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Mag az i ne

befriend

serve

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Massach u s e t t s Dar t m o u t h

A l um ni

UMASS Dartmouth

hope give back

build

Inside How our students learn by serving One alum’s unique way of ‘giving back’ Afghan human rights activist speaks on campus

understand share

join

shelter

help

community tutor

service feed support

sponsor

teach

mentor


MESSAGE FROM

Jean F. MacCormack To alumni and friends of UMass Dartmouth: What a year!

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e set out in the fall to celebrate our 40th year here in Dartmouth by breaking new ground and extending our tradition of innovation. We did this by inviting global thought leaders to our campus, welcoming the community to our intellectual and cultural activities, and dispatching our world-class faculty into the community to share their discoveries and ideas. As a university and a community, we heard the compelling messages of three amazing women: Maya Angelou, the renowned poet who drew 4,000 people spanning four generations to our campus in October; the courageous Afghan human rights leader Sima Samar (see story page 7) who has risked her life to provide health care and educational opportunity to women and children; and Deborah Prothrow-Stith of Harvard’s School of Public Health, who has transformed the way our nation thinks about youth violence. Our own faculty, proving once again that there are no walls around this campus, took their knowledge directly to the citizens of the region: economist Richard Shadbegian on the impact of national anti-pollution legislation; Portuguese Department Chair Anna Klobucka on the influence of language on nations; marine scientist Kevin Stokesbury on maintaining the balance between economic and environmental realities of the fishing industry; and Nursing Dean Nancy Dluhy and Engineering Professor Howard Michel on using personal technology to assist new nurses in surviving their first few years. Our colleges and library, through over a dozen events, brought the arts to the streets of New Bedford, highlighted the dedication of the region’s nurses, examined the architecture of our campus, and launched a new dialogue about chronic illness. We hosted the New England Women’s Studies Association annual conference, re-engaged alumni engineers in the life of the university, and unveiled recipes for innovation. We focused on the future of biotechnology and the SouthCoast, honored former Arts and Science Dean Sam Stone, scanned the horizon in marine sciences, and worked with the city of Fall River to promote literacy. Such activity leaves an imprint on the hearts and minds of people, especially our 8,300 students, who come to new understanding that they are part of something bigger than themselves. In the pages that follow, you will see evidence of this spirit of service in an alumnus who spends his days gathering up bicycles to send to poor communities around the globe, in faculty and students who volunteer their talents and energy to nearby communities, and even in the debate over the UMass Law School in which so many people fought so hard to expand educational opportunity for others. One year. So much enrichment of our lives.

Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

“Untitled” necklace: sterling silver, 14k, cultured black pearls Jesse Mia Horowitz current student class of 2005

Jewelry class, Star Store campus

“Summer Rain” neck piece: sterling silver, lampworked borosilicate glass Leanne Silva current student class of 2005


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Feature stories

“Untitled” necklace: sterling silver, freshwater pearls & Swarovski crystals Joslyn M. Lacasse class of 2005

Al umni

UMASS Dartmouth

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his issue of the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Magazine focuses on the various ways in which people are working together for a better society, locally and internationally. We spotlight an alum “giving back” in a unique way; a human rights activist fighting for Afghan women’s freedom; and community service efforts on campus. This issue also includes the names of those who have made a financial contribution to the university in the past year. We welcome hearing from you. Please send comments and letters to: Alumni Relations Office, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Rd., North Dartmouth ma 02747, or email them to dberube@umassd.edu

Serving & learning

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From Kabul to Dartmouth

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Bikes for a better life

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University news Around the Colleges 12 What now for law school 17

Athletics: Hockey highlights 18

Student Profiles: Connecting politically 20

Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement

Alumni news & notes

Jeffrey A. Wolfman Executive Editor

Donald A. Berube ’84 Director, Alumni Relations Managing Editor

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant to the Chancellor Designer

Rachel Cocroft Light metals class, Star Store campus

Writer/Editor

Diane H. Hartnett Photographers

Class notes 22 Tracking the dolphins 24

Letters 25, 26

Letter from Alumni Association President Letter from Alumni Relations Director 27 University donors 28

D. Confar, UMD photographics Luke Powell Alumni administrative assistant/Class Notes

Nancy J. Tooley ‘99 “Samples” brooch: mokume gane, shibuishi, sterling silver, & green beryl Rebecca Anne Budgell class of 2005

Cover photo: Students spend spring break working for Habitat for Humanity. Among them is cover photographer Lauren Stencel ’05.

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #015-139) Volume 9, Number 3, May 2005 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once in February, once in March, once in May, twice in June, once in July, once in August, twice in November by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300 Periodicals postage paid at New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740. postmaster: Send address corrections to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300

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UMass Dartmouth students are serving the community and strengthening their education in the process.

Learning sserving

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UMass Dartmouth students enhance their education through community involvement

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Lauren Stencel, UMass Dartmouth senior, spent spring break in Sumter, South Carolina, helping build a Habitat for Humanity house. To get there, she sold candy bars outside a Home Depot, and took several hundred dollars out of her own pocket. After working all day, she and the nine other UMass Dartmouth students with her slept in sleeping bags on a church floor. Describing the trip several days before leaving, Stencel grinned: “I am SO excited. I just can’t wait.”

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Professor Jeanne Leffers and seven nursing students continue a five-year tradition by spending two weeks in January in the Dominican Republic’s poorer areas. They travel to various sites, seeing perhaps 150 people at each stop for ailments such as malnutrition, parasitic diseases, and infections. Their ‘clinic” is sometimes the back of their truck. They stay in dorm-like quarters where electricity and

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By Diane Hartnett

running water are not guaranteed; most meals are rice and beans. Each student covers the approximate $1,000 cost herself, and “quite a few ask for that as their Christmas gift,” says Leffers. n

Courtney Oleson spends an hour a week helping two fourth-grade girls at Mount Pleasant Elementary School, New Bedford, with their literacy skills. A friendly rapport develops, extending beyond the formal student-teacher relationship. Obviously, the youngsters learn, but so too does Oleson, who realizes “It is just false to think that children have problems in school because they don’t care. So many kids put in such an effort and most work so hard. “Professor (Anne) Foley tells us she’s on an urban mission, and I want to follow her. Now I want to teach in an urban school because I can make more of a contribution.”


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Often teaming with faculty and staff, students have been helping out in agencies such as Habitat for Humanity and America Reads. And they have spent spring break in the Dominican Republic caring for persons where medical attention is limited.

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f “community service” brings to mind blood drives or food collections around the holidays, you haven’t been on a campus lately. Those drives still happen. But where they once represented the extent of community service, now they’re one component of a venture far more wide-ranging, formal, and inspiring. That venture is providing an invaluable dimension to the education of the university’s students, as they leave campus to aid organizations in the university’s backyard and even abroad. Student involvement with the community comes in a variety of shapes and forms—tutoring youngsters; befriending persons with mental illnesses; rebuilding a medical clinic in Honduras; helping lower-income persons with tax forms; collecting trash along waterways side-byside with local residents. More significantly, such service to the community has become woven into the curriculum. Within many courses, UMD students transfer what they’ve learned in the classroom to projects and programs for all sorts of non-profit organizations. “Service learning” is the label, and everyone benefits: students receive realworld, hands-on education, while a critical need of a community group is fulfilled. Another plus—students learn how to be contributing members of society.

A rise in interest in community service among students “Oh there’s definitely been more interest in volunteering by the students. And the faculty and staff have shown a strong interest in service learning suggestions,” says Deirdre Healy, UMD’s community service coordinator. Healy has become the go-to person on campus for volunteer and service learning opportunities. She points out that over the past decade, high schools have made community service a big part of students’ lives. While many students become involved simply to bolster their college applications, most find they actually like the experience. So they enjoy being asked to continue their involvement once in college, and welcome the more varied opportunities. At the same time, faculty interest in incorporating service into the curriculum has been driven by a now-accepted tenet. “The best way to learn is by doing,” says Healy. “And you’re teaching a great civics lesson.” Hiring Healy four years ago signalled the university’s commitment to the service concept, reflective of Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack’s intent when she spoke of UMass Dartmouth being “engaged and embedded.” Creating the coordinator’s position was another step in strengthening university-community partnerships.

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hat is most impressive is the scope and creative nature of what students offer, either through volunteering or as service learning. For example: • Business majors in a management class have recruited students to be Big Brothers/Big Sisters for local children. • Students from all disciplines are collaborating with Habitat for Humanity to build two homes for needy families. • Each semester of the past three years, more than 70 education students have been tutors in three New Bedford schools. • University students guide their high school counterparts on their own service projects, such as im proving conditions for persons with AIDS in Fall River. • And in March, the violence that has plagued New Bedford resulted in a university-community partner ship to develop an effective response.

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A University of New Hampshire business graduate, Healy was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Dominican Republic, developing ways to market native women’s crafts to tourists. She subsequently became a recruiter for the Peace Corps and then for the Corporation for National Service, principally in the Northeast. “I fell in love with New Bedford and the whole area. I felt a renaissance was happening.” When the UMD job opened up, “I knew there was a lot that students could do.” There was a foundation to build on. When the traditional town-gown separation diminished in the ’80s, most universities, including UMass Dartmouth, began to share their special resources with neighboring communities. Higher ed reformers—reacting to the popular perception of college students as self-absorbed and sheltered from reality—moved to engage those students in service-oriented endeavors. The result was a variety of service organizations, local and national, many funded through the government. Among them was the nationwide Campus Compact, which promotes and supports service as a critical component of higher education; today 60 colleges and universities in the Commonwealth comprise the Massachusetts CC chapter. UMass Dartmouth has been a longtime member, and Chancellor MacCormack co-chairs the executive committee. Compact membership initially entitled the university to an on-campus VISTA-supported person, who over-

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saw the America READS tutoring program. When the Compact asked member schools to commit more fully to the service concept by funding a coordinator, UMass Dartmouth agreed and Healy came on board. While service clubs and service projects certainly existed, Healy believes the events of Sept. 11, 2001 galvanized people, tapping within them a desire to do more for others. “People kept asking me what they could do. We wanted a project that was representative of a higher education institute,” Healy remembers. Students, faculty, and Healy brainstormed ideas, and a Twin Towers replica for the Campus Center was the result. The project received a huge amount of attention and praise, locally and nationally, for its creativity and emotional impact. “It seemed to change the direction of things,” Healy recalls, and drew more students into community involvement. For example, a long-discussed chapter of Habitat for Humanity was established. Students have worked on two houses in the South, constructed another in Kingston, and are building a fourth that will go to a Washington, DC family after it is entered in this summer’s Solar Decathlon Competition. The campus chapters of Rotary and Kiwanis, nationwide service clubs, have increased membership and activities. “Compeer” was launched and faculty, administrators, and students are mentoring people who have a mental illness. Two

years ago, two students went to Honduras during spring break on an aid mission organized through Campus Ministry; this spring, there were seven UMD students among the nineteen who signed up. Campus and community groups generally call on Healy when they need volunteers for a program. And as she recruits students—be it for a voter registration drive or an environmental issue campaign—“you have to show them why it matters to them. You get them involved in a dialogue on why, for example, it’s important to vote.” Not surprisingly, many of the students whom Healy meets “are the students who are busy, who do a lot.” Like Lauren Stencel, the chemistry major who spent this past spring break in South Carolina on a Habitat project. Her record of service is lengthy and impressive: tutoring local elementary school youngsters; joining a campus initiative to involve youngsters in service projects, such as serving at a soup kitchen; mentoring high schoolers doing their own community service with persons with AIDS; and spending winter break in the Dominican Republic renovating a local school and teaching children, some with cerebral palsy and autism. That trip cost Stencel nearly $600, yet “I would definitely do it again. You work with little kids who have close to nothing and they are so happy to see you.” Stencel is typical of the university student who has volunteered while in high


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school; sees how satisfying it can be; and enjoys the more diverse forms of involvement that college presents. “I did some volunteer work in high school, but was more involved with sports,” says Stencel. “But my parents always made us aware of the fact that we had lots more than many other people. “In college, there are people who volunteer because their friends are doing it. But that’s fine too, because it still gets you there. “I really enjoy working with people, especially kids. It just makes me feel better. “When we went to the Dominican Republic, the people had so little. You don’t see in this country the kind of conditions we saw there. They were so glad to see us. That trip had so many positives. It was just so gratifying.”

“It’s definitely service and it’s definitely learning.” ‘It’ is the two-week trip to the Dominican Republic that Nursing Prof. Jeanne Leffers makes during intersession with nursing majors. In rural poor areas, the group sets up makeshift clinics, often from the back of their truck. Sometimes 50 to 100 people line up to await their arrival, says Dr. Leffers, and as many as 150 people will be seen during a day. The team tends to ear infections, advises on better diets, treats wounds that have been improperly cared for, and facilitates more intensive care for those with serious problems.

Leffers began doing the trips, organized through Intercultural Nursing Inc., as a professor at URI. Her goal is straightforward: raise awareness and sharpen the future nurse’s sensitivity to unfamiliar cultures and customs. The experience translates into an invaluable lesson for the nursing majors; at the same time, they are providing a critical need for an under-served community. That is the essence of “service learning,” increasingly viewed as a vital component of a UMD education. Students and faculty alike embrace it enthusiastically. “I know that hands-on learning means the students learn more. Service learning engages a student more than just class discussion,” says Prof. Carlos Benavides. While incorporating service learning into a Spanish course is a challenge, Dr. Benavides routinely finds ways, i.e., having his class interview Hispanic owners of New Bedford businesses on their problems for the Community Economic Development Center. “Most students learn Spanish better in this way, and most enjoy it.” Faculty say an effective service learning experience demands thorough, thoughtful preparation, and a vehicle for student “reflection” during and after a project. It needs the complete cooperation of the community partner, who offers substantive, not superficial, work for students. The nursing majors who accompany Leffers are seniors. Some go as volunteers; others earn academic credit by doing it

as service learning or independent study. Students are advised well in advance that the trip is no vacation, and the accommodations “basically a little bit better than camping,” says Leffers. “The students work very hard, and it’s quite an adjustment for them. But they see this is the chance to bring together all their skills. They’re able to do a lot of interviewing and they feel it improves their confidence as well as their skills. “What it does is enhance their cultural sensitivity. Here is an opportunity to learn about, and learn to respect, other cultures.” That kind of lesson will stay with them, no matter where they eventually work. The journals they write (the ‘reflection’ part of their service) “help them to view this as not just an activity. In writing, they reveal those times that they’ve been judgmental or intolerant. It helps them put together all that they’ve experienced and seen, for a better understanding of how they have learned from their service.” The students share some obvious characteristics —an adventuresome spirit, a willingness to give up creature comforts. Most notable, says Leffers, is “their sense that nursing is more than just using skills in a profession, that it is a way of serving others. They acquire a very broad view of their profession.” While Leffers’ students volunteer for their service learning, many others are undertaking it as a course requirement. Getting students out of the classroom — once they’ve learned theory and basic A l u m n i

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concepts — makes for a more vibrant, enduring education, say faculty proponents. A number of professors also like the fact that, as students learn in the real world, they’re also doing something worthwhile for others. That’s the case with the introductory course for students who plan to become teachers. The course puts UMD students into three New Bedford schools for oneon-one tutoring with youngsters at least one hour a week through a semester. Education Prof. Anne Foley crafted the project with very specific goals. “University students are the ones who have figured out how to be successful in school. They could write off kids who weren’t so successful as kids who don’t care, or who come from families who don’t support them. So I wanted to give students a chance to connect with a youngster who is struggling to see that isn’t the case. “We focus on literacy because that’s the center of everything. If you can’t read the math problem, you can’t solve it.” Foley also wanted the students to see firsthand the pedagogical value of concentrated, one-on-one instruction. Foley deliberately chose urban schools for the course. Growing up in middle-class suburbia, she had a common, stereotypical—and flawed—image of city schools. In that respect, current college students may not have changed much, says Foley. Yet most will likely teach in an urban setting upon graduation. So Foley wants to debunk the stereotypes, and “give students a sense that kids are kids.” Before students go into the schools, faculty teach basic instructional skills, and “we also tell them the relationship is equally important as the skills you’re teaching.” Students are expected to get to know their assigned child—their interests and learning style, for example— and write a case study. The course also involves weekly meetings so students can discuss their experiences with one another and their professor. “It is very moving to listen to what the UMass Dartmouth students say about the experience, both in terms of the relationships that develop and in terms of the service they perform. They realize that teaching is not just a job. Quite a few

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continue as tutors on their own, simply because they really enjoy doing it.” The experience serves to clarify career ambitions. Some students decide that teaching isn’t for them. Others say it has steered them to a more specific teaching path. Like Courtney Oleson, a new graduate committed to teaching in an urban elementary school. Through her education courses, she spent time in schools in New Bedford and Mattapoisett; tutoring in the former was rewarding “because it was so much more hands-on, and I learned a lot. “The two little girls I worked with were very enthusiastic about school. Every week, they always wanted to tell me or show me something, like the 100

know that hands-on “ Ilearning means the students learn more. Service learning engages a student more than just class discussion.

they got on a test or that they had read a whole book. The kids in that school put in so much effort. They definitely cared about doing well.” Prof. Foley emphasizes that this project works because coordinators at each New Bedford school are enthusiastic partners. “The program would go nowhere without them.” Any one of the faculty who endorse service learning would make a similar comment. Success depends on a welcoming collaborator within the community, one with a real need that students can fulfill and learn from. Management Prof. Matt Roy has his students complete “change agent” projects. They work in teams to identify a substantive community need, then

develop solutions that actually change a situation. They have, among other things, collected funds and supplies for a shelter; designed programs about domestic violence for high schoolers; and recruited volunteers to fill the thinning ranks of Big Brothers/Big Sisters. Despite what some may think, Roy says, “It really isn’t unusual for this to be a part of our curriculum. We have the leadership component, which we emphasize.” How to move a project ahead, from conceptualizing to completion, is a critical skill for prospective leaders of business. The projects teach just that. Service learning appeals to Roy for two reasons. Students acquire an understanding of civic engagement and responsibility. And, because they are within a non-profit setting addressing a need that otherwise would go unmet, students are in control and able to effect genuine change. Corinn Williams, a 1980 graduate and director of the Community Economic Development Center in New Bedford, has seen that happen. Through service learning, several groups of students have assisted the center’s clients in a variety of ways. “This is something that’s close to my heart. It’s so gratifying to see students come into the community and give back.” As a sociology major, Williams did internships and community organizing, and sensed a desire on the university’s part for students to become active. The more structured and thoughtful approach represents a greater commitment to, and appreciation of, service learning, suggests Williams. “It’s an important part of enhancing the education experience, by combining theory and practice. It addresses the element of understanding the circumstances that people in the community live under. That’s a real eye-opener for many students. “And if you’re dealing with community building, you want to tap into the talents of the folks in the community. “What better than a university to partner with?” Diane Hartnett is the university Publications Department writer


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© Luke Powell 2004

Photo by D. Confar

By Brian Glyn Williams

From Kabul to

Dartmouth Afghan leader for peace and women’s freedom visits UMass Dartmouth

mericans have been bombarded with images of Afghanistan since the commencement of the war on terror, but few of us have the opportunity to interact with the living, breathing Afghan people whose land U.S. forces liberated from Taliban tyranny in November 2001. Most of us rarely have the opportunity to meet someone of the stature of Sima Samar, the internationally recognized human rights activist who spoke at UMass Dartmouth in February. Dr. Samar offered a rapt audience a glimpse into a brave woman’s struggle to fight fanaticism in a land rent by Soviet armies, CIA-sponsored freedom fighters‚ powerful warlords, Al Qaeda warrior-terrorists, and Taliban hordes. Samar’s story is that of someone who embodies what Mullah Omar (the Taliban’s fanatical leader) and Osama bin Laden fear and despise—a free-thinking female challenging the mullahs who have imprisoned Afghanistan’s women. Her story begins in the forbidding Hindu Kush Mountains which form Afghanistan’s spine. Samar was born there in 1957 into the oppressed ethnic group, the Hazaras, who are Shiite Muslims who have watched their mountain villages raided and burned by Dr. Sima Samar is flanked by Professors Brian Glyn Williams and Robin Robinson, a personal friend of Samar’s, at a reception in February. A l u m n i

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the dominant Sunni (majority Muslims) Pashtun group. Even as the plundering declined in the 20th century, the Hazaras faced unimaginable repression and discrimination in Afghanistan. I found Hazara men working in the capital Kabul as despised manual laborers or garbage collectors. It is hard to imagine how any woman could rise through the ranks of the maledominated conservative Afghan society, much less a woman who is Hazara. But Samar did. One of 11 children, Samar fought for the right to attend medical school when told it was time to wed. Miraculously, her husband agreed and Samar studied medicine in a country that, by the late 1970s, was gradually becoming more modern and liberal thinking. She became the first Hazara female to complete medical school in Afghanistan. Yet her world was shattered, and the efforts to modernize ceased, when the invading Soviets killed 1.5 million Afghans. Sadly, Samar’s husband was taken by the Communists and presumably executed. Like millions of her desperate countrymen, she fled to neighboring Pakistan, living in the squalor of a teeming refugee camp. Many who found themselves in such tragic circumstances died from their grief. But Samar continued her fight to fulfill her dream of becoming a doctor. She worked seven days a week to treat thousands of female refugees in Pakistan not allowed to see a male physician. She returned to Afghanistan in the late 1980s with the anti-Soviet freedom fighters (the mujahideen) and began to treat the wounded. She brought her medicine to the women of Afghanistan, and she also brought her sense of hope. Yet she was only one person. Larger forces conspired to crush her dreams of emancipating Afghanistan’s oppressed women through education. In the 1980s, the CIA encouraged Islamist fanatics from throughout the world to travel to Afghanistan to wage a global jihad against the Soviet atheists. Thousands of Wahhabi fanatics (among them bin Laden) descended on Afghanistan with their alien form of Islamic puritanism.

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They have to accept

the reality that women

are human beings.

Soon Arab fundamentalists and their local allies were forcing women into the all-encompassing burqa (head to toe veil) and calling for their exclusion from society. To Samar’s horror, the Americans unleashed fanatical Islam in Afghanistan, and the scars continue even to this day. By the 1990s, after Soviet expulsion, warlords divided the land into personal fiefdoms. Under all these warlords (except General Dostum whom Samar praised in her university address), women’s rights suffered. As Islamic holy warriors took control of the land, Samar’s courageous workers increasingly faced obstacles— bands of fighters harassed them, stole supplies, threatened girls attending her schools, and promised to kill Samar. Yet this intimidation paled in comparison to what was to come. From 1994 to 1996, a messianic cult of fundamentalist holy warriors known as the Taliban swept through the land, converting it into a medieval-style Islamic prison camp. Half of Afghanistan’s population—the women—were effectively excluded from society as the Taliban forced them from their jobs, schools, and the public sphere. Soon all women were denied education and medical treatment, and were confined to the prison of their burqas. One cannot overestimate the restriction of this garb. I myself saw how a woman cannot see to the side without turning her head, and how incredibly oppressive it is. Samar found more serious problems. “Almost every woman I see has osteomalacia,” she said. “Their bones are softening due to a lack of Vitamin D. They survive on a diet of tea and naan (flat bread) because they can’t afford eggs and milk…. Their burqas and veils deprive them of sunshine. On top of that, depression is endemic here because the future is so dark.” Horror swept through the land as the Taliban commenced public executions of adulterers‚ apostates‚ heretics‚ and any who defied the misogynistic laws. Even the Hazara women, to protect themselves, adopted the despised burqa. Courageously, Samar repeatedly challenged the Taliban. When threatened

All photos on this page © Luke Powell 2004

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D. Confar photo

Photo: Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission web site (www.aihrc.org.af/)

Whether in her native Afghanistan or at the Chancellor’s reception at UMass Dartmouth, Dr. Samar’s dedication to women’s rights makes an impression.

with death by the mullahs, she responded: “I will be killed eventually. Of that I am sure. My struggle is to make a difference and help people before I am killed.”

