Page 1

Fall 2006

A magazine for alumni & friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Inside

Spinning a New Economy Global Learning Blue & Gold Gala & Homecoming Gubernatorial Candidates’ Forum


MESSAGE FROM

J ea n F . Ma c C ormack Dear friends:

F

our days before the election, the four candidates for governor of Massachusetts came together on the stage of our main auditorium to discuss the issues that matter most to the citizens of the SouthCoast (page 16). It was an historic day for our university and for our region. Democrat Deval Patrick, Republican Kerry Healey, Independent Christy Mihos, and Green-Rainbow Party candidate Grace Ross differ on many issues, but they also have something very important in common. They each made the courageous decision to run for public office, placing their philosophies and ideas before us for inspection and criticism. They took the risk of leading and serving, and in doing so set an example for all of us. In this issue of UMass Dartmouth, we see many examples of university faculty, students, and alumni choosing to serve humanity in ways that are less public but still profound. In our cover story, written by 1974 alumnus Ron Gamache, we receive a glimpse of the amazing work being done by our faculty, students, and graduates in the emerging field of advanced materials and tissue engineering. As alumnus Gerry Mauretti, the president of Fall River-based Engineered Yarns, says (page 5), the future of our economy depends on our ability to develop “whiz bang’’ ideas into actual products that can be sold around the globe, and our faculty and students are right in the middle of this revolution. Then, we have the ‘globalization’ of our university (page 8). In this compilation, we see the inspirational examples of learning far beyond Ring Road, in places such as New Orleans, Lebanon, and a small village in Brazil. And we see the creative talents of Design Professor David Chapman’s students in making global warming a personal issue. Our October 14 Blue & Gold Gala (pages 14 and 15), which included the naming of our library for our exemplary alumna Claire T. Carney, raised more than $100,000 for the library in one night, and we announced a total of $3 million in gifts and pledges toward a $6 million campaign. This was a strong, tangible message from the business and civic community that UMass Dartmouth is the engine that drives the social and economic development of the region. All of the above gives us much cause for optimism that our university and region will continue to evolve in positive ways.

Sincerely,

Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

As a class project, sophomore arts majors designed posters on global warming. Shown here (from top) are posters done by Rochelle Fontaine, Stephen Hickey, and Gianna Abbondanza. Facing page (from top) by Randy Apuzzo, Jacob Licht, Joseph Nees (see story on page 8)


1

Feature stories

T

his issue of the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Magazine introduces you to the fascinating research occurring at the university in the area of biotechnology, research that is bolstering the region’s economy. There is also a look at the increasingly global nature of our students’ education. In this issue, we bring you news about the “Blue & Gold” gala that celebrated the campaign to transform the UMass Dartmouth library into a contemporary center of learning. There’s also lots of news about what’s happening on campus and the accomplishments of our alums. We look forward to hearing from you, with news about yourself as well as letters about the university and the magazine. Please send comments and letters to: Alumni Relations Office, UMass Dartmouth, Old Westport Rd., North Dartmouth, ma 02747, or email them to ntooley@umassd.edu

Spinning a new economy

2

Education goes global at UMass Dartmouth

8

Blue & Gold Gala kicks off library campaign

14-15

University & alumni news Around the Campanile 16 Class notes 21

Fall Festival photos 22-23

Scholarship inside back cover

Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement

Jeffrey A. Wolfman Managing Editor

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant to the Chancellor Director of Alumni Relations

Joe F. DeMedeiros ’99

Cover: Two examples of current research in the Materials and Textiles Department: graduate student Skander Limem inkjet prints human tissue. Human cells (inset) grow on scaffolds of silk fibers designed to mimic the cell’s natural supporting membrane.

Designer

Rachel Cocroft Writer/Editor

Diane H. Hartnett Contributing Writers

Will Dane, Ron Gamache ’74, Susan Gonsalves ’86 Photographers

D. Confar, Kindra Clineff, Justin Maucione ’02, Katie Mello ’08, Jen White ’07

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #015-139) Volume 10, Number 7, November 2006 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once in February, once in March, once in May, twice in June, once in July, once in August, twice in November by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300 Periodicals postage paid at New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740. postmaster: Send address corrections to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300

Alumni Class Notes

Nancy J. Tooley ’99 A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


22

Spinning

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


3

a new economy UMass Dartmouth

By Ron Gamache ‘74

builds on the region’s

Smart bandages healing burns!

textile roots to create

Organs engineered from living tissues!

the foundation for an explosion in biomaterials research

Fabrics that clean themselves!

T

hey read like supermarket tabloid headlines, but what sounds like fiction is really science —real science. And it’s going on now in the laboratories of UMass Dartmouth where biologists and chemists are forming new collaborations with engineers. In essence, these interdisciplinary teams are marrying their knowledge of machines, materials, and the human body to improve all three. Fast forward, really fast, from the days of the Bradford Durfee Textile School in Fall River and New Bedford Textile School. These were institutes founded in 1895 by local leaders of vision who recognized that innovation was the fuel of regional industrial prosperity. That meant focusing education on the thenprosperous textile industry. Today, more than four decades after the two textile schools merged to form the Dartmouth campus, Massachusetts is a hotbed of biomaterials and bioengineering. And the university’s roots in the mature textile industry are providing the foundation to support emerging biotechnology and advanced materials industries in southeastern Massachusetts. “The life science and biotechnology clusters are at the nucleus of the emerging innovation economy in our region and across Massachusetts,” said Paul Vigeant ’74, assistant chancellor for economic development. “Our inter-disciplinary research discoveries and innovative business partnerships enable UMass Dartmouth to serve the Commonwealth by making its economy more globally competitive.”

(counterclockwise from top) detail of “3-D Braiding Machine” in the Department of Materials and Textiles; quilling machinery at Bradford Durfee Textile School circa 1913; Peter Stetkiewicz ’95, Quality Assurance Manager and Gerald Mauretti ’65, President of Engineered Yarns. A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


4

fields:” biotechnology, biomaterials, biomimetics, biomedical, biocomputing. “Some of this is driven by medicine, some is driven by the need for lighter, more efficient machines and a desire to move to a softer kind of technology,” Calvert said. Recognizing the trend from traditional textiles to a much broader spectrum of advanced materials, Calvert’s department in the College of Engineering changed its name last year by adding the term “materials.” Calvert points to the fast-emerging field of organic electronics in which organic semi-conductors are making flexible transistors, data storage, and electronic displays possible. “This will let us do a better job of integrating the electronic components into the structure, the same way nerves are integrated into your tissues,’’ he said. “It will also let us move to cheap, printable, disposable electronics so everything has sensing, computing, and display functions as well as structure.”

An economy based on innovation

UMass Dartmouth scientists developing silk scaffolding for growing spinal disc replacements Professor Yong Kim (left) explains the flat braiding machine in the Materials lab to Tufts University graduate student Jonathan Kluge and Tufts Professor Gary Leisk. Professors Kim and Paul Calvert, working with Tufts University colleagues, are researching ways to “braid” a silk scaffolding that could ultimately be implanted in the human body to fight conditions such as chronic spinal disc pain. The opportunity to collaborate with nearby universities and industries is a key strength of the UMass Dartmouth research enterprise, says Professor Calvert. “This interaction with Tufts is an example of a collaboration that works, because we are close enough to exchange students and talk regularly. We expect to build many more such collaborations where our textile knowledge can be applied to new problems.”

Giving local history a new spin In a region where granite mills churned out cotton textiles, a different kind of spinning has begun. “Electro-spinning” is a technique whose applications in tissue engineering areas are just beginning to be realized. The potential long-term implications tease our imagination. A tissue-engineered kidney would allow for kidney transplantation without a donor. A tissue-engineered spinal cord, or spinal section, could restore mobility to victims of paralysis. A tissue-engineered heart, possibly grown from the patient’s own cells, could allow a heart transplant without the need of a heart donor. Dr. Paul Calvert, chairman of the Department of Materials and Textiles, said the textile industry is still important in this area, but much of the related engineering will focus on “bio

There are already examples of these high-tech materials. An Ohio company manufactures the “BlackCoat,” which has five buttons incorporated in order to operate the wearer’s iPod. An Iowa company makes tents with thin, built-in solar panels that power lights, radios, laptops, and even refrigerators. And a local example of how “textiles” no longer mean what they once did is a company called Engineered Yarns, whose president is UMass Dartmouth alumnus Gerry Mauretti ’65 (see page 5). One product being engineered by this “yarn” company is a garment to protect soldiers and public safety workers from dangerous biological agents, whether on a foreign battlefield or at the site of a domestic terrorist incident. The government wants it to be comfortable and made of something other than heavy “barrier fabrics.” So Mauretti’s engineers are developing “smart fabric” which contains active nanoparticles that neutralize the toxins, rather than being a barrier to penetration. UMass Dartmouth has become the focal point of innovation as the region establishes footholds in the biotechnology and advanced materials industries and engages in partnerships with the local and regional scientific community. “We are making strategic investments in new facilities to support interdisciplinary research projects with industry,” said Vigeant. Construction is underway on a new $17 million, 20,000 square foot research building that is scheduled to open in March. It is designed to encourage collaboration among scientists from different fields—biologists and engineers, chemists and computer scientists. “The new science building greatly enhances our ability to recruit and retain highly productive science faculty,’’ Provost Anthony Garro said. “The availability of this unique facility creates opportunity for collaborative studies that we did not have previously.” In addition, the state legislature recently authorized $10 million for a biomanufacturing center to be affiliated with the UMass Dartmouth campus. This center is part of a statewide network of biotech facilities intended to accelerate the growth of life science companies in Massachusetts. (Continued on page 6)

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


55

Gerry Mauretti with some of his products (l to r) electrical harness protection yarn (yellow), radient heat coil substrate (orange), Carbon Aramid laminate sailcloth (yellow, black), and component for a “dewatering” conveyor belt (white).

Gerry Mauretti ’65 — putting an international spin on a local industry

H

ere are those who believe the textile industry no longer exists in southeastern Massachusetts, lost to a bygone era that left granite mills standing like some oversized, inexplicable Stonehenge on the sides of the highway that splits its two largest cities. But more like a phoenix, the industry persists. Textiles are about much more than clothes and upholstery. Meet Gerry Mauretti, UMass Dartmouth Textile Engineering Class of 1965 and president of Engineered Yarns in Fall River. Mauretti was named World President of the Textile Institute International In 2005. The organization, incorporated in England by Royal Charter in 1925, has members in more than 90 countries, representing all sectors and disciplines of the textile industry. Mauretti’s ascendance to the position is evidence of the continuing influence of the U.S. and southeastern Massachusetts textile industry. He is often featured at forums around the world. In recent months he has carried the message of textile innovation to South Korea, Japan, and China. “We’re in a global economy,”

Mauretti said during a recent interview at Engineered Yarns. “The manufacturing base keeps moving. It’s no longer the function of the U.S. to be the manufacturer.” Engineered Yarns, developed in Rhode Island in 1965, formerly made fiberglass window screens, a non-traditional activity for the textile industry at the time. One side of the factory produces a wide array of components needed by other manufacturers such as the edging used to make conveyor belts, reinforced yarns for stronger competitive boat sails, stainless steel multi-filament yarns for heating elements, mesh that holds thermal wire used under flooring tiles, and fiberglass rods that strengthen fiber optic cables. In a time when it seems every consumer item label reads “made in China,” Mauretti has some startling news: “We export to China,” he states matter-of-factly. The other side of the factory “manufactures” ideas — such as applications for textiles that are novel and exciting. Mauretti calls them “whiz-bang!”

