASED FROM UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EXTENSION Check out the following fact sheets that were recently released online from the University of Maryland Extension: Spotted Wing Drosophila Monitoring and Management http://ter.ps/SWDFactSheet Launching a Cottage Food Industry http://ter.ps/CottageFood

HOLD THE DATE! THURSDAY FEBRUARY 25, 2016 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM WESTERN MARYLAND REGIONAL FRUIT MEETING


HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

PAGE 7

FACILITATING INTERGRATION AND ADOPTION OF RISK-BASED FUNGICIDE PROGRAMMING TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE STRAWBERRY DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC Dr. Cassandra L. Swett, Assistant Professor, Grape and Small Fruit Pathology, University of Maryland - AGNR-PSLA , Bryan R. Butler Sr., Extension Agent, University of Maryland Extension—Carroll County

Figure 1. Weather station at WMREC field station. Leaf wetness hours and temperature are used together with forecasted weather predictions to evaluate risk of pathogen infection periods.

This project seeks to address critical challenges in strawberry disease control and implementation of promising riskbased management strategies for the midAtlantic U.S. Anthracnose and Botrytis fruit rot diseases are primary drivers of yield losses in most regions of the mid-Atlantic. In the past five years, multiple fungicide failures have resulted in major reductions in available effective chemistries and there is a high resistance risk for most remaining chemistries. Disease forecasting systems such as Strawberry Advisory System (SAS) have proven highly effective in reducing fungicide use and resistance risk for strawberry producers in the southern and northeastern U.S (Figure 1 and 2). In response to requests from mid-Atlantic growers to have this system available, we propose three specific objectives, to (1) validate a disease forecasting system for timing fungicide applications to control strawberry fruit rots in the mid-Atlantic which will commence in the spring of 2016, (2) develop a region-specific disease forecasting App and website, and (3) educate growers on efficacy and use of the of risk-based disease control through panel discussions led by collaborating growers, demonstration plot tours, and development informational resources, to rapidly enable producer adoption. Dr. Swett and Mr. Butler will coordinate field trials at the Western Maryland Research and Education Center, Keedysville, MD. In mid-September, bare root strawberry plants were planted into

plastic-mulched rows. A weather station will be placed on site and connected to the weather station network (AgroClimate), and fungicide treatment application will begin in the spring (Figure 1 and 2). The calendar-based sprays will be compared with sprays timed according to the disease forecast system. An unsprayed treatment will be included to verify disease pressure. Trials will be conducted using the most popular plasticulture strawberry cultivar in the mid-Atlantic, ‘Chandler’, highly susceptible to AFR, and the recently released ‘FlavorFest’, tolerant to AFR. This information will be used to incorporate cultivar susceptibility into the disease forecast system. Fruit will be harvest twice weekly from May through June and both diseased and marketable fruit counted and weighed. Anthracnose fruit rot and Botrytis fruit rot incidence will be quantified as the percentage of the total number of fruit rendered unmarketable by each disease. Based on the outcomes of this study, we aim to test efficacy in on-farm trials with collaborating growers and expand the usefulness of this system to diversified producers by evaluating whether SAS can be used in a harmonized forecasting-based fungicide management system to control the Botrytis fruit rot pathogen (B. cinerea) and the Anthracnose fruit rot pathogens (Colletotrichum species) in other fruit crops commonly grown in hyperdiverse agriculture, including blueberries, raspberries, apples, peaches and grapes.

Figure 3. Members of the Berry pathology lab plant strawberries with Bryan Butler for the WMREC field trial planned for 2016. Figure 2. Infection of both Botrytis fruit rot (L) and anthracnose fruit rot (R) are triggered with greater 12 leaf wetness hours at or above 650 F-- warm spring rains are a primary trigger.


PAGE 8

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

HIGH-DENSITY ORCHARD SYSTEMS FOR MARYLAND: FIELD-TESTING ADVANCED SELECTIONS FROM THE GENEVA APPLE ROOTSTOCK BREEDING PROGRAM Bryan R. Butler Sr., Extension Agent, University of Maryland Extension—Carroll County, Anna Wallis, Christopher S. Walsh, Emily Snyder, and Tim von Thun, Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland-College Park, Julia Harshman, Washington State University, Douglas Price, Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, Gennaro Fazio, USDA-ARS, Cornell-Geneva

2013 as trees begin to fill their space This was the sixth leaf for our first evaluation of G-202 rootstock on a large scale. This study serves to examine and compare the growth habits of apple trees on tissue culture (TC) and stool bed G-202, as well as G-935 and G-41. The plot is split with half of the trees having Cripps Pink for a scion and the other half having Brookfield Gala for the scion. We have been evaluating these High Density systems for western/central MD since 2010. As we collect data on new dwarfing disease tolerant rootstocks we hope to provide useful information to determine the appropriateness of this High Density system for hot humid conditions of the mid -Atlantic region; and gain a better understanding of the growth habit of TC trees in comparison to those produced in traditional stool beds. By observing the growth rate and structure, overall size and yield, we want to begin to determine if the TC process is detrimental to apple production or cultural practices in the orchard. Much of the work that has been done with these rootstocks and the Tall Spindle system has been done in other parts of the country. Maryland growers have had to extrapolate from that information; given the variation in climates, we are not certain how closely recommendations from states like New York or Michigan can be followed here. With regard to rootstocks, at this point, I can assure you need to know if you are

By June most trees appeared to be just about where we wanted getting Gala on a 202TC vs. a stool bed 202 because the TC tree will be significantly larger. This does not seem to be the case with Cripps Pink. Tree size is comparable on both and the TC tree is very nice to work with when under Cripps Pink. Data has been collected on height, trunk diameter, survivability, fruit quality (which includes color, soluble solids, firmness, and starch), fruit size, yield per tree, and tree efficiency (fresh weight of fruit/cross sectional area) for four seasons. To this point as we finish the 6th leaf on this planting there has been very little difference between the trees. The 202TC trees certainly broke out of the blocks fast and initially made a larger more robust tree in comparison to stool bed 202 trees but, the planting overall appears to be evening out and it is difficult to see a great difference between many of the trees, and statistically there are no differences between the treatments. Yield was actually down from 2014 which may be due more to over thinning than anything else but fruit quality, color and size were very good in both varieties. This year the planting received its second fairly significant setback, with the first being brittleness at the graft union on some trees. Heavy fire blight pressure caused significant damage to the new shoots originating from the Dutch stub cuts. Continued on page 9

The renewal shoots were particularly susceptible to shoot blight, which then led to visible trunk cankers in August. This was particularly problematic on the Brookfield Gala trees which necessitated removal of significant portions of the scaffold branches on several trees. Although this project is primarily a rootstock evaluation, rootstock does not appear to be influencing this situation nearly as much as scion and the pruning/ training system. I do have growing

Figure 1. Fire blight canker in late August on Gala


PAGE 9

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

HIGH-DENSITY ORCHARD SYSTEMS FOR MARYLAND: FIELD-TESTING ADVANCED SELECTIONS FROM THE GENEVA APPLE ROOTSTOCK BREEDING PROGRAM continued from page 8 concerns about this system in our climate. Although rootstock selection is very important and we have a long way to evaluate scion/rootstock combinations. I feel the training system may be the first factor in mid-Atlantic High Density orchards that may need to be addressed. We have not lost any trees to fire blight yet but I am not sure if it will matter if the rootstock is alive if we lose the scion to cankers in the main trunk. I have enjoyed working with this system very much and having had the opportunity to prune from a standard tree down to this I will say this is an efficient system but we may need to modify it further to fit our growing conditions. In 2014, I was very excited this season to have actually accomplished renovation pruning. You can see (figure below) it did really work and we are now finishing our fifth leaf and will begin doing a lot more of this type of pruning as we work on our Maryland Modified Tall Spindle System.

In 2015, I was increasingly concerned that I had actually created a serious problem in the planting by doing this type of pruning as I tried to renovate older heavier limbs in the lower part of the trees of the Modified Tall Spindle System.