Dr. Samar becomes Afghanistan’s most recognized woman Fortunately for Samar, the Taliban were destroyed before the fanatical mullahs could carry out their threats to kill her and disrupt what had become a growing network of women supporting schools and clinics. Samar soon caught the attention of more benign power brokers in Afghanistan, the Westerners who arrived. Her life has changed remarkably, and her courage has brought her a variety of honors— from the Profile in Courage award from the Kennedy Library Foundation, to the recognition by Ms. magazine as its 2003 Woman of the Year. Most importantly, she was selected by the new, pro-American government of President Hamid Karzai as Afghanistan’s Minister of Women’s Affairs. Recently Samar was named to the prestigious post of Chair of Afghanistan’s UN-sponsored Independent Human Rights Commission. With her newfound power, Samar has been able to increase her network of schools to accommodate 35,000 girls. She has opened clinics across the land for those lacking access to health care. And she is confronting oppression, discrimination, and repression wherever she finds it, boldly calling for public trials of those Taliban and warlords who committed war crimes. Prior to her main speech at UMass

Dartmouth, Samar was introduced at a reception by Chancellor Jean MacCormack as “one of the world’s most powerful voices for human rights.” I asked Samar her feelings about the continuing threats of Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar to her unfinished work in Afghanistan. Characteristically, she responded defiantly. “What I can tell them is that they have to accept reality. They have to accept the reality that women are human beings.” Sociology Prof. Robin Robinson (who knows Samar and arranged for her visit) inquired about educational opportunities for Afghan women. Samar sadly recounted, “In some areas, the girls walk for two hours (to school) and most of them do not have proper shoes. They do not have good food. The lucky ones have a piece of bread and the unlucky ones don’t even have that much. “I saw a student whose father was drawing a line on a page of her notebook. He said she could use half of the page today and half of it tomorrow because he cannot afford to buy enough paper. There is not enough food or paper so you can imagine the situation of education.” When I told her that many aid workers I met in Afghanistan complained that the Western world was not fulfilling its obligations to rebuild her land as President Bush promised, she spoke eloquently of the continuing struggle to bring even the basics (such as school paper) to the longsuffering country. During her presentation to the UMD

audience, Samar delivered her most powerful descriptions of her struggles in Afghanistan. Answering a student’s question, Samar described her confrontation with major warlord Ismail Khan. She accused this former mujahideen freedom fighter/opium baron of burning her offices and openly criticized him for his heartless activities. These stories demonstrate Samar has lost none of her zeal for challenging those who inflict injustice. In exchange, she appreciates the opportunity presented by visits such as the one to UMass Dartmouth—the chance to be a bridge between her homeland and other countries. Leaving the campus that night, I looked back upon this woman who was so far from home. I hoped that the genuine curiosity about Samar’s struggle proved as gratifying for her as her stories of distant Afghanistan were for us. I also worry about this brave, yet fragile woman who remains a target of Taliban wrath. I pray God will protect her from the fate of so many others, killed while trying to make a difference. I hope for her a long life —from which countless others in her war-torn country can only benefit. Dr. Brian Glyn Williams, history professor, wrote of his summer, 2003 trip to Afghanistan in the winter, 2003 Alumni Magazine Photos of Afghanistan courtesy of Luke Powell from his web site: http://www.lukepowell.com/

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David Schweidenback Recycles Cycles for the World By Robert Lovinger

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s a UMass Dartmouth student, David Schweidenback envisioned a career in importexport. You could say he’s halfway there. The 1976 graduate is the founder of Pedals for Progress, which sends used bicycles to developing nations. Since 1991, P4P has shipped more than 86,000 bikes – plus spare parts and other supplies for repair and maintenance – to 28 countries. P4P rescues perfectly fine bicycles from their confinement in the dark corners of garages and basements and gives them new life. Not just new life, but a more fulfilling existence than they ever could have dreamed – providing people with vital transportation to school and work, to markets and to customers. Schweidenback is an evangelist. “Within 50 miles of most Americans, there are 100,000 bikes available,” he says, adding that as many as 17 million adult bikes will be abandoned this year. At one time, there was a US market for used bikes. No more. “Now, they’re just excess material wealth.” With a life expectancy of 50 years, a discarded bicycle also represents untapped economic potential, he adds. In Barbados, “We have put over three percent of the country on bicycles. That changes a country. We are creating tremendous social change.” Schweidenback, 52, is a Dartmouth native who

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Save the date... and that unused bike. On October 1—the start of Homecoming Weekend— the Alumni Association will join Pedals for Progress to collect bikes from alums and friends and ship them overseas. You’ll also have the opportunity to meet David Schweidenback ‘76, Pedals for Progress founder. You’ll receive details during the summer, and there will be updates on www. umassd.edu/alumni/

grew up playing in the woods that would become the university’s athletic fields. Today, he lives in High Bridge, NJ, with his wife, Geraldine Taiani, a math professor at Pace University in New York City. Their son and daughter are both in college. Schweidenback has long harbored a desire to live in the larger world. He majored in German in part because of the value he thought it would have internationally. He loved to travel and was instrumental in launching the university’s International Study initiative. Once, he represented the university at the Student United Nations in New York. After graduation, he looked for a job in import-export, but the market was tight. Instead, he taught for a year at the Dartmouth Middle School. Eventually, the siren call was too great. “I needed to do something, to get some international experience.” In September 1977, he joined the Peace Corps. It was during the two and a half years he spent as a volunteer in Ecuador that he realized the role bicycles could play in developing economies where wheeled transportation is scarce. In the rural town where he worked, “everybody walked. But there was one guy, a carpenter, with a bicycle. It amazed me how affluent this guy was, relative to other Ecuadorans. I didn’t understand it ‘til one day another carpenter told me, ‘Without a bike, he can work two miles from his home. With a bike, he can go 10 miles away.’”


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Schweidenback returned to Massachusetts in 1980, but didn’t stay long. “We had 20 percent unemployment in New Bedford. It was like a high school reunion at the unemployment office.” He taught in New York for a while, met his wife, and moved to rural New Jersey. There, he started a small construction company. In 1991, business slowed down. “I thought: I’m not doing anything. I might as well do something worthwhile.” That’s when he remembered the Ecuadorian carpenter. He decided to collect a dozen bikes and ship them to the town where he’d served as a volunteer. A story in his local newspaper drew 140 bikes, but the Ecuadorian government refused the shipment without a heavy import fee, money Schweidenback didn’t have. (Ecuador is one of several countries that have thrown obstacles in P4P’s path.) So he sent the bikes to Nicaragua with a group doing aid work there. He continued shipping bikes to Nicaragua exclusively for four years. Pedals for Progress remained a hobby for Schweidenback until 1994, when he felt it tugging him from his construction business. It was fun. It had meaning. Soon, he left construction behind and became a full-time employee of P4P. He paid himself $5,000. Today, he earns $50,000 and usually makes one trip a year overseas. The organization has six employees and an army of volunteers. Among the nations that have received P4P bicycles are Colombia, Eritrea, Ghana, Fiji, and Guatemala. More than 20,000 have gone to Nicaragua alone. More than 500 groups have held P4P bike collections in this country, some more than once. “Groups love doing them,” Schweidenback says. “It’s one day, three hours, and it helps a lot of people.” P4P provides guidance, posters and press releases to send to local media. In return, the community groups – Rotary Clubs, Eagle Scouts, churches, high school community service groups – not only collect the bikes, but also pay $10 to P4P for every bike they deliver. P4P uses the money to defray shipping and administrative costs. In their new countries, P4P bicycles may assume a variety of roles besides personal transportation: trash haulers, taxis, farm machinery, even transport for “mobile bike medics” delivering health care to villages otherwise inaccessible. Inadvertently, P4P is empowering women, Schweidenback insists. Because women usually take better care of their bicycles than men, most bikes shipped are women’s and end up going to women. Program partners in receiving countries are usually charities. They train and hire local people to maintain and repair bikes, which are then sold. Some of the money goes to pay P4P expenses. Some of it funds health centers or potable water lines. Bikes are never given away. “This is an economic development program,” Schweidenback says. “People don’t take care of things they’re given for free.” Someone who can’t afford a bike can sometimes earn one by working for the shop. The economic ripple effects are huge, Schweidenback says. In 1998, Bicycling Magazine called P4P “the most effective organization of its kind.” In 1999, the New Jersey State Senate commended Schweidenback’s “tireless efforts in behalf of

Donated bikes that Schweidenback ships from New Jersey become delivery vehicles and family transportation in Third World countries.

world humanity.” In 2000, he was named a Rolex Awards for Enterprise laureate. Pedals for Progress aims to increase the use of environmentally sound transportation by improving trade regulations. In this country, P4P is lowering the number of bikes buried in landfills. In Schweidenback’s view, the world will sink into anarchy unless well-off societies help lift poorer nations so that their citizens come to believe “that their children can do better than they did.” Schweidenback loves to sail and garden. He also still enjoys carpentry. But his biggest satisfaction comes from his work with P4P. The best part “is closing the door when the container is loaded and we put the seal on it, and we know that it won’t be opened ‘til it gets to the other end.” This is now his life’s work. “Because of my efforts, I have made a fundamental change in the life circumstances of 86,000 families. It’s a little drop in the bucket. But it’s my drop.” Pedals for Progress is raising money to build a warehouse to store bikes year-round. Currently, collections occur only in spring and fall. Donations can be made at the group’s website, www.P4P. org, or by mail to P4P, PO Box 312, High Bridge, NJ 08829. Robert Lovinger is senior writer in Lifespan’s Marketing & Communications Department

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By Diane Hartnett

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Course examines the politics of human rights violations n

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What drives “ordinary” people to torture their fellow man in the name of truth and justice? Is there any defense for a national, formal policy that condones abuse and cruelty? What conditions promote human rights violations—and what condi- tions bring an end to them?

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hese are the types of ques tions that UMass Dartmouth students are exploring in Dr. Robert Darst’s seminar on human rights and world politics. In a course that could not be more timely or relevant, the approximately 13 students examine cases of human rights violations and genocide internationally, as well as campaigns to halt such abuses. Darst takes a decidedly interdisciplinary approach in the class, so that students are exploring the subject from political, legal, ethical, and psychological perspectives. That means they are acquiring not only knowledge about violations, but also insights about the motives and justifications—individual as well as national—that foster crimes against humanity. As the course continues, students “certainly see more grays in terms of good or bad people,” suggests Prof. Darst. “I think that they come to see that the main bulwark against human rights abuses internationally is some kind of liberal democracy…which is pretty much in line with scholarly findings.” The course is a rigorous one. Students have a lengthy, demanding reading list, including texts such as The Roots of Evil, by Ervin Staub, and Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning A Problem from UMass

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Political Science Professor Robert Darst

Hell: America and the Age of Genocide. They write three papers: one that examines the conditions that lead decision makers to choose abuse as a policy tool; a second, on actions by other parties that either facilitate or discourage abuses; and third, the degree to which human rights advocates succeed in ending abuses. And they are expected to participate in class discussions. Dr. Darst used courses he taught previously on human rights violations and war as the foundation for his current class. While the course once focused on institutions, such as the United Nations, “what students were most interested in were specific cases and why did they happen. They wanted to know, ‘why did people do these things?’” a topic on which numerous books have been written. In class, discussions become “pretty lively,” as student and professor consider not only specific instances of abuse, but also scholarly research on cruelty and torture. For example, students learn that levels of interest or indifference to terrorist kindappings vary according to the

proximity of the episodes; the closer a terrorist situation is, the greater the sense of moral obligation people feel for beleaguered fellow citizens. During one recent class session, the topic was ‘why?’ Darst prods the students to consider the conditions that tend to foster human rights abuses. “Why do they occur in some places, at certain levels, but not in others, or at different levels?” “Economic conditions,” replies one student, recalling The Roots of Evil reading. Author Staub, another student adds, wrote of the “continuum” of causes— a faltering economy, on top of racism, on top of an out-of-control military faction. All are valid, responds Darst, as he reminds the class that virtually all instances of abuse have occurred within situations or armed conflict. His remarks lead to a discussion of war’s dehumanizing effect, what Darst calls the “psychological numbing” in which soldiers view their opponents as other than human. Students also discuss the impact of significant, rapid political change in a society. Such upheaval can lead to paranoia, with people feeling their way of life has been jeopardized, says one student. The situation sets up an “us against them” mentality, and resultant abuse from one group upon another. “Isn’t a prime motivation self-preservation?” asks one woman. Through the course, students are confronting issues, dilemmas, and realities that defy easy, glib answers. “They have to think about the implications of having an actual policy on torture. They definitely have a less cavalier attitude,” says Darst. “The main thing they learn is how easy it is to choose human rights abuses (as a way) to solve vexing problems, and how easy it is to recruit people.”


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Charlton embarking on initiatives to bolster collegecommunity links

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oughly one year into her post as dean of the Charlton College of Business, Dr. Eileen Peacock is making community outreach one of her top priorities. Raising Charlton’s visibility benefits both the faculty and the community, says the dean. Stronger, more numerous links will bolster the area’s economic wellbeing; in turn, UMD and Charlton professors acquire timely information about, and contacts within, the business world. The outreach initatives include: hosting an area Chambers of Commerce after-hours reception; developing “C-BeST,” to enable businesses and organizations to draw on faculty expertise; and forming an advisory board of executives to act as ambassadors and resources for the College. The after-hours meeting at Charlton was the regular monthly gathering for the Greater Fall River and Greater New Bedford Chambers of Commerce. Local business representatives toured the new Charlton building while meeting Dr. Peacock and professors. The event, Charlton co-sponsored with Dartmouth Building Supply and Ralph’s Auto, drew hundreds of persons— evidence, says Dr. Peacock, of the business community’s interest in the university. She has been meeting with faculty participants in C-BeST, which translates, loosely, to “Charlton Business Support Team.” The “e”, Peacock explains, denotes the College’s excellence and the university’s engagement in the community. Through C-BeST, businesses or organizations—established or emerging—can contact the College on issues ranging from information technology to development of a business plan. The College will connect the persons inquiring with the appropriate professor. As an example, Dr. Peacock notes that Prof. Michael Griffin is developing financial planning software for farmers. Peacock is working out details about the scope of faculty assistance, contracts,

Charlton College of Business hosted a “Business After Hours” event on January 27.

charges for clients, etc. Professors are motivated primarily, Peacock believes, “by their interest in creating opportunity and creating partnerships. This is a ‘what can we do for you?’ proposal.” Contacts in the community enable faculty to bring professionals into the classroom, for example, or can lead to student internships. Peacock sees a natural collaboration between C-BeST and the ventures utilizing the expertise and facilities of the Advanced Technology & Manufacturing Center. With the ATMC focus on startup ventures, it makes sense that fledgling high-tech companies could use business faculty assistance. To that end, C-BeST has space in the center’s Fall River facility, and within the Charlton building. A graduate student is currently handling inquiries. Interested persons can call 508.910.9836, or email cbest@umassd. edu for more information. Peacock has also established a nine- person advisory board which could grow to approximately 20, with regular meetings and a more formal structure. Members include Elizabeth IsherwoodMoore ’80 MBA, president of Moore & Isherwood, of New Bedford, and Rep. Michael Rodrigues ‘83, who represents Westport and parts of Fall River on Beacon Hill. Also on the board is James Mathes, Greater New Bedford Chamber of Commerce president. “Basically, they are ambassadors for the school, who can serve for outreach and networking, and as resources for both faculty and students.”

“Global vision” attracted music department chairman to UMass Dartmouth

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arl Berger had been concentrating on his composing when he noticed the ad for the music department chairman’s post at UMass Dartmouth. “It asked for someone with a ‘global vision’ of music, and I said ‘That sounds like me.’” Berger —whose impressive resume includes teaching stints in Germany—had no plans to return to academe. “But this intrigued me, and then I struck a chord” with CVPA Dean John Laughton. Most appealing was the College’s stated intention to make the music program more national, even international, in scope and outreach. “With that goal in mind,” Berger came on board last fall with the aim of expanding and strengthening the department’s offerings. The breadth of Berger’s career underscores his vision of music as global. He has performed, composed, and taught in, among other places, France, the US, Brazil, Nigeria, and his native Germany. A six-time winner of the Downbeat Critics Poll as a jazz soloist, he has collaborated with the likes of Dave Brubeck and Gunther Schuller. And he was a founder of the acclaimed Creative Music Foundation and its educational arm, Creative Music Studio, in Woodstock, NY. During the 1970s, Berger joined a group of American musicians in Paris, and came with them when they returned to the

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Berger, who has been playing piano since age 6, says he did not choose music as a career so much as “it chose me.” The recent cutbacks on music programs dismay him. “It should be one of the major things taught in school….It encompasses so much—timing, tuning, the senses, harmony. People can interact through music. It fills a human need.”

Karl Berger played at the UMass Dartmouth Labor Day concert and fireworks display.

U.S. to produce recordings. “Ever since, I’ve been commuting back and forth.” The Creative Music ventures, which existed from the early ’70s to the mid80s, focused on emerging music from throughout the world, and cross-cultural developments in composition/improvisation. Berger notes the UMD’s music program is singular in including world music, jazz, and western classical music under one umbrella. That “nurtures a global understanding and vision of music reminiscent of the CMS approach.” The study of world music, he says, encompasses both study of different music traditions and exploration of “crossover” forms that incorporate styles from throughout the globe. Berger wishes young people would learn more about the diversity within music, and that “there are many more forms of music than what they’re hearing on the radio.” To that end, 10 musicians each semester have come to campus. “The students love it. They’ve been very receptive.” Berger would like to increase the current enrollment of 80 majors to roughly 100, and add two professors to the faculty of four full-timers. More students would come, he says, with the expanded facilities and studios he is committed to providing. Recognizing most music majors’ interests, the music and education departments have collaborated to launch a master of arts in teaching music option. This also reflects Berger’s belief that the music program establish itself in specific, nonconservatory areas such as teaching; preparing people for multi-faceted performer/ composer careers could be another.

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Engineering’s co-op program continues with success, some changes

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or Matthew Gallant ’04, senior year at UMass Dartmouth was free of the anxiety that nags at most students —the “am I going to get a job?” concern. Gallant, a civil engineering major, had been a co-op student at the highly regarded Camp Dresser & McKee in Providence. During his co-op stints, he progressed from doing basic tasks such as data research, to designing parts of projects. And a year before he received his degree, the company offered Gallant a full-time position upon graduation. “It was such a relief not to have to worry about a job,” says Gallant, who’s still at CDM working on projects involving drainage and water distribution. The co-op program, which enables engineering majors to combine academic studies with paid work in companies and agencies, “not only provided practical experience, it also made classroom learning much easier. Lecture material would often cover concepts I had been exposed to at work,” says Gallant. “Co-op is a great way to get your career started.” The program, now eight years old, is one of the Engineering College’s most successful initiatives to provide a contemporary, relevant education. The co-op schedule has been revamped slightly, and organizers are hoping to attract additional participating employers— perhaps some UMD alums themselves. Under co-op, students now spend the summer before and after their junior year, and then two consecutive semesters, working for a firm or agency. The schedule means students spend the usual

senior year doing co-op, then return to the university for a fifth year. As co-op students, engineering majors are applying the theory learned in the classroom to actual situations and projects. As their co-op time progresses, they receive increasingly challenging tasks and greater responsibility. Co-op provides a host of benefits: an invaluable, real world dimension to students’ education, money that defrays college costs, an impressive addition to a student’s resume, and the chance to turn the co-op job into an actual position upon graduation. A number of well-respected companies participate in UMD’s program, including Bose Corp., LockheedMartin, Pratt & Whitney, and Fidelity. According to Yolanda Baird, former co-op program specialist, “once a company has one of our students, that opens the door. They always come back,” impressed by the knowledge and work ethic of the UMD students. The UMass Dartmouth program is selective and voluntary; students choose to join co-op and must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 to qualify. While the College helps them in a number of ways—advising on resume preparation or prospective employers, for example— the students do the bulk of the work involved in landing a placement. In most instances, they’re competing for jobs with students from other schools with co-op programs. Both Baird and Associate Engineering Dean John Finnie have found that students interested in co-op are generally those with solid marks, ranked in the top two-thirds of their class. Many are initially drawn to the program for financial reasons; co-op salaries can help with the college bills that they’re bearing on their own. Before actually starting work, engineering majors attend mandatory preparatory sessions aimed at bolstering their performance and employer satisfaction. Those sessions cover everything from proper appearance—no piercings or midriff-baring tops—to ethics and professional behavior. “We tell them about keeping information they might


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The engineering co-op program is interested in adding to its list of participating employers.

hear confidential, and we discuss ethical behavior,” says Baird. The prep meetings are a key component of a program that has been developed carefully and precisely. “Employers know they are getting students who have at least a year and usually more of engineering education, students who have been briefed about ethics and corporate culture,” says Dr. Finnie. Most students receive from $10 to $15 an hour and above for their co-op job, although that figure has climbed higher in some instances. Following each work session, the student completes a report and the employer submits a student evaluation. The reports serve to measure the quality of the work assignments, and the level of satisfaction of both student and employer. The students are ready for projects that have substance and relevance. And because most students generally stay with the same employer throughout their co-op stint, “it’s hoped that there will be a progression of assignments toward those that would be given to an entrylevel engineer,” says Baird. That happened for Christopher Armstrong ’04, who received increasingly complex, interesting jobs during his co-op with Pratt & Whitney. He has a full-time position there now, working on the Joint Strike Fighter F135 engine development program he first encountered as a student. For Armstrong, co-op provided the opportunity “to put my education to work firsthand in designing solutions for safety-critical software.” Despite some perceptions, participating co-op employers need not be large companies. “We would definitely wel-

come smaller companies,” says Finnie. For further information on participating in co-op, please call 508.999.8387, or visit the program website at www. umassd.edu/engineering/co-op/

New dean excited about Nursing College’s challenges and future “

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e’re always asking the question: who will teach the next generation of nurses?” That comment comes from Dr. James Fain, new dean of the College of Nursing, who hopes to develop programs and initiatives to address that concern. Fain, most recently associate dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at UMass Medical, takes over from Interim Dean Nancy Dluhy, who replaced Dr. Elisabeth Pennington when she retired in 2004. Fain brings to the position experience as a nurse, a nursing educator, and an administrator. He began his career as a staff nurse after graduating from the St. Joseph’s Hospital School of Nursing in Providence. Fain subsequently earned his B.S. in nursing from URI, a master’s from the University of Alabama, and his doctorate from the University of Connecticut School of Education. Nursing appealed to Fain because it’s “a helping profession,” and “I wanted to work with people (not) sit behind a desk and push papers. I liked the idea of talking with people and helping.” Enrolling in a diploma school such as St. Joseph’s helped him determine nursing was the right career. “It was indeed rare” for males to

enter nursing in the ’70s. When Fain graduated from St. Joseph’s, only 11 other men had done the same thing. “I had a phenomenal experience. We had a class of 28 students and they really embraced me. I lived in a separate dorm with other males who were studying for other health careers and it was a very supportive environment.” (At UMD, he is the first male named as nursing dean; through the years, only a handful of men have been faculty members.) Early in his career, Fain “had the sense that teaching might be down the road.” Prior to his stint at UMass Medical—where he also directed the Ph.D. program—Fain was associate dean at Yale University’s School of Nursing. Fain is also editor-in-chief of The Diabetes Educator, and has published extensively on diabetes issues. Speaking of his new UMD position, Fain says that “All of the faculty are master teachers, great in the classroom. I’m excited about the fact that the

Dr. James Fain, new dean of the College of Nursing, hopes to create a doctoral program

College is ready to move into more of the research arena.” He hopes to make a doctoral program a reality within the College, given the dire shortage of doctorally-prepared nurses. “The need far outweighs the supply. The nursing shortage is directly fueled by the faculty shortage.” Interest in nursing careers has risen dramatically, and admission to nursing programs—including UMass Dartmouth’s —has become very competitive. While the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reports a steep rise in enrollment nationwide, it also notes that more than 32,000 qualified students, including nearly 3,000 grad students, were turned away because A l u m n i

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of a lack of qualified faculty. The problem, says Fain, is exacerbated by the fact that nursing faculty are now retiring in large numbers. And salaries for nursing professors still lag behind those of advanced nursing practitioners. “All of this is hurting us.” Fain foresees greater collaboration between the Dartmouth and Worcester UMass campuses to provide jointly-sponsored nursing programs (much as Lowell and Boston, and Worcester and Amherst currently do). “I want to pull people in with different programs, to entice them back to school” to consider career opportunities that extend beyond hospital nursing. “I think that southeastern Massachusetts is a really good area. . .in terms of having people look at different options.”