“I Google everything,” Mauretti said when asked where the ideas originate. “And I read. If I see something that interests me, I’ll pick up the phone and ask someone in my network what they think of it as a potential product.” Then, there are the daily phone calls and emails. “Somewhere in the world some engineer is designing something and does a web search,’’ Mauretti said. “We get a phone call from that engineer. He says ’I need a piece of string, but it needs to do this or that.’ Next thing you know, we’re in a dialogue about the specifications. The amazing thing is the ideas could be about anything under the sun.” As the textile industry continuously and radically evolves in the private sector, so does UMass Dartmouth’s role in the global transition. What was called the Department of Textile Engineering was re-named last year to the Department of Materials and Textiles, giving rise to crosscampus, interdisciplinary collaborations among textile engineers,

“ We export to China. ”

Mauretti, current World President of The Textile Institute, addressed the Korean Federation of Textile Industries in July of this year. chemists, biologists, computer scientists, and others. In constant search of “whiz bang,” Mauretti stays connected to those scientists at his alma mater, and also does his part to support the campus’ continued development as an economic engine. He serves as chair of the university’s fund-raising foundation and as vice chair of the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center Advisory Board. By Ron Gamache ’74

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


6

Skander Limem and Animesh Agrawal, both biomedical engineering and biotechnology PhD candidates, view images they have taken on a confocal microscope in the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center lab. At right are human fibroblasts (cells that make connective tissue such as bone or cartilage) growing on scaffolds of nanometer-sized fibers designed to mimic their natural supporting membrane.

Inkjet printing of living cells At the top of Skander Limem’s “to do” list is developing inkjet technology that can print human tissue. “If there’s a challenge, I’m there,” said the UMass Dartmouth graduate student who is working under the direction of Dr. Paul Calvert and in collaboration with scientists at Tufts University. “There are two aims of our project,” Limem said. “One is the use of inkjet printing technology and computer driven stages to print natural protein-based materials such as silk and collagen, as cell supports. The second is to print the cells themselves with the hope to generate complex 3D structures that will function like human organs. The astonishing thing is that you can put something as delicate as a cell through an inkjet printer, and it survives and multiplies.” In 2003, Limem received his UMass Dartmouth master’s degree in textile technology. He has also earned a Math, Physics and Science Engineering credential in Tunisia, as well as an engineering diploma from the National Superior School of Textile Industries in France. Pursuing a doctoral degree at UMass Dartmouth in the biomedical engineering and biotechnology program was a logical path considering the department’s shift in emphasis from textiles, to materials and textiles. “It’s a positive change. An increasing shortage of organ donors, and the level of complications associated with non-living implants, raise the need for a dynamic alternative. “What keeps me going is when I see the cells are printing. Those moments make the difference for me. It’s really thrilling.” —Susan Gonsalves

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

(Continued from page 4)

Meanwhile, the UMass Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center, opened in 2001 on the Fall River site of a burned mill building, represents the link between UMass Dartmouth research and industry. It incubates start-up companies and is the magnet for expanding firms. Needham-based Avant Immunotherapeutics, one of the hottest biotech companies in the state, located a satellite manufacturing facility at the ATMC. Also, the university is investing in its technology transfer efforts to speed up the process of moving innovative ideas from the laboratory to the market, ultimately creating new jobs in the region.

Couch—clean thyself Dr. Alex Fowler, mechanical engineering professor, said there are already applications for bioactive fabrics in the medical and defense industries, such as drug-producing bandages and protective clothing with highly sensitive cellular sensors. But Fowler said that biofabrics may someday form the basis of a whole new line of commercial products as well. “Biotechnology is revolutionizing the way problems are solved in almost all areas of life,” Fowler said. “Bacteria are used to remediate oil and chemical spills; genetically engineered plants resist pests and weed killers; and bioreactors are used to produce drugs and enzymes to treat cancer and unclog drains.” Would you buy fabrics that literally eat odors with genetically engineered bacteria? Imagine choosing furniture with self-cleaning fabric, or fabric that continually regenerates water and dust repellants. It’s possible, says Fowler, by embedding genetically engineered bacteria or mammalian cells into fabrics. “Our vision is to create fabric-based bioreactors in which colo-


7

Materials and Textiles graduate student Jia Ren stands with a “3-D Braiding Machine” designed to solve the problem of delamination of multi-layered materials. The machine, built as part of a National Textile Center-sponsored project, weaves composites with strong fibers running in three directions, not solely in layers. The project is advancing knowledge related to the manufacturing of products ranging from synthetic blood vessels to aircraft. The fabric sample above represents a four-layer weave.

Professor Alex Fowler (left) and mechanical engineering student Wenjian Wang discuss ways to use genetically engineered bacteria to assess long term function in living fabrics.

nies of mammalian cells or bacteria can live and function for extended periods of time,” Fowler said. “We want to develop methods for making the cells and their environments more tolerant of cold, variations in humidity, and washing.”

Bandages with brains Every year in the United States, 1.1 million burn victims require serious medical attention. The ideal burn bandage would control the wound healing environment, protect against healing retardants, and enhance the healing process. Although scientists know this process works, such bandages are currently cost-prohibitive. “Unfortunately, no such cost-effective bandage is yet available,” noted Mechanical Engineering Professor Sankha Bhowmick, who

is working on bioactive bandages, which contain genetically modified skin cells that heal burn wounds. The idea is to implant functionally active, genetically engineered mammalian cells in textile fibers. Dr. Bhowmick believes these bandages can have a wide range of applications beyond wound healing, from screening for infection to delivering medication to the body. “Our research effort,” according to Bhowmick, “focuses on forming the basis of developing a bioactive bandage that will have genetically modified fibroblasts (skin cells) that can secrete growth factors that are of paramount importance to the treatment of burn patients.” Another research team has developed a braiding machine that the scientists hope will spin synthetic materials into products that transform the economy and life itself, from artificial blood vessels to super-strong fabrics. The visionaries who started the textile schools more than a century ago probably never expected that body parts would be “spun” on textile machines. But perhaps they did know that they were setting the stage for constant economic renewal. “New England experiences a cycle of growth and decay like any living thing,” Calvert explained in his description of the Materials and Textiles Department. “Our good fortune here is that the new growth can spring straight from existing roots.” Ron Gamache ’74 is a freelance writer and musician living in Dartmouth. A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


8

Learning about the world through a wider lens Tackling problems that are international in scope…. Doing volunteer work in Brazil…. Witnessing war in Beirut…. Studying in Portugal, France, Germany or right at home.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


9

global education takes, such as business students using their knowledge to do charitable work in South America and others aiding the New Orleans rebuilding effort. If education, as the cliché goes, is about ‘widening your world,’ that is happening at UMass Dartmouth. A few examples: Nursing students spend semester breaks assisting the poor in the Dominican Republic. The Center for Indic Studies offers numerous events, and now there’s a minor in the subject. A political science/anthropology major traveled to Tanzania and studied a Maasai tribe as an independent study project. And the number of students in expanded study abroad programs has climbed from 11 in 1998-99 to a high of 49 in 2004-05. Last year, the total stood at 37, with numbers expected to remain steady in the coming years. Says business major Derek Thatcher, who has been to Germany, Brazil, and Peru: “More students should take advantage of these opportunities. I feel they really make you think about what you’re doing with your education.” What students in these ventures learn is difficult to test, but is very real—confidence about handling new situations; recognition of the value of an open mind; and a clearer perspective on what they consider important.

Designing for world change: using art to inform and inspire on issues of global warming

U

Prof. David Chapman hangs students’ global warming posters with the help of Vaibhavi Pisolkar.

S

tudents at UMass Dartmouth are an increasingly sophisticated, well-traveled, and worldly group. Selfconfident and open-minded, the world is the classroom for these students, not simply to study unfamiliar cultures, but also as an entity whose issues—universal in nature and impact—make for stimulating, meaningful educational projects. It’s the “globalization” of education. As technology creates a smaller world, a university education becomes more expansive and learning venues grow far larger. In the following pages, we spotlight the different forms that

mistakenly universal in nature was the assignment that David Chapman gave his sophomore design students last spring: do the research, then design a compelling poster that will promote awareness of—and inspire action on— global warming. And when the students were done, said Chapman, “I think they all realized that they are studying an art and a profession that has true global value and can effect positive social change.” The poster project was rooted in an event with international impact and implications —the tragedy of September 11, 2001. During discussions with fellow arts professor Howard Windham, recalls Chapman, “a single question kept surfacing, ‘what can we do?’ As educators we have the ability to influence, direct, guide, and sensitize the students we teach. So we applied the question to the discipline we teach—design. ‘What can we do as designers?’” But prospective projects were back-burnered, mainly to give students and professors time to deal with the impact of 9/11. “Now, five years later, we have even more world-threatening issues to contend with, including the war in Iraq (and) seemingly having no appropriate influence over the situations in the Middle East, Africa, or anything else…. It’s all negative, and virtually impossible to give any aspect of those issues a positive approach. But the one issue that has become increasingly visible, and has potential as a design project, is the issue of global warming.

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


10

“It is my firm belief that positive action — education supported by practice — is a solid method to employ. As graphic designers, with the influence potential that we maintain, we have the opportunity to use our art to effect appropriate, meaningful, and constructive social change. Most often it takes generations to accomplish those changes, so we can’t begin our efforts too soon. This project was intended to demonstrate, using real issues, our value as graphic designers beyond simply making something look good; and to inspire the students to find something that could have an impact on society and the issue. “My sophomore students had to thoroughly research global warming, exploring the details of anything and everything that relates to the problem. They documented their research and listed pertinent information, not only as reference for an intelligent approach to the project, but also as material for a support document accompanying the project. “From the information, they were to select one tangible aspect that interested them and that contributes to global warming—something that they could promote to sensitize people to global warming’s disastrous impact. The primary design vehicle was a poster to be used as a public service promotion with a call to action. “They could choose a specific audience…. The idea was to

proactively engage the selected audience. The support document was to serve as a reference to the issue being promoted and show each student’s developmental process of their idea.” The outcome? “Quite excellent. The overall design and sophistication level of these posters is quite notable,” says Chapman, who has taught at the university since 1997 and is president/ principal designer of his own firm. “The students kept them more simple than complex, quickly get to the point, and make almost any viewer feel able to take immediate, effective action.” Chapman observed that his students became immediately engrossed in the subject, quickly delved into the research, and took the project seriously because they realized the gravity of the problem. They enjoyed working on a “‘real’ design problem. “The projects deal with fundamental design issues that help them understand the critical thinking required, as well as the processes available as solutions.” And Chapman says there were lessons for him about this generation of students, notably that “they care about today’s world, have valid ideas and opinions on issues, and are open to dialogue. “They are extremely articulate and capable, both verbally and visually. “I pushed them very hard and the results speak for themselves.”