Although this was the final season for collection of the complete data set, the planting will remain and be managed so further observations can be made regarding this rootstocks and scion interaction, and the overall serviceability of the planting and system. I would like to try leaving scaffold branches on the lower part of the tree and compare yield potential and survivability to the tall spindle. A number of old research orchards planted at Keedysville were removed during the past few years. These sites were chisel plowed to remove old roots and bio-renovated with two crops of rape and seeded to tall fescue prior to replanting in 2015. We planted sleeping eye Pink Lady and Granny Smith on 969 on 11/13/14 with one row on the trellis and two rows to be free standing. Other trees planted in spring, 2015 include Fuji budded on G935, G41, G202, G214, G11, G222, Bud 9, M9 (Nic29), M9 (Nakb337) and G42; planted at 6’x12’ and 3’x12’ spacing’s on a four-wire 9’ trellis system. As far as survivability, we have lost a number of trees. All tree losses were due to breaking at the graft union. Most of the losses were early on but G-935 continues to break and has been the rootstock that has lost the most trees. 2015 CRIPPS PINK YIELD PER TREE AND SURVIVAL AT KEEDYSVILLE ROOTSTOCK

YIELD (KG/TREE)

SURVIVAL (%)

G.41

21.4

54

G.935

14.3

68

G.202

15.4

100

G.202 (TC)

20.3

96


PAGE 10

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

POLLINATION AND YIELD ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH TUNNEL TOMATOES Jerry Brust, IPM Vegetable Specialist

percentage of culls was significantly reduced when tomatoes were treated 4times a week in HT-B and when treated 2, 4 and 6 times a week vs 0 in HT-A (tables 1 and 2). Average fruit size was significantly greater when pollination enhancement techniques were used for 2, 4 or 6 days a week vs. no enhancement in HT-A and HTB (Tables 1 and 2).

Fig. 1 Average yield of fruit harvested from pollination enhanced plants (left) vs. nopollination enhancement (right) The Problem: Tomatoes in high tunnels (HT) often produce a great deal more flowers than they do tomato fruit. Much of this fruit deficit is due to poor pollination and fruit set. Tomatoes are usually selffertilized with their pollen being well hidden. It takes some decent wind or bumble bee action in order for the pollen to be released. But in a HT it often is difficult to get enough air movement into the center to have effective pollination. So, I was looking for a simple easy method of increasing pollen release from tomato flowers to see if that increased the number and/or size of tomato fruit being produced and, if it did, could the plant nutritionally support the increase in tomato fruit (measured as fruit quality). The way in which I enhanced pollination and fruit set was by using a leaf blower, yes a leaf blower. Methods: Four different cultivars of tomatoes were used in 2 HTs (HT-A and HTB), 2 hybrids (Mt Fresh+ and Crista) and 2 heirlooms (Cherokee Purple and Big Beef). I used a Craftsman 235/150 mph electric blower. An ‘enhanced pollination treatment’ consisted of taking the leaf blower and placing it on low (150 mph) with the end of the blower 2-3 ft from a plant and moving it back and forth and up and down concentrating the movement in

the area of the flowers. Plants were treated either for 0, 2, 4 or 6 times a week. Treatments started 5-days after the first flower cluster appeared and were treated for 4 weeks. Results: Overall, 2015 was a good year for HT tomatoes in these trials. The average for the 4 tomato cultivars in each HT will be examined first. At both HT sites - A and B using the leaf blower at least 4 times a week resulted in significantly greater fruit set and yields than not enhancing pollination (tables 1 and 2). The pollination enhancement increased yields by 44% in HT-A and 60% in HT-B vs. the control. The

Discussion: Overall yields were good in these two HTs compared with previous seasons. Normally, I would have expected 19.6 lbs/plant in these HTs, but instead got 21.8 lbs per plant (control plants). Research in the eastern United States has demonstrated that the yield per tomato plant from a HT should be between 20 and 30 lbs per plant. As you can see, I was at the bottom end of this range with an average of 19.6 lbs/plant. The average increased to as much as 33.7 lbs per plant with the pollination enhancement technique. It would seem that the low end of the scale that I was at was mostly due to poor pollination in these HTs. By enhancing pollination, I was able to increase my yields by as much as 72%. The pollination enhancement technique also improved fruit quality by reducing the percentage of culls and increasing the average fruit size. We did not add any extra nutrients to HTs compared with how we normally fertilize. Plants would need to be treated for 5-10 seconds at least 4 times a week for there to be a good possibility of yield and quality enhancement. This technique did appear to work better on the first 8-10 fruit clusters the plants produced vs. using the technique on later fruit clusters.

Table 1. Number of times per week plants treated-HT-A No. days/wk. treated: Yield (lbs./plant) % fruit that were culls wt. of average fruit (oz.)

0

2

4

6

21.5a 8.4a 7.05a

22.7a 6.5b 8.85b

30.2b 4.5c 10.34c

31.8b 4.2c 10.51c

Means within a row with different letters are significantly different at the p< 0.05 level Table 2. Number of times per week plants treated-HT-B No. days/wk treated: 0 2 Yield (lbs/plant) 22.1a 26.4b % fruit as culls 12.6b 8.7ab wt. of average fruit (oz.) 7.12a 8.36b

4 33.7c 6.3a 9.14c

Means within a row with different letters are significantly different at the p< 0.05 level


HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

PAGE 11

INCORPORATING SURROUND® INTO AN IPM PROGRAM FOR CONTROL OF BMSB IN APPLES Bryan R. Butler Sr., Extension Agent, University of Maryland Extension—Carroll County , and Douglas Price, Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station

present. Pheromone traps for Coddling Moth, Tufted Apple Bud Moth and Oriental Fruit Moth were placed in the block and monitored weekly to determine need for application. BMSB were monitored using three-minute surveys of five trees weekly to determine presence and damage to fruit. Half of the trees received the program without Surround® added and half received the program with Surround® added. fifty fruit per panel were destructively sampled at harvest to evaluate damage.

Having had the opportunity to experience Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) in 2010, I am always aware of this bugs capabilities. However, since then I feel there has been a marked decline in numbers and damage and I hope we will never see 2010 again, but that may also mean we will not truly be able to evaluate the value of this project with such low levels of damage. I have continued my work with Surround® and “soft insecticides” this season on apple and peaches. This makes the fourth consecutive year for this project and, although we have one more year to go, the analysis of the data so far is not really a big surprise to me. Damage has been very low and we have not seen a significant difference in the treatments. As the pressure seems to drop each season of this project, it has become more difficult to see any differences. To give BMSB a better chance we never added any products to our spray programs on any of the tree fruit at WMREC to target BMSB. BMSB pressure was very light again this season with a scattered migration to homes occurring the fourth week of September into the first two weeks of October in central Maryland. This project examines the potential to return to pre-2009 timing, interval, and material selection by incorporating Surround® to reduce BMSB damage. The Surround® was used at a rate of 12.5 pound per 100 gallons as a tank mix that may be acting as a repellent or tactile deterrent and could offer greater protection of the fruit. Thus, the addition of the clay to the surface of the fruit and foliage may be resulting in behavioral modification of BMSB. It is well-documented that BMSB is very mobile and moves into the orchard causing the most severe damage on the perimeter rows. The clay barrier from Surround® was thought be deterring BMSB from moving into the orchard or possibly reduce the time spent in the trees leading to a reduction in feeding damage, but weekly counts for the last four years show no significant difference in egg masses, nymphs, or adults in treated or untreated areas. The insecticide applications were made based on an IPM program using traditional monitoring tools for lepidopteron pests with visual observations for BMSB being added to the program and material selection being based on need for control of the pests

The apple data for 2015 on our Fuji block was overall light from BMSB, but we did find BMSB in the block later in the season and did have damage to fruit. As mentioned earlier this year, we did not add any BMSB specific products to our program and had minimal damage all the way through the Cripps Pink harvest. There was some damage, although it was very low, yielding a high percentage of salable fruit. In our Red Haven peach block, we had no BMSB pressure at all in 2014 and, although we did experience some cat facing injury in 2015, the injury appeared to come from native Brown Stink Bugs as opposed to BMSB. Weekly counts and end-of-season evaluation of the fruit showed extremely low levels of injury with brown stink bugs being the stink bug we did find in the block just before harvest time, but very few BMSB for the last two years. After four years working on this project, I am forming an opinion that using Surround® early may be very helpful as we work our way through the initial incursion from BMSB, However, if pressure begins with that fresh, hardy population later in the season, the use of Brigade or Venom or similarly effective product is the way to go to ensure clean fruit at harvest. This work will continue as we try to provide adequate control with the softest possible program.