SMAST embarking on significant fisheries, oceanographic research

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ith support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the School for Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) has begun ambitious research programs in critical areas of fisheries science and oceanography. With the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Institute and the UMass Intercampus Graduate School of Marine Sciences and Technology, SMAST is focusing on scallops, groundfish, lobster, and oceanographic modeling of Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine. For the past two years, SMAST scientists and collaborators from the commercial scallop fleet have used video instrumentation of their own innovative design to survey sea scallop abundance on the continental shelf covering virtually the entire U.S. Atlantic resource. These surveys, continuing under the new federal funding, also establish a baseline to calculate the fishing power of various types of scallop gear, as well as the effects of fishing gear on habitat and on benthic fauna. Scallop tagging studies will be extended to improve estimates of growth, migration, and mortality

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rates. Finally, laboratory investigations of scallop biologyusing specimens the commercial fleet contributeswill serve to enhance stock assessment estimates. In the groundfish arena, an innovative Fishery Management Decision Support System is well along in development. Operations research theory is being incorporated into the system to enable formulation of decision rules that take multiple species interactions into account. Programs are being prepared to analyze the complex interactions of multiple variables and produce an optimum harvesting strategy for a given fishery or suite of fisheries. Key input for the decision support system will come from an acousto-optic fish assessment array being designed to enumerate size and species-specific fish abundance on Georges Bank. The acoustic array will provide the detection range, with optical elements giving the resolution needed for positive size and species identification. In a planned joint experiment, Lockheed Martin/Sippican will provide an autonomous underwater vehicle as a mobile observer to multiply the optical range of the stationary array. Fishing-gear engineering studies are addressing the problem of unwanted bycatch. Unintentional capture of nontargeted species complicates management: regulators cannot control fishing mortality in a particular depleted fishery without also restricting operations for other, even abundant, species. With the

cooperation of net makers and the fishing industry, gear scientists are modifying trawls for the selective capture of haddock and cod, two species known to co-mingle. Guided by studies of differential behavior between the two species, the researchers seek to improve trawl selectivity without employing the large, clumsy panels or grids that are difficult to implement in a practical, working fishery. The lobster fishery is the focus of a three-part research effort. Lobster stock assessment is traditionally done with “ventless traps,” similar to commercial traps minus the vent that allows undersized lobsters to escape. Careful sampling with ventless traps gives reasonable relative population estimates, but any estimate of absolute abundance based on such sampling is confounded by a major unknown, namely, the percentage of available lobsters ending up in the traps. SMAST researchers are responding by “calibrating” ventless traps using scuba observation, as well as studying lobster movements to better identify stock structure. The lobster disease problem will also be investigated, and studies of Buzzards Bay water will explore water chemistry’s role in declines in lobster abundance. Recent funding has also made possible the acquisition of a new supercomputer to bolster SMAST’s Georges Bank/ Gulf of Maine oceanographic modeling research. The new machine will boost computing power by a factor of ten, making feasible an ambitious modeling scheme to support understanding and making predictions about the region’s fisheries. SMAST modelers are numerically simulating the region in great detail, including the rivers that feed the Gulf. When linked on the supercomputer to their latest-generation meteorological model, and receiving forcing information from models of the northwest Atlantic basin at collaborating universities, FVCOM is expected to simulate the dynamics of the Georges Bank/Gulf of Maine region that underlie fisheries reproduction and recruitment with unprecedented speed and precision. —From Frank Smith, SMAST


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The deal seemed so simple in the beginning UMass Dartmouth to strengthen advocacy efforts in wake of law school plan rejection

By John Hoey

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outhern New England School of Law, 10 minutes from UMass Dartmouth, would donate $15 million in assets to the university, and the university would begin offering law degrees. Given that Southern New England had already been licensed to offer the degrees by the Board of Higher Education and was accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, university officials were confident of success. But the Board of Higher Education in March rejected the plan based on opposition by the Suffolk University School of Law, the New England School of Law, and the Western New England College School of Law. The 8-3 vote overruled plan supporters, which included the UMass Board of Trustees, all 29 presidents and chancellors of public higher education campuses, two past presidents of the Massachusetts Bar Association, and dozens of business leaders. Area legislators, mayors, and business leaders charged the vote was the latest snub of a region too often under-appreciated by Boston powers, and viewed the rejection as a triumph of private interest over the public good. In an opinion piece published in The Standard-Times of New Bedford two days prior to a March 24 Board of Higher Education hearing, UMass Dartmouth Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack wrote of the irony that Suffolk University School of Law, begun in 1906 in the living room of a Roxbury home to create educational opportunity for the working class, was seeking to suppress the aspirations of working and middle-class students from southeastern Massachusetts. “What a difference a century makes,’’ Chancellor MacCormack wrote. “There is always danger in forgetting where you come from, forgetting what it was like to be hungry.’’

Others were outraged when New England School of Law Dean John O’Brien told the higher ed board that a law school in southeastern Massachusetts could never be successful because the New Bedford area is “to some applicants a less desirable location than Boston or other metropolitan locations.’’ MacComack and others argued that the region, due to its relatively low cost of living compared to Boston, was ideal for a law school that wants to be financially accessible to students. As the disappointment of the vote sunk in, the inevitable question of “what now’’ emerged. Chancellor MacCormack made it clear that UMass Dartmouth and Southern New England will continue to build a strong public-private intellectual partnership. “One of the positive outcomes of this process is a full appreciation of the talent and community service ethic present in the faculty, staff and students of Southern New England. Their mission parallels ours, and we see many opportunities to work together in ways that benefit our students and our community.’’

Become an Ambassador One lesson learned is that UMass Dartmouth needs to develop a stronger advocacy effort to assure that the campus message of opportunity and excellence is heard loudly and clearly by state policymakers. Advocacy efforts such as the Ambassadors Program are more important than ever following the Board of Higher Education’s action on the law school, and because the legislature has recently renewed the public debate about the future of public higher education in the Commonwealth. A Senate task force, which included Sen. Mark Montigny, D-New Bedford, and Sen. Joan Menard, D-Fall River, unveiled a report calling for new investment in UMass, state colleges, and community colleges, along with changes in the way public higher education is gov-

The Ambassadors Program­— building a stronger UMass Dartmouth: The Ambassadors Program is a volunteer organization of alumni, parents, faculty, staff, students, and friends of UMass Dartmouth dedicated to: n

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introducing the campus to the business and civic communities;

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ensuring strong support for the campus from policy-makers and thought leaders.

erned. The report will likely lead to an energetic legislative debate, and ambassadors can play an important role in assuring that UMass Dartmouth’s voice is heard. “Our alumni, the people who truly understand the transformative power of higher education, need to be fully engaged in the public dialogue about the future of the university and our campus,’’ said Alumni Association President Michael Rodrigues, a 1983 alumnus, state representative from Westport, and chair of the Committee on Labor and Workforce Development. “The law school vote should be a clear message to all alumni that it is time to speak up.’’ To learn more about how you can become a UMass Dartmouth ambassador, please visit www.umassd.edu/ alumni/ ambassador; email Alumni Association director Don Berube at dberube@umassd. edu; or call 508.999.8741. John Hoey is assistant to Chancellor MacCormack

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What’s a coach to do? By Jim Mullins

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hat is an ice hockey coach supposed to do when midway through an already successful season he loses his best player to a knee injury? Making matters worse, that player happened to be off to the best season in his career, so good in fact that he was leading NCAA Division III in scoring? That’s the situation UMass Dartmouth ice hockey coach John Rolli faced in mid-January when senior forward and assistant captain Scott Trahan was knocked out of the lineup during an 8-1 win over Western New England College. At the time of his injury, Trahan — a player Rolli described as “the heart and soul of this team”— was among the nation’s leading scorers in several categories. Despite an impressive 9-4 overall record at the time, the UMass Dartmouth season was in doubt after the injury to its leader. With Trahan averaging a goal a game through the early weeks of the season, the Corsairs had raced out to five straight wins before a couple of losses in December left UMD at 7-4 heading into the holiday break.

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Two games after returning to the ice in January, Trahan went down and no one at the time could have predicted what was in store for the Corsairs. The answer as to how to replace the nation’s leading scorer turned out to be an easy one for Rolli and the Corsair coaching staff. They didn’t have to look any further than Trahan’s roommate and teammate Eric Frank. Over the next 13 games, Frank exploded offensively, carrying the Corsairs to a 15game winning streak, a secEric Frank ond place finish in the ECAC Northeast, and a berth in the conference championship game. Although the Corsairs fell short to eventual conference champion Curry College in the finals, Frank’s performance, along with great


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late season play from goalie Kevin McGowan, turned the 200405 season into one of the most successful in recent memory. Trahan ended up returning to the starting lineup after missing just a handful of games. In his former place atop the NCAA scoring race, however, was Frank, a junior forward out of Waltham. By season’s end Frank had established himself as the top scorer in NCAA Division III, averaging 2.27 points per game while finishing third in the nation in goals (24) and second in assists (35) for 59 points. Frank was named the ECAC NE Player of the Year, and was joined on the conference all-star team by Trahan and McGowan. Frank has also been chosen for the American Hockey Coaches Association Division III Second All-America team. “Eric Frank had a phenomenal year for us,” said Rolli, who completed his 21st season at UMass Dartmouth. “When Scott went down with the knee injury, Frank just stepped up his game along with the whole team. For those who were watching him, you couldn’t help but notice that he’s blessed with the kind of offensive skills that few players have. This was clearly a break-out season for him.” With some rehabilitation help from Corsair trainers Kevin Pickering and Wendy Kirby, Trahan returned to the lineup to finish fourth in the NCAA Division III scoring race, averaging 1.73 points per game with 19 goals and 19 assists for 38 points. Frank captured the ECAC NE scoring title and Trahan was fifth overall. Trahan has signed a six-game pro hockey contract with the Memphis (TN) Riverkinds of the Central Hockey League. “Trahan is a real blood and guts type of guy. His first two years after transferring from Bentley were productive seasons but not the production we thought he could deliver,” said Rolli, who shared ECAC NE Co-Coach of the Year honors at season’s end. “This year he started out with shots that used to go wide of the net. Now they were ending up in the back of the net.” If there was a turning point to the season, it came from a key Trahan goal in a February 9 game at Wentworth Institute. Playing the three-time defending ECAC NE champions at Matthews Arena in Boston, the Corsairs found themselves trailing, 3-0, with what was then a seven-game win streak in the balance. “Trahan let go with a bomb from about 40 feet out that beat the Wentworth goalie and that goal just got us going,” said Rolli. “We got four more after that and that was the game. We really turned the corner with that win. We went from clawing and scratching in the standings to being the second best team in the conference.” The Wentworth win was significant because it gave the Corsairs second place (14-1 in ECAC NE, 22-5 overall) in the conference standing which resulted in a pair of home games in the post season playoffs. Playing before two loud, enthusiastic crowds, complete with the ceremonial fish on the ice after Corsair goals, UMD cruised past Salve Regina and Wentworth to reach the ECAC NE title game. Despite the season-ending loss, Rolli saw this season as important because it moved the Corsairs back among the top teams in the ECAC Northeast. For a team that had been to five straight ECAC championship games from 1995 through 1999 (winning three and losing the other two in overtime) UMass Dartmouth

Kevin McGowan, Northeast Goalie of the Year

had drifted down a few notches. The Corsairs streak of postseason play continued this season with their 23rd consecutive appearance, but they had not been back to the championship game in several seasons. “After the championship game we told the players that this was the team that brought us back to the elite status in the ECAC NE again,” Rolli said. “The burden is on us now to continue to be one of the top two or three teams in the league.” Compounding the problem of losing Trahan to graduation will be replacing senior goalie Kevin McGowan. Selected as the ECAC Northeast Goalie of the Year, McGowan capped an outstanding four-year career (55-14-1, 2.82 GAA) with a tremendous final season. He was 21-5 this season with a 2.59 goals against average and a winning percentage of .808, fifth best among all goalies in NCAA Division III. And as solid as he was during the second half of the season, twice earning ECAC NE Goalie of the Week honors, McGowan was even better during the playoffs. “It’s not going to be easy to replace a goalie like Kevin McGowan. He saved us quite often this season,” said Rolli, who picked up his 400th career victory with a 5-1 win over Fitchburg State in December. “The coach’s job right now is to get the right player in goal for next year.” Rolli will be looking for replacements for outgoing seniors Shane Relihan and Brandon Koziara along with Trahan and McGowan, a group of seniors whose teams compiled a four-year mark of 73-26-5. “Somehow we need to replace those people, although we know that the new guys coming in won’t have the kind of production this group had. But we have a very good sophomore class in Kyle McCullough, Peter Lindner, and Jim Foley. All had good years and were effective for us in the playoffs. We need to find the right goalie and replace some of these key players with new ones.” For Rolli, this last season gave the Corsairs the chance to move back up closer to the conference top. With 2005-06 looming, Rolli jokes when asked what he needs to do to match this season’s success. “I need to get Eric Frank a new roommate.” Jim Mullins is administrative assistant for promotion/information for the Athletics Depatment

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Political Connections by Dana Gierdowski

Internships in Washington, DC, give students a special educational opportunity

Ilya Spitkovsky

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hen senior Stephen Davos applied for an internship last fall, he never dreamed that he would be touring the White House, meeting ambassadors, and working on confidential U.S. government projects. “We actually went to the White House briefings in the executive office buildings,” says Davos, during a visit organized especially for the college interns by the Washington Center. Davos is one of 25 UMD students who over the last several years earned academic credits by interning in the nation’s capital through the Washington Center program. The non-profit educational center places students in professional positions at thousands of organizations from government agencies, to non-profit groups, to Fortune 500 firms. The late William Burke, a Massachusetts native and UMass Amherst alumnus, established the organization in 1975.

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“The Washington Center has been serving students for over 30 years, and its reputation for program quality is unsurpassed,” says Robbin Roy, Career Resource Center associate director. “It provides our students with an extensive internship tailored to their interests, a rich program of academic courses, lectures by national and international leaders, workshops, and much more.” Roy assists students with their applications, which involve writing essays, compiling recommendations, and collecting information for security clearances. She says that the center’s jobs for students often surpass average administrative work. “They have been given high-level tasks with a great deal of responsibility.” At the Department of Treasury, Davos, who received security clearance, worked on several major projects, including “the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program which provides insurance to other companies in the event of a [terrorist] attack.” A finance major from Tewksbury, Davos was also part of a team of interns assembling information for the Office of Financial Management Briefing Book. This manual brought President Bush’s new political appointees up to speed on Treasury policies and procedures. “The experience I

got in the workplace was invaluable.” Roy says the Washington Center offers internships to a wide variety of majors and interests. “We have had students majoring in history, psychology, biochemistry, sociology, economics, political science, criminal justice, and finance participate.” The Center prides itself on placing students in internships matching their interests and goals. Junior Rachel Volinsky, a sociology major, is interning this semester at the non-profit Feminist Majority Foundation, where she is exploring her interest in women’s issues and helping coordinate the National Collegiate Global Women’s and Human Rights Conference. “I research college departments and student organizations that may be interested in going and contact [them].” Says the Stoughton resident, “Working at the Feminist Majority Foundation has made me view the government differently because I can see how this organization can influence policy.” Ilya Spitkovsky has put his native Russian language to use in the Department of Commerce this semester. Spitkovsky, who came to the U.S. in 1990, works in “Business Information Services for the Newly Independent States.” When


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the Soviet bloc collapsed, these societies became capitalist and needed trade partners. This sub-department is a liaison between them and the U.S. in order to facilitate American exports. “We provide information to U.S. companies regarding those countries and industry in all of the Russian Federation,” says the political science major, who was surprised at the responsibility given interns. “I wasn’t expecting to be trusted with certain things so quickly, to be able to talk to clients and directly email clients.” He has also researched Russian websites for a database for the department’s deputy director. Interning with such programs give students a competitive edge as they search for jobs, says Roy. “Students are provided with many opportunities to network with professionals in their field of interest. They have been encouraged to contact these people after graduation for job leads and questions regarding career opportunities.” Davos, who interned in 2004, says that his supervisor was a mentor to the Treasury interns, who received tours of other agencies, including the Tax & Trade Bureau, the Internal Revenue Service, and the Secret Service. Davos’ supervisor asked his interns to call him after they graduate. “We are a step above everyone else applying for a government job because [we] made so many good contacts,” says Davos. The program also enables participants to meet students from all over the world and to live independently. “It’s an extraordinary opportunity to live and work in DC,” says Prof. Susan Krumholz, faculty sponsor to four program students. She helps students with job placements, and reviews their evaluations and reports. “I think that it broadens their horizons and gives them selfconfidence. In a lot of ways, it’s helped them grow up.” Davos says he realized that his UMD education had prepared him well for the challenge. No matter which college they attended, all students were doing the same jobs in a highly competitive arena. “That says a lot about not only the Charlton College of Business, but also about my work ethic.” n

Student Republicans enjoy the challenge of being in the minority

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ast fall when the more than 50 student organizations at UMass Dartmouth set up recruitment tables in the Campus Center, there was a new club that raised some eyebrows. Alongside the usual fare of Greek life and interest-related groups sat the newlyformed College Republican Club. Manning the table were club chairman Matthew Santos and co-chairman Eric Bowlin. The two political science majors formed the club to bring together students who share more conservative views. “It’s a very liberal campus and so is Massachusetts in general,” says Santos, a junior from New Bedford. “Sometimes students in our position feel shut out or not heard.” According to the Massachusetts Secretary of State, 36 percent of Bay State voters were registered as Democrat in 2004, compared to the 13 percent registered Republicans. The National Conference of State Legislatures reports that the state legislature is 85 percent Democratic, making Massachusetts the most Democratic state in the U.S. With Republicans so clearly outnumbered on campus and across the Commonwealth, Santos wanted to create an organization where GOP students could discuss issues and participate in activities supporting their politics. Santos and Bowlin agree that the club has been generally well-received. “Most people give us props for doing something we believe in though the opposition is stacked against us,” says Bowlin, a Dudley sophomore. “It is relatively rare that people will say anything bad to our faces.” The club leaders are especially appreciative of The Torch, the campus newspaper, which has published several articles written by their members. Santos also feels reassured by the university’s faculty. “I think a lot of the faculty, although they may be liberal, are fair. Our voice is different, but they are not willing to shut out a voice.” Bowlin sees being a Republican in a sea of Democrats as a fun challenge.

“The more Democrat the area, the more our message is really heard. If everyone agreed with us already, then what good would we be doing?” Dr. Peter Friedman, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, is the College Republicans’ faculty sponsor. He has always been interested in having a Republican club on campus, but knew that it couldn’t start with him. Friedman offered to sponsor the group after meeting Santos at a local Republican Committee meeting. He says he was not surprised that there were students interested in joining, and believes the club’s creation would have occurred eventually. “What did surprise me is how much success he’s had at establishing a vibrant club so quickly,” Friedman says of Santos’ efforts. The club has a core group of about 20 and an email distribution list of over 80 since its launch last fall. They have participated in a number of activities on campus and off, including a trip last year to Maine to campaign for Pres. Bush. The group believes that some people have preconceived notions about what they represent and about Republicans in general. “The club’s primary goal is to break the stereotypes about Republicans,” says Bowlin. “A true balance of politics has not been seen in this area for decades, which has caused people to forget what Republicans really stand for. “We are not extremists or fascists. We do not hate the environment or wildlife. We are just like everyone else. We just have a different viewpoint on social and fiscal policies.” Dana Gierdowski is a freelance writer and student in the UMD graduate writing program

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Clas Cla ss Nos t eNs o t e s

’50s

John R. Stratford ‘54, civil engineering, a public agency manager and chief engineer, retired in 1989. He served as a consultant and interim general manager/ chief engineer for local governments in California through 2000, and has now moved to a retirement community in Rosenburg, OR. Bernard Forcier ‘59, civil engineering, of Export, PA, and wife Pat celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in September 2004.

’60s

Wilfred M. Canto ‘60, textile technology, of Assonet is president of Color 2000, a supplier of textile dye and chemicals. Wilfred and his wife, the former Pat Botelho, have five children and fourteen grandchildren. John D. Bowen ‘61, electrical engineering, of Silver Springs is national secretary of the Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge Association, which hosted a 1,000-person reunion in conjunction with the World War II Memorial Dedication in Washington, DC last May. John’s brother fought in the Battle of the Bulge with the 83rd Infantry division. Richard J. England ‘65, chemistry, has started a business, Unicorn Financial Service Inc., in Forestdale, MD. Richard and wife Jackie celebrated the birth of their sixth grandchild, Morgan Elise, born in 2003, to son Doug and wife Heidi. Their eldest grandchild, Ryan, attends the US Naval Academy. Gary W. Drewniak ‘66, chemistry, of Assonet, has retired from teaching school. Paul S. Pastie ‘66, electrical engineering, a senior systems engineer, retired from General Dynamics Defense Systems in Pittsfield after 36 years of continuous service on the U.S. Navy Fleet Ballistic Missile Program.