A student’s perspective on the tragedy in Lebanon The following is an edited version of an essay by history major Sean Morgan ’08 on his experiences in war-torn Beirut, Lebanon this past summer

I

have been moved by the tragedy I saw during my stay with the Lebanese to write about these people and their city, hoping I can in a small way bring to life the people and the land I came to know briefly. My story begins during a class on the Middle East taught by History Professor Brian Williams. After hearing over and over how important it was for Americans to see the world, I asked myself, “Why not go see the region for myself and learn Arabic?” Dr. Williams advised me to travel to Beirut, a warm Mediterranean city rebuilding from the civil war of 1975-90. “You will love the falafel (a chickpea and fava bean dish), the Lebanese history, the night life, the beaches, and the legendary hospitality of the Beirutis.” I arrived in Beirut on June 24 in the midst of the World Cup fanfare. As I entered southern Beirut (which has become the main target of Israeli bombardments), I could see the passion of the Lebanese people on display, as they hung the flags of their favorite World Cup teams from balconies and rooftops. This was not the only sign that Beirut was a modern, cosmopolitan city. I came to see that through hard work, the Lebanese people had rebuilt the war-torn city into a city rich in culture, with great restaurants and tourist attractions. This construction made it easy for myself and the students who were in Beirut

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

to learn Arabic, and to forget that the city was only 15 years removed from a bloody civil war that had left it destroyed. The hospitality was impossible to miss and the optimism of people was contagious. Whether ordering lunch or grabbing a taxi, I was welcomed to the city by everyone with whom I spoke. Despite the language barrier, I interacted with many Lebanese. As soon as they understood I was a student at the Lebanese American University studying Arabic, they would try to teach me some Arabic words. Even as the conflict with Israel began, this hospitality never ceased. For most Beirutis I met, international politics were an abstract, a guest was a guest, and even Americans were considered friends. A discussion I and two friends had with three Palestinian youngsters occurred when Beirut filled with unease over Israel’s recent incursion into the Gaza Strip in search of Hamas terrorists. It came as no surprise therefore when the Palestinians (voiced) their hatred for the Israeli state and its people. Nor was I surprised when the boys went on to express their dislike for American politics. But what did surprise me was that they stressed their admiration for Americans! They thought of America as a beautiful, wondrous country. Differentiating between American foreign policy and Americans themselves was a recurrent theme throughout my stay in Lebanon.


11

Life in a war zone Roughly two weeks later, on July 12, while walking on Beirut’s famous Corniche I heard that Hezbollah had struck Israel in a cross-border raid. I was stunned to hear that the Shiite Hezbollah, which controls much of southern Lebanon, had invaded Israel! I had no idea the conflict was going to blow up as quickly as it did—a belief that I think many other people inside Beirut shared. That night, American and Arab students at the Lebanese American University watched the news as Israel commenced its bombing of Lebanon, and we could not believe it was happening. There was much anger towards Israel for its actions, as well as towards the U.S. for, in the words of one student, “providing Israel with many of the weapons they were using to destroy us.” But again the Arab students made a point of distinguishing between hatred for American foreign policy, and the friendships they had developed with us. The next morning, I asked a Lebanese soldier at a recently set-up checkpoint where I could find calling cards to phone my parents. The young soldier, saying I would not find a store open that early, gave me his own calling card so I could make my international call! The helpful soldier then informed me of areas throughout the city where I would be safe. After returning to my room and falling asleep, I awoke to the sounds of Israel bombs exploding on the runways of Rafiq Harriri International Airport. I would have to explain to my parents that I no longer had an airport to fly out of, that I was trapped in a city which was now the target of Israel’s military. The next afternoon I, along with many Beirutis, spent much of the day purchasing essentials such as biscuits, water, and toilet paper as Israeli jets screeched overhead. While still calm in Beirut, many (expected) an escalation of violence since Hezbollah was refusing to turn over the captured Israelis. The next morning I awoke to the noise of Israeli bombs hitting central Beirut, and to the sound of the Lebanese responding with anti-aircraft fire. Subsequently, I watched the glow of flames from fires burning throughout the city as well as the red streaks of anti-aircraft fire darting futilely upwards towards the sky in search of American-built Israeli fighter bombers. Later Friday afternoon, several of us fled to the northern city of Byblos where the university has another campus. We arrived there without incident and we all felt safe for the moment. The days I spent in Byblos were uneasy, and I felt conflicted— eager to return to my home and family, yet reluctant to say goodbye to a country and city which I had come to love. On July 18, the U.S. embassy offered to evacuate us. I scrambled to pack as many personal belongings as I could. Minutes later, I and other Americans boarded buses bound for the port of Beirut. I worried about those who did not have the chance to leave this country and war.

Sean Morgan in Beirut

As we entered the city for the first time in four days, my eyes fell upon streets that normally were filled with cars, Lebanese people, and a certain energy. Now they were eerily quiet and empty. Military personnel preparing their equipment could be seen on almost every street corner. Boarding the Norwegian cargo ship taking us to Cyprus, I was overcome with sorrow for the people of Beirut. I watched this beautiful city, now shaded by smoke from bombings, fade away as our ship drifted away into the Mediterranean. Israeli naval ships served as reminders of the destruction and pain the Lebanese people were enduring as they sat in their country at the mercy of Israel’s military might. To think of them, and how their state had been hijacked by a terrorist organization, made me share their feeling of powerlessness. Watching the news, my heart went out to the people of the warm city who made me feel so welcomed as an American. I want to tell my countrymen about Beirut and the people being bombed—many are people that I am proud to call friends. I hope that you can make the same distinction between politics in a region and the average person living there the way everyone in Beirut does. And please keep the people of Lebanon and Israel in your prayers.

“ I would have to explain to my parents that I no longer had an airport to fly out of…

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


12

UMass Dartmouth business students learn lessons in social responsibility during a working spring break in Brazil and Peru.

A lesson learned in South America—

Tiffany Cardoza ‘05, ‘06 (left) learns what it takes for Brazilian women to create fashion lacework which sells online at Fairloom.org

there is more to business than the bottom line

F

rom freshman year on, business majors are told: the modern business world is a global one, so don’t feel limited by geographical boundaries. And there’s a corollary lesson for many UMass Dartmouth business students: use your education not only to enrich yourself, but also to better the lives of people throughout the world. That “do well, do good” concept is a key focus of the International Business Association, whose members spent their spring ’06 break in Brazil and Peru. There they provided business and marketing assistance— as well as physical labor — for two nonprofit organizations that are aiding needy persons. The IBA is co-advised by Dr. Steve White and Dr. Godwin Ariguzo, marketing professors who want to widen the perspective of business majors while inspiring a sense of social responsibility. “Until recently, business was not seen as a vehicle for affecting social behaviors,” says White. Today, however, “our students not only learn about that, they actually do it.” White, Ariguzo, and 36 students spent the first part of their March break in Fortaleza, Brazil, advising and assisting “Fairloom,” established in 2004 by Westport resident Annie Doran. Through Fairloom, women in the tiny, impoverished village are improving their and their children’s lives by selling worldwide unique products woven in renda, the traditional art of bobbin lace making. As a course assignment, White’s marketing students had worked with Doran on marketing and promotion schemes. “Once I heard we had the opportunity to actually go to Fortaleza and implement our ideas, I jumped on it right away,” says Adam Fleckles, a 2006 graduate now working for TIAACREF in Denver. In Brazil, students worked in teams on different

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

issues, with Fleckles’ group exploring methods to increase the products’ saleability. From an academic perspective, the trip served to reinforce Fleckles’ classroom lessons. “We learn as marketing students that there has to be an emotional connection if something is to sell. I could see the emotional tie the women had with their work, and that really helped to sell their product.” He saw firsthand the value of entering a situation with no assumptions or judgments. “My expectations really changed. I had been thinking this would be an impoverished, depressing atmosphere. But we were overwhelmed by the happiness of the people there. Their attitudes were so positive and they had so much energy. I wanted to learn from them as much as vice versa.” From Brazil, the students went to Lima and the Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru, internationally recognized for its research and assistance for persons with retardation or autism issues. Again, the UMass Dartmouth group fashioned business and marketing plans to expand the 27-year-old center’s reach. Ariguzo says the trips combine “a business orientation with a humanitarian focus,” appealing to students “who tend to have an interest in global affairs and a commitment to making a positive difference.” They bring to life the philosophy he advocates to the business majors: “If you get to the point where you’re making money and are comfortable, you can recognize that not everyone has had the opportunity to acquire the skills and knowledge that you have, so you have a responsibility to help them.” “The trip completely changed my perspective,” Fleckles says. “It did make me appreciative of everything I have. I like the philanthropic idea behind it. The idea of giving back is more reward-


13

ing to me than just making money.” Through the IBA, students are not simply applying their classroom lessons in the “real world,” they’re gaining a far deeper understanding of the contemporary real world. Says Ariguzo, “We miss out by not involving students with the outside world from the beginning.” Fleckles agrees: “There is no question about the importance of bringing your education outside the classroom and gaining that hands-on experience. Once students move in that direction, and see what a difference they can make for themselves and for others, it’s a win-win situation.”

Going south to help, work, and learn Photos by Katie Mello ‘08 New Orleans is not, of course, a foreign country. But in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, it may as well have been for the UMass Dartmouth students who this past spring assisted in the reconstruction effort. “We knew it was bad, but we didn’t realize how bad it was. We were really shocked,” says Katie Mello (inset), a junior who is majoring in photography with an art history minor. She was one of approximately 20 students who, under MassPIRG auspices, spent spring break and a second week in May in the Algiers area of New Orleans. They cleaned, painted, refurbished, and rebuilt the equivalent of eight homes — and in the process received the kind of education that classrooms and lectures can’t deliver. Students are increasingly using school breaks on ventures such as this, contributing time, money, talent, and energies for those in need. Technically speaking, these are not “academic” trips, but they serve to complement and supplement traditional education. “They involve so much— politically, socially, economically, culturally,” says Jennifer Marshall, former MassPIRG organizer at UMass Dartmouth. “They are real-life experiences and real-world work rather than homework.” Mello returned with close to 500 photos, three of which appear on this page. She also brought back greater confidence in her abilities as a photojournalist; heightened awareness of the value of teamwork and collaboration; and a sharper perspective on what matters in life. “We had all heard about and saw what had happened in New Orleans. When MassPIRG came up with the plan, I knew I wanted to be a part of it,” Mello recalls. “We felt we were doing something relevant. This was the first really big thing of this nature I had done and that was the case for most of us. It was very intense —that’s the word we all kept using. “I learned so much. It was a time of a lot of personal growth. “We learned how to work as a group, how to compromise,

how to get along. I learned perspective, what’s important, not to sweat the small stuff. “It was very emotional coming back (to school after spring break) and getting acclimated. We had been to a place where everywhere you looked, there was destruction…. You almost became numb. It was kind of shocking not to see demolished houses back here. It certainly made you appreciative of what you have. “This definitely made me think about opening my mind to new experiences, how rewarding that can be. “And I was in this situation also as a photojournalist. I had to think all the time about how my photographs would convey the destruction, how they would say what I wanted them to say. “That is experience I could never get in a classroom.” Article compiled by Diane Hartnett

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


14

$3 million in library gifts announced at first Blue & Gold Gala

U

Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack and Claire T. Carney stand before the portrait honoring the ‘73 alumna, for whom the library is named. Below, Rep. Michael Rodrigues ‘83 talks with other guests.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Mass Dartmouth kicked off a major library renovation campaign on October 14, announcing nearly $3 million in private gifts and the naming of the library in honor of alumna, former trustee, and staunch university advocate Claire T. Carney at the first “Blue & Gold Gala.’’ The gala, held in the library, attracted more than 500 members of the region’s corporate and civic community. The campaign, the first major capital campaign in UMass Dartmouth history, is designed to raise $6 million in private funds to be matched by $4 million in university funds. The money will be used to renovate the 250,000 square foot facility that opened 35 years ago. “What brings us together tonight is the beginning of a new dream to transform this library into a powerful engine of educational opportunity,’’ Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. Chancellor MacCormack described Claire Carney as “an extraordinary role model for us all, a strong supporter of this university, and an inspirational advocate of public higher education.” Among those playing a leadership role in the effort are Fall River businessman and former UMass Board chairman Robert Karam and former state Senator William Q. MacLean, who recently agreed to co-chair the UMass Dartmouth Foundation Development Committee. Alumnus Ron Xavier, president of Silver City Aluminum Corp. in Taunton, led the committee that organized the gala. Major gifts include: an anonymous leadership pledge of $2 million; additional anonymous gifts of $100,000, $75,000 and $30,000; $100,000 from William and Mary Jane MacLean and the MacLean Charitable Foundation; and $75,000 from Dr. Mel Yoken and his wife Cindy.