PAGE 12

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

FRUIT ROTS AND SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA IN FALL RED RASPBERRIES: THE PERFECT STORM? Kelly Hamby, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Maryland Department of Entomology Cassandra Swett, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Maryland Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, Berry Pathology Program

The Problems: Raspberry production in the Mid-Atlantic is challenged by pre-and post-harvest fruit rot diseases as well as insect pests, most notably the pre-harvest disease, Botrytis fruit rot, and the vinegar fly insect pest, spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii). While it is most important to manage Botrytis fruit rot during bloom, the pathogen, Botrytis cinerea, can also infect ripe fruit later in the season. Infection periods for Botrytis occur during periods of warm temperature that are combined with wetness (rains or heavy dews). Additionally, Botrytis more easily infects wounded fruit. Recent surveys suggest that a second fruit rot pathogen, Cladosporium, may also be causing pre and post-harvest losses. The grey-green color of early Cladosporium infections is the main trait that distinguishes it from Botrytis fruit rot which is lighter grey; however, later symptoms can be very similar. Wounding also appears to play an important role in facilitating Cladosporium fruit rot development, and it can initiate disease development even on un-ripe fruit. One potential source of wounds in Mid-Atlantic berry fields is spotted wing drosophila (SWD). SWD females create wounds as they lay their eggs in fruit, and in addition to the direct damage of larvae feeding in fruit, this may also facilitate secondary damage by fruit rot development in these fruit. Additionally, this secondary fruit rot may provide an inoculum source for fruit rot outbreaks. Compounding this issue, insecticides targeting SWD often wash off and do not effectively control spotted wing drosophila populations during pathogen infection periods triggered by persistent leaf wetness. SWD populations build during the season, with the heaviest insect pressure occurring in the late summer and early fall, so this is particularly relevant for late season management. The North American Raspberry and Blackberry Association (NARBA) supported our project to gather preliminary data examining the possible role SWD plays in fruit rot development in raspberries in 2015. We present one portion of this project here, and a full report will be provided to NARBA later in the year. Methods: Two Maryland fall (primocane fruiting) raspberry fields were used for this project. At site one three rows of ‘Caroline’ were used and at site two three rows of ‘Jaclyn’ were used. In early August, at least five raspberry clusters composed of hard green raspberries (at least 5 fruit per cluster) were bagged per row at each site using nylon mesh 1 gallon paint strainer bags securely closed with wire to exclude spotted wing drosophila. Un-infested (confirmed un-infested with SWD and not exhibiting any visible fruit rot symptoms) ripe raspberries were collected from both field sites and used within one day of collection for laboratory experiments. Raspberry clusters were placed in floral water picks inside test tube racks and kept cool until use. Treatments included a control where no flies and no spores were introduced to the fruit, SWD only where laboratory reared SWD (20 males, 20 females per enclosure) were introduced, and SWD with Botrytis spores. See Figure 1 for an example of the treatment enclosure. After a 24 hour treatment period where the clusters and flies were left at room temperature (~73°F (23°C)) on the bench top, the fruit clusters were

Figure 1. Treatment enclosure.

Figure 2. Mean ± SE (N = 2) proportion of fruit infected with Botrytis fruit rot for each laboratory treatment for each site.

Figure 3. Mean ± SE (N =2 ) proportion of fruit infected with Cladosporium fruit rot for each laboratory treatment for each site. sterilely removed from the cages and inspected to ensure no flies remained. They were then transferred to incubation bags and held at a 63°F (17°C) for 3-5 days before incidence of Botrytis and Cladosporium, as well as other post-harvest fruit rots were evaluated. Treatments were replicated two times for each site. Continued on page 13


HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; DECEMBER 2015

PAGE 13

FRUIT ROTS AND SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA IN FALL RED RASPBERRIES: THE PERFECT STORM? continued from page 12 Results: Flies exposed to Botrytis spores increased the number of Botrytis infected fruit in our laboratory studies relative to fruit that were not exposed to flies carrying spores (Figure 2). However, we do not know if the number of spores the laboratory flies were carrying would be similar to the spore exposure of flies in the field, nor do we know if flies in the field would visit un-infected fruit within 24 hours of spore exposure. Therefore, this laboratory experiment is a worst-case scenario. Site 2 had a much higher background level of Botrytis, probably due to infections that occurred during flowering. Interestingly, the introduction of laboratory flies and subsequent wounding of the field collected fruit by flies increased the number of fruit that were infected with Cladosporium fruit rot at both sites (Figure 3). Therefore, it is likely these fruit carried latent Cladosporium infections that better developed into rot after the flies wounded the fruit.

Figure 4. SWD larva (arrow) from within a fruit rot infected raspberry.

Discussion: SWD and fruit rot pathogens occur together in Mid-Atlantic fall red raspberry fields, and are likely impacting one another. However, we are just scratching the surface of these potential impacts with the preliminary laboratory and field studies that were conducted in 2015. We have confirmed that SWD wounds can increase incidence of fruit rot pathogens such as Cladosporium under controlled laboratory conditions. We also observed that if flies are exposed to Botrytis spores they may be able to transport them to healthy fruit and initiate Botrytis infections. In the field, we have observed early stages of fruit rot development occuring with SWD larvae (Figure 4). Do these larvae later die when the fruit rot infection advances (the fungus covers the fruit entirely), or do they finish development before the infection progresses and emerge successfully? If these flies successfully emerge, will they then carry spores to other fruit that are not exhibiting disease symptoms? If SWD is important to the development of fruit rot, this may mean that (1) the disease is less severe in early season raspberries that are less affected by the flies and (2) controlling SWD could help to minimize pre and post-harvest losses from fruit rots. We plan to continue investigating this issue, so stay tuned for further information.

Thanks to all the members of the Berry Pathology lab and Hamby lab who helped with sample collection, experiment set up, and processing. We would like to particularly thank cooperating growers for allowing us to use their sites and fruit and to NARBA for providing funding for the work.

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EXTENSION OFFERS PRIVATE PESTICIDE CERTIFICATION AND RECERTIFICATION & NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT VOUCHER TRAINING University of Maryland Extension is offering private pesticide applicator and Nutrient Management certifications and recertification classes for farmers during the fall, winter, and spring season. To find a listing for classes/workshops near you go to: UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EXTENSION EVENTS: http://extension.umd.edu/events PRIVATE PESTICIDE CERTIFICATION COURSES http://mda.maryland.gov/plants-pests/Documents/2015%20Private%20Testing%20and%20Training.pdf PRIVATE PESTICIDE RECERTIFICATION MEETINGS: http://mda.maryland.gov/plants-pests/Documents/Private%20Recert%20Meetings%202015%20-2016.pdf NUTRIENT APPLICATOR VOUCHER COURSES: http://mda.maryland.gov/resource_conservation/counties/VoucherTraining.pdf


PAGE 14

HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

ONLINE REGISTRATION FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION IS NOW AVAILABLE Online registration for the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention has been set up for those who would like to use their *credit card can go to: http://mafvconventionmshs.eventbrite.com *There is an additional processing fee from Eventbrite to pay by credit card If you would like to attend the workshops on Feb. 1, you will need to mail the registration form on page 24. If you have any questions or need help, please contact Susan Barnes at 301-432-2767 x301 or by email sbarnes6@umd.edu

LODGING AT HERSHEY

To make hotel reservations, please call 1-800-HERSHEY or 717- 5333311. The group code number is 1042731. Discounted rate for the 2016 convention is $140.00. Remember to make your room reservation early as the Hershey Lodge has sold out of rooms the past two years. For additional information go to: www.hersheylodge.com