’70s

Doreen M. Defreitas ‘73, education, is a real estate broker with Suzette & Associates Realty in New Bedford. Earle W. Flynn ‘73, mechanical engineering tech-

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nology, teaches management and operations at the undergraduate and graduate levels at the University of Phoenix, Boston. Earle retired as director of operations and logistics for Waters Corp. of Milford after 25 years. He previously worked at Corning Glass Works, Science Products Division, in Corning, NY. In 2003, Earle published a family history book, From Connaught to Fall River: The Journey & History of an Emigrant Irish Family, tracing the Flynn family history from Counties Roscommon and Mayo, Ireland, to Lancashire, England and Fall River. Earle and wife Denise live in Norton. John J. Gushue ‘73, civil engineering, of East Freetown, has a web site, www.gushuelaw. com, with legal news and references of interest to individuals and business. Joan L. Pepin ‘73, psychology, announces the birth of her first grandchild, Jack Matthew Pepin. Paul Magee ‘74, business administration, is global procurement manager for Digital Rework System, Inc., Brighton. He lives in both East Freetown and Vero Beach, FL. Lucille Rosa ’75, visual design, and her husband Joseph have a daughter, Ann-Marie, who graduated magna cum laude with a degree in accounting and marketing from UMD in 2004. She works at Tofias in Providence, specializing in auditing non-profits. Deirdre H. Bass ‘76, visual design, teaches at Cape Elizabeth Pond Cove School. Her twins are teens with college on the horizon. Paulette M. Chartier ‘77, nursing, is board certified in adult psychiatric and mental health nursing, and has a psychotherapy practice, South Coast Counseling Associates, New Bedford. She lives with her husband and two teen-age sons in Dartmouth. Amy B. Gaines ‘77, visual design, is an antiques dealer in Newport. She has been married for 27 years and has a teenage daughter. Amy also does web design as a second business. Edward Hill, Jr. ‘77, multidisciplinary studies, of Swansea, is the volunteer coordinator

for Southeastern Mass. Legal Assistance Corp. He is a member of the Diman School Committee, Public Library Trustees, and Public Housing Commission. Debra Szretter McCormick ‘77, psychology, of Natick, works in peripheral interventions marketing at Boston Scientific. Her daughter Melanie is a member of the Class of 2008 at UMD. She has three other children, Jenn, Mike, and Erin. Jeffrey P. Poliquin ‘77, mechanical engineering technology, of Westport, has a personal chef service, Jeff’s Express Cuisine. He prepares meals for his clients in their own homes. Jeff is also project manager for Creative Environment Corp. in East Providence. John Barradas ‘79, painting, received a degree in architecture from Cornell University, and lives in Ithaca, NY. Patricia Neary Hale ‘79, psychology, a guidance counselor in the Fulton school systems in Atlanta since 1980, received her master’s degree from Georgia State University. She remembers fondly her days as a SMU cheerleader and congratulates the cheerleading teams for all their national success. Pat and Gary, and their children, Eric and Meghan, live in Acworth. Deborah A. LambertHuber ‘79, nursing, received her degree during the tenure of Sr. Madeleine Vaillot and Prof. Rita O’Neill, and values her degree from SMU. She has worked in community health in rural Maine; at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta; and for the Maryland state health department, the Medicare program, and the Department of Veterans Affairs. She received her MS in Public Health at UMass Amherst, and her PhD in Public Health and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins.

’80s

Sandra J. Hathaway ‘80, business administration, is practicing law in New Bedford and welcomes her seventh grandchild. Karen A. Quintin ‘80, marine biology, is development assistant and field hockey coach at Bishop Stang High school. Karen and

her husband, Raymond, and their children Brian, Michael, and Katie live in Dartmouth. Maurice E. Coates ‘81, psychology, of New York retired after 25 years in the human services field. He has been an adjunct lecturer and field instructor at SUNY Empire State College, MSW program; assistant director of social work at SUNY SB; and most recently associate director of social work at Bellevue Hospital Center, New York City. Karen Fulginiti LeTourneau ‘81, accounting, works as a MCAS tutor at Apponequet Regional High School in Lakeville. Anthony Mercadante ‘81, textile chemistry, of Randolph works as a production supervisor at Novacel, Inc in Newton. Mariline R. Tavares ‘81, English, worked at Pfizer, Inc. for 11 years as Director of Global Regulatory Training. Mariline and her husband, son, and daughter live in Kinnelon, NJ, and enjoy traveling and being involved with her children’s sports activities. She can be reached at mariline. tavares@pfizer.com. Henry A. Champagne ‘83, sociology/ anthropology, is semi-retired. He volunteers on Kiwanis community service projects and teaches part-time at Brevard Community College. Diane L. Gendron ‘83, nursing, and husband, Paul Gendron ‘85, chemistry, live in East Bridgewater. Their son Jason entered UMD in September 2004 as a computer engineering student. Stephen C. Beale ‘84, chemistry, is senior vice president of marketing and sales and chief scientific officer at Analytical BioChemistry Laboratories. He has relocated to Columbia, Missouri, to oversee ABC’s marketing and sales operations worldwide. Robert D. Gemme ‘84, electrical engineering technology, has spent 20 years at Texas Institute, Inc., as an electrical design engineer, and is a member of the group technical staff. John T. Lally ‘84, accounting, has opened his own CPA practice in New Bedford. Carol Anderson ‘85, economics, received her Accredited Asset Management Specialist


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designation from the College of Financial Planning. Carol and husband Alan, and daughters Sarah, Andrea, and Christina live in North Falmouth. Joan M. Roy ‘86, nursing, moved back to her hometown of Dalton with her two daughters, Becca and Emily, and is a school nurse at Craneville Elementary. Sally Ann Ventura ‘86, nursing, is a nurse in the labor and delivery room at Morton Hospital in Taunton. Sally lives in Berkley with husband Bill and daughters Sara and Lauren. Jonathan Langfield ‘86, accounting, of Somerset, has been admitted as a shareholder at Landa & Altsher, P.C. Certified Public Accountants of Randolph. Julia Furtado-Lavio ‘86, art history and English, is district sales manager at Paychex, Inc, where she ranked #29 out of 1,000 sales representatives nationwide. She is a Circle of Excellence Club qualifier and manages the Providence team. Robert Rocha ‘87, biology, is the Community Science Programs Manager at the New Bedford ECHO Partnership, comprising the New Bedford Whaling Museum and New Bedford Oceanarium. Bob and his wife, Kristen Leotti, live in Acushnet with their daughter Emma. Bob would welcome a note from any of his TKE brothers. Vinith Nayak ‘88, computer engineering, is a business software consultant at Nytech, Inc. in Edison NJ. Dean P. Remy ‘88, medical technology, Bellingham, writes: “Hello to all and a special greeting to my former classmates of the medical technology program. I am married to the same sweet girl Amy (Newcomb) ‘90, (electrical engineering, cum laude) whom I met at SMU. We have five beautiful children; Danielle-Christina, Tyler-James, Taylor-Leigh, Nicole-Corine, and Chad-Brendan, a dog, a cat, and a fish. Post-graduation, I traveled as a singer/dancer and then came home to get married and try using my degree…I have finally ended up doing sales and technical consulting in the biotech field working first in genomics and

now in proteomics. Although I work out of my home, I travel extensively as I have never gotten that bug out of my system. I have, as a ministry, worked with teens for the last 12 years and…started a mentoring program for “collegiate-aged” young adults that is going quite well. I most of all would love to hear what you MT’s have been doing since 1988.” Email Dean at JavaJive777@aol. com. Olivia R. Silva-Mello ‘88, English, is the library director of the Joseph H. Plumb Memorial Library in Rochester. She received a MLS at Simmons College in 1991. Jennifer Ann St. Laurent ’88, political science, was married to Jeffrey Douglas Sowa in December, 2003. The couple visited Antigua on their honeymoon and reside in Scituate, R.I. Jennifer earned her juris doctorate at Roger Williams School of Law and practices as an attorney. Kerry A. McKinnon ‘89, visual design, and husband Jack welcomed twins, Ruth Ann and William Padraic, last June. The twins have three older brothers, Jack, Thomas, and Daniel. Paul Dozois ’89, photography/visual design, of Sharon is director of creative services at Advertising Ventures, Providence. Paul works in all aspects of graphic/visual design. He had been co-founder and vice president of i.d. Group Inc., providing creative services to clients in the financial, educational, retail, manufacturing and high technology markets. Adam O’Dwyer ‘89, mechanical engineering, is a business analyst at EMC in Hopkinton and lives in Upton. Nancy L. Robinson ‘89, management, joined Mary Louise Nunes CPA, PC. She has more than 10 years experience in public accounting and the not-for-profit business area. Nancy belongs to the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. She is a member of the Dartmouth Finance and Library Building committees.  

Alumni Profile Jeannette Hixon ‘90, political science, director of Bentley College’s Multicultural Center, won the Donald L. McCullough Award from the National Association for Campus Activities. The McCullough Award, the NACA Northeast region’s highest honor, is given to an individual who has contributed in an outstanding way in the area of student activities. “I was very surprised to win; it’s very humbling,” said Hixon, who has been at Bentley since 2003. “I really believe that what we do complements the academic part of a student’s life. It’s very rewarding; we give to the students, but the students also give to us.” Prior to Bentley, Hixon held student affairs positions at Wentworth Institute of Technology. She holds a master’s degree from Northeastern University, and lives in Stoughton with her fiancé Andrew Buntin and stepson Andrew.

’90s

Paul Languirand ‘90, accounting, joined Tofias PC as a Principal in the Accounting & Auditing Group. Michael Pontes ‘90, accounting, has been admitted as a shareholder of Fernandes and Charest, PC. in Westport. He joined the firm in 1993 and has over 14 years of accounting, tax and consulting experience. Pontes is a member of Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. He and his wife, Carolyn, reside in Dartmouth with their two children. He also is a coach for local soccer and basketball leagues. Joseph Spriano ‘90, business information systems, is the systems administrator at FPL and resides in Loxahatchee, Florida. Marilyn L. Archer ‘91, visual design/illustration, has had multiple surgeries for an injury to her right hand. She works as a fashion model, but is working even harder to regain her full ability. Marilyn is able to paint portraits and murals, after 14 surgeries. She anticipates more surgery, and is looking forward to doing work in her field. Michael Courville ‘91, electrical engineering and technology, married Cherilyn A. Perry in March 2004 at Salve Regina University

A l u m n i

in Newport RI. He serves in the Massachusetts National Guard. James Cusson ‘92, computer and information science, has been an information security analyst at Compass Bank in New Bedford. Charlie Guenard ‘92, history, moved back from Oregon and says it’s nice to be home. Trying to reconnect with old friends, his email is charliesg@ yahoo.com Paul E. Lambalot Jr. ‘92, marketing, married Tracey J. Besner at the Boca Raton Marriott Renaissance in February 2004. He works as a residential and commercial real estate loan consultant. Patricia Spellman ‘92, sociology, of Somerville is the CFO of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services for Massachusetts. Dawn A. Young ‘92, management, was elected bank officer/secondary market manager at Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank. Dawn, her husband, and daughter live in Westport. Zhan Deng ‘93, computer and information science, of Andover, is a software engineer at Converse. Peter Erwin ‘93, history, of Assonet, is vice president and business systems analyst in Portfolio Credit Risk Management at Citizens Bank, which he joined in 2002. Previously, Peter worked as a senior web developer for Tom Snyder Productions of Watertown.

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By Frank Smith It all began when Cedar Key, Florida, resident Frank Cox witnessed a remarkable sight from his fishing boat. A group of dolphins was station-keeping in a tight row as small fish leapt from the water in front of them and the dolphins snatched the fish out of mid-air. Despite appearances, the fish were not committing suicide. A single dolphin swam behind the school, herding it toward the rest of the group in their closely spaced row. Caught between the “driver” dolphin and the “barrier” dolphins, the fish instinctively leapt from the water—many into the mouths of the waiting predators. Intrigued, Cox videotaped the display and sent the tape to Dr. Dan O’Dell, chief biologist at Sea World in Orlando. O’Dell shared the tape with his colleagues, among them Prof. Richard Connor, marine mammal specialist in UMD’s Biology Department. “That tape stayed in the back of mind,” says Connor, until two years later, when a graduate student asked for his guidance in choosing a research topic. Connor asked O’Dell for clearance to further investigate the phenomenon. When classes ended, that graduate student, Stefanie Gazda, was on her way to Florida to spend summer 2001 studying a previously unknown hunting strategy among bottlenose dolphins.

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Various hunting techniques have been observed among dolphins, and driving fish toward a barrier is involved in several of them. In fact, dolphins have proven quite adaptable in terms of what will serve as a barrier. Along the coast of Mauratania, for example, fishing nets suffice. Where local people still employ the traditional fishing method of wading into the surf with hand-held nets, dolphins often oblige by herding schools of fish directly into the nets. This obviously boosts the fishermen’s catch, but the relationship is symbiotic. To avoid the nets, some of the fish turn back — into the jaws of the pursuing dolphins. However, the Cedar Key strategy was the first observed in which the dolphins themselves formed the barrier. Gazda and her colleagues focused on two groups of dolphins observed employing the driver-barrier technique. One day, while still learning to distinguish the individual dolphins within the groups, something dawned on her. “I turned to my assistant,” and said, ‘Am I imagining it, or is it always the same dolphin doing the driving?’” They didn’t dare believe it until they had carefully reviewed the day’s video footage. Then “we were just dancing around on the boat. We were looking at something no one had seen. It was just incredible.” While cooperative hunting strategies are not rare in the animal world, this was only the second time that researchers had observed, in any species, an apparent “division of labor with role specialization.” The preliminary results were sufficiently intriguing to be covered by major print and broadcast media, and Proceedings of the Royal Society of London has published a scientific article— with Gazda as first author. Like most discoveries in science, this one raises a host of questions. Is such specialization common to all bottlenose dolphins, or limited to certain groups or locations? What is the genetic relationship among members of a group? What is their relationship when they’re not feeding; for example, does the “driver” stand out from the group in any other way? Is there vocalization that accompanies the hunt? With her master’s degree received in 2002, Gazda is teaching at the New England Aquarium, but hopes to return to Cedar Key to follow up on some of these questions, again working with Prof. Connor. She is also applying to the Ph.D. program of the UMass Marine Graduate School, with UMass Dartmouth as her home campus. However, if her application is successful, it seems likely that her real residency will be in Cedar Key. As for Frank Cox, who made the original videotape that inspired the research, he didn’t stop there. “He was great,” Gazda says. “I didn’t know the area at all, and he became my point of contact. He and his family were extremely helpful and supportive. His son lent us his boat for the entire summer. His family cooked us dinner all the time. Frank, a computer specialist, helped us with computer identification and such.” Connor is equally effusive. But one indicator stands above all words of appreciation: he is now a published co-author in the annals of the Royal Society of London. Frank Smith is technical writer at the School for Marine Science and Technology

Dolphin photo courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce. Sequence of dolphins hunting courtesy Frank Cox

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He sits on the board of the Friends of Historical Preservation in Freetown and the Freetown Historical Commission. Nancy S. Pires Fernandes ‘93, finance, MBA ‘00, of New Bedford is a commercial loan credit analyst at Citizens Union Savings Bank in Fall River. She oversees financial analysis of new and existing commercial loan relationships. A New Bedford resident, she is a member of the Risk Management Association of New England. Zhengyu Gu ‘93, computers and info science/ physics, of Andover is a software engineer as Sun Microsystems. Judith F. Jamieson ‘93, English, and owns Chef on Call with husband Kevin. It has expanded its operation to the Daytona Beach area, has eight chefs with unique cooking backgrounds, and serves all of Cape Cod and Daytona Beach. Norm Medeiros ‘93, English/writing, and wife Trisha, celebrated the birth of their first child, Ava Elizabeth, on April 21, 2004. They live in Wilmington, Delaware. Elizabeth A. Mello ‘93, psychology, received a juris doctor degree from Roger Williams University Ralph R. Papitto School of Law in May 2004. Mello is employed with the Specialized Foster Care Program, Community Care Services Inc., Taunton. She also earned a master’s in community psychology from Troy State University, Phoenix City, AL. Nassar Shabo ‘93, electrical engineering, works as a project manager for the archdiocese of Newark and resides in New Milford, NJ. Julie Niewola Soares ‘93, accounting, resides in Kailua and works as a teacher for the Mariee Core Base in Hawaii. Kelly Ann Torrans-Aubut ‘93, finance, of Shrewsbury, married Steven A. Aubut at St. Mary’s Church last July. She is a financial analyst with EMC, Hopkinton. James E. Boyle ‘94, JD, political science, is assistant director for economic development at the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. Gary M. Collins ‘95, computer and info science, and wife Heidi welcomed their first child, Amanda Taylor, in

December 2004. Gary continues to work as a software engineer for Sun Microsystems. Monica Arruda ‘95, philosophy, is a nurse practitioner at the Albany Medical Center. She and husband Glenn have two children, Austin and Aidan. Glenn is the John A. Balint Professor of Bioethics at Albany Medical School and chief of bioethics for the state of New York. They ski, swim, and generally have fun during the two months it is not winter. Christina Braga ‘95, accounting, moved to Alaska with her fiancé Kevin. They will visit east this summer, and look forward to seeing UMD friends. Joseph M. Dana ‘95, business management, works in sales for Ti-Sales, Inc. of Sudbury. Amy L. Dowe ‘95, psychology, announces the birth of her daughter, Emma Kennedy, in March 2004. Jason Fennelly ‘95, psychology, works as a behavior specialist at the Cape Cod Collaboration. Karen Garnett ‘95, social studies, teaches the third grade at the Charlotte Woods School, Providence. She earned her master’s degree in elementary education at Providence

Deaths William W. Davis ’30 Henry G. James Jr. ’71 Robert Young ’66

College last year. Marianne Iacobucci ‘95, nursing, was married in 1996, had her first child, a daughter, in 2001, and had a newborn this past February. She works at Wareham Pediatrics as a RN. Faye L. Weiner ‘95, psychology and sociology, received a juris doctor degree from New England School of Law last May. She also has a master’s degree in education from Springfield College. Rebecca Woods ‘95, illustration and painting, received her MFA in painting from the Savannah (GA) College of Art and Design. She has been in several group and solo exhibitions, as well as in an upcoming juried show at the Jaffe Arts Center in Norfolk, VA titled “As I Am”. Carmen M.

Your letters The following is a copy of a letter sent to Stephen P. Tocco, Board of Higher Education chairman, regarding Southern New England Law School. Dear Chairman Tocco: I am writing to inform you of the reasons for my support of the merger that will create a UMass School of Law. I grew up in Harwich and attended Harwich High School. I graduated in 1973, and attended SMU (now UMass Dartmouth) in the 1973-1974 school year. As my parents were not in a position to support my education, I joined the Army, and returned to school with the help of Uncle Sam. He was most supportive. I was successful in the LSATs, and needed to choose a law school based on affordability. I studied at an ABA-approved school in San Diego, California and after graduation, returned to take and pass the Massachusetts Bar. Without a Massachusetts-owned law school, guildism in the practice of law will continue. A UMass Law School would broaden the ability of working class people to obtain advanced degrees. I have felt that without the support of Uncle Sam, I would not have obtained a law degree. Access to the law and law degrees are vital citizens’ rights; and by broadening the source of a law school education into the public domain, you will be doing a great benefit to common people. Thank you for all that you do for the Commonwealth and the higher education of its citizens. Please feel free to contact me if you wish to discuss any of these issues, or if I may be of any assistance. Sincerely, Paul W. Scannell ‘80 Scannell, Lynn & Associates, P.C.

Please tell us your news — and visit us online at: www.umassd.edu/alumni Please tell us about yourselves — your families, your careers, your hobbies, what you’re doing. Send letters to UMass Dartmouth, Alumni Office Foster Administration Building 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300. Or email Nancy Tooley at ntooley@umassd.edu.

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Alumni news

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Your letters To the editor: I have followed a path less taken, and it has brought me to China. This country helped me to put my own life into perspective. The recent drive for economic development has not erased the evidence of years of neglect, and the people have a certain form of learned helplessness. As a teacher, I face the challenge of convincing my students to pursue opportunities to develop their own potential, to envision a future for themselves where they are able to find personal satisfaction. Living conditions in China vary from city to city. However, the intellectual development of the people is still heavily controlled by the government. Fortunately the same government makes it possible for people like me to live and work here. I sometimes wonder what has become of my friends from the Swain School of Design. It would be nice to be able to reconnect with them. Marilyn O’Donnell ’82 Foreign Language Expert, Shandong University Jinan, Shandong, PR China Anyone who would like an address for Marilyn can contact the Alumni Relations Office.

Good eye, good memory Thomas E. Duval ’73, management, was the winner of the last issue’s “Where on campus is it?” competition, successfully identifying the photo as the basement of the Liberal Arts & Sciences building, better known as Group I, near the south side entrance. He receives a UMass Dartmouth t-shirt and $25 gift certificate to the campus store.

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Francisco ‘96, Portuguese, is a Portuguese and Spanish teacher at Somerset High School. She will finish her MAT in Portuguese this year at UMD. Her husband Tony works in sales at Barry’s Nissan Volvo in Dartmouth, her daughter Sarah is a freshman at PC, and her son Mathew is a junior at Somerset High School. Jennifer L. McCarthy ‘96, English/writing & communications, is assistant registrar at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Katherine M. Murphy ‘96, accounting, and Chris Murphy are proud to announce the birth of their second son, Thomas Christopher. He joins his older brother, Joseph, born in October 2001. Thomas Silveria ‘96, computer and info science, announces the birth of his son. Scott F. Hoyle ‘97, accounting, married Katherine Pereira ‘99, English, in August 2004 in Espirito Santo Church. Their reception was at Rachel’s Lakeside, Dartmouth. Following a Mediterranean cruise, they live in Swansea. Kenneth P. Watts ‘97, computer science, is a software engineer at UMass Amherst and reports the birth of his first son, Logan, last May. Brendan Piccolo ‘98, mechanical engineering, a Naval officer working for the Department of Defense, is pursuing his masters in systems engineering from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. Jason Cook ‘99, accounting, is an accountant for Wachovia and lives in Charlotte, NC. Beth Kosakowski ‘99, English/communications, of Marlborough married Jesse Green ‘00, sculpture, last June in Southborough. Beth works at UBS Financial Services.