15

(clockwise from top) Gala guests at the cocktail reception and silent auction; Otilia Ferreira, ‘87, donor to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese American Archives, Chancellor MacCormack, and Claire T. Carney; (l to r) Robert S. Karam, ‘61, ‘91, William Q. Maclean, Jr., ‘80, and James J. Karam, ‘71, ‘01; sketch of proposed library; (l to r) student speakers Lucas Moraes, Sara Andrade, Emmanuel Lyte, and Marielle Sardella; (l to r) Provost Anthony Garro, Mary Ann Garro, H. Jay Carney, and Carol Pimentel, ‘76, director of internal audit & administrative services

Become a supporter of the Claire T. Carney library UMass Dartmouth invites all of its graduates and friends to join the campaign to transform the Claire T. Carney Library. The $6 million renovation venture will modernize and revitalize the “intellectual heart of the campus.” There will be new accommodations for the library’s collections; areas that encourage collaboration and provide the technology for contemporary learning; and an atmosphere of community through spaces for public discourse and discussions. Of special note is the planned addition for the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives. Already $3 million in donations have been announced. Support has been enthusiastic and widespread. Join the campaign now. To learn more about contributing, please call 508.999.8200, email librarycampaign@umassd.edu, or visit www.umassd.edu/librarycampaign

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


Around the Campanile

16

(l-r) Deval Patrick, Grace Ross, Kerry Healey, and Christy Mihos

Gubernatorial Forum attracts attention to SouthCoast issues UMass Dartmouth and the SouthCoast were front and center in the final lap of the Massachusetts race for governor. Just four days before voters elected Democrat Deval Patrick on Nov. 7, the former federal prosecutor and civil rights attorney joined Republican Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey, Independent Christy Mihos, and GreenRainbow Party candidate Grace Ross for a final joint appearance on the Main Auditorium stage. “I’m going to miss you all,” Patrick told his three competitors as the 90minute forum drew to a close. A few seats away, Mihos replied, “Where are you going?” A prophetic Patrick replied, “All the way to Beacon Hill, my friend.” The forum, organized by the SouthCoast Alliance of media and

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

civic organizations, including UMass Dartmouth, was a showcase of both the region and the university. Broadcast and webcast by NBC10; carried live on regional radio, including the university’s own WUMD; and covered by every major Boston and Providence media outlet, the dialogue focused attention on regional issues. “Never before has a campaign for governor focused this kind of attention on this region,” Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack told 500 students, staff, faculty and visitors gathered in the auditorium. “We thank all four candidates and their supporters for joining us and for taking such an active role in our ongoing experiment in democracy.” Each candidate said they would work hard to bring commuter-rail service to the area, discourage the siting of

an LNG facility in Fall River, and direct more funding to education. Daniel Griffin, a Vietnam Veteran and head of the Fall-River-based Coalition for Responsible Siting of LNG Facilities, said “I loved the format. I’d had enough of their mudslinging.” Alisha Fowler, a student from the MassPirg organization at UMass Dartmouth, said the forum topped off an exciting season of campus-wide organizing. “So far we have registered 700 people to vote, and we will be shuttling students to and from voting stations on election day,” she said. Jack Spillane, veteran reporter for the New Bedford Standard-Times, called the forum “a great victory for the area.” Will Dane, author of this article, is a graduate student in the professional writing program.


17

Big plans for a tiny berry UMass Dartmouth faculty and students are helping to strengthen the Massachusetts cranberry industry by researching the health benefits of the tiny red fruit, improving insecticide spraying technology, and researching potential new markets. The work was recently praised by Senate Ways and Means Chairwoman Therese Murray, D-Plymouth, who has been a strong advocate of cranberry farmers and UMass Dartmouth. “Cranberries are the crown jewel of the agriculture industry in southeastern Massachusetts,” Murray said. “The research being conducted at UMass Dartmouth is essential to the successful future of the cranberry industry. UMass Dartmouth has been able to help growers adjust and adapt while preserving the tradition of cranberry growing in southeastern Massachusetts.” Senator Murray, whose district includes thousands of acres of cranberry bogs, also serves as chairwoman of the Cranberry Oversight Committee which oversees the UMass Amherst-managed Cranberry Experiment Station. Chancellor Jean MacCormack serves with Sen. Murray on the committee. Chemistry/Biochemistry Professor Catherine Neto has been working with Dr. Justine Vanden Heuvel, a plant physiologist at the Experiment Station, to identify components of cranberries that may fight cancer and heart disease. Dr. Nora Ganim Barnes, director of the university’s

Center for Marketing Research, has been studying market potential of various cranberry products; grower attitude and opinions about farming; consumer preferences as they relate to the purchase and consumption of cranberry products; and opportunities to include cranberries in pet food. Barnes, her research associate, and six to eight marketing students will begin a new study this fall concerning the viability of establishing a Cranberry Visitors Center. The Cranberry Experiment Station also hopes to make use of a cranberry bog boom sprayer designed and fabricated this past spring by UMass Dartmouth mechanical engineering students Nicholas Heichel, Meagan Calabrese, and Mark Rudenauer, under the direction of Dr. John M. Rice. The senior design project took one year to complete and addressed the disadvantages of uneven spraying, labor intensity, and other hazards of manual spraying. “Since the Cranberry Station’s focus tends to be

Senate Ways and Means Chairwoman Therese Murray

production and applied research oriented, having the basic chemistry expertise available from UMass Dartmouth has been key to advancing our knowledge in the continuum from basic to applied research,’’ said Dr. Carolyn DeMoranville, the station’s executive director.

US News accolades for UMass Dartmouth and the College of Engineering UMass Dartmouth was the top-ranked New England “Master’s” public university in the 2007 edition of US News and World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. The university also

climbed to the 11th spot from 13th the previous year in the larger northern region of Master’s public universities (those located in the New England states, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania). From the overall field of 557—which includes private universities and colleges— UMass Dartmouth tied for 51st with Emmanuel College, Regis College, and Suffolk University. Furthermore, the College of Engineering has again been described as one of the nation’s “Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs,” tying for 36th with programs at Purdue University, Smith College, Northern Arizona University, and the Citadel. “These rankings are evidence of the high quality of our faculty and our university’s mission to provide accessible and excellent educational opportunities for the people of our region and Commonwealth,” Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. “This high quality, focused on the economic and cultural needs of our community, is driving growth in our student population, research activity, and service.”

WUMD expands reach WUMD radio station, formerly known as WSMU, now broadcasts its eclectic offerings to a much larger audience thanks to a power boost from 1,200 watts to 9,600 watts this past June. Listeners as far away as Providence and Plymouth can tune to the station’s new home at 89.3 and hear CDquality sound from WUMD’s

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


18

Around the Campanile

N e ws o f N o t e

high-definition, high-powered transmitter. The increased wattage extends the station’s average range from 15 to 25 miles. Station officials say the WUMD signal now reaches Providence, Newport, Taunton, Bridgewater, Plymouth and the upper Cape and Islands, while continuing to serve Greater New Bedford and Fall River. WUMD can also be heard around the globe via its webcast at www.893wumd.org One of the upgraded station’s first featured broadcasts was the New Bedford Symphony Orchestra’s July 3 pops performance at the Bank of America Freedom Festival on campus. Classified as a non-profit educational radio station, WUMD offers more than only “college music.” Public affairs programming addresses current issues relevant to the university and surrounding communities. Three of these shows air weekly, along with several other independently produced programs. An official student organization, WUMD also provides a learning environment in which students can experience the realities of radio broadcasting.

New dining area utilizes 21st-century technology The Commons at Birch, a new retail and dining facility run by Sodexho, includes a “Webfood” system that allows students to order their selections in advance from either their personal computers or in-house kiosks. While waiting for their order, patrons can relax with their

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

friends without the need to stand in line. “The area is now a very attractive, welcoming space for students to gather and socialize during meal times. We’ve truly stepped into the 21st century with these electronic menus and kiosks, streamlining the system for both customers and staff,” said Jennifer Pacheco, marketing manager of resident dining services. The facility, designed by Connor Architecture, features lots of open space with a contemporary, brightly colored decor. A display kitchen, forming the hub of the entire area, allows patrons to watch chefs prepare their meals.

Seating accommodations include cafe-style booths and tables with bar stools, an outdoor pavilion and a lounge area with a 42-inch plasma TV and comfortable sofas. An adjacent conference room provides an ideal setting for special events and private functions. Restaurants in the Commons include Grill 155, Stacks Deli, Pep-a-Roni’s Pizza, Smart Market, and a convenience store area. The facility can serve 1,200 patrons a day. In September, Sodexho also opened a “Jazzman’s” Kiosk in the Woodland Commons Community Center, with espresso-based beverages, fresh-baked muffins, pastries, breakfast items, and smoothies.

Beacon Hill strategist and ’77 alumna is new Alumni Association president The Alumni Association has elected New Bedford native and 1977 alumna

Gloria Craven as its president. A nursing major, Craven has spent the past 15 years on Beacon Hill, helping shape public policy as a partner in the government relations firm of Craven & Ober Policy Strategists, LLC. Other newly elected officers include Jacquelyn Briggs, ‘03, Hingham, vice-president; Kathy Lee Dombrowski, ‘03, Abington, secretary; and James Pratt, Jr., ’89, South Dartmouth, treasurer. Briggs is a cardiovascular research assistant at Caritas St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Boston. Dombrowski was recently named development database manager for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. Pratt is a partner in the accounting firm Hodgson, Pratt & Associates, PC. Newly-elected board members are Theresa Ann Brum, ’76, and Robert Lavoie, ’61, both of Dartmouth. An emergency room nurse, Brum is the mother of two UMass Dartmouth engineering alums. Lavoie, a retired utility executive, returns to the board after having previously served. Re-elected board members are Scott Costa, ’78, South Dartmouth, owner of Bufftree Building Company; Donald Wood, ’60, Fall River, a math and engineering instructor at Bristol Community College; Frederick McDonald, ‘55, Fall River, a retired school principal; Rhoda Purcell, ’73, North Dartmouth, instructional supervisor at New Bedford High School; and Sherri (Guerin) Sterling, ‘97, New Bedford, a clinical laboratory scientist at Imugen, Inc., Norwood.