2016 CALENDAR OF EVENTS Jan. 7-10, 2016: Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference, www.seregionalconference.com/ January 7-9, 2016: North American Strawberry Growers Association , Savannah, Georgia in conjunction with the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Convention, www.nasga.org/n-american-strawberry-growers-conference.htm Jan. 14-16, 2016: Future Harvest - CASA 17th Annual Conference—Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed ” www.futureharvestcasa.org/conference/2016-conference Jan. 18-20, 2016: Ohio Produce Growers and Marketing Association (OPGMA), http://opgma.org/OPGMA-AnnualCongress Jan. 19-21, 2016: 2016 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo http://nysvga.org/expo/information/ Jan. 29, 2016 (8:45 AM to 3:30 PM): Central Maryland Vegetable Growers Meeting, Friendly Farm Inn, Foreston Road, Upperco, MD. Registration or more info. call (410) 887-8090 or visit web page: http://extension.umd.edu/baltimore-county/ agriculture/upcoming-agricultural-meetings Feb. 2-4, 2016: 2016 Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention, Hershey, PA http://www.mafvc.org (registration and program included in this newsletter) Feb. 1 - Feb. 06, 2016: 30th Annual NAFDMA Convention, Nashville, Tennessee, http://www.farmersinspired.com/Convention/ Feb. 5-6, 2016: Maryland Wine & Grape Industry Annual Meeting www.marylandgrapes.org/events/ annualconference.shtml

Feb. 6-12, 2016: 59th International Fruit Tree Assoc. Annual Conference, Grand Rapids, Michigan http://www.ifruittree.org/dnn/default.aspx Feb. 11, 2016 (8 AM -4 PM): Southern Maryland Vegetable & Fruit Production Meeting, Location: Bowie Elks Lodge, Rt. 450, Gambrills, MD. For more information: R. David Myers (410) 2223906 or email myersrd@umd.edu. Registration: https:// events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg? oeidk=a07ebhos4vsfd956c5c&oseq=&c=&ch= Feb. 11, 2016: Mid-Atlantic Women In Agriculture, 15th Annual Regional Conference , Dover Downs Hotel and Casino Dover, DE www.extension.umd.edu/womeninag/annual-conference Feb. 17, 2016: Bay Area Fruit School, Wye Research and Education Center, Queenstown, MD. For more information contact: Mike Newell @ mnewell@umd.edu Feb. 25, 2016 (8:30 AM to 4:00 PM): Western Maryland Regional Fruit Meeting, Western Maryland Research & Education Center, Keedysville, MD. For more information or registration contact Susan Barnes at (301) 432-2767 x301 or sbarnes6@umd.edu Mar. 2-4, 2016: 2016 North American Raspberry & Blackberry Conference, Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg, WV www.raspberryblackberry.com/local.cfm? doc=webdocs/2016ConferencePreview.htm


HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER — DECEMBER 2015

MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY MEETINGS HELD AT MAFV CONVENTION The Maryland State Horticultural Society will have the following meetings during the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable (MAFV) Convention. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING (officers and board members) Tuesday, February 2, 2016 ● 4:30 PM (NEW TIME!) ● Tower #2

HARRY G. BLACK DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

Although primarily intended to be given to a fruit grower or those involved in fruit production, it may be given to a person in an allied industry such as processing, a state employee, a county agent, university personnel, or to any other person making a special contribution to the fruit industry. The committee will annually review the list of nominees, if any, to determine its recommendation to the Executive Board.

PREVIOUS RECIPIENTS ARE: Lloyd Balderston III, 1976 Dr. Castillo Graham, 1976 Professor A. F. Veirheller, 1976 S. Herman Todd, 1977 William C. Main, 1978 Theodore Stegmaier, 1978 M. N. “Nick” Pope, 1979 Dr. L. O. Weaver, 1980 Dr. Ben L. Rogers, 1981 Dr. Arthur Thompson, 1982 Harry G. Black, 1985 George H. Butler, Jr., 1986 William M. Allenberg, 1996 Evan B. Milburn, 1997 John H. Rinehart, 1999 Dr. Paul W. Steiner, 2000 I. Bruce Barr, 2005 Henry R. Passi, 2008 Allan Baugher, 2011 Robert E. Black, 2014

ARTHUR H. THOMPSON TRAVEL FELLOWSHIP The purpose of the Thompson Travel Fellowship is to expose young people, working in the Maryland fruit industry, to ideas on fruit production in other areas of the world. In order to do this, the Maryland State Horticultural Society has established a fellowship of up to $1,000. This fellowship can be awarded annually to young people working in the fruit industry to promote leadership within the Society. Recipient: The recipient will be a fruit grower or someone else associated with fruit production in Maryland, to be given to young persons aged 18 to 30, to encourage travel outside the state of Maryland. The recipient would be expected to make a short presentation to the membership at the annual meeting concerning the information learned in the travel.

The Horticulture Technology Newsletter is published yearly by the Maryland State Horticultural Society in cooperation with University of Maryland Extension. Maryland State Horticultural Society (MSHS) Contact: Robert E. Black 15308 Kelbaugh Road Thurmont, MD 21788 Phone: 240-409-7491 E-mail: HBGala@aol.com

BUSINESS MEETING (All members are encouraged to attend) Wednesday, February 3, 2016 ● 4:30 PM ● TBA

The Harry G. Black Distinguished Service awarded is given, when deemed appropriate by the Executive Board, to a person who is a member of the Maryland State Horticultural Society making a significant contribution in the state of Maryland this year and in years past. The Award and Nominations Committee, consisting of three members appointed by the President, shall recommend to the Executive Board such an award.

PAGE 15

Application and Procedure: To apply, a brief explanation of the proposed trip should be submitted in writing. The application letter should include the name, age, and potential trip being considered by the applicant. Applications should be submitted by January 22, 2016 to be considered for use during the subsequent year. Applications for the award should be submitted to: Lynn Moore, Secretary, c/o MSHS , Nominating and Awards Committee, 2415 Woodbine Road, Woodbine, MD 21797, (410) 489-7034. The Awards and Nominating Committee will consider the nominations and will make its recommendation to the Executive Committee, which will make the final decision. The Thompson Fellowship will be presented at the Awards Banquet held during the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention in Hershey, PA.

MSHA Officers: President: Wade Butler 1st Vice President: John Fendrick 2nd Vice President: J.D. Rinehart Secretary: Lynn Moore Assistant Secretary: Dr. Joe Fiola Treasurer: Robert Black Board Members: Henry Allenberg Molly Bromley Jay Milburn Brad Miller Washington White

University of Maryland Extension Dr. Joseph Fiola , Specialist in Viticulture and Small Fruit 18330 Keedysville Road Keedysville, MD 21756 Phone: 301-432-2767 x344 E-mail: jfiola@umd.edu Susan Barnes, Administrative Assistant II Phone; 301- 432-2767 x301 E-mail: sbarnes6@umd.edu The University of Maryland Extension programs are open to any person and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, national origin, marital status, genetic information, political affiliation, and gender identity or expression.


PAGE 16

Feb. 2–4, 2016 Schedule & Registration

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM (AS OF NOVEMBER 19, 2015) Please note, speakers, topics, times and rooms in this program are subject to change. Check for updates on the website at www.mafvc.org. The printed program at the Convention will take precedence over any pre-convention programs.

PRE-CONVENTION WORKSHOPS—MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2016 (pre-registration is required) Unless otherwise noted, workshops will be conducted at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center in Hershey. 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM FARM TRANSITION—FEE: $40 (includes lunch)

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM HOPS PRODUCTION 101—FEE: $90 (includes lunch)

This one day session is designed to provide farm families with critical resources to navigate through transitioning the farm from one generation to the next. You will interact with both nationally recognized experts and farm families who are currently working through the transitioning process.

This one day session on hops production is designed to educate hops growers and prospective hops growers on site selection, nutrient management, pest management, harvesting & processing of hops, and how to work with local brewers to market hops. 9:00 AM

9:00 AM

1:00PM

2:45 PM

What You Need to Know When Transitioning the Farm From One Generation to the Next Louis Shuntich, Advanced Consulting Group with Nationwide Insurance. Farm Family Communications - Dynamics and Challenges and Family Meeting Guidelines - Darlene Livingston, PA Farm Link Families in the Arena - Lenny Burger Jr. & Lenny Burger III, Burgers Farm; Lewis & Robin Peregrim, Miller's Orchard Farm Market

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM PA PESTICIDE APPLICATOR LICENSE TRAINING—FEE: $60 (includes lunch) If you intend to purchase and/or apply restricted use pesticides for the purpose of producing an agricultural commodity on land which is owned or rented by you in Pennsylvania, then you need a Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) Pesticide License. To become a certified private applicator, testing is required. This full day session on February 1, will cover the basics and prepare you for the pesticide applicator’s exam (which will take place the morning of February 2, from 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.). Fee includes the Private Applicator Packet (course and study material). This class is not on the MSHS registration form—If you would like to register for this class, please contact William Troxell at 717-6943596 or by email pvga@pvga.org

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM TOOLS FOR FARM FOOD SAFETY PLANNING, GAP AUDITS, AND FSMA COMPLIANCE—FEE: $50 (includes lunch) This workshop will assist growers who are writing a USDA Harmonized GAP Food Safety plan and who are preparing for a GAP audit. In addition, we will provide updates on the Produce Safety Rule of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), including scope, coverage, exemptions and timelines for compliance. Limited to 50 participants. Speakers will include Dr. Luke LaBorde, Penn State Univ.; Judy Martin, PA. Dept. of Agriculture; Lee Stivers, Penn State Ext.; and Thomas Ford, Penn State Ext.