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Amanda Kline ’00, finance, married Mark Lique ’00, chemistry, in September 2004. They honeymooned in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, and live in Andover. Amanda works at Digital Credit Union and Mark has begun a chiropractic business. John Stadtman ‘00, mechanical engineering, lives in Tewksbury, and his son, Jack Hayes, was born

last April. John recently changed careers and is a process engineer for Allegro Microsystems in the Manchester, NH facility. His wife, Susan Hayes ‘99, marketing, works for Craft Brewers in Danvers. Sherry Ann Vieira ‘00, nursing, is a nurse at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence. Kathleen J. Wilson ‘00, psychology, is the proud mother of two sons, Collin and Tyler. She is a mental health counselor on a children’s unit. Jennifer L. Miksis-Olds ‘02, biology, was married to David Olds in 2000. Timothy Troup ‘02, management, works as a construction supervisor for Roseland Contractors. Erica Martins ‘02, Portuguese and Spanish, has married Antone Pereira. Their reception was at the Hawthorne Country Club, Dartmouth. Erica works for the town of Somerset. Erin Morrisey ‘02, psychology, works as a clinical coordinator for MENTOR and resides in Fall River. Crystal Coppola ‘03, biology, is seeking a new job and looking into graduate school at UMass Boston. Carrie-Anne Cowdrey ‘03, computer engineering, works for United Parcel Service as a TSG Technician and resides in Hamden, CT. John Follett ‘03, biology, works as an environmental monitoring technician in East Falmouth, and lives in New Bedford. Vincent Orgeat ‘03, business information systems, works as a teacher at Roosevelt Middle School in New Bedford. Brian Padelford ‘03, electrical engineering, joined Cornell Dubilier as an engineer in the Product Development Department. Brian works for SHARE at UMass Dartmouth, building computers for the physically disabled. An Acushnet resident, he enjoys playing billiards and reading. Joanne J. Scally ‘03, biology, works for Boston Biomedica as a manufacturing lab associate in West Bridgewater and lives in Fairhaven. Dusty Waters ‘03, psychology and Spanish, is a graduate assistant at URI and lives in Narragansett, RI. n


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From the Director

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n this edition of your alumni magazine, you’re reading of the great sense of community that our alumni share and the importance of giving. Volunteerism and community service represent an important component of life at UMass Dartmouth, and it continues so for many after graduation, in a variety of forms and ways. I know firsthand of the dedication and commitment of a particular group of our alums. They serve on the Alumni Association Board of Directors. As a group, they meet formally four times per year, but each attends in addition countless events and committee meetings representing our alma mater. Most of the directors on the Alumni Board are busy individuals with careers and families that also place demands on their time. Yet they continue to serve. I am grateful to each of the following members of our board. If you personally know any of our directors, take the time to thank them for their allegiance to UMass Dartmouth. Their donation of time, ideas and enthusiasm has made and continues to make a tremendous difference. Members of the 2004-2005 Alumni Association Board of Directors are: Michael Rodrigues ’83, President Donald F. Taylor ’54, Vice President James R. Pratt, Jr. ’89, Treasurer Mary Ellen DeFrias ’94, Clerk Brenda L. Bouchard ’89 Jacquelyn E. Briggs ’03 Robert Correia ’62 Scott W. Costa ’78 Susan T. Costa ’72

Gloria T. Craven ’77 Paul J. DeCoste, Jr. ’84 Joe F. DeMedeiros ’99 Kathy Lee Dombroski ’03 Roger J. Dugal ’70 Alan Ferguson ’74 Michael J. Ferreira ’77 Sherri L. Guerin ’97 Frederick B. MacDonald ’55 Michael J. Pieroni ’84 Donald Plant ’61 Rhoda Purcell ’73 Donald G. Wood ’60, ’70

From the President

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uite often, I use this column and my position as president of our Alumni Association to make the “ask”. In the past, I have asked you to participate in campaigns to increase alumni membership, to attend alumni events, and to lobby our state government to financially support our alma mater. Today I write to “ask” for your investment in our future. Will you consider providing a UMass Dartmouth student with an opportunity—an internship at your place of business? Whether you are an engineer, educator, legislator, artist, or health care professional, you have the ability to create a pathway for our future leaders. Although you may not have the decision-making authority yourself, there is a substantial likelihood that you know who does. Internships can take many different forms: paid or unpaid; for academic credit or not; during the summer, etc. This opportunity to add to traditional education— what is called “experiential learning”—is invaluable. It also provides UMass Dartmouth students with a head start in the search for permanent employment following graduation. You can make no greater investment in your community or society’s future than by facilitating this opportunity. Contact Don Berube, Alumni Relations Director, to discuss your internship opportunity. He can be reached at 508.999.8802, or via email at dberube@umassd.edu Thank you for all you do to support UMass Dartmouth.

Michael Rodrigues ‘83 Alumni Association President

Your board working for you

All of us who make up the UMass Dartmouth community owe a debt of gratitude. THANK YOU!

Don Berube ’84, Director, Alumni Relations

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Message from Donald H. Ramsbottom Executive Director, UMass Dartmouth Foundation

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n behalf of the entire University of Massachusetts Dartmouth community, I am pleased to provide you with our 2004 Annual Report. On the following pages you will find the names of individuals, businesses, and organizations who contributed to the university during the period of July 1, 2003 through June 30, 2004. This large and diverse group of supporters has the university’s gratitude and appreciation. Their donations have made possible a wide array of programs, projects, and activities that make UMass Dartmouth the vibrant intellectual, cultural, and economic resource it has become. During this past year, the cadre of generous foundations, corporations, and individuals — including alumni, faculty, and staff—that are listed contributed a total of $2,887,409. As of June 30, 2004, the total assets of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation were $17,138,008. Your generosity continues to inspire the university’s faculty, administration, and students, and assists us greatly in our mission to educate, undertake research, and serve the community. We continue to find that philanthropy to the campus is often very personal in nature. The following donations serve to illustrate how many of our donors link the interests with special meaning to them with their desire to strengthen UMass Dartmouth’s academic offerings. n

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The Estate of Alvida Quill bequeathed $361,000 for the establishment of an endowment for scholarships in honor of Augusta Silva. The Dartmouth Industrial Development Foundation, Inc. donated $120,000 for scholarship aid to students from the town of Dartmouth who enroll here, and also contributed an additional $36,000 to SHARE. Our former Dean of Students, Mary Louise Walsh, who passed away last year, designated $50,000 from her estate to continue funding the endowment in her name for international study. This scholarship, established in 1988, has distributed $56,674 to enable 74 students to widen their world by studying abroad. Charles J. Hoff continues to donate large sums of money in financial aid to deserving students. This year, he donated $74,351 to help students with unmet financial need.

In addition to the funds described above, thousands of alumni have continued their connection to the university through payment of dues to the Alumni Association. While these payments do not factor into our figures, such dues are integral to the financial sustainability of our Alumni Association, enabling it to fund notable programs and scholarships. They are further testimony of the support and high regard UMass Dartmouth enjoys from its graduates. As we look to the future, all of us at the university recognize that without the generosity of individuals, corporations, and foundations, much of the growth and success we experience would not be possible. Your investment in our great academic institution has resulted in an outstanding level of academic excellence and giving, and your continued support will sustain and expand these attributes.

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Thank you.

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The following list includes donors to the Annual Fund alphabetically according to their giving levels.

Benefactors

Mr. Antonio F. Andrade Mr. Charles J. Hoff Mrs. Elizabeth Isherwood-Moore ‘80 and Mr. John D. Moore ‘96 Dr. Thomas Lawton ‘53 Ms. Gratia R. Montgomery Dr. Joyce Y. Passos Estate of Alvida Quill Estate of Angelica L. Russell Dr. and Mrs. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. Estate of Dr. Roger N. Violette Estate of Dean Mary Louise Walsh ‘87 Ms. Liwen Yu ‘97 Patrons

Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Feitelberg Professor Howard T. Glasser Estate of Joseph W. Houth ‘24 The Jarabek Family Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington Mentors

Mr. and Mrs. Hershel Alpert Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Bogan ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Earle P. Charlton II Mrs. Cindi L. Galiher ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Brian T. Helgeland ‘83 Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Dr. Emmanuel C.A. Ojadi Dr. Richard Quintiliani, Jr. Mr. Robert S. and Mrs. Janice H. Reynolds ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Wo-Tak Wu ‘84, ‘88 Partners

Alan and Ruth Ades ‘96 Mr. Michael S. Aizenstadt ‘79 Dr. Cynthia M. Alves ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Francis Angino Dr. Lisa F. Antonelli ‘79 Mr. Richard H. Aubut ‘75 Mrs. Charlotte G. Babbitt Mr. Harold R. Bannister ‘35

Attorney Donald A. Berube ‘84 Dr. Alan L. Boegehold Chancellor Professor Donald Boerth Ms. Brenda L. Bouchard ‘89 Mr. David A. Brown Mr. and Mrs. John K. Bullard ‘94 Mr. Paul M. Camara ‘69 Crystal and Edwin Campbell Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 Dr. and Mrs. Paul Chervinsky Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Chi-Hau Chen Chancellor Professor John A. Chopoorian Dr. Julie A. Cleare Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Lester W. Cory ‘63 Dr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Curry ‘64 Mr. Thomas G. Davis Mr. Ronald J. Dias ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan S. Duhamel ‘83 Drs. Louis and Frances F. Esposito Professor Geraldine Gamburd Mr. Bernard Gould Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Graham ‘78, ‘79 Chancellor Professor James T. Griffith ‘70 and Dr. Susan J. Leclair ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. John G. Hawes ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Huidekoper Professor Raymond Jackson Dr. Susan C. Lane Mr. Bruce W. Larson ‘74 Mr. Robert F. Leduc ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. J. Michael MacKeen Mr. Gerald J. Mauretti ‘65 Dr. and Mrs. J. Greer McBratney Brian and Cindy McGreevy ‘79, 78 Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Walter E. A. Mierzejewski Dr. Thomas M. Mulvey Dr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. R. Henry Norweb III Mr. Thomas F. Quinlan, Jr. ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Ramsbottom Mr. David J. Raposa Mr. Albert P. Ribeiro, Jr. ‘84 Ms. Joan C. Ruel ‘98 Mrs. Andrea L. Schulmeyer ‘93 Ms. Ann Montgomery Smith Professor Emeritus J. Donald Smith Mr. Ralph S. Stephenson Ms. Mary M. Sullivan

Mr. Karl Svendsen ‘63 Mr. Paul L. Vigeant ‘74 Chancellor Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Richard J. Ward Mr. and Mrs. William N. Whelan Dr. William C. Wild, Jr. ‘90 Ms. Elizabeth Winiarz Mr. Donald G. Wood ‘70 Mr. Ronald M. Xavier ‘72 Attorney Margaret D. Xifaras ‘78 Mr. Donald L. Zekan Advocates

Anonymous Mrs. Roberta G. Arostegui ‘73 Mr. Ralph A. Boardman ‘63 Mr. Donald J. Brody ‘71 Mr. Leonard V. Brophy ‘78 Mr. Wendell S. Brown Mr. and Mrs. L. Dean Cassell Mr. Gary Czelusniak ‘87 Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Dars ‘04 Professor Nancy M. Dluhy Dr. and Mrs. John P. Dowd Mr. Michael P. Duarte ‘80 Mr. Terry R. Farias ‘68 Mr. Wayne Finney Mr. John A. Freeman ‘58 Mr. Peter D. Garvey ‘70 Dr. James A. Golen ‘65 Dr. and Mrs. Charles J. Gormley II Mr. John E. Grenier, Jr. ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Guilmette Professor Louise A. Habicht Mr. Pei-Gee Ho Ms. Janice L. Hodson ‘84 Dean Donald C. Howard Mr. H. Austin Hoyt Professor Vernon Ingraham Mr. William T. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Lenhardt Mr. John P. Levesque Mrs. Mary D. Mandeville Mr. Matthew Morrissey ‘96 Mr. Paul A. Nolin ‘70 Drs. Richard and Carolyn Panofsky Ms. Catherine A. Partridge ‘79 Dr. N. A. Pendergrass Mr. Raymond J. Possick ‘85 Mr. Milton Rhodes ‘41 Mr. Seth T. Rosenfield ‘92 Ms. Gerda A. Sano ‘81 Dr. George S. Smith Ms. Marie E. Sullivan ‘76 Mr. John F. Walsh ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. and Mrs. Sumner J. Waring, Jr.

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Ms. Marilyn N. Abraham ‘82 Ms. Elizabeth Acheson Ms. Joan R. Adaskin Mr. Michael Adler Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Aducci ‘81 Mr. Brian C. Aguiar ‘71 Mr. Alvin P. Almeida ‘70 Mr. Brian A. Alosi ‘65 Mrs. Lynn Alpert Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Alpert Ms. Mary E. Ambrose ‘79 Mr. Michael J. Ambrosini ‘70 Mr. William S. Anderson ‘80 Ms. Mary I. Andrade ‘81 Mr. Ernest S. Angstadt ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Anness ‘73, ‘74 Anonymous Dr. Patricia H. Ansay ‘74 Mr. Dimitrios Antonopoulos ‘73 Mr. Anthony C. Arruda, Jr. ‘61 Mr. Gary Ashworth ‘81 Mr. Normand G. Audette ‘72 Mrs. Barbara J. Audino ‘79 Dr. Farhad Azadivar Mr. Edward J. Bajakian ‘71 Mr. Charles C. Ballard ‘87 Mr. Thomas S. Bancroft ‘60 Mr. Felix George Banis II ‘02 Mr. James D. Barber ‘68 Mr. George Barboza ‘59 Mr. Kenneth W. Barclay ‘65 Ms. Elaine Barger Ms. Barbara L. Barnes Mr. Bruce E. Barnes ‘73 Ms. Shaleen C. Barnes Ms. Phyllis J. Barney ‘76 Ms. Charline Barron Dr. Clyde W. Barrow Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry Mr. Paul M. Bartkiewicz ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. James E. Basque ‘81, ‘82 Mrs. Deirdre H. Bass ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Beaton ‘81, ‘84 Sr. Barbara Beauchamp Mrs. Carolyn M. Beaulieu ‘65 Mr. Norman R. Beauregard ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Bednarz ‘75 Mr. Joseph M. Benevides, Jr. ‘77 Mr. Arnold H. Bennett ‘62 Mrs. Elizabeth Benoit ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Benoit ‘81, ‘84 Mr. John S. Berg ‘85 M a g a z i n e

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You have helped make it possible—The new track

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Dr. Gail L. Berman-Martin Ms. Evelyn Bernardo Mr. Mark J. Bernardo ‘92 Mr. Conrad Bernier ‘98 Mr. A. Robert Bernstein ‘53 Ms. Myra R. Besen ‘75 Mr. Paul A. Bessette ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bettencourt ‘76, ‘78 Mr. Donald C. Betts ‘77 and Mrs. Martha L. Antaya ‘76 Mr. Eugene A. Bisaillon ‘59 Mr. George A. Bishop III ‘60 Ms. Anne C. Bisson ‘81 Mr. Clinton L. Bjornson ‘59 Mr. Bruce H. Black ‘86 Ms. Judith E. Black ‘60 Mr. Ernest J. Blais ‘74 Mr. R. William Blasdale Mr. Scott W. Blevins ‘80 Mr. Thomas C. Bliss ‘71 Mr. Robert O. Boardman Attorney and Mrs. Peter C. Bogle Mr. Thomas J. Boivin ‘60 Mr. Alan R. Boling ‘70 Mr. Bruce P. Boni ‘60 Ms. Marietta E. Booth ‘73 Mr. Jason W. Bordun ‘01 Mr. Kenneth F. Borges ‘71 Mr. William B. Borges ‘48 Mr. John A. Botelho ‘77 Mr. John P. Botelho, Jr. ‘93 and Mrs. Christine A. Botelho ‘93 Ms. Nicole R. Boudria ‘98 Mr. James G. Bourgoin ‘86 Mrs. Elizabeth L. Bowen ‘82 Ms. Mary L. Bowen ‘82 Mr. Richard W. Bowman, Jr. ‘80 Mr. Bruce P. Branchaud ‘76 Mrs. Sandra B. Bravo ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. John R. Brazil Mrs. Beth D. Breen-Santheson ‘90 Mr. Steven T. Briggs Mr. Nathan C. Brinker ‘98 Mr. James M. Brown ‘95 UMass

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Ms. Leonora V. Brown ‘97 Mr. Paul Brown ‘74 Mr. Wendell S. Brown Mr. A. Keith Broyles ‘88 Mr. Edward A. Bruce ‘91 Ms. Roxanne M. Buccos ‘93 Mr. Bruce H. Buckley ‘60 Mr. James F. Buckley ‘81 Peter and Tia Bullard Mr. Jeffrey P. Burdzel ‘02 Mr. David J. Burke ‘83 Mr. Joseph J. Burke, Jr. ‘67 Dr. and Mrs. Richard T. Burke Mr. Edward Cabral ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. George M. Cabral ‘88, ‘92 Ms. Catherine L. Cacho ‘78 Mrs. Karen M. Caddell ‘85 Mr. John E. Cadorette ‘86 Mrs. Peg Caldwell Condon ‘74 Ms. Cindy L. Callisto ‘99 Mr. James J. Camacho ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cameron Ms. Jeanne C. Campbell Mrs. Mary E. Canning ‘83 Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Cappadona ‘79 Mr. Augusto R. Cardoso ‘81 Mr. George S. Cardoza ‘63 Mr. Wayne M. Cardoza ‘70 Dr. Ann T. Carey Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73 Mr. Mark H. Carney Ms. Rhea Carpenter Mr. David W. Carreau ‘55 Chancellor Professor Magali Carrera and Mr. Alan J. Heureux Chancellor Professor John J. Carroll Mr. Thomas J. Carroll ‘60 Mr. Alan H. Cass ‘98 Ms. Mary C. Cassidy ‘77 Mr. William G. Catlow ‘69 Ms. LaVerne Cawthorne Mrs. Dianne M. Cerone ‘71 Mr. Brian S. Cesolini ‘83

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan D. Chace ‘81, ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. William A. Chace ‘81, ‘92 Mr. Eugene K. Chapman, Jr. ‘47 Mr. James F. Charrette ‘97 Mr. Lawrence R. Chartier ‘85 Mr. Everett Charves ‘52 Ms. Ann-Marie S. Chin Ms. Janet L. Chrisos ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Randall Christensen ‘85, ‘86 Mrs. Terri F. Ciolfi ‘88 Mr. Peter G. Clements ‘89 Ms. Sharon M. Cleveland ‘00 Mr. John Clifford Ms. Vernell L. M. Clouden ‘99 Mr. Maurice G. Coderre ‘66 Ms. Nadine Coffey ‘87 Mr. Richard A. Cohen ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Coite ‘69, ‘91 Mr. Frank L. Cole ‘81 Mr. Don C. Coleman ‘76 Ms. Joanne K. Como ‘96 Mr. Douglas P. Condon ‘79 Mr. Peter D. Connolly Mr. Michael F. Conway ‘79 Mr. Ben L. Cook ‘89 Mr. Herman T. Cook ‘93 Mr. Christopher Cooney ‘90 Ms. Dyanne F. Cooney ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Cordeiro ‘74 Mr. Leonard W. Coriaty ‘87 Mr. John F. Cornwell ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Antone Correia ‘67, ‘83 Ms. Goodie M.J. Corriveau ‘77 Mr. Antonio H. Costa ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Costa ‘78, ‘80 Dr. Susan T. Costa ‘72 Mr. Thomas F. Costa ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin P. Cote ‘71, ‘90 Mr. Leonard D. Cotter ‘52

Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Cottrell, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Keith D. Coughlin ‘82, ‘85 Professor Alden W. Counsell ‘42 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Cozzolino ‘87, ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas R. Crabtree ‘77 Ms. Lisa M. Crocetti ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Roland J. Croteau, Jr. ‘82, ‘91 Mr. John B. Crowley ‘04 Mr. Robert C. Crowley ‘79 Mr. Walter Crowther Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Cummings ‘76 Mr. Edward M. Cusson ‘61 Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Cutler ‘70 Mr. James M. Czerkowicz ‘04 Mr. Arthur D’Aguiar ‘80 Attorney Peter Daigle ‘95 Mr. Charles F. Daly ‘73 Mr. Frederick E. Davis ‘87 Ms. Doloretta D. Dawicki ‘78 Mr. Daniel J. DeAmaral ‘86 Mr. Robert F. Deans ‘70 Mr. Wesley T. Decampos ‘77 Mr. Kenneth DeCosta ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. DeCoste, Jr. ‘84, ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Delano ‘57 Mr. Glenn I. Deming ‘82 Ms. Carolyn J. DeMoranville Ms. Debora J. DePaola ‘74 Mr. Rodney P. DeRego ‘67 Mr. Joseph N. Desautel, Jr. ‘74 Mrs. Kelly L. DeSenti ‘92 Ms. Cheryl A. Dessert ‘80 Mrs. Maria G. Dias Professor Mary Ann Dillon Mr. and Mrs. Brian M. Donahoe ‘74, ‘75 Mr. Hu Dou ‘99 Ms. Katherine Douglas ‘01 Ms. Pauline Dowd Ms. Joann M. Downs ‘86 Professor Daryll C. Dowty ‘78 Ms. Sailynn M. Doyle ‘00 Mr. Peter A. Draymore ‘79 Mr. Stanley W. Drewniak ‘59 Ms. Paula M. Duarte ‘90 Mr. Robert P. Duarte Mr. Richard J. Dube ‘59 Mr. Richard L. Dubois, Jr. ‘82 Mr. John V. Dufresne ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dufresne ‘72 Mr. Roger J. Dugal ‘70 Mr. James A. Dulude ‘78 Mr. Roland J. Duphily ‘66 Mr. Theodore J. Dziedzic ‘76


Mr. James R. Eggert ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Ehrenhaus Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Sherif D. El Wakil Mr. Samuel C. Ellett ‘85 and Mrs. Beatrice Carmody-Ellett ‘76 Mr. David L. Erickson ‘86 Dr. and Mrs. Paul M. Ernsting ‘82, ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Ed Etsten Mr. and Mrs. James R. Fallon Mrs. Maureen J. Fanning ‘71 Mr. Charles L. Faria ‘69 Ms. Linda A. Farrell ‘70 Dr. John W. Farrington ‘66 Dr. Richard Faulkenberry Mr. and Mrs. Scott C. Faulkner ‘83 Mr. Laurier A. Fauteux ‘69 Ms. Mary P. Feitelberg Mr. Anthony J. Ferreira ‘54 Ms. Otilia S. Ferreira ‘87 Mr. Richard S. Fine ‘76 Mr. David T. Fisher ‘83 Professor Edward J. Fitzpatrick, Jr. Mr. Martin W. Flinn ‘79 Mr. Richard W. Flood ‘65 Mr. Edmund T. Folger ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Fontaine Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Fontaine Mr. and Mrs. James P. Forance ‘84, ‘86 Mr. Robert G. Fortes ‘77 Mr. Donald A. Foster ‘72 Ms. Dorothy S. Frade ‘77 Mr. Robert V. Frates ‘78 Dr. Janet L. Freedman Mr. James C. Freeman ‘87 Mrs. Kathleen B. Friar ‘78 Attorney Sheldon Friedland Mr. Gary A. Friedman ‘80 Dr. and Mrs. Peter Friedman Ms. Christine Frizzell Mr. Ronald J. Fryer ‘55 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Furlong ‘78, ‘80 Mr. John E. Furtado ‘68 Mr. Paul G. Furtado ‘94 Mr. Kristopher G. Furtney ‘80 Mrs. Rosalinde M. Fussell ‘00 Mr. Richard L. Fyans ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Gagliardi ‘87 Mr. Donald A. Gagnon ‘81 Mr. John C. Gagnon ‘74 Mr. Roger J. Gagnon ‘61 Mr. William F. Gainey ‘85 Mr. Donald M. Gale ‘79 Mrs. Eugene Galkowski Mr. Kevin F. Galligan ‘77 Mr. Robert R. Gamache ‘73 Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay

Mr. Robert J. Ganson ‘81 Mr. Angus G. Garber III ‘79 Mr. Stephen F. Gardiner ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Gauvin ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Gemme 83, ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Alan W. Genereux ‘92, ‘93 Ms. Susan C. Genoa Mr. Kurt Gent ‘74 Mr. Roger J. Gentilhomme ‘33 Mr. Edwin B. Gentle III ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Geoghegan ‘78, ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. John Gerry ‘69, ‘78 Ms. Paige M. Gibbs Mr. William E. Giblin ‘57 Mr. Thomas M. Gibney ‘86 Mr. Chris J. Gibson ‘93 Mrs. Susan E. Gibson ‘76 Dr. and Mrs. Frederick V. Gifun ‘ 86 Professor and Ms. Harold L. Gilmore Mr. Mark P. Gilmore ‘81 Mr. Peter C. Giusti ‘65 Mr. George J. Godfrey ‘91 Mr. Walter R. Goldstein, Jr. ‘76 Mr. Antonio M. Goncalves ‘81 Mr. Jose C. Gonsalves ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Manuel A. Goulart Mrs. Linda R. Gouveia ‘77 Mr. Patrick A. Gouveia ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Grant ‘75 Ms. Eleanor L. Gray ‘83 Dr. Lawrence W. Gray ‘77 Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Green Ms. Kathleen J. Greene ‘76 Mr. John C. Gregson ‘68 Mr. David C. Greim ‘79 Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Gross Mr. John R. Guarino ‘95 Mr. Henry A. Guay ‘65 Mr. Joseph Guglietta ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Mark E. Guillemette ‘78 Mr. Paul B. Guillet ‘79 Dr. Qiushuang Guo ‘97 and Ms. Congfeng Yang ‘98 Mr. Jeffrey P. Gworek ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. David P. Hack ‘90, ‘91 Mr. Mark J. Hahn ‘75 Mrs. Anne M. Hall ‘71 Mr. Lawrence C. Hall Mr. Stephen T. Hall ‘93 Mr. James J. Halpin ‘79 Mr. Steven P. Hamburg Mr. and Mrs. Armand R. Hamel ‘73, ‘87 Ms. Katherine Hammond ‘91 Mr. Mark R. Hansen ‘91