19

Business Innovation Research Center uses academic resources to aid businesses The Charlton College of Business recently launched the Business Innovation Research Center to accelerate economic development throughout southeastern Massachusetts. “BIRC nurtures economic growth and addresses the concerns of business in an increasingly global economy,” said Director Dr. Angappa Gunasekaran. “It aims to improve the performance of SouthCoast businesses through research, assistance and support. College faculty and students are a great source of strength for the center and its activities.” BIRC professors and their students draw on academic resources from the Charlton College of Business, the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center, the College of Engineering, and the School for Marine Science and Technology. The center also works closely with area business organizations to ensure that the information exchanged between companies and academics accurately reflects the ever-evolving modern landscape of business. Throughout the academic year, the center will host conferences, forums, workshops, seminars, and panel meetings on campus. These will address the interests of a wide variety of audiences, from academics (“Writing for Professional Journals”) to local businesses (“Best Practices in Supply Chain Management”).

Campus mourns Chancellor Professor Philip Melanson The UMass Dartmouth community lost one of its most distinguished, wellknown faculty members when Dr. Philip Melanson, an internationally recognized expert in political violence and governmental secrecy, died on September 18. “We have lost an exemplary teacher, scholar and servant of the community,’’ Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. Dr. Melanson joined the UMass Dartmouth faculty in 1971. He was the Chancellor Professor of Policy Studies, Director of the Policy Studies Program and Coordinator of the Robert F. Kennedy Assassination Archive, the world’s largest collection on the subject. He was the author of 15 books and 14 articles, and lectured to varied audiences at higher education institutions, law enforcement conferences, military installations, and civil rights organizations. He was a consultant to the Assassination Records Review Board, a commission appointed by President Bill Clinton to oversee release

of records relating to the assassination of President Kennedy; a member of the Board of Directors of the Center for Atomic Radiation Studies, helping to obtain nuclear-test records; and a consultant to the House of Representatives Committee on Governmental Affairs’ 2005 study of governmental secrecy under the Bush Administration. The Philip H. Melanson Scholarship Fund has been established at the UMass Dartmouth Foundation for students pursuing graduate and undergraduate studies in public policy.

History professor on the History Channel Len Travers, associate professor of history, shared his expert commentary on the History Channel in a November 19 documentary entitled “Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower.” Travers helps to shed light on the rebellious Pilgrims’ trans-oceanic odyssey and their subsequent founding of Plimoth Colony. The program was shot on location at Plimoth Plantation, as well as in England, Belgium, Maryland, and Virginia, and includes re-enactments by actors from the Royal Shakespeare Company. Travers recently edited a two volume collection of scholarly essays that explore the history and evolution of American holidays. In the two-volume Encyclopedia of American Holidays and National Days, which was released in January and April 2006, scholars trace the ori-

gins and evolutions of the full range of American holidays, from Christmas to Super Bowl Sunday. Library Journal described the book as “diligently researched and fun to browse.” Travers is currently coediting The Correspondence of Reverend John Cotton, Jr. (1640-1699), a forthcoming volume in the Colonial Society of Massachusetts Publications Series. He is also working on The Journal of Abner Barrows, 17561758, a bulletin of the Fort Ticonderoga Museum; and studying the letters of JeanPaul Mascarene, who was governor of Nova Scotia from 1740-1749.

University alumna releases debut jazz CD Rising jazz star Candida Rose ’05 has released her debut CD, “Kabumerikana: The Sum of Me” (Golden Rose Music). The versatile Rose—who does her own arrangements and production— performs jazz covers such as “AfroBlue,” Cape Verdean staples such as “Sodade,” and five original tunes. English Prof. Everett Hoagland collaborates on the spoken-word title track, “Sum of Me (Un Poku di Tude/A Little of All).” Rose starred in the classroom, as well; she graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Music, and a minor in African and African/American Studies. Her mentors in the College of Visual and Performing Arts

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


20

Around the Campanile

N e ws o f N o t e

included royal hartigan and Semenya McCord. Before moving on into the recording world, Rose’s voice filled the campus in May 2005 when she sang the National Anthem during commencement ceremonies. She has performed solos in the National Center of AfroAmerican Artists’ production of Langston Hughes’ “Black Nativity,” and she has sung with the New England Conservatory’s Millennium Choir. The New Bedford native applies herself to musical efforts in the region. In addition to teaching an all-boys’ choir at the New Bedford Nativity Preparatory School, she also runs a church choir at the Union Baptist Church. The New Bedford Branch of the NAACP gave her an Artistic Service Excellence Award in recognition of her dedication to the community.

The new ROTC Honor Guard presents colors at the Homecoming football game.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Engineering team seeks to predict scale of volcanic destruction

Students, faculty team with Habitat to construct solar-powered home

Researchers in the Mechanical Engineering Department may one day be able to better predict the degree of impending damage as a volcano prepares to erupt. With more detailed data gathered further in advance of eruptions, scientists will have a firmer sense of when and if to evacuate nearby residents. Utilizing two National Science Foundation grants totaling $300,000, Dr. Peter Friedman, assistant professor, is collaborating with Dr. Steven Carey, a volcanologist at URI, UMass Dartmouth graduate students Bill Meyer and Vidya Vadakoot, and undergraduate Josh Borsari. “When a volcano erupts, it is not necessarily a destructive event,” Friedman said. “Magma brought to the earth’s surface by the volcano contains a lot of heat energy, but something has to convert that heat into a more destructive energy form.” Friedman and his team are using a state-of-the-art experimental system that features a specialized digital camera and high powered illumination laser to study the volcanic eruption process.

Students and faculty from UMass Dartmouth’s College of Engineering are partnering with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Plymouth in the construction of what will be the first solar-powered Habitat For Humanity house built in Massachusetts. Nancy Morse, president of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Plymouth, said, “Everyone on the Board of Directors is very excited about UMass Dartmouth’s participation in the building of the first Habitat solar home in Massachusetts. We feel honored that our affiliate has been chosen by the students and faculty, and hope that it is not only the start of a long-term relationship, but also the groundwork for many solar Habitat homes to be built in the future.” Electrical/Computer Engineering Professor Gerald Lemay said the UMass Dartmouth team’s work in the 2005 Solar Decathlon, an international competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing, provided valuable insights for use in the Plymouth home. Habitat will use the same

regional suppliers and builders who helped with the Solar Decathlon. The family selected by Habitat for Humanity for the home contributes “sweat equity,” working with volunteers, and using donated funds and materials. The homeowners then make affordable, no-interest mortgage payments to the non-profit organization, which uses the funds to help finance more construction. For more on Habitat for Humanity, visit www.hfhplymouth.org

On-campus community for 55-plus being studied UMass Dartmouth is collaborating with a firm developing a network of university-affiliated 55+ adult communities. “We are trying to gauge interest and determine whether the concept is a sound public policy,” said Associate Chancellor LaVerne Cawthorne. “It will require many conversations with local, regional and statewide officials to fashion a wise course of action financially and programmatically that benefits the university.” “We believe UMass Dartmouth can attract a diverse set of baby boomers to live on campus. Their skills and experiences will enrich the academic community,” said Gerard Badler of Campus Continuum of Newton. Residents could access UMass Dartmouth programs and facilities, and organize seminars and other activities. More information is available at www.campuscontinuum. com/umassd


Clas s N o t e s

21 Alumni Profile

’50s

Alumni news

Grover Boothman ‘58, mechanical engineering, Bella Vista, AR, retired from IBM Corp., Santa Clara, CA, where he had been senior development engineer in mechanical design.

’60s

Arthur H. Henderson ‘62, business administration, Tiverton, RI, has retired from the US Defense Department, and is now a substitute teacher, sports official, and limousine driver. Ronald Yates ‘64, textile technology, Stuart, FL, has retired from an engineering career with Sonoco Products. Richard J. England ‘65, chemistry and business administration, and his wife Jackie, ‘85, nursing, have a new grandchild, Tommy. They now have four grandsons and three granddaughters. Richard is a part-time lecturer at UMass Dartmouth, teaching sales management and international marketing, and Jackie is a case manager with Hospice and Palliative Care of Cape Cod. They live in Forestdale.

’70s

Bruce H. Brown ‘71, civil engineering, Jefferson, is a senior resident representative at Weston and Sampson Engineers Inc., Peabody. Michael Yourey ‘71, accounting, Poquoson, VA, loves the alumni magazine and writes “the photos of the students are great. Makes it personal!” Normand G. Audette ’72, accounting, was nominated by New Bedford Mayor Scott W. Lang to be senior mayoral aide for financial matters. The father of three and lifelong New Bedford resident was employed as a revenue agent for over 32 years. He is active in various civic and professional groups, and was the airport commission’s vice chairman for four years. Ronald A. Francoeur ’72, civil engineering technology, Livingston, TX, has retired. Dorothy L. Desrosiers ’73, humanities/ social sciences, New Bedford, remains active at age 84. She has a walking group on Mondays, yoga on Tuesdays, followed by a game of pitch, and an exercise class and whist games on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday nights. Joan L. Pepin ’73, psychology, Rochester, received the Lloyd Reuss Award for teaching excellence at Dartmouth’s George H. Potter elemen-

Cast and crew members of Monsters.

Team of alumni produce “Monsters” musical in Boston “Monsters,” a musical that made its world debut in September in Boston, was the culmination of a collaboration between Gail Phaneuf ’89 and playwright/ composer Ernie Lijoi ’91. The production involved a number of other UMass Dartmouth graduates: actors Patti Hathaway ’92, Lisa Beausoleil ’98, and Sam Belanger ’89; Michelle McGrath ’89, public relations; Ron Downing ’90, lighting crew; John Beausoleil ’98, lighting and crew; Constantine Scionti ’97, stage crew; Ken Ross ’89, set design; and Richard Pacheco ’78, logo artist. “Monsters!” is described in press releases as a universal story that captures the emotions experienced at many of life’s “passages.” For Samantha, the protagonist, her 40th birthday has her soul-searching, determined to overhaul her life. There are plans with friends, a taxing visit from her mother, and a number of annoying, unin-

vited guests who know too much. “Monsters!” was performed at the Boston Center for the Arts from September 14 through September 30. Phaneuf is a “computer doctor” by day while pursuing her career in theater. “The piece comes directly from within. I face these demons too!” said Phaneuf. The play represented the first professional collaboration of Phaneuf and Lijoi, longtime friends who met two decades ago on a college stage at UMass Dartmouth. At the launch of their partnership, Phaneuf was writing plays and earning her second master’s degree at Emerson College in Boston, while Lijoi was writing music as a fellow at the BMI Lehman Engel Musical Theater Workshop in New York. “Monsters!” was a finalist in the Rod Parker Playwriting competition at Emerson College.