9:45 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:30 AM 1:00 PM 1:45 PM 2:15 PM 3:00 PM

Site Selection and Pre-Plant Considerations for Eastern Growers - Steve Miller, Cornell Coop. Extension Nutrient Management in Commercial Hops Plantings Thomas Ford, Penn State Extension Growers Perspective on Training and Planting HopsNoah Petronic, Keystone Hops Weed Management in Hops Production Systems Timothy Weigle, Cornell University How Brewers Use Hops, What Varieties and Why John Trogner, Troegs Brewery Insect and Disease Management in Commercial Hops Production Systems - Timothy Weigle, Cornell University Harvesting and Processing of Hops for Eastern Growers - Steven Miller, Cornell Coop. Extension Economic Considerations for Commercial Hops Production - Kevin Martin, Penn State Extension Experiences With Using Local Hops and Local Growers John Trogner, Troegs Brewery

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM HARD CIDER FROM SEED TO SIP: BUSINESS AND PRODUCTION WORKSHOP—FEE: $120 (REGISTRATION DEADLINE 1/4/16) This workshop will be conducted at The Vineyard and Brewery at Hershey, 598 Schoolhouse Road, Middletown, PA 17057 http://vineyardathershey.com/the-brewery/ (fee includes networking from 5:00 to 6:00 PM. with tapas by Sophia’s at Walden and an opportunity to try Hershey Brewery Ciders) 1:00 PM Welcome 1:05 PM Hard Cider Market Trends - Carla Snyder, Penn State Extension, Marketing & Ag Entrepreneurship U.S. hard cider market trends with a focus on Mid-Atlantic market sales, consumer outlook and competition. 1:30 PM Developing the Modern American Hard Cider Orchard Eric Shatt, Cornell University, Horticulture & Redbyrd Cider Challenges of growing cider apples, choosing your varietal blend, orchard design and much more. 2:30 PM Benchmark Tasting of Fruit Ciders Tasting to focus on select fruit ciders to evaluate style relative to fruit ciders from a commercial or craft perspective. Data (i.e., residual sugar, alcohol, tannin) presented on each hard cider along with sensory descriptors and production techniques. Led by Denise Gardner.


2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

PAGE 17

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2016 (pre-registration is required) 3:30 PM

4:00 PM

Content Marketing - Mary Bigham, Town & Dish Works LLC. Customized, professional content marketing to increase sales, customer engagement and brand awareness for your cidery! Hard Cider Production: A Closer Look at Fermentation Denise Gardner, Penn State Extension, Enology Dive into the world of primary fermentation from yeast selection to stylistic options available for hard cider producers.

1:30 PM-3:30 PM PRUNING BY THE NUMBERS – SIMPLIFIED RULES FOR PRUNING AND TRAINING TALL SPINDLE SYSTEMS —FEE: $15

Various Tree Spacings, Simplified Pruning and Training Strategies Economic Impacts based on Yield and Fruit Size

TIME TO BE ANNOUNCED FARM MARKET TOUR—FEE: $60 (includes lunch) This all-day bus tour will leave and return to the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center. Stops include Kauffman’s Fruit Farm and Market (including their own cider pressing and canning operations), Bird-in-Hand, PA, Cherry Hill Orchards Outlet, Country Barn Farm Market and Kegel’s Produce, in Lancaster, PA

This workshop will be conducted at the Penn State Fruit Research & Extension Center 290 University Drive, Biglerville, PA 17307 http://agsci.psu.edu/frec. Topics to discussed and demonstrated: Pruning Tall Spindle Trees at

MAIN CONVENTION PROGRAM TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 2, 2016 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 9:00 History and Status of Fencing for Wildlife Management - Frank Otto, Summit Ag Systems 9:45 Managing Deer Damage in Your Enterprise - Jonathan Kays, University of Maryland Extension COVER CROPS 9:00 Beneficial Cover Crop Mixes for Vegetable Rotations Kaitlin Dye, Cover Crop Solutions, LLC. 9:45 Nutrient Recovery In Cover Crops – Steven Groff, Cedar Meadow Farms HERBS 9:00 Getting Started with Growing Culinary Herbs – Dr. Elsa Sanchez, Penn State University 9:45 *Basel Downy Mildew: Management and Progress in Research – Dr. Andrew Wyenandt, Rutgers Coop. Ext.

INTRODUCTION TO HOPS 9:00 Site Selections and Pre-Plant Considerations & Basic Management for Eastern Growers - Steve Miller, Cornell Cooperative Extension 9:45 Pest Management in Hops Production Systems Timothy Weigle, Cornell University 10:10 Economic Considerations of Commercial Hops Production - Kevin Martin, Penn State Extension GMO'S 9:00 GMO Basics, The Science of it and Crafting Marketing Messages - William Hlubik, Rutgers Coop. Extension & Heather Mikulas, Penn State University 9:45 Consumer Perceptions of GMO's and Mandatory Labeling – Dr. William Hallman, Rutgers University

ORGANIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 9:00 Minimum Tillage and Cover Cropping for Managing Weeds in Organic Vegetables – Dr. Cerruti Hooks, University of Maryland 9:45 Low Soil Inorganic N is Not so Yield Limiting in Established Organic Systems – Dr. Alison Grantham, Blue Apron

TREE FRUIT 9:00 Invocation – Ed Weaver, Weavers Orchard 9:05 President’s Address – Timothy Weiser, State Horticultural Association of Pennsylvania 9:15 *Managing Nematodes in Tree Fruit Orchards – Dr. Kari Peter, Penn State University 9:45 George Goodling Lecture - How We Will Survive the FSMA and the Next Challenge, Whatever It Is - John Rice, Rice Fruit Company

FOOD BANKING 9:00 Overview of Food Banking - Sheila Christopher, Hunger Free Pennsylvania 9:45 Tax Policy for Food Donations - Carrie Calvert, Feeding America

KEYNOTE 10:45 Mid-Atlantic Legislative Affairs Update 11:00 Keynote Presentation – Discuss the UndiscussabullTools for Talking about the Tough Issues in Farm Transfer Elaine Froese, Family Farm Coach

* before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


PAGE 18

2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

TUESDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 2, 2016 SWEET CORN 1:00 **Storage and Spills – Dr. Timothy Elkner, Penn State Extension 1:30 *Fall Armyworm Migration - Implications for the Mid Atlantic - Robert Meagher Jr, USDA, ARS 2:00 No-Till Planter Set-Ups: Do's and Don'ts - Thomas Strzelecki, Covered Wagon Produce 2:30 *Cover Crops for Weed Management and N-Supply Steven Mirsky, USDA, ARS 3:15 Early Season Production – Ronald & William Beinlich, Triple B Farms; Brenton Barnhart, Country Creek Produce; Mark & Andrew Duda, Duda's Farm; Harold Weaver, Meadowgate Vista Farm

3:15 4:00

Chasing Nutrient Solutions Targets - Thomas Childs, Twin Springs Fruit Farm *Downy Mildew in Hydroponic Basil - Thomas Ford, Penn State Extension

LABOR/FARM MANAGEMENT To be announced

FOOD SAFETY CRISIS MANAGEMENT 1:30 Impact of FSMA on Mid Atlantic Growers – Dr. Wesley Kline, Rutgers Cooperative Extension 2:00 Can Cow Manure Be Used Safely as Fertilizer for Vegetables? – Dr. Jeffrey LeJeune, Ohio State University 3:15 Are You Ready for a Recall - Amy Philpott, Watson Green, LLC.