Mr. Robert J. Harpham ‘73 Mrs. Marlene Ayash Harrington ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lloyd Harrington III Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Harris ‘85, ‘88 Mr. Gregg F. Harrison ‘95 Mr. James M. Harrison ‘38 Professor royal hartigan Ms. Lorraine Roy Hawkes ‘71 Mr. Raymond F. Haworth ‘51 Mr. Ziqiang He ‘98 Ms. Deirdre Healy Mr. and Mrs. William G. Heaney ‘78, ‘03 Mr. Melvin D. Heckman ‘56 Professor Robert C. Helgeland ‘68 Mr. William D. Hennessy Professor Eugene Herman Ms. Florence Herman Dr. James A. Hijiya Mr. and Mrs. Kevin W. Hill Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hilliard ‘83 Dr. and Mrs. Alan W. Hirshfeld Ms. Judith A. Hodge ‘77 Mrs. Carol A. Hokans ‘82 Ms. Melinda M. Holland ‘90 Mrs. Susan M. Holland ‘92 Mr. Elliott P. Horch Mr. A. Werner Horlbeck Dr. Bertram E. Howard Mr. Ronald W. Hoy ‘64 Mr. Richard Huey ‘76 and Ms. Catherine H. Reid-Huey ‘78 Ms. E. Jacqueline Hunt ‘76 Ms. Yen M. Hurley ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. Kim M. Hyland ‘73, ‘84 Mr. Edward F. Iacaponi ‘69 Mr. Peter J. Inglese ‘59 Mrs. Gail Isaksen ‘67 Professor Barbara R. Jacobskind Mr. Michael F. James ‘71 and Mrs. Judith A. Dionne James ‘70 Mrs. Judith Forman Jamieson ‘96 Mr. Charles W. Janda ‘69 Mr. Andrew D. Johnson ‘73 Ms. Carole J. Johnson ‘77 Mr. David W. Johnson ‘75 Mr. Stephen C. Johnson ‘68 Mr. and Mrs. John H. Johnston, Jr. Ms. Debra L. Jones ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Jones Mrs. Sandra Ann Gracia Jones ‘74 Mr. Kenneth N. Josephson ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Juttlestad Mr. and Mrs. Gary H. Juvinall ‘83, ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Joel S. Kane Mr. John F. Kane ‘34 A l u m n i

Ms. Lynne K. Kane Mr. Boris Katan ‘84 Mrs. Erin Keaney-Moynihan ‘89 Mr. William F. Keating, Jr. ‘62 Mr. Donald W. Keesey ‘85 Mr. Mark W. Keighley ‘88 Mr. Mark F. Kelley ‘84 Mrs. Deborah M. Kenney ‘77 Ms. Maryanne Kepinski ‘70 Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Wolfhard E. Kern Mr. Alexander J. King, Jr. ‘61 Mr. Michael C. King ‘90 and Mrs. Elizabeth J. Lovejoy-King ‘90 Mr. Rodney T. King ‘50 Ms. Doris M. Kingman ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Mahmoud K. Kobeissi ‘79 Dr. Richard W. Kocon ‘63 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Gerard M. Koot Ms. Rene J. Koszerowski ‘79 Mr. Cesar R. Kothe ‘86 and Ms. Jean M. Murphy ‘85 Ms. Katherine Krikorian ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Russell R. Kroszner ‘77 Ms. Susan T. Krumholz Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. La Perriere ‘73, ‘74 Mr. Stephen L. Labrie ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Lucien R. LaFlamme ‘82 Mr. John T. Lally ‘84 Ms. Deborah A. Lambert-Huber ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Craig Lamkin Mr. Henry C. Lamontagne ‘68 Mr. Frederic J. Lamoureux ‘51 Mr. Paul A. Lamoureux ‘81 Mr. Paul A. Lamoureux ‘53 Mr. Matthew J. Landoch ‘69 Dr. Michael J. Laney ‘77 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Kenneth D. Langley ‘64, ‘71 Dr. John C. Laughton Mr. Mark A. Lavallee ‘84 Mr. Robert G. Lavoie ‘63 Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘61 Mr. Brian A. Lawton ‘78 Mr. Bruce W. Lawton ‘65 Mr. Howard J. Lazerowich ‘78 Mr. Joseph R. Leal ‘40 Mr. J. Louis LeBlanc ‘62 Ms. Joyce M. LeBlanc ‘89 Mr. Wayne LeBlanc ‘92 Mr. Michael J. LeDonne ‘97 Mr. Talsop Lee ‘57 Mr. Richard V. Lemay ‘74 Chancellor Professor Steven J. Leon Mr. Daniel R. LePage ‘76 M a g a z i n e

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2005

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Ms. Monica A. Lesniak ‘86 Mr. Richard C. Letendre ‘80 Dr. and Mrs. Clinton N. Levin Mr. and Mrs. Melvin H. Levine Mr. Christopher Limerick, Jr. ‘50 Mr. Jens F. Lisinski ‘88 Mr. James C. Lok ‘72 Ms. Mary Ann Lomba ‘64 Mrs. Nanette Defeo Longley ‘76 Mr. Dennis J. Lopes ‘74 Mr. Edward P. Lopes ‘75 Ms. Cynthia J. Lord ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Louro Mr. Paul A. Lovett, Jr. ‘78 Mrs. Suzanne M. Lucas ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Sau Mun Lui Ms. Katherine Lukas ‘00 Mr. Robert F. Lundgren ‘77 Dr. Nancy S. Lussier Lamontagne ‘65 Dr. and Mrs. Amine B. Maalouf Mr. Vernon J. Mace ‘77 Mrs. Nancy E. MacEachern ‘82 Mr. Rodney F. Mach ‘79 Mr. John G. Machado ‘91 Mr. Glenn S. MacNaught ‘83 Mr. Dana W. Madden ‘85 Mr. John L. Madeira ‘73 Ms. Carol A. Mailloux Mr. Carmen Maiocco Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Maiolo, Jr. Mr. Donald M. Makie ‘74 Mr. Daniel P. Malone ‘84 Dr. Charles H. Manley ‘64 Mr. Robert A. Manson ‘70 Mrs. Anne E. Manzi ‘42 Attorney Robert J. Marchand ‘66 Mr. Gianluca Marchi ‘95 Mr. David F. Marcille ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. William R. Markey ‘54, ‘55 Ms. Anne P. Marks ‘75 Ms. Sharon K. Marrama ‘99 Mr. William H. Marsden ‘54 Mr. Alan W. Martel ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. Peter D. Martelly ‘79, ‘89 UMass

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Mr. Anthony Martin Ms. Elizabeth A. Martin ‘78 and Mr. Martin Wood Ms. Georgette F. Martin ‘84 Mr. Paul A. Martin ‘84 Mr. Sidney E. Martin III ‘81 Mr. Wallace J. Martin ‘76 Mr. Paul G. Martins ‘78 Mr. Abel R. Massa ‘78 Ms. Marta E. Massi ‘97 Mr. James H. Mathes Mr. Michael C. May ‘97 Mr. Steven J. May ‘97 Mr. and Mrs. Les Mayo Mrs. Theresa A. McAvoy ‘71 Mr. Hugh R. McCartney III ‘77 Ms. Karen L. McCloskey ‘87 Ms. Donna L. McClung ‘79 Mr. Paul S. McCormick ‘71 Ms. Flora McCoy-Greene Mr. Frederick B. McDonald ‘55 Mr. Peter J. McDonald Mr. Jerry B. McGinnis ‘68 Mrs. Barbara L. McGrath Spencer ‘76 Mr. Kenison A. McIntosh ‘59 Professor Janice McKeachern Mr. John P. McKenna ‘67 Professor Donald G. McKinley Mr. Jay M. McKinnon ‘93 Mr. John F. McLaughlin ‘72 Mr. Robert C. McLaughlin, Jr. ‘61 Mr. Laurence M. McLucas ‘78 Mrs. Kathleen G. McNeil ‘81 Mr. Anthony J. Medeiros, Jr. ‘71 Mr. John Medeiros ‘70 Mr. John Medeiros ‘60 Mr. Louis Medeiros ‘81 Mr. Noe O. Medeiros ‘71 Mr. Norman S. Medeiros ‘93 Mrs. Patricia M. Medeiros ‘83 Mrs. Susan M. Mellace ‘77 Mr. David M. Mello ‘87 Mr. Victor C. Mello ‘82 Mr. Edward J. Mendes ‘65 Ms. Natalie Mendes Mr. James Meniates, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Alan B. Mercer ‘48 Mr. James C. Miczek ‘76 Mrs. Beth Milham ‘92 Ms. Elizabeth A. Miller ‘55 Mr. David H. Mitchell ‘70 Ms. Judith A. Mitchell ‘80 Mr. Theophano Mitsa Mr. Joseph F. Mocker, Jr. ‘61 Mr. Donald F. Mofford ‘81 Professor Walaa S. Mogawer Mr. Eugene J. Mogilnicki ‘42 Mr. Alfred A. Montalvo ‘80 Mr. Paul A. Montero ‘80 Mr. Mark A. Moreira ‘85 Mr. Raymond E. Morris ‘47 Mr. Jason M. Morrison ‘02 Mr. Sanford A. Moss Mr. Alan A. Motta ‘63 Mr. Joseph P. Mroczka ‘81 Mrs. Barbara Mucciardi ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. James Mulford Mr. Robert N. Mullen ‘82 Mr. James M. Mumma III ‘97 Mr. James C. Munro Mr. Earle R. Munroe ‘60 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher E. Murphy ‘96 Mr. Cornelius J. Murphy, Jr. ‘52 Mr. John M. Murphy ‘81 Dr. Paul D. Murphy ‘74 Mr. Richard S. Murphy ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Vincent John Murphy ‘77, ‘93 Ms. Elizabeth M. Murray ‘72 Ms. Gina M. Muscato ‘00 Dr. and Mrs. David J. Myerson Mr. Charles J. Nannery ‘37 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Narbonne ‘77 Mr. Steven C. Nardone Ms. F. Lee Nason Mr. Mark A. Nault ‘95 Mrs. Barbara L. Nay ‘78 Dr. Catherine C. Neto ‘83 Mr. Phillip W. Nimeskern, Jr. ‘77 Ms. Andrea L. Nixon ‘77 Ms. Christine Nounou ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Noury Ms. Liduina Noverca ‘78 Mr. George I. Noyes, Jr. ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Anthony P. Nunes Mr. Klaus and Ms. Louann M. Nygaard ‘83 Dr. and Mrs. Kevin D. O’Brien Mr. Robert F. O’Brien ‘93 Ms. Donna M. O’Connor ‘78 Dr. Nancy J. O’Connor ‘80 Ms. Sheila K. Oliva ‘91 Mr. Bruce J. Oliveira ‘98 Mr. Ric Oliveira Mr. Richard T. Oliveira ‘63

Ms. Sylvia L. Oliveira ‘90 Ms. Norma M. Olivier Mr. Dennis Olson ‘77 Ms. Andrea Osburne Mr. Gary Otico ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Roland M. Ouellette ‘79, ‘80 Mr. John A. Owen ‘64 Ms. Kathleen Paiva ‘82 Mr. Lewis C. Palmer II ‘63 Mr. James S. Panos Dr. June E. Paoline ‘70 Dr. Doreen Parkhurst Mr. Joseph E. Parola ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Parola ‘85 Ms. Mary Ann Partridge ‘80 Mr. Robert M. Payer ‘67 Mrs. Susan L. Payne ‘78 Ms. Alice Pearse Mr. Gregory A. Pelagio ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Pelletier ‘79, ‘80 Ms. Susan Peloquin ‘81 Mr. Daniel N. Pelton ‘85 Reverend John J. Pennington, Jr. ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Pentheny ‘80, ‘81 Mr. Richard L. Pepin ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Manuel F. Pereira Mr. William T. Pereira ‘84 Mr. Joe Perry ‘72 Mrs. Rose A. Perry ‘76 Mrs. Geraldine A. Perry-Lopes ‘69 Mrs. Lauralyn Persson ‘74 Mrs. Anne Marie Petit ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Petitti ‘71, ‘79 Mr. Peter A. Phillips ‘82 Ms. Charlene Picard Mr. Marc Picquendar ‘88 and Mr. Yves R. Picquendar ‘92 Mr. Robert M. Pielech ‘71 Dr. Susan F. Pierce ‘73 Mr. Gerald Pietruska ‘80 Ms. June M. Pina ‘72 Ms. Donna J. Pineau ‘83 Ms. Kim M. Place ‘95 Mr. Donald H. Plant ‘61 Dr. Walter M. Platt, Jr. Mr. Randall B. Pollard ‘53 Mr. Dino R. Polselli ‘56 Mr. Hugh W. Popenoe ‘88 Mr. Mark J. Porter Mrs. Mary A. Portley ‘72 Mrs. Mary Alice Post ‘77 Mr. John B. Powers ‘95 Mrs. Anita L. Poyant ‘84 Ms. Lisa A. Poyant ‘83 Mr. James R. Pratt, Jr. ‘89


Mr. Richard W. Purdy Mr. David P. Quilty ‘77 Mr. Peter J. Racine ‘92 Mr. Robert C. Randall ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Rando ‘84, ‘85 Mr. Edward J. Rank ‘87 Ms. Barbara A. Raposa ‘01 Mr. Luis M. Raposo ‘83 Mr. Joseph F. Rapoza Mr. Paul J. Rauker ‘92 Ms. Jennifer L. Raxter ‘98 Mrs. Donna Raymond Brown ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. Rea Dr. Dorothy L. Read Mr. Jeffrey S. Reback ‘71 Mr. Robert F. Reed, Jr ‘70 Ms. Carol A. Rego ‘82 Ms. Judy Reis ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Rezendes ‘84, ‘93 Mr. Michael D. Rhines ‘84 Mr. F. Paul Richards ‘74 Mr. Scott Rigney ‘93 Mr. Michael K. Riley ‘69 Mr. Richard P. Riley Mr. Adam K. Risedorf ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Rizzo, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Larry D. Robbins ‘78 Mrs. Janet D. Robinson ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey L. Robinson Ms. Lynne A. Robitaille ‘81 Mrs. Donna M. Rogers ‘81 Dr. Wendy A. Rogers ‘85 Ms. Anne-Marie J. Rosa ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Rosa ‘73 Mrs. Anita Carroll Rose ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose Mr. Joseph G. Rose III ‘39 Mrs. Evelyn S. Rosen Mr. Rene E. Roy ‘74 Ms. Gail E. Russell Dr. and Mrs. John J. Russell Mr. Wayne H. Rutledge ‘82 Mr. G. Milton Ryan ‘66 Mr. Howard W. Salden ‘84 Ms. Fran Salubro Ms. Carmen M. Salvador ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Antonio J. Santos ‘78 Mr. Craig L. Santos ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. George P. Santos Ms. Susan D. Sargent ‘01 Dr. Joseph P. Sauro Mr. Stephen Savaria ‘83 Mr. Craig M. Sawtelle ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Schaefer Ms. Donna A. Schenkel ‘74 Mrs. Kay Scherzinger ‘56 Ms. Lea A. Schneider ‘83 Mr. Andrew G. Schofield, Jr. ‘70

Mr. Gilbert N. Schofield ‘51 Mr. and Mrs. William S. Schofield ‘74, ‘79 Mrs. Sandra M. Schutt ‘82 Mr. Martin A. Schwalm ‘92 Ms. Kathleen Scieszka ‘97 Professor Emeritus Joseph N. Scionti Mr. Daniel F. Scully ‘58 Ms. Laura E. Seabury ‘94 Mr. Donald T. Sena ‘73 Ms. Virginia A. Sexton Mrs. Kathleen Shannon ‘83 Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Shapiro Mr. Dana F. Shave ‘66 Mr. Dale Shenk Mr. Walter O. Shepard, Jr. ‘65 Ms. Susan Shubitowski ‘86 Mr. Howard S. Shubs ‘87 Dr. Augustine Silveira, Jr. ‘57 Ms. Evelyn M. Silvia ‘69 Mr. Jose F. Simas ‘90 Mr. Edward J. Simmons, Sr. ‘89 Dr. Bal Ram Singh Mr. Michael Sitarz ‘72 Mr. Jonathan K. Sjoblad ‘82 Mr. Peter F. Skaves ‘76 Mr. Thomas Skibinski ‘76 Mrs. Edith R. Skinner ‘83 Dr. William E. Skinner Mr. Robert C. Smith ‘80 and Mrs. Barbara Franconi Smith Mrs. Sylvia M. Smith ‘89 Attorney and Mrs. Walter R. Smith Ms. Karen E. Smith-Johnson ‘80 Mr. James J. Soares ‘66 Mr. Victor C. Soares ‘84 Mr. Otto F. Solberg ‘80 Mr. Michael J. Soucier ‘79 Ms. Denise M. Soucy ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Sousa Mr. Joseph L. Sousa ‘82 Mr. Ronald Souza ‘67 Mr. Joel Sowalsky Mr. Henry L. Spingler ‘68 Mr. Raymond H. St. Pierre ‘52 Mr. David A. St. Yves ‘78 Mrs. Jean E. Staiti ‘66 Mr. Charles Stampler Lt. Col. Audrey Stebenne, USAF (Ret.) ‘70 Dr. and Mrs. Michael T. Steinman Mr. Alexander J. Stevenson ‘78 Ms. Heather L. Stober ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Clifford L. Stoltze ‘78, ‘80 Dr. Richard D. Stone ‘68 Mr. Sheldon I. B. Straker ‘99 Mr. John R. Stratford ‘54 Mrs. Loretta E. Stride ‘85

Ms. Jane Strillchuk Brookins ‘82 Mr. Richard D. Strong ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Stucchi Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Sullivan Mr. Daniel T. Sullivan ‘63 Mrs. William F. Sullivan Mrs. Doreen M. Sylvia Hutchinson ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sylvia ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Sylvia ‘80 Mr. John Sylvia, Jr. ‘52 Ms. Pearl R. Szatek ‘78 Mr. Frederick L. Taber ‘70 Mr. Steven W. Taber ‘77 Mr. Roger P. Tache ‘80 Mr. Evangelos D. Tassiopoulos ‘90 Mr. Charles G. Taylor ‘65 Mr. Donald F. Taylor ‘54 Mrs. Pauline J. Teixeira ‘78 Mr. John A. Theriault ‘89 Professor Doris Thibault Mr. and Mrs. Gordon R. Thomas ‘69, ‘70 Mr. John E. Thomas ‘77 Mr. Manuel A. Thomas ‘56 Professor Emeritus Hans Thommen Mr. Scott D. Tingle ‘87 Mr. William D. Titcomb ‘62 Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Torres Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Trahan ‘76 Ms. Claire E. Travers ‘73 Dr. Linus Travers Mrs. Lorraine A. Travers ‘75 The Honorable Philip B. Travis ‘63 Mr. Martin E. Treadup ‘64 Mr. William L. Trippe ‘81 Mr. Stephen S. Trond ‘55 Mr. Mark Truelson ‘83 Ms. Kathleen F. Trumbull ‘86 Mr. Daniel J. Tschaen ‘77 Mr. Douglas J. Turner ‘69 Mrs. Tammy E. Vacha-Carreiro ‘88 Ms. Dorothy A. Valenti Mr. Brian D. Van Buskirk ‘98 Mr. and Mrs. Harvey D. Varnet ‘75 Mr. Peter M. Vercellone ‘69 Mr. Philip H. Viall ‘80 and Mrs. Claudette A. Roy-Viall ‘68 Mr. Thomas A. Viana ‘73 Dr. Antone C. Vieira ‘68 Ms. Karyn D. Vincent ‘85 Mrs. Karen E. Viteritti ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Wainer Ms. Diane J. Walder ‘73 Mrs. Patricia A. Walker ‘79 Mr. Richard C. Walker ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Philip N. Wall, Jr. Mr. Michael Walsh ‘01 Mr. Richard D. Walsh ‘76 Mr. Timothy P. Walsh ‘78 A l u m n i

Ms. Kerry J. Walsh-Kelleher ‘96 Mr. Duncan C. Warden ‘79 Ms. Susan Warren ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watkins Mr. Eric S. Watson ‘73 Dr. Robert P. and Mrs. Linda Waxler Mr. David A. Webster ‘71 Ms. Cecelia M. Weeks ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig J. Weimann Mr. Jeffrey Weissman ‘72 Ms. Lorna A. Welding ‘79 Mr. Timothy J. Welsh ‘77 Mr. J. Charles West ‘78 Ms. Dawn H. Wheeler ‘97 Mr. and Mrs. James Wheeler ‘98 Mrs. Cecilia C. Whipp ‘93 Mr. John S. Whitaker ‘82 Ms. Patricia J. Whitaker ‘73 Mrs. Judith G. White Mr. Paul M. White ‘ 80 Mr. John W. Whitehead ‘64 Mr. John F. Whiteside ‘52 Mr. Richard S. Whiting, Jr. ‘80 Mr. Maurice Wiernicki ‘81 Mr. Donald F. Wilbur ‘54 Ms. Mary R. Wilczek ‘91 Mrs. Virginia F. Wilkens ‘82 Mrs. Jean E. Williams ‘90 Mr. Maurice J. Wills ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Alan C. Willson ‘80, ‘81 Mr. Francis P. Wilson ‘62 Professor Howard W. Windham ‘ 67 Mrs. Theresa A. Winsor ‘73 Ms. Norma A. Winsper ‘73 Mr. Edward B. Wood ‘50 Mr. Malcolm D. Woodward III ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. Chang Ning Wu Mr. Joseph Xavier, Jr. ‘75 Ms. Jenny Xifaras ‘60 Mr. Robert B. Yates ‘84 Ms. Rose A. Yates Mr. Joseph H. Yoffa ‘79 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken Mrs. Joyce L. Youngberg ‘68 Ms. Elizabeth A. Zelski ‘73 Ms. Susan Senesac Zipoli ‘92 Mr. James R. Zisson ‘82 Ms. Rosemary A. Zurawel ‘73

33

Members

Mrs. Doreatha M. Aguiar ‘64 Mr. Luis F. Aguiar ‘75 Mr. Raffaele Aiello ‘64 Mr. Kyle A. Ainsley ‘80 M a g a z i n e