(Continued on page 24) A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


22

Chi Phi fraternity members led the Homecoming Day parade during Homecoming Weekend.

AS

SACHUSE

TT

S

OUTH

UNIVERS

TM

IT

AR

Y

D

O

F

M

A

lu

mn

i Associat

A

io

n

Among those inducted into the Corsairs Hall of Fame were members of the 1976 field hockey squad: (seated l-r) Barb Donnellan, Barbara Carreiro, and Claire Marie Butler; (standing) Ellen O’Rourke, Sally Darlington, Susan Rose Warren, Linda Pintrich, and Mary McDonald.

Homecoming

lumni, family and friends attended Homecoming Weekend October 13-15 which kicked off with the Hall of Fame banquet followed by the Young Alumni & Zero year reunion at Woodland Commons. Current students joined young alums for a night of fun and dancing. On Saturday morning, several hundred parents came together for the pre-game brunch followed by the Homecoming Day parade featuring the award-winning New Bedford High School Band, and the crowning of the Homecoming king and queen. Provost Anthony Garro spoke to the parents about the many exciting things that are happening at UMass Dartmouth. Alumnus David Schweidenback ’76, founder of Pedals for Progress, a program that donates used bikes (Spring 2005 Alumni magazine) to the developing world, collected over 100 used bikes and raised over $1000. The reconditioned bikes will be shipped in the coming weeks to Nicaragua. And of course it wouldn’t be Homecoming without a half-time barbeque served under the Homecoming Tent during the football game which ended with a routing of Salve Regina in a 17-7 win for the Corsairs. Homecoming Weekend was capped off with the 2006 Annual Alumni Awards Brunch where distinguished alumni and friends of UMass Dartmouth were honored for their commitment and dedication to the university. Chancellor Jean MacCormack and Alumni Association President Gloria Craven ’77 praised the recipients and thanked them on behalf of UMass Dartmouth’s 40,000 alumni. New members of the Corsairs Hall of Fame include: (seated l-r) Stefan Pagios ’00 and Sheila Edwards ’92; (standing) Keith Rose ’99, Mark Crowther ’90, and John Pacheco ’63.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


23

Weekend 2006 (clockwise from top) Alumni vs. Students, Women’s Lacrosse led by Coach Gerry Jennings Alpha Sigma Tau crammed in car Sean Murphy ’08 & Steven Finethi ’09 of the Chi Phi fraternity in a non-traditional float Alumni join former Coach Bob Dowd (the third from left) on the track (inset) senior class officers Jenny Pereira ’07 & Jesse Correia ’07 show their school spirit Class of 1986 reunion under the Homecoming Tent The award-winning New Bedford High School Band


24

Cla ss No t e s

Alumni news

(Continued from page 21) tary school, where she taught for 32 years. John McCoy ’75, industrial relations, Hernando, FL, writes that after graduating in 1975, he served in the Army, from which he has retired with the rank of Sergeant Major. He works for the state of Florida as a disabled veteran outreach program representative. He married in 1968 and has three children. His youngest daughter graduated magna cum laude from Florida State University School of Law, and is an attorney in Tampa. He plans to travel to North Dartmouth this year, his first such trip since 1975. “Great school! I met many Vietnam veterans while enrolled there and thoroughly enjoyed my experiences in college.” Jay Gonsalves ’76, psychology, Rochester, is president of Action Collection Agencies Inc. in Middleboro. He has his master’s degree in health services administration from Salve Regina University. A longtime coach and former commissioner of Rochester youth baseball, Jay is also deacon of the First Congregational Church of Rochester. He and his wife Connie have three children. Kim Holland ’76, biology, Seattle, is a physician at Group Health Permanente at the Rainier Medical Clinic. Jerome C. Rosperich ’76, management, Charles Town, WV, is the assistant principal at Leslie Fox Keyser elementary school, Warren County. He also owns Stonewall Farms, specializing in the breeding and training of horses. Ronald Teachman ’76, political science, New Bedford, a 30-year veteran of the New Bedford police department, was appointed the city’s chief of police by Mayor Scott W. Lang. Edward Hill ’77, multidisciplinary studies, Swansea, was reelected as the town’s representative to the Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School Committee. He is the first school committee member in Massachusetts to earn the “distinction of fellow” for completing 100 training hours with the Massachusetts Association of School Committees. He is a program specialist for People Inc., Fall

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Alumni Awards

Homecoming Weekend 2006 featured the annual presentation of Alumni Association awards. Gathered above are: (l to r) Alumni Association President Gloria Craven ‘77, former Alumni Relations Director Donald Berube ‘84, Representative Michael Rodrigues ‘83, Phyllis Lopes (grandmother of Cecil Lopes III), Kevin Santos ‘81, Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack, Christina (Tina) Bruen, Alumni Relations Director Joe DeMedeiros ‘99.

Family of slain student among those honored with Alumni Association awards

T

he death of his son, UMass Dartmouth student Cecil M. Lopes III, was a tragedy. But Cecil Lopes Jr. said his family, while still grieving, has tried “to turn a negative into a positive and make a difference in people’s lives.” Their efforts have been twofold: becoming increasingly active in efforts to halt violence and establishing the Cecil M. Lopes III Scholarship Fund to aid New Bedford residents who enroll at UMass Dartmouth. For their work, the Alumni Association presented the Lopes family with its University Service Award during the Fall Fest weekend, one of five awards given at the annual homecoming brunch. Cecil’s grandmother Phyllis accepted the alumni honor on the family’s behalf. Lopes family members have championed the cause of anti-violence since Cecil, 18, died in a drive-by shooting on Oct. 31, 2004. An athlete at New Bedford High, Cecil had planned to use his energy and education to better his community. Joe DeMedeiros, alumni relations director, said the Lopes family has pledged $100,000 over the next several years to the scholarship they established, which “will serve as a testament to Cecil’s life.” Also honored at the brunch were: v Christina Bruen, director of UMass

Dartmouth’s International Student Center, Alumni Employee Award. Bruen was alumni relations director from 1991 through 1996, and her stewardship was crucial as Southeastern Massachusetts University became UMass Dartmouth; v Representative Michael J. Rodrigues, (D-Westport), Alumni Service Award. The 1983 graduate recently stepped down after a stint as the longest serving president of the Alumni Association. On Beacon Hill, Rodrigues is a tireless university advocate; v Kevin Santos ’81, a Dartmouth assessor and founder of Stat Ambulance Service, Personal Achievement Award. In 26 years, Santos’ company has grown from a oneman, basement operation to a leader in ambulance service in New England. Santos provides in-kind ambulance services for university athletic events; v Donald A. Berube ’84, former director of alumni relations, the Alumni Association Award. An attorney who now heads the Association of New England Title Agents, Berube oversaw alumni relations from 2002 to 2005. The 2006 award recipients “are truly deserving of the honors,” said DeMedeiros. “The university is fortunate to count them as friends.”


25

River. Jeffrey Larivee ’77, management, Berkley, is a property document manager for KirkhillTA Haskon Aero, Taunton. He has become paralyzed as a result of having a tumor inside his spine. Judith Wirtzburger Lincoln ’77, sociology, Lakeville, works in customer service for Textile Plus Screen-printing. Debra L. McCormick ’77, psychology, Natick, works in marketing at Boston Scientific. Her daughter Melanie is a sophomore at UMass studying fine arts. Garry Nickerson ’77, civil engineering technology, Wilbraham, is a senior engineer for Northeast Utilities in Rocky Hill, CT. Manuel J. “Tiny” Fernandez ’78, sociology, Medford, has become principal of the John F. Parker School, Taunton. He served as a faculty member for Teachers 21, Wellesley, and is an adjunct faculty member at Wheelock College, Boston. Philip R. Graham ’78, accounting, Mansfield, is the vice president of corporate tax for Fidelity Investments. He has two sons, one a freshman at Fairfield University and the second, a tenth-grade student. He and Deborah Udall Graham ’79, marine biology, have been married for 25 years. She retired after 20 years as a marine biologist, and teaches at the Norton Middle School. Donna M. Rondeau Malliaros ’78, psychology, Milton, is married, has one child, and is pursuing a career in elementary education. Robert Adams ’79, marine biology, Beverly, has worked for Baxter Healthcare for the last 18 years. He and his wife Diane have been married for 25 years, and have two sons: Paul, a student at Florida Tech, and Alex, a freshman at UMass Dartmouth. Janice Dyke Barney ’79, biology, Lunenberg, chairs the Dept. of Natural Sciences, and is a biology professor, at Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner. She is married and has a son. Joseph M. Bilodeau ’79, electrical engineering technology, Saint

Peters, MO, was selected as a Boeing leader for the instrumentation and data processing integrated product team for test and evaluation on the P-8A multi-mission maritime aircraft program. He also was the Boeing nominee for a professional organization’s achievement award. Gregory P. Jarosik ’79, biology, Frederick, MD, has been promoted to chief of the microbiology clinical review branch at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda. He received his master’s degree in biological sciences from Bowling Green State University and a doctorate in molecular microbiology from SUNY Stony Brook. He was formerly an assistant professor at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He and his wife Theresa have three daughters, Meghan, Jessica, and Stephanie. Mary Languirand ’79, psychology, Westbury, is a psychologist. Marguerite C. Picard ’79, medical technology, Fall River, retired in June 2002 and volunteers at Marie’s Place, operated by the nuns’ order of St. Anne’s Hospital. Bonnie W. Werly ’79, humanities/ social sciences, Dartmouth, is happily retired with her husband, Professor Emeritus John M. Werly.

’80s

Richard C. Thompson ’80, is the dean of the School of Business at Jones International University in Centennial, CO. He received an MBA from UMass Amherst, and a doctoral degree from the University of Colorado. Divorced, he has three sons, Jake, Luke, and Ben. Harold ‘Hank’ Wolfson ’80, marketing, Norwell, is chief administrative officer of Cubellis in Boston. He was previously vice president of corporate operations support for Shaw’s/ Star Supermarkets. As part of Cubellis’ executive administrative team, Hank’s work encompasses strategic planning, human resources, information technology, training, finance, and accounting. Muriel T. Kokoszka

’81, accounting, Westport, retired this past February as the town’s accountant. D. Milo Morin ’81, BFA, visual design, Cotuit, is artist-in-residence at Milo Creations, doing custom greeting cards and commissioned work in children’s illustration, pastel landscapes, and custom mural designs. Debra Noschese ’81, marketing, Medfield, is vice president of Keystone Partners, working with clients on their integrated career management needs. She was previously a regional training coordinator and educational specialist with Eastman Kodak Co. She sits on the Medfield School Committee. Sidney E. Martin ’81, MS ’82, electrical engineering, Raynham, is responsible for military product development and internal requirements of a new division within SynQor. Rita Gardner ’83, psychology, is executive director for Melmark New England in Woburn, a non-profit children’s agency serving children with autism spectrum disorders, brain injuries, and severe behavior disorders. Rita and her husband, Frank Bird, are among the agency’s founders. She has a master’s degree in public health from Boston University and is studying for her doctorate in applied behavior analysis at Simmons College. The couple live in Dunstable with their three sons. William J. Kitchen ’83, human resources management, was a candidate for a seat on the Fall River City Council. John C. Calnan ’84, management, Westport, is the vice president and East Coast sales manager in Citizens Bank’s automobile finance department. David D. Gavin ’84, political science, Maynard, has been with Arbella Insurance Group for 21 years. He and his wife Stephanie have two daughters, Molly and Lily. Andrew J. Raczka ’84, finance, was named president and chief executive officer for North Abington Co-operative Bank. He, his wife, and daughter live in Mansfield where he coaches youth basketball and softball.