WHOLESALE MARKETING 1:30 Food Hubs - Enhance Your Understanding of This Newer Method to Get Farm Fresh Food to Consumers - Ann Karlan, Fair Food 2:15 Farm To School - Recent Successes and Future Opportunities to Connect Local Produce with School Food Programs - Vonda Cooke, Child Nutrition Program 3:15 Direct Store Deliveries - Meeting Criteria, Building Relationships and What We Do to Exceed Expectations - James Weaver, Meadow View Farm 4:00 Produce Auctions - Trends in This Industry and What is On the Horizon - Bennie C. Yoder, Countryside Produce Auction

ROOT CROPS 1:30 *Gain the Upper Hand in Weed Control by Understanding the Enemy - Darcy Telenko, Cornell Coop. Extention 2:00 Growing and Marketing Root Crops at Everblossom Farm - Elaine Lemmon, Everblossom Farm 2:30 Variety Selection for Flavor, Nutrition and Marketing - Jan Van Der Heide, Bejo Seeds 3:15 *Insect Pests of Root Crops – Dr. Shelby Fleischer, Penn State University 4:00 **Overlooked Steps to Getting the Correct Rate of Pesticides - Lee Stivers, Penn State Extension

TREE FRUIT - HONEYCRISP SYMPOSIUM 1:30 Fruit Packer Observations on Honeycrisp Post Harvest Disorders - Benjamin Rice, Rice Fruit Company 2:00 Three Years of Storage Research on Pennsylvania Honeycrisp—Implications for Growers and Packers Christopher Watkins, Cornell University 3:00 Growing Tips for Honeycrisp - Grower Panel, Dr. Tara Baugher, Penn State Extension (moderator); Bennett Saunders, Saunders Brothers Orchard; Nathan Milburn, Milburn Orchards; Joseph Lerew, Lerew Orchards 3:45 Rootstocks and Site Preparation for Honeycrisp - Rob Crassweller, Penn State University

ORGANIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 1:30 *Weed Management in Organic Onions - Bryan Brown, University of Maine 2:00 *Scouting Insects in High Tunnels - Kathleen Ayers, Penn State University 2:30 *Using Biocontrols for Insect Pests in High Tunnels – Dr. Margaret Skinner, University of Vermont 3:15 *Identifying Common Natural Enemies in High Tunnels – Dr. Margaret Skinner, University of Vermont 4:00 Planning Diversified Crops for Winter Income - Elaine Lemmon, Everblossom Farm HYDROPONICS 1:30 Tomatoes Varieties for Hydroponics in the MidAtlantic - Natalie Bumgarner, University of Tennessee 2:00 *Keeping Hydroponic Systems Clean Using Peroxides - Vijay Kumar Choppakatla, BioSafe Systems 2:30 *Utilizing Microbial Probiotics in Hydroponic Lettuce Production - Natalie Bumgarner, University of Tennessee * before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

PAGE 19

WEDNESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 3, 2016 TOMATOES 9:00 Penn State Variety Update - Dr. Majid Foolad, Penn State University 9:30 *Looking at Nanomaterials for Bacterial Spot Control To be announced 10:15 *Tomato Disease Update - Planning for 2016 - Dr. Beth Gugino, Penn State University 11:00 *Detection of Canker and Salmonella in Irrigation Water - Nitika Khatri, Ohio State University 11:30 PVGA Annual Meeting - Crystal Room GENERAL VEGETABLES/IPM 9:00 Update on Biodegradable Mulch - Dr. Michael Orzolek, Penn State University Emeritus 9:30 **Air Blast Sprayer Calibration - Eric Oesterling 10:15 All Season Field Production of Lettuce - Arthur King, Harvest Valley Farms 11:00 Celery Production - Paul Rebarchak, Penn State University 11:30 PVGA Annual Meeting - Crystal Room GREENHOUSE SKILLS 9:00 Potting Media Management - Dr. Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph 9:30 **Water Quality - Impact on Pesticide Efficacy and Plant Production - Thomas Ford, Penn State Extension 10:15 Deconstructing Fertilizer Formulas - Dr. Cari Peters, J R Peters, Inc. 11:00 *Managing Western Flower Thrips Using Biocontrols Scott Creary, IPM Labs 11:30 PVGA Annual Meeting - Crystal Room PEPPERS AND EGGPLANT 9:00 Pepper Variety Trials - Sheldon Sutton, Rupp Seeds 9:30 Broad Mites in Peppers - Steven Bogash, Penn State Ext. 10:15 Diseases of Peppers - Dr. Andrew Wyenandt, Rutgers University 11:00 Peppers and Eggplant for Ethnic Markets - Thomas Strzelecki, Covered Wagon Produce 11:30 PVGA Annual Meeting - Crystal Room SMALL FRUIT 9:00 *Spotted Wing Drosophila - When Do I Really Need to Start Spraying? – Dr. Gregory Loeb, Cornell University 9:30 Closing the Loop in Recycling Ag Plastics - It Can Be Done! - Ron Davis, Davis Enterprises, Inc. 10:15 *Thrips Galore, and We Don't Want More! – Dr. Margaret Skinner, University of Vermont & Kathleen Demchak, Penn State University 11:00 Performance of New Strawberry Varieties in Plasticulture and Matted-Row Field Trials – Dr. Timothy Elkner, Penn State Extension & Kathleen Demchak, Penn State University

BUSINESS PLANNING FOR DIRECT MARKETERS 9:00 Yes, You Really Do Need a Business Plan - Keith Dickinson, Farm Credit East 10:00 You Think you're Being Smart, but… - Ed Weaver, Weavers' Orchard, David Fleming Jr., Shady Brook Farm & Caleb Torrice, Tabora Farm 11:30 Family Dynamics - I Can't Fire My Sister! - Elaine Froese, Family Farm Coach WINE GRAPES 9:00 What People Should Know Before Establishing Their Vineyard - Dr. Joseph Fiola, University of Maryland Extension 9:45 Identifying and Managing Weed Problems That Escape Conventional Practices - Andy Senesac, Cornell Cooperative Extension 10:15 Ecological Considerations for Winegrape Growers Alice Wise, Cornell Cooperative Extension 11:00 Leaf Removal Strategies for Improving Grape Health and Wine Quality - Michela Centinari, Penn State University 11:30 The Essentials of Grape Nutrient Management Dr. Gary Pavlis, Rutgers Cooperative Extension TREE FRUIT 9:00 Performance of European Pears – Dr. James Schupp, Penn State University 9:30 The Continuing Quest for Optimal Harvest Management & Storage of Apples - Christopher Watkins, Cornell University 10:15 Rootstock Scion Combination Observations - Bryan Butler, University of Maryland 10:45 **The Worker Protection Standard is Here - James Harvey, Penn State University 11:15 The Young Grower Alliance & Precision Management Innovations - Russell Homberg, Ben Lerew, Mark Boyer SPANISH 9:00 Practica sobre Identificación de Malezas (Hands-On Weed Identification) - Dwight Lingenfelter & Lee Stivers, Penn State Extension; Beth Sastre, VCE-Loudon Extension Office 10:00 *Técnicas de MIP para Producción en Macrotúnel (IPM Techniques for High Tunnel Production) - Maria Gorgo (NRCS), Noel Soto (NRCS), Cathy Thomas (PDA) 10:45 **Protegernos y Nuestras Familias de la Exposición a Pesticidas (Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Pesticide Exposure) - Hector Nunez-Contreras, Penn State Extension