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Ms. Sally M. Aldrich ‘87 Ms. Elizabeth Ann Almeida ‘95 Mr. Nadilio D. Almeida ‘66 Dr. Charles M. Alty ‘61 Mr. Stephen J. Alves ‘89 Mr. Jay C. Amicangelo ‘ 91 Ms. Mary G. Andrade ‘76 Mrs. Jessica M. Andree ‘00 Mr. Peter G. Annunziato ‘90 Ms. Janice Antonellis Mrs. Andrea S. Arquette ‘01 Ms. Eva M. Arsenault ‘80 Mr. John D. Arsenault ‘78 Mr. Warwick P. Atkins Mr. David A. Augustinho ‘79 Mr. John L. Aumann ‘75 Mrs. Lorraine M. Azar ‘71 Mrs. Elizabeth A. Bahrns ‘75 Mr. Damien P. Bailey ‘90 Mr. Vernon Bailey ‘89 Mr. Keith B. Baldwin ‘95 Ms. Ann M. Bamber ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Banys ‘80, ‘81 Ms. Donna D. Baracka ‘87 Mr. Mario J. Barbosa ‘77 Dr. Nancy D. Barnes ‘79 Ms. Elaine M. Barrett Ms. Susan J. Barrett ‘81 Mr. Christopher Bassett ‘86 Mr. John E. Bauer ‘84 Ms. Thelma A. Baxter Mr. Dennis E. Beals ‘69 Mr. Jeffrey Beatty Mrs. Sheila Beckeman ‘80 Mr. Richard G. Bedard, Jr. ‘84 Ms. Tillie J. Bederow Mrs. Barbara E. Belanger ‘77 Ms. Sandra A. Belanger ‘72 Mr. Carlos O. Benavides Mr. Manuel Benevides ‘81 Mr. Everett H. Bennett ‘56 Ms. Denise Benoit ‘ 83 Mr. Normand R. Benoit ‘77 Mr. David J. Berche ‘85 Mr. Peter L. Berdos, Jr. ‘85 Mr. Richard H. Bergman ‘71

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Ms. Wendy M. Bernazani ‘92 Mr. Arsene J. Berube ‘50 Ms. Kerry J. Betsold ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Manuel Bettencourt Mr. Richard H. Bibby ‘61 Mr. Bradford R. Bibeau ‘77 Ms. Crystal Bickford ‘93 Mrs. Anne M. Blackington ‘81 Ms. Christine M. Blackshaw ‘01 Ms. Sandra R. Boehler ‘00 Mrs. Anne B. Boisvert ‘74 Mr. Paul J. Bollea ‘75 Mrs. Diane L. Bonalewicz ‘80 Ms. Jeanne M. Bonneau ‘63 Mr. Frank R. Borges, Jr. ‘52 Mr. Paul A. Borkman ‘60 Mr. Paul B. Boucher ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Bertrand A. Bouffard ‘75, ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Lionel M. Bourassa ‘63, ‘64 Mrs. Susan C. Bouthillette ‘88 Mr. Allen A. Bozek ‘65 Ms. Dianne M. Bradley ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Bradley, Jr. ‘82, ‘83 Mr. Thomas R. Branchaud ‘91 Mr. William Branco ‘96 Ms. Kathleen R. Bredimus ‘70 Mr. Ronald A. Bridge ‘88 Mr. David A. Bridgwood ‘78 Ms. Maria D. Brigida-Gil ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Brinley Ms. Lillian C. Brisebois ‘70 Mr. Charles V. Brock ‘60 Professor Joseph A. Bronstad Mr. and Mrs. David Brookfield Ms. Debbie L. Brooks Ms. Susan M. Buchan ‘72 Mr. Jeffrey H. Bunce ‘76 Mr. Matthew F. Burke ‘89 Mr. Jeffrey S. Burns ‘86 and Mrs. Jane E. Burnem-Burns ‘86 Mr. Richard M. Bush ‘71 Mr. Richard Bussiere ‘77 Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Cabral

Ms. Debra M. Callahan ‘97 Dr. and Mrs. Wayne J. Camara ‘78 Mr. Jason S. Campbell ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Canty Mr. Joseph Carando ‘53 Mrs. Ann M. Cardoza-Askew ‘88 Mr. Paul A. Cardullo ‘72 Ms. Pamela J. Carlson ‘90 Mrs. Rosemary S. Carlson ‘74 Mr. Richard J. Caron ‘69 Ms. Shirley A. Carreiro ‘73 Mr. Kenneth R. Carrier ‘67 Mr. David M. Carroll ‘01 Mr. Robert N. Carroll ‘94 Mr. William Carter, Jr. ‘54 Mrs. Mary Anne Cary ‘76 Ms. Veronica A. Casey ‘92 Mr. Arthur F. Cassidy, Jr. ‘76 Ms. Joy I. Cawley ‘83 Ms. Dianne M. Cella ‘75 Mr. William D. Chamberlain ‘71 Mr. Henry A. Champagne ‘83 Mr. Kieran J. Chapman ‘71 Mr. David B. Charette ‘76 Mr. Ashok Ruman Charry ‘00 Mr. Eric R. Chartier ‘87 Mr. Patrick E. Chasse ‘95 Ms. Robin A. Chlebek ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Nicolas A. Choubah ‘88, ‘89 Mr. Neil T. Churchill ‘81 Ms. Patricia M. Ciavola ‘82 Ms. Mary Kate Cichon ‘01 Mr. Paul Cienniwa and Ms. Audrey Cienniwa Mr. David W. Ciszkowski ‘97 Mr. and Mrs. Gerard J. Clark Ms. Mary M. Clarke ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Clark ‘83 Ms. Susan A. Clarke ‘01 Ms. Elena J. Clifford ‘97 Mr. Philip A. Clorite ‘50 Mrs. Gail Coble ‘78 Ms. Lisa M. Cohen ‘94 Mr. Aaron E. Coleman ‘93 Mr. G. Normand Collet ‘60 Ms. Paula G. Collins ‘85

Mr. Leonard C. Connors ‘50 Mr. Leonard C. Connors, Jr. ‘75 Mrs. Colleen C. Considine ‘75 Ms. Carol A. Constantine ‘02 Ms. Cathy J. Cormier ‘88 Mr. Stephen J. Correa ‘73 Mr. John W. Cosgrove, Jr. ‘82 Mr. Carlos A. Costa ‘92 Ms. Claire P. Costa ‘71 Mr. Robert M. Costa ‘01 Ms. Mary L. Costello Daly ‘83 Mr. Edward R. Cote ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Arie J. Cote ‘66, ‘84 Mr. William J. Cote ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. James E. Coughlin ‘84 Ms. Caroline Court ‘90 Mr. Eugene L. Courteau ‘84 Mrs. Lisa P. Couto ‘92 Mr. Paul R. Couture ‘72 Mr. Christopher W. Covert, Jr. ‘85 Mr. Maurice K. Crawford ‘80 Mr. Joseph R. Crimmins, Jr. ‘81 Ms. Maria F. Crivello ‘80 Mrs. Karyn D. Crocker ‘85 Ms. Michelle A. Croft ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Crompton ‘67, ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. William C. Crooker ‘83, ‘86 Mr. Peter A. Cross ‘77 Mr. Gary W. Crowley ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Crowley III ‘80, ‘84 Colonel Ronald J. Cruz (Ret.) ‘69 Ms. Sarah P. Curley ‘99 Mr. Thomas R. Curtiss ‘83 Mr. Edward V. Dailey ‘54 Mr. Michael J. D’Alu ‘70 Ms. Jane V. Damiani ‘87 Mr. Fredric C. Danhauser ‘74 Ms. Susan E. Darbyshire ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Fernando DaSilva ‘75, ‘78 Mr. David B. Dauer ‘75 Mrs. Kathleen L. Davey ‘82 Ms. Deborah Barboza Davis ‘74 Mr. John S. Davis ‘76 Mrs. Isabel A. Dean ‘78 Ms. Lori A. Dean ‘92 Mr. Kevin F. DeAquair ‘92 Mr. James Deliyiannis ‘80 Mr. Americo DeMelo Mr. James F. DeMelo ‘72 Mr. Gregory A. Derosier ‘81 Mr. Paul R. Desforges ‘62 Mrs. Marianne DeSouza ‘84 Ms. Dorothy L. Desrosiers ‘73 Mr. Stephen Devlin ‘79 Mr. Stephen W. Dodge ‘83 Mr. Michael E. Donaghy ‘77


Mr. John V. Donnelly ‘67 Mr. Lee S. Donohue ‘89 Mr. Kevin M. Donovan ‘93 Mr. James A. Doucet ‘55 Mr. Thomas M. Dowd ‘79 Mrs. Carol Doyle ‘80 Mr. Gary W. Drewniak ‘66 Mr. Michael J. Duarte ‘80 Mrs. Bernice R. Dubitsky ‘70 Mr. Douglas D. Ducharme ‘01 Mrs. Joanne W. Duckworth ‘70 Mr. Donald J. Dufault ‘86 Mr. Peter G. Duhaime ‘90 Mr. Robert J. Dumais ‘73 Mr. Robert W. Dunn III ‘01 Mrs. Janice G. Dyke-Barney ‘79 Very Reverend Walter M. Dziordz ‘77 Mr. Thomas B. Eastwood ‘86 Mr. Charles L. Eble Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Eddleston ‘82, ‘89 Mr. Brian J. Ego ‘88 Ms. Lori A. Elkerton ‘92 Mr. Orluf R. Elting Ms. Linda Enos ‘78 Mr. Antonio F. Esteves ‘80 Mr. William R. Etchells ‘55 Mrs. Gayle Exworthy ‘81 Chancellor Professor Gilbert Fain Mr. Alfred J. Falconieri, Jr. ‘80 Mr. William C. Faye ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. A. Eugene Feio Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Felag, Jr. Ms. Lucille Fernandes Mr. Gerald J. Ferreira ‘77 Mr. Jeffrey D. Field ‘82 Ms. Phyllis J. Figueiredo ‘87 Mr. Barry S. Fineberg ‘76 Ms. Donna L. Finni ‘86 Ms. Carole Fiola Ms. Sheri A. Fish ‘93 Mr. Barry O. Fisher ‘73 Mrs. Noreen E. Flaherty ‘93 Ms. Kathleen Flanagan ‘00 Mr. Michael S. Flory ‘92 Professor John Fobanjong Mr. Michael A. Fogarty ‘93 Mrs. Rose A. Follett ‘97 Ms. Wendy Forbush ‘80 Mr. Bernard R. Forcier ‘59 Ms. Kathleen D. Fortier ‘00 Mr. Paul J. Fortier ‘81 Mr. Roger H. Fortier ‘78 Ms. D’Anna Fortunato Mr. Richard A. Foster ‘64 Ms. Nancy L. Fournier ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. David W. Fowle ‘73 Dr. and Mrs. Irving A. Fradkin Ms. Terese S. Frasca

Ms. Kellie L. Freitas ‘97 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin F. Frey Mr. and Mrs. Jess Frontain Mr. Geoffrey W. Fuchs ‘80 Mr. Erik D. Fuglestad ‘93 Mr. Edward Furtado ‘53 Mrs. Cheryl C. Furze ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Pierre J. Gabriel ‘75, ‘78 Ms. Theresa R. Galligan ‘74 Ms. Marianne A. Ganzenmuller ‘78 Ms. Lynn J. Garant ‘83 Reverend F. Richard Garland 85 Mr. David W. Gavigan ‘61 Mrs. Lisa A. Gay ‘84 Mr. Michael Gaydou ‘80 Mr. Paul D. Gelinas ‘90 Mr. Douglas K. Gentile ‘85 Mr. David Gibbs ‘81 Mr. James R. Gilbert ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Kirby Gilmore Mr. and Mrs. Herman Gitlin Ms. Kathleen Gleason ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. James Glover Mr. William J. Gobush ‘97 Mr. Gordon E. Goldberg ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Ludgero Gomez Ms. Patricia E. Gonet ‘73 Mr. Ronald L. Gonneville ‘71 Ms. Susan M. Gonsalves ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. John P. Gorman Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Gould ‘84, ‘86 Mr. Arthur Goyette, Jr. ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Grandmaison ‘73, ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. John P. Grant ‘62, ‘71 Mr. Walter M. Gray ‘62 Mr. Paul J. Grebla ‘69 Mr. Daniel I. Greer ‘92 Mrs. Lucille E. Gregory ‘81 Mr. James E. Greichen ‘53 Mrs. Mary E. Griffin ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Steven A. Groves ‘82, ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Guay, Jr. ‘81 Mr. Edward Guida ‘92 Ms. Danielle M. Guillette ‘86 Mr. Jeff S. Guinee ‘91 Dr. and Mrs. A. Gunasekaran Ms. Susan C. Gurganious ‘68 Mr. Terence Haaland ‘81 Ms. Lucille R. Hadley Mrs. Laurie Hahesy ‘00 Ms. Nicole J. Hahn ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Alan W. Hall Mr. John F. Halloran ‘79 Mr. Bradford G. Hammel ‘78 Mrs. Carol A. Hanley ‘68 Mr. J. Michael Hannon ‘62

Mrs. Deborah A. Harding ‘88 Mr. Brian P. Hart ‘88 Mrs. Betty M. Hartford ‘86 Mr. Edward J. Hartigan ‘68 Mr. Barry E. Haskell ‘71 Ms. Judith A. Haskell ‘90 Mr. Wayne A. Haskell ‘58 Mr. William R. Hathaway ‘77 Ms. Kathleen E. Hawkins ‘71 Mr. Bradley P. Hayes ‘95 Mrs. Joan M. Hayes ‘87 Mrs. Thelma L. Hayward ‘80 Mr. Earl W. Hebert ‘62 Ms. Kathryn Heimerdinger ‘76 Mr. Crispin D. Hesford ‘74 Mrs. Catherine M. Hickey ‘90 Mr. Michael J. Hickey ‘70 Mr. Brian C. Hildebrant ‘00 Mr. John M. Hill ‘97 Mr. Jonathan E. Hird Mr. Thomas C. Hoder ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. James S. Hoffman Mr. Timothy L. Hoffman ‘77 Mr. Christopher M. Hogan ‘93 Ms. Barbara M. Holmes ‘75 Mr. Donald P. Horn ‘59 Mr. Ronald A. House ‘64 Mr. Raymond J. Houtman ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Alex Houtzager Mr. Robert P. Huff ‘73 Ms. Colleen Hughes Mr. Warren L. Ide ‘75 Ms. Deborah Ignagni ‘83 Mr. Harold I. Isserlis ‘54 Mr. Russell R. Jackson ‘68 Mr. Donald Jacobsen ‘84 Mr. Michael T. Jamgochian ‘65 Mr. Mark E. Jenkins ‘84 Ms. Christine M. Jennette ‘99 Mrs. Estelle R. Jennings ‘74 Ms. Emily Johns Ms. Courtney L. Jones ‘01 Ms. Debra L. Jones ‘91 Mr. William J. Kane, Jr. ‘86 Rabbi Raphael J. Kanter Chancellor Professor Laurie J. Kaplowitz Mr. Kenneth E. Keay ‘81 Ms. Kathleen E. Keller ‘80 Mr. Edward M. Kelly ‘65 Mr. James V. Kelly ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Kennison Mr. Jason M. Kent ‘94 Mrs. Lisa M. Kilcoyne ‘ 82 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey D. King ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Kirkwood ‘77, ‘83 Mr. Nicholas Konstantakos ‘60 Mr. Ivan Kranich ‘49 A l u m n i

Mrs. Sheila Krekorian-Tully ‘87 Ms. Janet D. Krobot ‘80 Ms. Jennifer L. Krol ‘01 Mr. Donald Krudys ‘79 Mr. Peter A. Kuchinski ‘76 Mr. Pierre L. La Perriere ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. James F. LaFrancois Mr. and Mrs. James J. Lally ‘78 Mr. John E. Landers-Cauley, Jr. ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Clifford W. Landry Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Landry ‘82 Mr. Joseph A. Lane ‘60 Attorney and Mrs. Scott W. Lang Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Langlois ‘69 Professor Richard J. Larschan Ms. Kim M. Lauder ‘82 Mr. Alvin C. Lavoie ‘77 Mr. Bruce S. Lavoie ‘98 Mr. Frank J. Lawrence ‘67 Mr. Robert A. Lawrence ‘70 Professor James B. Lawton Mr. Peter C. Leary ‘85 Mr. Jonathan P. Leaver ‘93 Mr. Raymond J. LeBlanc, Jr. Mr. Robert G. Ledoux ‘83 Ms. Amy L. Leduc ‘78 Mr. Donald R. Lee ‘73 Mr. Richard J. Legan ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas E. Lemmo ‘71 Mr. David J. Lentz ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. LeRoyer ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Marc L. Letendre ‘75 Ms. Deborah F. Leve ‘82 Mr. John L. Lewis ‘81 Mr. John W. Lewis ‘96 Mr. Martin A. Lipman and Dr. Barbara Pearl Mrs. Cynthia M. Lipsett ‘78 Mr. William G. Lisk ‘77 Ms. Brenda C. Livingston ‘96 Mr. Brian R. Loiselle ‘03 Mr. William F. Lopes ‘66 Mr. Gennaro R. Lopriore ‘56 Mr. Armindo P. Louro ‘77 Mrs. Elayne G. Lowenthal ‘68 Mr. Thomas C. Lucier ‘92 Ms. Brenda M. Macedo ‘81 Mr. Robert D. Machado ‘68 Mr. Edwin L. Maclean ‘79 Mrs. Christine M. Magalhaes ‘92 Mr. David J. Mahoney ‘77 Mr. John Mahoney ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Makarewicz ‘69, ‘71 Mr. Paul D. Malcolm ‘57 Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Malkoski ‘81, ‘82 Mr. Michael S. Manchester ‘67 M a g a z i n e

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You have helped make it possible—The Charlton College of Business

36

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy A. Mancour ‘88, ‘89 Ms. Lynn Manning ‘84 Ms. Paulette L. Manssuer ‘78 Ms. Risha H. Margolis ‘69 Mr. Peter F. Mark ‘83 Ms. Ana E. Marques ‘93 Mrs. Catherine M. Martin ‘82 Mr. Raymond N. Martin ‘59 Mrs. Margaret A. Martinez ‘72 Ms. Regina M. Martino ‘99 Chancellor Professor Giulio Massano Mr. and Mrs. Jude Mattero Mr. David E. Maynard ‘89 Ms. Eleanor M. Mayo ‘90 Mr. Joseph A. McCabe ‘78 Mr. James M. McCarthy ‘68 Ms. Rita C. McCormack Ms. Danielle Poyant McCue ‘89 Ms. Jacquelyn E. McDonald Mrs. Joan M. McDonald ‘97 Mr. Paul M. McDonald ‘79 and Mrs. Kathleen S. McDonald ‘79 Ms. Janice R. McDonough ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. McGarr ‘81, ‘82 Ms. Erin L. McGough-Silvia ‘87 Ms. Rachel J. McGourthy ‘98 Mr. Chad J. McGuire ‘97 Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey A. McNally ‘85, ‘86 Mr. Michael J. McNally ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Medeiros ‘59, ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Medeiros ‘85, 86 Mr. John E. Medeiros ‘83 Mr. Robert Medeiros ‘62 Ms. Cheryl A. Mello ‘93 Mr. James D. Mello ‘83 Ms. Linda A. Mello ‘90 Mr. Philip W. Mello ‘75 Captain and Mrs. Raymond Mello ‘72, ‘79 Mr. Richard C. Menard ‘69 Mr. Anthony Mercadante ‘81 Ms. Elaine R. Meredith ‘81

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Mr. and Mrs. Michael Meredith ‘75, ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Merullo ‘83, ‘85 Mrs. Karren E. Meyer ‘87 Mrs. Heidi A. Michaelis ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Michaud Mr. Peter A. Michno ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Ryan P. Mickool ‘94, ‘95 Ms. Stacey R. Millen ‘00 Mr. Charles J. Miller ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Newton Millham Ms. Patricia M. Mitchell ‘77 Ms. Susan M. Moe ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Monchik Mr. and Mrs. Antonio T. Moniz ‘75 Ms. Nancy Morgan-Boucher ‘96 Mr. Herbert M. Moskowitz ‘67 Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R. Moss ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery Mullen Ms. Claire Mullins ‘72 Mr. Gary S. Munroe ‘78 Mrs. Linda B. Munson ‘88 Mr. Charles Murphy Ms. Kelly A. Murphy ‘94 Mr. William J. Murphy ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Dave Murray Mr. William F. Murray ‘81 Ms. Rachel Arianna Muzzy ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. William S. Napolitano ‘78, 82 Mr. Francis E. Nasser ‘52 Mr. Hugh J. Neenan ‘78 Ms. Brook Nelson-Caesar ‘77 Mr. Robert J. Nestor ‘63 Ms. Mary L. Neves ‘78 Ms. Candace A. Nichols ‘83 Ms. Paula M. Nicholson ‘85 Mrs. Florence E. Nisbet ‘73 Ms. Elin Noble Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Noonan ‘79 Ms. Susan E. Norlin-Staudaher ‘79 Mrs. Debra A. Nourse ‘85 Mr. Robert M. Nyman ‘90 and Ms. Susan Dorry ‘89 Mr. Joseph J. O’Bara ‘71

Mr. Michael P. O’Bryan ‘92 Mr. Daniel C. O’Connell ‘64 Ms. Karen A. O’Connor Ms. Margaret M. O’Connor ‘90 Mr. John P. Oliveira, Jr. ‘89 Mr. Thomas A. Ollila ‘78 Ms. Raquel Pacheco ‘95 Mr. Bruce H. Palmer Mr. and Mrs. David P. Palmer ‘92, ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis P. Paquette ‘74, ‘75 Ms. Alyssa Parent Mr. Robert V. Partington ‘50 Mrs. Mary M. Pasquale ‘89 Mrs. Carleen Patrone ‘76 Ms. Leslie Pearson ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Pejouhy ‘78 Mr. John H. Pelto, Jr. Ms. Joan L. Pepin ‘73 Mr. Elliott S. Perchuk ‘76 Mr. Jeremy M. Pereira ‘02 Ms. Nancy M. Peresta ‘83 Mr. Alan Vinton Perkins ‘94 Ms. Sharon Pero ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Perreault Mr. David T. Perry ‘91 Mr. and Mrs. Eric Perry ‘01 Mr. Jeffrey Perry ‘01 Mr. Anthony P. Persiani ‘88 Mr. Daniel Petrie ‘90 Ms. Lucia A. Petringa Mrs. Joanna L. Pettey ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell S. Pettey ‘79, ‘99 Mr. David Kendall Pierce ‘95 Mr. Donald I. Pierce, Jr. ‘53 Ms. Heidi L. Piknick ‘94 Mr. George M. Pimentel ‘79 Mr. Stephen Pires ‘83 Ms. Michelle A. Plamondon ‘01 Mr. Vincent D. Plourde ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Policastro Mr. Richard Polka ‘88 Mr. Donald G. Polsell ‘ 73 Ms. Arlene Pombo ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Pomerleau ‘74 Mr. Michael Poster ‘39 Mr. Garnett L. Powers, Jr. ‘71 Mr. Steven Powers ‘80 Ms. Mona Provencher Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth K. Pustis ‘85 Mr. Roger E. Race ‘76 and Ms. Margo J. Moore ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. James P. Ragan ‘83, ‘84 Mrs. Catherine A. Raker ‘89 M. Shuamala Raman Mr. Joseph D. Raposa ‘52