Gabriel Cabral ’85, textile chemistry, his wife, and their three boys live in Bowling Green, KY, where he is a business analyst for Fruit of the Loom. He has a master’s degree from the Institute of Textile Technology, Charlottesville, VA. Stephen A. Radnor ’85, business management, Attleboro, is a telecommunications specialist at General Dynamics Missile Defense Systems in Lexington. Daniel J. Russell Jr. ’85, accounting, Charlotte, NC, is a risk manager at the Wachovia Bank. Stephen J. Previte ’86, electrical engineering, Framingham, is employed at Prevco Audio as an engineer and consultant. Kathleen R. Foley-Peres ’87, psychology, is an assistant professor at Dean College and resides in Sharon. She received her master’s degree in education from Curry College and her doctoral degree from St. Johns University. Paul B. Kitchen ’87, management, sought reelection to the Fall River School Committee. David M. Mello ’87, electrical engineering, lives in Concord with his wife, Netta, and daughter, Olivia. He has become a partner in the law firm of Mills & Onello, LLP in June. Keith Francis ’89, photography/ graphic design, Mattapoisett, showed at “Space 200” in April in Boston, featuring images and sculptures from his new portfolio. His artwork, which hangs in museum, corporate, and private collections nationwide, has been featured in the Boston Globe and on CBS television. He is also the principal of Francis Communications, a Boston-based graphic design firm. Julia M. Miller ’89, English/writing and communications, MA ’93, professional writing, is a marketing consultant living in Los Angeles.

’90s

Dianna Brown ’90, electrical engineering technology, Sarasota, FL, is a software design engineer for LTC Engineering Associates and has two young children. Brian T. Fox ’90, visual

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


Alumni news

26

Cla ss No t e s design/illustration, a selfemployed artist, is one of the nation’s most sought-after sports artists. He has acquired a national reputation for his equine, canine and feline paintings. Brian is the father of two and lives in Somerset. His website is www. brianfoxstudio.com. Jill Guthrie ’90, management, Snow Camp, NC, writes that she is a stay-athome mom. Thomas D. Viveiros ’90, electrical engineering, Franklin, is an engineering manager for Lockheed Martin in Chelmsford. Michael R. Naughton ’91, and Laurie Schiavone Naughton ’92, both management majors, celebrated their 12th anniversary on April 30. They have four children, Tyler, Cameron, Zackary, and Chase. Michael is the indirect sales manager with Sprint in Burlington and Laurie is controller with Dalbar, Inc. in Boston. Renee T. Ouellette ’91, MA ’98, art education, Rochester, is slated to have a one-person exhibit, entitled “Yes and No,” at the Park Plaza Hotel in Boston. The 24-piece exhibit is to be held during the ADAA convention in August 2007. David Borges ’92, political science, Westport, is assistant director of the Center for Policy Analysis at UMass Dartmouth. Carlos A. Costa ’92, electrical

Deaths Arthur S. Ashley ’50 James Bold ’53 Alan Bayreuther ’55 Hartley S. Gurney ’59 John F. Dunn Jr., MD, ’37 Charles A. Frascatore ‘61 Gerard J. Beaulieu ’65 Elaine A. Silva ’69 Patricia A. “Pat” Giza ’72 Robert D. Blackburn ’73 William B. Stevens ’73 Joan S. Butler ’79, MS Kathleen Rose Machado Dugal ’80 Helen S. Maravell ‘81 Jeanne T. Bourassa ’85 Rhiannon B. Poitras ‘01 Jill E. Lawrence ‘01

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

engineering, is living in the Ann Arbor area of Michigan with his wife Martha and children Christopher and Joseph. Carlos is in his seventh year as the assistant director of the student union at Eastern Michigan University, and is involved in planning for the new student center. Chris P. Sullivan, Jr. ’92, business information systems, Providence, is the senior project manager for the Cavan Group, Inc. in Boston.

James Quinn ’92 (right), history, Dartmouth, is a Plymouth County juvenile court probation officer. He was the recipient of a 2006 Probation Employee Recognition Award and was honored at a State House ceremony. Employed by the Massachusetts Probation Service for the past nine years, he was recognized for his community work. Quinn serves as chairman of the Children In Need of Services diversion program, designed to meet the needs of troubled youth. He is also the representative for the county child fatality committee. Marlene Wisuri ’92, visual design, Duluth, is a noted Minnesota historian, archivist, and photographer. She has collaborated with educator Thomas Peacock to produce three children’s books: The Four Hills of Life: Ojibwe Wisdom; Ojibwe Waasa Inaabidda: We look in all directions; and The good path: Ojibwe Wisdom. The latter two won Minnesota Book Awards in 2002. She and Peacock are working on To Get Free, a book for middle school children about racism. Wisuri, who taught photography at universities for 20 years, also is director of the Carlton County Historical society in Cloquet. She lives with her partner and

has three grown children. Steven Robert Brightman ’93, MS electrical engineering, is a senior software engineer with Zebra Technologies, Warwick, RI. Steven married Jennifer Louise Martin ’99, MS chemistry, in September. She is a quality assurance specialist at AMGEN, West Greenwich. Melissa M. Danforth ’93, illustration, works at Sherle Wagner and lives in New Bedford with her husband Jonathan, a software quality engineer for Gensym Corp. and musician. Francis G. Kosky ’93, accounting, writes that he, wife Deidre and their daughter Taygan, welcome new son, Tighe Braden Kosky. Frank is general manager and chief financial officer at Bates Finishing Supply, Inc., and continues to play bass guitar with his band, “Probable Cause,” at Worcester and Newport venues. Among his notable performances was one playing with former Red Sox pitcher Bronson Arroyo. He also did a live club appearance with contestants from the TV show “American Idol.” A listing of performances is available at probablecause.net. Craig E. Rousseau ’93, painting/2D studies and visual design/illustration, Swansea, concentrates on being a father by day and is a comics artist by night. He created the new comic The Perhapapanauts. Ginger Stabach ’93, civil engineering, Barrington, RI, has had a third son, Phineas Finn James Stabach. Heather Leigh Stober ’93, humanities/social sciences, of Fairhaven, married Timothy P. Fleming. She is a wine consultant at Cardoza’s Wine and Spirits. The couple took a trip to Las Vegas. Aimee J. Surprenant Rapoza ’93, humanities/social sciences, and Glenn Rapoza were married July 16, 2005, by Peter L. Bangs, Ph.D., cousin of the bride. The couple, who live in Mattapoisett, visited Los Angeles and Hawaii. Paul Molak ’93, marketing, Basalt, CO, is an art dealer at the Huntsman Fine Art Gallery in Aspen, and also makes films at www.oneaspenfilms.com.

Suzanne Catraio ’95, marketing, Dartmouth, is business development marketing manager at the Fall River Municipal Credit Union, managing media advertising and sales collateral, developing marketing plans, and designing and managing marketing pieces. Faye Lyn Weiner Jackson ’95, psychology/sociology, graduated from New England School of Law in 2004, and opened a private law practice. In October of 2005, after a long friendship since graduating from UMass Dartmouth and five years of dating, she married Roderick D. Jackson, Jr. ‘94, civil engineering, who is a CAD engineer for Waterman Engineering, East Providence, RI. The couple resides in North Attleboro. Michele Michaels ’95, psychology, is a senior milieu therapist in the Safe Quest intensive outpatient program at Bradley Hospital in East Providence, RI. Michele, her husband, and daughter Eva live in Swansea. Julie A. PavaoLavoie ’95, accounting, works for Hodgson Pratt & Associates as a staff accountant, and lives in Dartmouth with her husband, Steve, and daughter, Isabelle. Gregg Rivers ’95, psychology, is a chemical officer for the US Army in Fort Lewis, WA. David P. Cabral ’96, civil engineering, Marlboro, married Linda M. Cabral in May 2005. David, who earned his master’s degree in environmental engineering at the University of Michigan, is an environmental engineer at Mabbett & Associates, Bedford. Sean Macamaux ’96, business administration, Cambridge, is a banker for State Street Corporation in Boston. Michael Raymond Andrade ‘97, civil engineering, married Kimberly Joan Lomas. He is a civil engineer at Graves Engineering in Worcester, where the couple live. The couple honeymooned in Aruba. Dora DiLeonardo ’97, photo/electronic imaging, finished her graduate studies at Eastern Connecticut State University and teaches sixth grade language arts at


27

the Sage Park Middle School in Windsor, CT. Melinda J. Sauro ’97, nursing, North Carver, is a registered nurse. Arlette M. Oliveira ’98, sociology/social services, writes that she is living with her husband, three dogs, and one of her grown sons. She says she enjoys the times when one of their children come for extended visits, as well as similar visits from her father. Currently not working, Arlette has won two poetry contests. “My work is to be featured with the work of 32 other poets on a CD album and in two separate poetry anthologies. This began with a verbal encouragement from Dr. (Charles) White, who did not act surprised when I told him I wanted to write in a brief conversation that I had with him…I began posting poetry on an AOL homepage for about two years and then a New York journalist who has a writing group invited me to his group.” Kerri Tally ’98, psychology, Attleboro, married Timothy Tally on September 18, 2005. Greg Workman, ’98, finance, Brighton, works for Automatic Data Processing, Inc. as a district sales manager in the resource division in Waltham. Peter T. Engel ’99, nursing, married Sherron E. Pires on May 28, 2005, and the couple went on a southern Caribbean cruise. Peter is a nurse at St. Luke’s Hospital and the couple lives in Acushnet. Danielle K. Renaud ’99, visual design/graphic design, North Grafton, is a senior user experience designer with Iron Mountain Digital, Southborough.

’00s

Tyler Gulden ’00, MFA artisanry, is programs director at Watershed. He lives in South Bristol, ME, with his wife Kat, a nurse, his sons, Camden and Jarret, and daughter, Reed. David Maier ’00, photographic/electronic imaging, works as a photographer. Jennifer Burnap Nolan ’01, finance, married Joseph Nolan on September 24, 2005. The couple lives in Plainfield.

Alumni Profile Jan Reynolds Ziter, who received her degree in fine arts with a design major in 1977, was recognized this May by the Ad Club of Western Massachusetts for her work on Visions that Endure. Her firm, Jan Reynolds Design, designed the history book that traced the origins and growth of Wilbraham & Monson Academy. The book was one of five selected from more than 200 entries to receive the Charles A. Stein Award at the Creative Merits Award ceremony. The 50-page book celebrates the bicentennial of the academy and includes a fold-out centerfold of images that depict the school’s history, which was also a 40-foot installation at the academy’s Binney Art Gallery last year. Jan has worked in the design field since graduation, and her clients include Springfield area non-profit agencies such as Goodwill Industries and Springfield Partners for Community Action. The Wilbraham resident won a National Kovod Award in 1999 for a brochure for Springfield’s Jewish Family Services.