* before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


PAGE 20

2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 3, 2016 TOMATOES 1:30 *Bio Pesticides - Where Is the Future - Timothy Johnson, Marrone Bio Innovations 2:00 **Storage and Spills - Dr. Timothy Elkner, Penn State Extension 2:30 *Fruit Rots and Timing of the Last Fungicide Application – What’s the Best Approach? - Cheryl Trueman, University of Guelph 3:15 Top Tomato Production - Steven Bogash, Penn State Extension 4:00 *What We Have Learned about Managing Stink Bugs in Tomatoes - Dr. Thomas Kuhar, Virginia Tech GENERAL VEGETABLES 1:30 Succession Planting - Dr. William Lamont, Jr., Penn State University 2:00 Asparagus Production - Dr. Thomas Orton, Rutgers Cooperative Extension 2:30 *Evaluating Select Management Strategies for Bacterial Diseases of Onion - Jennie Mazzone, Penn State University 3:15 How Plant Growth Promoters Size Grain and Fill Fruits - Dr. Richard Woodward, Stoller USA 4:00 *New Vegetable Herbicides - Dr. Mark Van Gessel, University of Delaware GREENHOUSE ORNAMENTALS 1:30 *Diagnosing Disease Problems in the Greenhouse Virginia Brubaker, GGS-Pro 2:00 *Diagnosing Insect Problems in the Greenhouse Virginia Brubaker, GGS-Pro 2:30 Succulents - All the Juicy Details - John Friel, Emerald Coast Growers 3:15 Best Plants From the 2015 Penn State Flower Trials Sinclair Adam, Penn State Extension 4:00 LED's in Greenhouse Production - Dr. Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph SPECIALTY CROPS 1:30 Outstanding New PawPaws - Carl Cantaluppi, North Carolina Extension 2:00 You Can Grow Ginger - Leah Tewksbury, Tewksbury Grace Farms 2:30 Chick Peas Have Potential - Joseph Yodok & Jase Moore; John Esslinger, Penn State Extension 3:15 Growing Okra on Plastic – Dr. William Lamont, Jr., Penn State University 4:00 **Get My Drift? - John Esslinger, Penn State Extension AGRITOURISM 1:30 How to Handle Large Crowds at Your AT Events Timothy VonThun, VonThun Family Farm 2:00 Practical Advice for Managing Liability on Agritourism Farms - Brian Schilling, Rutgers Cooperative Extension 2:30 Tips for Hiring and Managing Employees for

3:15 4:00

Agritourism - Gillian Armstrong, Rutgers University & William Hlubik, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Agritourism Need Not to be a Risky Business - Patricia Hastings, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Consumers Want to Know Their Farmer, But Do Farmers Know Their Customers - Richard VanVranken, Rutgers University

PEACHES 1:30 *Contribution of Mid-Season Cover Sprays to Management of Peach Brown Rot at Harvest - Norm Lalancette, Rutgers University 2:15 *The Use ProGibb and ReTain to Reduce Peach Flower Bud Density & Enhance Fruit Firmness - Win Cowgill, Rutgers University 3:00 Peaches: Trends and Opportunities - Eric Gaarde, Gaarde FoodSource 3:45 *Bacterial Spot Management in Stone Fruit - Sarah Bardsley Capasso, Penn State University 4:30 Maryland State Horticultural Society Business Meeting - Location TBA WINE GRAPES 1:30 Clean Plant Material - An Effective Strategy for Disease Prevention in the Vineyard - Hemant Gohil, Rutgers Cooperative Extension 2:00 Early Season Disease Control for Mid-Atlantic Wine Grape Production - Bryan Hed, Penn State University 2:45 Diagnosis and Integrated Management of Late Season Fruit Rots in Wine Grapes - Dr. Cassandra Swett, University of Maryland 3:30 Update on Spotted Lanternfly Research in Grapes Dr. Michael Saunders, Penn State University TREE FRUIT 1:30 **Top Ten Tips for Pesticide Applicators - Dr. Kerry Richards, Penn State University 2:00 *Attract and Kill for BMSB - Chris Bergh, Virginia Tech 2:45 US Apple Association & PA Apple Marketing Board Updates 3:30 *Solid Set Systems as a Novel Method of Delivering Chemical Inputs in Apple - Dr. Larry Gut, Michigan State University 4:30 Maryland State Horticultural Society Business Meeting - Location TBA SPANISH 1:15 Visita al Mercado de Productores de la Villa Masónica – This session will be held at Mason Village, 310 Eden View Road, Elizabethtown. 1:20 Poda Básica y Principios de Manejo de Carga del Cultivo de Arboles de Manzana (Basic Pruning/ Crop Load Management Principles for Apple Trees) - Mario Miranda Sazo, Cornell Cooperative Extension

* before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

PAGE 21

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 3, 2016 CONT... 2:00

Equipo de Crecimiento de Frutales – Comunicación en Áreas de Trabajo (The Fruit Growing Team – Work place Communication) - Miguel Saviroff, Penn State Extension

2:30

Pasos para Podar Arboles de Manzana en un Sistema de Eje Alto (Steps for Pruning Apple Trees to the Tall Spindle System) - Mario Miranda Sazo, Cornell Cooperative Extension

THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 4, 2016 VINE CROPS 9:00 *New Options for Cucumber Beetle Management Dr. Shelby Fleischer, Penn State University 9:30 Growing Seedless Watermelons - Dr. Gordon Johnson, University of Delaware 10:15 *Weed Control in Vine Crops - Making the Most With What We Have Available - Dr. Mark Van Gessel, University of Delaware 11:00 Seedless Watermelon Varieties - Results of the SE PA Trial - Tanner Delvalle, Penn State Extension 11:30 Biological Strip-Till for Vine Crops - Dr. Gordon Johnson, University of Delaware BIO CONTROLS IN HIGH TUNNELS 9:00 *Managing Key Pests of Tomatoes with Biocontrols - Scott Creary, IPM Labs 9:30 TerraGrow and TerraClean 5.0 in High Tunnel Systems - Vijay Kumar Choppakatla, BioSafe Systems 10:15 *Pathways to Biological Control - Case Studies from the 2015 Growing Season - Nicolas Ellis, Norden Agricultural, LLC. 11:00 *Managing Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes Steve Bogash, Penn State Extension 11:30 Root Zone Temperature Management - Natalie Bumgarner, University of Tennessee POTATOES 9:00 Update from the United States Potato Board Nolan Masser, Red Hill Farms Inc. and David Fraser, United States Potato Board 9:30 Review of the 2015 Potato Season - Robert Leiby, PA Coop. Potato Growers 10:15 Fertility Management for Potatoes - Dr. Steven Johnson, University of Maine Cooperative Extension 11:00 *General Disease Update - Dr. Beth Gugino, Penn State University 11:30 *Insect Control Measures - Dr. Thomas Kuhar, Virginia Tech CUT FLOWERS 9:00 *Biologically Based Approaches to Disease Management in Specialy Cut Flowers - Thomas Ford, Penn State Extension 9:30 High Tunnels as Overwintering Structures for Perennials and Simi-Hardy Annual Cut Flowers: A Sharing of Experiences - Dr. Chris Wien, Cornell University

10:15 11:00

11:30

Hybrid Liliums & Other Bulb Crops for Summer Production - Ko Klaver, Botanical Trading Co. Utilizing Topping Pinching Techniques to Increase Floral Stem Yield in Cut Flowers - Dr. Chris Wien, Cornell University Grower's Prespective on the Cut Flower Industry Michelle Elston, Roots Cut Flower Farm LLC.

SMALL FRUIT 9:00 ***What's New in Biofumigants for Strawberry Production - Dr. Charles Johnson, Virginia Tech 9:30 Pruning Brambles - Increase Harvest Efficiency and Winter Hardiness While Improving SWD Management - Nathan Nourse, Nourse Farms 10:15 *A National Research Effort to Manage Spotted Wing Drosophila and Recent Advances in Biology and Management - Dr. Hannah Burrack, North Carolina State University & others to be announced 11:00 *Strawberry Diseases and Early Season Stunting Dr. Charles Johnson, Virginia Tech 11:30 *Strawberry Crown Rots - How to Tell Them Apart and Differences in Control - Dr. Cassandra Swett, University of Maryland MARKETING 101 9:00 Capturing Your Virtual Customer - Rebecca Frimmer, Kitchen Table Consultants 10:15 Are Your Products Paying the Rent? - Josh Smith, Frecon Farms 11:15 Business Collaborations to Expand Your Market The Partnership of a Hard Cidery and Diversifie Farm Market - Reed Soergel, Soergel Orchards PEACHES 9:00 *Ernie Christ Lecture - Getting Back into an IPM Program in Peaches & Nectarines - Dean Polk, Rutgers University 10:00 To be announced 10:30 Nectarine Varieties – 50 Years of Experiences in the East - Jerry Frecon, Adams County Nursery 11:15 Peach Genetics and Breeding for the Future - Ralph Scorza, USDA, Kearneysville TREE FRUIT 9:00 *Fungal Leaf Pathogens of Apple - Keith Yoder, Virginia Tech. 9:30 *Mating Disruption Then, Now and the Future - Dr. Larry Gut, Michigan State University