Mrs. Diane R. Raskind ‘81 Mrs. Rita T. Raymond Mrs. Sandra M. Read ‘76 Mr. Christopher Ready ‘92 Mr. James H. Rebello ‘72 Ms. Eileen F. Regan Mr. August Francis Reis ‘63 Ms. Joan M. Remmes ‘02 Ms. Danielle K. Renaud ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Stanley A. Revzin Mr. and Mrs. Alan Richard ‘72 Mr. Raymond C. Richardson, Jr. ‘57 Ms. Sara Ringler ‘89 Mr. Kenneth B. Ritchie ‘95 Ms. Estelle T. Roach ‘77 Ms. Martha A. Robertshaw ‘79 Mr. Donn L. Robidoux ‘75 Mrs. Claire Robinson ‘78 Mr. Samuel F. Rocco ‘77 and Ms. Ann M. O’Brien-Rocco ‘ 77 Mr. John G. Rocha ‘52 Mr. Leonard F. Rocha ‘76 Mrs. Ida Roderick ‘56 Mr. Steven J. Roderigues ‘82 Mr. David G. Rodrigues ‘75 Mrs. Rosemary Rodrigues ‘73 Mr. Joseph Rogers ‘67 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Rose ‘95, ‘94 Mr. James C. Rose and Ms. Eileen A. Rose Mrs. Wendy Roskowski ‘90 Mr. William B. Ross ‘63 Ms. Valerie J. Rousseau ‘97 Ms. Karla J. Rovatti ‘95 Mr. Kevin M. Rowles ‘77 Mr. David P. Roy ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Ruegg ‘80 Mr. David J. Ruggeri ‘85 Mr. Tom Frank Rusek ‘89 Mrs. Cathy A. Russo ‘84 Mr. Michael R. Ryerson ‘64 Ms. Margaret E. Sabens ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. Barry Sachs Mr. George J. Sadler III ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. James D. Salvo Mr. and Mrs. Dennis P. Santos ‘93 Ms. Mary H. Santos ‘74 Ms. Gayle Sauer Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Scanlon Mrs. Diane Scheffler ‘84 Ms. Christine Schromm Mr. and Mrs. Lester Schwartz Ms. Mary Blum Schwartz ‘79 Mrs. Thelma Schwartz Dr. James R. Sears and Ms. Donna Huse Mrs. Cynthia D. Sequino ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Shand ‘69 Mrs. Judith Ganson Shaw ‘60


Ms. Karen Sheehan ‘83 Mr. Gary R. Shepherd ‘78 Mr. William A. Sicard ‘90 Ms. Filomena M. Silva ‘ 79 Mr. Manuel H. Silva ‘80 Mr. Robert J. Silva ‘67 Mr. Roger L. Silva ‘73 Mr. Raymond K. Silveira ‘50 Mrs. Diane M. Silvia ‘86 Ms. Janine E. Simmons ‘75 Ms. Kathleen Sitarz ‘78 Mrs. Patricia Smith ‘75 Mr. Stephen J. Smith ‘00 Mrs. Virginia M. Smith ‘84 Mr. John B. Sorel ‘90 Mr. Donald R. Sorelle ‘71 Dr. Sharon A. Sousa Ms. Anne Marie Souza ‘84 Mr. John S. Souza ‘50 Mr. Michael M. Souza ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Souza ‘75, ‘91 Ms. Carol B. Spencer ‘92 Mr. Victor Spiroff ‘64 Ms. Jayne T. St. Pierre ‘81 Ms. Susan D. Starrett ‘73 Ms. Brenda J. Steek ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Neil A. Steinmeyer ‘92, ‘93 Dr. and Mrs. Jeremy B. Stern Ms. Margaret Stimson ‘80 Mr. Steven M. Strandberg ‘88 Ms. Beverley E. Sullivan ‘78 Mrs. Carole C. Sullivan ‘81 Ms. Cecile M. Sullivan ‘00 Ms. Rolande Sullivan ‘80 Mr. William G. Sumner ‘51 Ms. Heather Egan Sussman ‘96 Mr. Matthew J. Sylvia ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Szala Professor Priscilla R. Tabachnik ‘63 Mr. James F. Tarallo ‘85 Mr. Durval M. Tavares ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Tavares ‘64, ‘76 Mr. Alden F. Taylor ‘41 Mr. Carl D. Taylor ‘55 Mr. George B. Teixeira ‘90 Ms. Victoria Tepe Ms. Donna M. Theodore ‘86 Mr. Henri-Louis Thiboutot ‘67 Mrs. Charlotte E. Thomas Mr. Isaac J. Thomas ‘82 and Mrs. Colleen Bruce Thomas ‘99 Mr. Randall G. Thurston ‘79 Ms. Elaine Tisdale Asselin Mr. Frank C. Trani Mr. Gerard L. Tremblay, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Carrie L. Tremko ‘79 Mr. William L. Trepanier ‘83 Mrs. Janet R. Tschaen ‘75

Dr. and Mrs. Albin F. Turbak ‘51 Mr. Christopher Turek ‘78 Mr. Arthur J. Turner, Jr. ‘53 Mr. Kevin Turner ‘97 Mrs. Gayle E. Ulrich ‘85 Ms. Mary Ungerman Mrs. Jean M. Van Doren ‘77 Mrs. Carol H. Vedrody ‘70 Mr. Thomas M. Vickery ‘85 Mr. John Vieira, Jr. ‘76 Mr. Stephen A. Vieira ‘63 Mr. Gareth I. Vigus ‘92 Ms. Paula T. Villanova ‘75 Mr. Gary W. Vincent ‘81 Dr. Donna M. Viveiros ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. David J. Walsh ‘94, ‘98 Mr. Richard C. Waring ‘69 Mr. Paul W. Warren ‘79 Mr. Kenneth P. Watts ‘97 Mr. John M. Werly and Ms. Bonnie Werly ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. David F. Westgate Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Wheeler Ms. Nancy F. Wheelwright ‘74 Mr. Joseph M. White ‘03 Mrs. Juliette L. Whitehead ‘89 Mr. Francis P. Whitsitt-Lynch ‘85 Mr. Andrew Wiernicki ‘83 and Ms. Lorraine McCarthy ‘83 Ms. Elizabeth A. Williams ‘63 Mr. James B. Williams, Jr. ‘86 Ms. Maria F.B. Williams ‘97 Ms. Lindas Williams-Dillon ‘75 Mrs. Georgia Wingrove Ms. Delia C. Woodward ‘02 Mr. Jun Xu ‘96 Mr. Steven L. Youngblood ‘01 Mr. Henry J. Zapasnik ‘73 Mrs. Jan R. Ziter ‘77 Mr. Matthew A. Zito ‘93

Corporations, Foundations and Other Organizations A. H. Ferguson Company ABC Disposal Service, Inc. Acushnet Company Acushnet Construction Acuvision, Inc. AFFS, Inc. AFSCME Local 507 Allergy & Asthma Center Almeida Realty, Inc. Alperts Furniture Showplace Alphagraphics #183 American Research & Management Company

ASM International, Rhode Island Chapter ATMC Advancement Fund Alice S. Ayling Scholarship Foundation Ballymeade Country Club Ballymeade Realty Corporation Battelle Bay Sailing Equipment Beaumont Sign Company, Inc. Borden & Remington Corporation Boston Scientific Corporation Brandeis University National Women’s Committee Bristol Community College Bristol Tape Company, Inc. Brockton Exterminating Company, Inc. Brookline Co-operative Bank Brothers of Christian Instruction Bucko’s Parts & Tackle Bufftree Building Company The Bufftree Foundation J. F. Burke Consultants Cambridge Mustard Seed Foundation Cape Cod Plastering, Inc. Cardoza’s Wine & Spirits Patrick Carney Foundation Castle Mortgage Brokerage Center for Business Research Century Foodservice, Inc. The Charles Irwin Travelli Fund Ida S. Charlton Charitable Trust Chubb Group of Insurance Companies Citizens Financial Group, Inc. Citizens-Union Savings Bank CIVITAS Architects & Planners Claremont Flock Corporation Clifford Marketing Club Madeirense Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Providence Colonial Wholesale Beverage Combined Jewish Philanthropies Committee to Elect Mark C. Montigny Committee to Elect Michael J. Rodrigues Committee to Elect Robert Correia Committeee to Elect Therese Murray CompassBank Jack Conway & Company, Inc. Core Business Technologies Henry H. Crapo Charitable Foundation CSIV, Inc. Dartmouth Dodge A l u m n i

Dartmouth Industrial Development Foundation Dartmouth Mall Philip G. David Insurance Agency Decas Cranberry Company, Inc. Dias, Lapalme & Martin, LLP Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, Inc. Diversified Marine Donnelly Concrete DSD Realty Trust Eastern Fisheries, Inc. Edgewood Trust Sander and Ray Epstein Charitable Foundation Fairhaven Mazda Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank Fall River Ford Fall River United Jewish Appeal, Inc. Fall River Women’s Union Robert B. Feingold & Associates, P.C. Fernandes & Charest, P.C. Fifield, Inc. Fire Protection Services First Bristol Corporation First Citizens Federal Credit Union The Firstfed Charitable Foundation Flint Village, LLC Frajile Glass Fredette Engineering Services Friday & Associates Maria Furman Family Fund Garcia, Galuska & DeSousa Consulting Engineers Garzoni & Company, Inc. General Carpentry Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Milton A. Glicksman, DMD Global Glass of New England, Inc. Good Friends Chinese Restaurant H & S Tool and Engineering, Inc. Harold G. Lash Real Estate Hillel Instituto do Livro Instrument Technology, Inc. Intermark Fabric Corporation International Compliance Systems, Inc. International Council For Canadian Studies J & S Finish, Inc. J. D. Design & Decorating J. S. Luiz 3rd, Inc. The Jarabek Family Charitable Foundation Jewish Federation of Greater New Bedford, Inc. Jimmy’s Pizza W. D. Jones Engineering M a g a z i n e

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You have helped make it possible—Evergreen, one of the new dorms

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J-W International Imports, Inc. Karam Insurance Agency, Inc. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company Kenneth T. and Mildred S. Gammons Charitable Foundation, Inc. Kevin’s Auto Parts, Inc. LMP Realty Trust Labor Heritage Foundation Gerald J. Lemay Family Trust Raymond A. Letourneau, Esq. Little People’s College, Inc. The Lloyd Center Luso-American Development Foundation Maag Flock Macschinen GmbH The MacLean Charitable Foundation Macx, Inc. Mall Tanning and Skincare Center, Inc. Manuel Rogers and Sons Funeral Home, Inc. Robert J. Marchand, Esq. Mass. Foundation for Teaching and Learning, Inc. Mass Society of Professional Engineers Medeiros Insurance Agency Metro South Chamber of Commerce Micro Technology Mission Hill Women’s Auxiliary Moore & Isherwood, Inc. Munro Distributing Company, Inc. National Council of Jewish Women, N.B. Section Nauset Sales Company, Inc. NBHS Athletic Dept. NBHS Faculty Fund Neto Insurance Agency, Inc. New Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce New Bedford Floor Covering Sales Company, Inc. New England Carpenters

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New England Construction Company, Inc. New England Laborers New England Promotions Northeast Medical Research Association Notre Dame Children’s Class OCI Software Design & Development Pencils, Inc. Ponichtera & Denardis, P.C. Precix, Inc. Projx Corporation Provost’s Council Purvis Systems Incorporated Quadrant Software Quality Inn of Somerset R. B. Textiles R. N. LeBoeuf Enterprises Ramsbottom Printing, Inc. Redgate Design Group Regiao Autonoma dos Azores Reynolds-DeWalt Printing, Inc. RiverView Marketing Consultants, Ltd. River Road Family Medicine RJD Engineering Company Rocky Run, Inc. SCI Northeast Region Saint Anne’s Hospital The Scotts Company Sippican, Inc. Sisters of Notre Dame Slade’s Ferry Bank Smokey Bones Restaurant Sodexho, Inc. Southcoast Endodontics Southeastern Textile Machinery, Inc. Southern New England School of Law, Inc. St. Anne’s Credit Union Steam Turbine Engineering and Maintenance, Inc. Mr. William J. Sullivan

Sylvia & Company Insurance Agency, Inc. T.A. Wallace & Associates, Inc. Takeoffs, Inc. Thistle Hill Weavers Tifereth Israel Congregation TOFIAS The Standard-Times Tremblay’s Bus Company, Inc. Truesdale Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association, Inc. Tufts University UMass Dartmouth Library Associates United Way of Greater New Bedford, Inc. United Way of Rhode Island Universal Plating Company, Inc. Universal Roofing & Sheet Metal Company, Inc. University Campus Store V-RAJ Corporation Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Wareham Nurse-Midwives, P.C. Waring Affiliated Family Funeral Homes Waring-Sullivan Funeral Homes W.B. Mason Henry and Joan T. Wheeler Charitable Fund White’s of Westport The Sidney J. Weinberg Jr. Foundation Wing Walker Initiatives YMCA Matching Gift Companies Abbott Laboratories Aetna Life & Casualty Alstom Power, Inc. American Ref-Fuel Amica Mutual Insurance Company Analog Devices, Inc. AstraZeneca Attleboro Mutual Fire Insurance

The Chubb Corporation Clariant Corporation Compaq Computer Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Eaton Corporation Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Exxon Education Foundation Fidelity Investments Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund Fleet/Boston FleetBoston Financial Foundation Fleet Matching Gifts Program Fluor Foundation FM Global Foundation Geico Companies General Dynamics General Electric Gillette Company Greif Bros. Corporation Harvey Hubbell Foundation IKON Office Solutions International Business Machines Corporation Invensys Systems, Inc. John Hancock Mutual Life Johnson & Johnson Key Foundation LaSalle Bank, N.A. McKesson Foundation Merck & Company, Inc. Merck Company Foundation The J.P. Morgan Chase Foundation National Grange Mutual Insurance Company National Grid USA Service Company, Inc. Northeast Utilities Pearson Education Pfizer, Inc. Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Procter & Gamble Company Qualcomm Incorporated Quest Diagnostic Matching Gift Program Raytheon Company Reebok Foundation Saint-Gobain Corporation Foundation Sprint Foundation Stop & Shop Supermarket Company SunTrust Mid Atlantic Texas Instruments, Inc. Tyco Electronics Corporation Verizon Verizon Foundation William M. Mercer, Inc. Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories


Honor/Memorial Gifts The following list includes donors who designated gifts in honor of or in memory of their loved ones. Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Ms. Rebecca Blumenthal Anderson Ms. Yetta Chwekun Sister Cecilia Louise Moore Ms. Florence Narva Ms. Suzie Perez Mr. Paul Shaler Mr. Arthur Snyder Mr. Robert St. John Mr. Joe Yetta Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry In Honor of Mrs. Penny Fitzgerald Mrs. Eudine Laurans Claremont Flock Corporation In Honor of Mr. Randall R. Martin Mr. Walter Crowther In Memory of Mrs. Helen MacCormack Mrs. and Mrs. Lewis Dars ‘04 In Memory of Mr. Joseph J. Kestenbaum

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Fallon In Memory of Mr. Raymond Eisenberg Mr. Philip Kliman Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Goldberg In Honor of Miss Jocelyn Belena Master Gabrielle Geller Naftoly Mr. and Mrs. Steven S. Gorban In Honor of Chancellor Professor Melvin B. Yoken Mrs. Rocky K. Harvey In Honor of Ms. Betty Mayes Ms. Florence Herman In Honor of Mrs. Cynthia S. Yoken Chancellor Professor Melvin B. Yoken Intermark Fabric Corporation In Honor of Mr. Randall R. Martin

Mr. Owen B. Devine In Memory of Mr. Owen B. Devine

Jewish Federation of Greater New Bedford, Inc. In Honor of Mr. Bruce H. Palmer

Professor Nancy M. Dluhy In Honor of Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington

Mr. and Mrs. Joel S. Kane In Honor of Ms. Ellen Ventura

Dr. and Mrs. John P. Dowd In Memory of Mrs. Clare J. Vancini Mr. Paul P. Vancini

Ms. Joyce M. LeBlanc In Memory of Mrs. Helen MacCormack

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Duarte In Memory of Lena and Manuel Duarte Dr. Louis Esposito In Honor of Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington Fall River Women’s Union In Memory of Ms. Bertha Levesque

Ms. Adelaide A. Lindbergh In Honor of Mrs. Leah Adaskin Rifkin

Professor Donald G. McKinley In Memory of Professor Shaukat Ali

Mrs. Kay Scherzinger In Memory of Jennie Smithies

Dr. and Mrs. David J. Myerson In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Samson Segall

Professor Emeritus J. Donald Smith In Honor of Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Naftoly In Honor of Master Gabrielle Natfoly Dr. and Mrs. Kevin D. O’Brien In Memory of Dr. Roger N. Violette

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sylvia ‘59 In Memory of Ms. Helen Batacao Mr. Warren Blanchette Mr. Richard Ford Ms. Frances Held Ms. Jean Elizabeth Winters

Mr. James S. Panos In Memory of Professor Margaret M. Panos

Ms. Dorothy A. Valenti In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Vogt

Ms. Andrea D. Piccarini In Honor of Mr. Randall R. Martin

Mr. Richard C. Waring In Honor of Dean Donald C. Howard

Provost’s Council In Honor of Dr. Thomas J. Curry

Dr. Robert P. Waxler and Mrs. Linda Waxler In Honor of Master Alan Graubart Mr. Haskell Kivowitz Mr. Fred Lassoff Ms. Olivia Manna Master Gabriel Naftoly In Memory of Mr. Felix B. Waxler Mr. Jonathan Blake Waxler

Mr. Richard P. Riley In Memory of Dr. Roger N. Violette Ms. Estelle T. Roach In Memory of Dr. Roger N. Violette Mr. James C. Rose and Ms. Eileen A. Rose In Memory of Ms. Julia Rose

Special thanks

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Salvo In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Bogan

Dr. Jean F. MacCormack In Honor of Dr. Elisabeth A. Pennington

Mr. and Mrs. George P. Santos In Memory of Mr. Joseph J. Baptista Dr. Mary Vermette

Ms. Arlene R. Machado In Memory of Lena and Manny Duarte

Ms. Norma Santos In Memory of Lena and Manny Duarte

A l u m n i

to the members of the Class of 2003 who gave.

39

for a complete list of donors according to the designated purpose of the gift, please go to: www.umassd.edu/institutional_ advancement/foundation/

M a g a z i n e

|

Spring

2005


UMass Dartmouth Foundation Board of Directors

President Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack Vice President Louis Esposito Chairman Gerald Mauretti

Ways to Give Cash

Many of the gifts received by the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are in the form of cash-usually by check. Increasingly, some alumni and friends have chosen to make their gifts to the Annual Fund using a major credit card. This allows the donor to take advantage of any benefits awarded by the credit card company such as frequent flyer miles, bonus points, etc. Both types of gifts are simple to make and are immediately available for use by the University. Securities

Gifts of appreciated stocks, bonds and mutual funds offer distinct advantages to the donor while benefiting the UMass Dartmouth Foundation. In the case of such gifts, the donor can earn a charitable income tax deduction and eliminate all or a large portion of the capital gains tax that the donor would otherwise be required to pay if the securities were sold. Gifts-in-Kind

These donations to the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are not direct, monetary contributions; they may consist of real estate and other assets including antiques, paintings, rare books, and equipment. Gifts-in-kind may offer particular tax advantages, depending upon the circumstances of the donor. We suggest that the donor consult with professional counsel for advice on such gifts. Honor or Memorial Gifts

Family or friends can make these gifts to benefit UMass Dartmouth and honor campus community members or loved ones in a special way.

40

UMass Dartmouth Foundation Staff

Vice Chairman Robert S. Karam

Executive Director Donald H. Ramsbottom

Treasurer John Feitelberg

Data Base Manager Judy Amaral

Assistant Treasurer Donald Zekan

Administrative Assistant Elaine Tisdale Asselin

Assistant Clerk Donald H. Ramsbottom

Information Manager Ronald M. Biron

Maria Furman William T. Kennedy Mary O’Neil Anthony Sapienza Frank B. Sousa, Jr. Robert Stoico Robert Watkins Myron Wilner Margaret Xifaras

Director of Donor Relations Tia Bullard

Ex-Officio Members Susan Costa William Giblin Susan Leclair Michael Rodrigues Honorary Directors Alan Ades Charlotte Babbitt Patrick Carney Kevin Champagne Betty Chang Peter H. Cressy Dale Jones James J. Karam Harold Lash Gustave Lastaiti Karen G. Lloyd William Q. MacLean, Jr. Jean Whelan

Director of Development/ Annual Giving Vernell L. M. Clouden Data Entry Operator Juanita Lopez Administrative Assistant Gina M. Nolan Accountant Charlene Picard

Alumni Relations Staff

Director of Alumni Relations Donald A. Berube Administrative Assistant Nancy J. Tooley

Statement of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action UMass Dartmouth wholeheartedly supports and encourages the development of action programs designed to promote the employment and advancement of women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, persons with disabilities, and Vietnamera veterans as a means of assuring compliance with the provisions of campus Affirmative Action plans.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

The University firmly supports the concept of equal opportunity without regard to an individual’s race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status as it applies to his/her employment, admission to and participation in the University’s programs and activities, provision of services, and selection of vendors who provide services or products to the University.

The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant Chancellor for Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Outreach, Foster Administration Building, Room 323, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747 508.910.6405.

Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Room 222, J.W. McCormack Building, Boston, MA 02109.


“ I definitely plan

to give back when I graduate.

A new graduate says thanks Tricia Hayes is a brand-new UMass Dartmouth graduate— thanks to her determination, vision, and the financial support the university was able to give her. The oldest of six children, Tricia was the first in her family to enroll in college. And while family members gave her encouragement and guidance, Tricia had to assume the entire cost of school. She was accepted through the College Now program, which helped with the cost of books and classes she took during intersession. When UMass Dartmouth inaugurated the Policy Studies minor last year, Tricia was the first student to sign on. Her interest and effort landed her a scholarship from the Policy Studies department that provided significant financial assistance. As she prepares for life after college, Tricia reflects on her time at UMD: “It was important to me to continue my education beyond high school. The financial help from College Now, as well as the scholarship from the Policy Studies department, were a tremendous help with my financial obligations and reduced the amount that I would have had to take out in loans. “Also, as a student manager for the Phone-a-thon program here, I’ve learned the importance of private support and the impact that it has on the quality of education.”

Your Annual Fund investment improves the college experience for students like Tricia, and makes it possible for many to come to UMass Dartmouth. Your gift can make a difference. To learn more about opportunities to give: online: www.umassd.edu/ university_relations/donations/ email:

vclouden@uamssd.edu

phone: 508.999.8515 fax:

508.999.8773


Calendar of Events May 21, 2005 6 pm 8th Annual Commencement Gala Main Campus May 22, 2005 10:30 am 105th Commencement Amphitheater Oscar winner Brian Helgeland ’83 speaker July 1, 2005 5 pm Pops Concert and Fireworks Campus Quad Featuring the New Bedford Symphony September 6, 2005 Freshman Convocation, start of fall classes

A magazine for graduates of: Bradford Durfee Textile School Bradford Durfee Technical Institute Bradford Durfee College of Technology New Bedford Textile School New Bedford Textile Institute New Bedford Institute of Textile & Technology New Bedford Institute of Technology Swain School of Design Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute Southeastern Massachusetts University University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

UMASS Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

Fall Festival Events September 30, 2005 Athletic Hall of Fame, UMD Campus for more information: www.umassd.edu/alumni/

October 1, 2005 Homecoming Football game, Cressy Field Alumni Athletic Games Pioneer Society Annual Dinner Reunions for the classes of 1980, 1995 ZERO Year Reunion Pedals for Progress “Bike Collection” Coalition for Cape Cod “Alumni shore clean up”

Alumni Awards Brunch (date TBA)

October 6, 2005 Second Annual Alumni Cocktail Reception Back Eddy Restaurant, Westport, ma

Periodicals Postage Paid New Bedford, MA

UMass Dartmouth Magazine Spring 05  

A magazine for Alumni and Friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

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