Catherine Caffelle ’01, sociology/ social services, Plymouth, graduated from Simmons College with her master’s degree in social work. She is enjoying time off from school as she plans her June 2007 wedding and prepares for a social work career in western Massachusetts. Melissa H. Jansson ‘01, business information systems, and Andrew J. Catalfamo were married in Worcester. They took a Mediterranean cruise and live in Rutland. Melissa is an IT analyst at Dynamics Research Corp., Andover. Maria G. DeAbreu ‘01, medical laboratory science, is a medical technologist at Charlton Memorial Hospital, Fall River, and a 2007 candidate for a doctorate in pharmacy at URI. Timothy J. Fay ’01, political science, Yorca Linda, CA, received his law degree last year from Chapman University School of Law. He is

an attorney with McNally & Bhavsar. Ryan S. Henebury ’01, mechanical engineering, Fairhaven, married Jill M. Salvucci in Southboro. He works for Climate Engineering in Abington as an HVAC technician. Darlene Adrienne Pavao ’01, art history, Fall River, received her master’s degree in historic preservation from Savannah College of Art & Design. She is a member of Sigma Pi Kappa Honor Society for Historic Preservation. Melody M. Pereira ’01, psychology, Fall River, is studying at Bridgewater State College. She married Robert Skinner on May 27, 2006. Sumner James Waring III ’01, MS, business administration, Mattapoisett, was promoted by Service Corporate International to the position of vice president of major market operations. Brian Edward Acheson ’02, biology, married Rebecca Ann

Bennett. They honeymooned in Jamaica and reside in Ayer. Brian received his master’s degree in biotechnology from UMass Lowell, and is a research assistant at Antigenics, Lexington. Jaclyn L. Burke ’02, accounting, married Anthony J. Chaves III at in Webster. The couple took a cruise to the Caribbean and resides in Millbury. She is a supply chain manager for Lewcott Corp., Millbury, and Anthony is a technician at Glick Nissan in Westboro. Kelly Medeiros Correia ’02, business information systems, New Bedford, and her husband Thomas Correia ’97, visual design/illustration and graphic design, have a daughter, Kelsey Rei, born in January, 2005. Kelly writes, “We were very sorry to hear of Professor (Roger) Deveau’s passing and our hearts go out to his family, friends and staff members. He was a great man!” Stephanie A. Lipka ’02, psychology, Taftville, CT, is in her last semester of the counseling psychology program at Assumption College. Erin Murphy ’02, graphic design, writes, “I’m living in downtown New Bedford and working as a graphic designer at the American Mathematical Society in Providence. I’ve met many other UMass Dartmouth alumni that have remained in the area. It’s great to see UMass grads helping to revitalize Southeastern Massachusetts.” Bryan Michael Spicer ’02, sociology and criminal justice, Acushnet, and Brandi Marie Almeida were married in September, 2005. The couple visited Honolulu and Maui on their honeymoon. Bryan is a meat cutter. Gina Forte Amancio ’03, psychology, of Fall River, married in September 2003 and her daughter, Emily Madon, was born on January 19, 2006. A case manager for St. Vincent’s Home, Gina is pursuing a master’s degree in elementary education. Stacy Dailida Arsenault ’03, visual design, Whitinsville, is a designer for the Telegram & Gazette newspaper. Jacquelyn Briggs ’03, biology, Hingham, is a

A l u m n i

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2006


Cla ss No t e s

Alumni news

We want to hear from you— and you can send us news by going to www.umassd.edu/alumni/ Here, you can post a Class Note. You can also learn about upcoming events, become an Alumni Association member and see what membership provides, read about former classmates, and make a donation that enables the association to award scholarships and sponsor special projects. clinical research associate for ARS Clinical, Weymouth. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ’03, photography/ electronic imaging, Abington, received her master’s in arts administration from Boston University in September 2006. She is involved with numerous non-profit organizations and committees. She is the clerk for the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association Board of Directors, and development database manager at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. Lauren Jepsen ’03, graphic design/ letterform, Gilbertville, is an art assistant for Wondertime Magazine, Disney Publishing Worldwide. Melissa LaRose Linstruth ’03, psychology, Leominster, married Cha Linstruth in October 2005. The couple honeymooned in Hawaii. Melissa is a special education teacher at Lowell High School. Qian Li ’03, MFA electronic imaging, Cleveland, is an assistant professor of graphic design at

Cleveland State University which hosted major solo exhibition of her work in the university art gallery. Titled “Silent Mix,” it featured electronic installations and constructions. Qian was a graphic designer/web developer at UMass before moving to Cleveland. She works in a variety of media including web, print, interactive CD, 3D animation, film, and painting. Her inspiration comes from her dreams, life experiences, and the richness of Chinese art and culture. She devoted herself to Dunhuang Art for the past decade during which she designed and created over 300 pieces. She has shown her work throughout the world, with shows at, among other places, Fuller Museum in Brockton, Gallery 244 in New Bedford, Museum of The Central Academy of Art and Design in Beijing, and Guanhai Gallery in Qingdao. Qian Li received a bachelor’s of fine arts in textile design from The Central Academy of Art

Support your Alumni Association

and Design in Beijing. Debra A. Lowrey ’03, accounting, MBA ‘05, Freetown, was promoted to senior accountant at Jed Cohen & Company P.C. She works closely with various local businesses and individuals performing services such as audits, reviews, compilations and tax services. Marianne Mis ’03, business information systems, Fall River, is the senior business analyst for Arbella Insurance Group in Quincy. Vincent Orgeat ’03, business information systems, Malden, is a portfolio administrator for State Street Bank. Catherine Rosario Ruble ’03, English literature, attends graduate school at Antioch New England in Keene, NH, studying environmental education and collaborating with another student on a bird journal for children in the Keene area. Catherine married David Ruble on July 28 and they live in Ashuelot, NH. Colleen E. Trahan ’03, accounting, Cambridge, is employed as an internal auditor for Fresenius Medical Care, North America in Lexington. Jozef Trzepacz ’03, history, Boston, is the residential director at Wentworth Institute of Technology. Andrew Beaumont ’04, management, New Bedford, married Amanda Howarth last January aboard a Royal Caribbean cruise. Andrew is a cost schedule analyst at

N

EW

with the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association Visa© Platinum card.

Lockheed Martin, Sippican in Marion. Daniel Boardman ’04, mechanical engineering, Swansea, married Julie Ribeiro Boardman ’04, psychology. She is a teacher in the Fall River school system. George A. Emmanuel ’04, mechanical engineering, Holbrook, is permanently employed at Phoenix Electric. Justin Koster ’04, computer engineering, New Bedford, married Holly L. Baker at St. Lucy’s Catholic Church in Middletown on June 1. They visited Grand Cayman in the British West Indies on their honeymoon. Justin works at an engineering firm in New Bedford. Geoffrey Nettleton ’04, civil engineering, Phoenix, is a design engineer for CMX, Inc. Daniel Cronin ’05, marketing, Peabody, is employed by Northwestern Mutual Financial Network in Wakefield. Jessica Desnoyers Faria ’05, nursing, married Adam Faria on September 17, 2005. The couple visited Aruba and lives in New Bedford. Jessica is a nurse at St. Luke’s Hospital. Stacey M. Lamontagne Martin ’05, sociology/criminal justice, Dartmouth, is a teaching assistant in Dartmouth. She married Andrew Martin in July 2005. Erin R. Twomey ’05, MS physics, Taunton, is a research analyst for the National Fire Protection Association.

Stop worrying !

about your student loans We can help Call us at 1.800.961.6937

Apply today by calling 1.800.853.5576 extension 8356. Visit www.umassd.edu/ alumni/member/affinity.cfm for more Umass Dartmouth alumni membership benefits.

to get a loan with a great fixed rate for the life of the loan. Visit us online: www.umassd.edu/ alumni/studentloans

U.S. Bank National Association ND, is creditor and issuer of the University of

U.S.Massachusetts Bank National Association ND, is creditor and issuer of the University of Dartmouth Alumni Association Visa Platinum Card. ©2004 U.S. Bank Massachusetts Dartmouth Alumni Association Visa Platinum Card. © 2004 U.S. Bank

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

UMASS

DARTMOUTH

28


You succeeded at UMass Dartmouth — help others have the same opportunity

Jimmy Tingle class of 1997

alumni association

online at www.umassd.edu/alumni Marielle Sardella class of 2008

Jimmy Tingle ’77 went from UMass Dartmouth to a successful career as a political humorist and social commentator, on TV and in his own club. As a longtime Alumni Association member, Tingle is helping others — like history major Marielle Sardella ’08 —continue their education.

You can do what Tingle has done. Give today’s students the opportunities you enjoyed, by joining the UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association and contributing to the Alumni Association Scholarship Fund. How? Go to www.umassd.edu/alumni

Letter from the Alumni Association president

A

s we continue with long-standing programs, the Alumni Association is offering increasingly valuable services and opportunities for graduates. With a mission to support educational excellence and scholarships, the association is focusing on several objectives: v Recruiting and retaining members— that means you Opportunities for you to network arise throughout the year, so watch your mailbox and email for them. The Outreach Committee is planning events with guests offering timely presentations. The Board of Directors has also established what it hopes will be a notable tradition, an annual membership meeting.

We are developing a spring event that will serve to launch this. Your $25 annual dues is a real value when you consider the advantages it provides, such as a UMass Dartmouth Bank of America Affinity Program for premier financial services. v Increasing interactions among alumni and student —that means you and our students With so many accomplished graduates, the association is enthused about events such as career panels so current students can meet alums. We are committed to continuing financial support for students through our scholarships. And we are pursuing new ways, such as internships, to give students increased professional opportunities. Senior class president Kristi Matsumoto, a member of our board, promotes ways to further alumni-student interaction.

We look forward to bringing today’s students into an ever-growing Alumni Association. v Collaborating with faculty, staff, and the community The Alumni Association is eager to connect with all who work to advance UMass Dartmouth, as well as its surrounding communities. The association had a strong presence for the recent Blue & Gold Gala; such integration into university life enables the association to foster graduates’ continuing connection with faculty, staff, and the university’s neighbors. The association is expanding its circle of friends, while developing more benefits for members, students, and the university as a whole. We urge you to join the Alumni Association—become active, and let us know how we can be of assistance to you. —Gloria Aubut Craven, ‘77


The Stream Team— A rapid response unit from the Computing and Information Technology Services division worked late nights and early mornings, bringing the November 3 gubernatorial forum via live webcast and television to the university community. The team also provided dozens of newspaper reporters with wireless Internet access and created an online forum ticket form that attracted nearly 300 requests in about an hour. Seated (L to R): Justin Maucione, Chris Frias, Diane Gomes, Don King, Tim O’Neil, Steve Forde, Rich Pacheco Standing (L to R): D. Confar, Wendy Malenfant, Paul Souza, Heather Tripp

Periodicals Postage Paid New Bedford, MA 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

UMass Dartmouth Fall 06 magazine  

A magazine for Alumni & Friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you