* before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


PAGE 22

2016 MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 4, 2016 CONT... 10:30 11:00 11:30

Getting to the Root of the Tree - Emily Lavely, Penn State University What Affects the Treeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Photosynthesis Factory - Dr. Richard Marini, Penn State University Flower Power: Apple Pollen Tube Growth and its Management - Thomas Kon, Penn State University

THURSDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 4, 2016 PUMPKINS 1:30 *Update on Insect Pest Management Research in Pumpkins - Dr. Thomas Kuhar, Virginia Tech 2:00 Tale Of A Thousand Pumpkins - Creating Magic at the Arboretum at Penn State's Pumpkin Festival Shari Edelson, Penn State University 2:30 *Soil Borne Cucurbit Disease Management and a Foliar Disease Update - Dr. Beth Gugino, Penn State University 3:15 *Palmer Amaranth and Waterhemp Anxieties Management and Legal Implications? - Dwight Lingenfelter, Penn State University

SMALL FRUIT 1:30 Crop Production Methods in Beach Plum and Aronia - Jenny Carleo, Rutgers Cooperative Extension 2:00 *Demystifying Blueberry Declines in the Mid-Atlantic - Dr. Cassandra Swett, University of Maryland 2:30 Understanding Winter Hardiness and Injury in Blueberries - Dr. Mark Ehlenfeldt, USDA - ARS 3:00 *Recent Developments in Blueberry Pest Control Options - David Trinka, MGB Marketing 3:30 *Practical Monitoring and Management of Spotted Wing Drosophila in Highbush Blueberries Dean Polk, Rutgers University

HIGH TUNNELS 1:30 Supplemental Heating for High Tunnels - David King, Harvest Valley Farms 2:00 Plastic Films for High Tunnels - Dr. Michael Orzolek, Penn State University Emeritus 2:30 Managing Key Pests of Peppers and Cucumbers with Biocontrols - Scott Creary, IPM Labs 3:15 ***Pesticide Sprayers for High Tunnels - Thomas Ford, Penn State Extension 3:45 Growing Cucumbers in High Tunnels - Steven Bogash, Penn State Extension

SOCIAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY 1:30 Apps, Sensors and Technology for Crop Results - Ben Butler, Butlers Orchard 2:00 Using Videos to Share Your Story - Sarah Cornelisse, Penn State University 2:30 Social Media Realities - Shannon Dill, University of Maryland Extension 3:15 Tricks of the Trade - Shannon Dill, University of Maryland Extension

POTATOES 1:30 Developing Infrastructure in MSU Potato Breeding Program to Facilitate Bringing New Specialty to Small Growers - Dr. David Douches, Michigan State University 2:00 *Dickeya, an Emerging Pathogen on Potatoes - Dr. Steven Johnson, Univ. of Maine Coop. Extension 2:30 New Varieties for Pennsylvania Potato Growers Michael Peck, Penn State University 3:15 New Opportunities in Disease Resistant Breeding in Potatoes - Dr. David Douches, Michigan State Univ. 3:45 Blue and White Potato Chips - Dr. William Lamont Jr., Penn State University INNOVATIONS EQUIPMENT & INFRASTRUCTURE 1:30 To be announced 2:00 Future of Drones in Ag - Paul Caskey, SkyPhilly 2:30 Irrigation Optimization - to be announced 3:15 Is There a Future in Interseeding Cover Crops? Corey Dillon, Penn State University 3:45 To be announced

PEACHES 1:30 Ripening in Peach & Nectarine & Internal Breakdown - Dr. Christopher Walsh, University of Maryland 2:00 National Peach Council Industry Update - Kay Rentzel, National Peach Council 2:30 Microbiology of an Orchard Soil - David Eissenstat, Penn State University 3:00 Managing Nematodes in Tree Fruit Orchards Dr. Kari Peter, Penn State University 3:30 **Sprayer Deposition - Dr. Kerry Richards, Penn State University TREE FRUIT 1:30 **Effect of Water Quality on Pesticides - Dr. Kerry Richards, Penn State University 2:00 *How to Use Harvista Technology - Dr. Nancy Brill, AgroFresh 2:45 *Managing BMSB as Part of the Total Insect Pest Management System* - Dr. Greg Krawczyk, Penn State University

* before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a category pesticide applicator license update credit. ** before a topic indicates the topic is expected to qualify for a core pesticide applicator license update credit.


Maryland State Horticultural Society (MSHS) Annual Meeting - Feb. 2-4, 2016

At the Mid-Atlantic Fruit and Vegetable Convention - Hershey Lodge Convention Center, Hershey PA

POSTAL CODE

STEP 3 — SPECIAL OFFER WITH MAFVC REGISTRATION

 FREE 1 year subscription to Country Folks Grower

$60

$60

$80

$80

$80

$110

$110

$110

$110

$110

1-DAY

$150

$150

$150

$150

$150

$150

3-DAY

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

GROWERS DINNER

$60

$60

$60

$60

$60

$60

$60

$60

Farm Market Tour

$40

$40

$40

$40

$40

$40

$40

$40

Farm Transition

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

Food Safety Training

$120

$120

$120

$120

$120

$120

$120

$120

REGISTRATION DEADLINE 1/4/16

$90

$90

$90

$90

$90

$90

$90

$90

Hops Production

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

$15 $

WORKSHOPS (FEB. 1, 2016)

$60

$80

$110

$150

$35

2016 MSHS MEMBER

$60

$80

$110

$150

NON MEMBER

$60

$80

$110

Pruning by the Numbers

MEMBER

ADDITIONAL

$130 Membership & Walk-in Reg.

Hard Cider

WALK IN

$60

$80

ADVANCED REGISTRATION

$60

TOTAL ENCLOSED $

PAYMENT METHOD

 CHECK #________  CASH

TOTAL

 Add my name to the e-mail list (receive program information from MSHS/UME)  I do not have e-mail and wish to receive program information from MSHS/UME via U.S. Mail.

STEP 2 — MAILING PREFRENCE (Please check preference )

*There is an additional processing fee from Eventbrite to pay by credit card If you would like to attend the workshops on Feb 1, you will need to mail this registration form

If you would like to pay by credit card* (convention/membership only) go to: http://mafvconventionmshs.eventbrite.com

JOIN MSHS TO QUALIFY FOR THE CONVENTION MEMBER RATE

PHONE

STATE

STEP 1— FARM/BUSINESS INFORMATION (PLEASE PRINT) FARM/BUSINESS NAME

STREET ADDRESS

CITY

E-MAIL

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

$50

Optional

OR AFTER 1/22/16

Membership & Advanced Reg.

$115

MSHS 2016 DUES

STEP 4 — ATTENDEE REGISTRATION (MUST BE POSTMARKED ON OR BEFORE JANUARY 22, 2016 Please CIRCLE the following that applies for each person attending To QUALIFY for the Advanced Registration convention rate you must have at least 1 person from a family, farm or company that has paid their 2016 MSHS Membership dues.

PLEASE PRINT NAME 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8

Please make your check payable to: MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY (MSHS) (You may use one check to pay for convention registration and 2016 Membership Dues)

Mail registration and payment to: University of Maryland Extension—WMREC Attention: Susan Barnes, 18330 Keedysville Road, Keedysville, MD 21756 For more information please call Robert Black at 240-409-7491 or e-mail hbgala@aol.com Thank you for registering in advance!


HORTICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY NEWSLETTER Which includes the MID-ATLANTIC FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONVENTION (Program and Registration) Western Maryland Research & Education Center 18330 Keedysville Road  Keedysville, MD 21756 The University of Maryland Extension is an Equal Opportunity Employer with Equal Access Programs.

Profile for UME-Grapes and Fruit Program

2015 Horticulture Technology Newsletter  

A yearly publication released in December by University of Maryland Extension & the Maryland State Horticultural Society. It contains articl...

2015 Horticulture Technology Newsletter  

A yearly publication released in December by University of Maryland Extension & the Maryland State Horticultural Society. It contains articl...

Advertisement