Page 1

Fall 2010

A magazine for alumni & friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Idea makers

A university is defined by a passionate faculty who create and share innovative knowledge with students and the community


MESSAGE FROM

J e a n F . M a c C o r m ac k

Dear reader,

O

ften when I encounter alumni out in the community, our conversation about UMass Dartmouth inevitably turns to the professor who changed their lives by opening their eyes to new ideas and possibilities. I believe it is such faculty who set our University apart from other institutions. UMass Dartmouth is special because our faculty members connect to students at the intersection of learning, discovery and engagement. They are pioneering researchers — passionate about their work— who love to bring their discoveries right into our classrooms, labs and studios. Then, once absorbed, their ideas are injected into the fabric of our community, far and wide. In this issue of UMass Dartmouth Magazine, you will meet many of our world class faculty members who place new ideas and the excitement of discovery within reach of our students. You will meet our five new Fulbright Scholars, who are being dispatched to far off lands by the State Department to help build global understanding of issues related to war, immigration, business, art, and education. They will then return to share those experiences and their new knowledge with our students and the rest of our community. You will read about two other professors who took up the challenge of one of their students and travelled to a treacherous mountain region of Pakistan once controlled by Al Qaeda to find, live with, and learn from a peaceful, joyful people believed to be descendants of Alexander the Great. They have returned with remarkable stories that will engage their students in real dialogue about our country’s role in the Middle East. You will experience an inter-disciplinary conversation between three of our professors examining society’s response to the Great Recession, and you will also encounter two business professors who have taken up the cause of rising textbooks costs. Recalling their experiences as students trying to finance their own education, these two professors have come up with new ways to keep higher education opportunity within reach of our students. These are just a few examples of the people— our faculty—who define UMass Dartmouth as a vibrant, innovative center of learning and discovery that transforms individuals and communities.

Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

Susan Hamlet Jewelry /Metals

Alan Burton Thompson Jewelry /Metals

Charlotte Hamlin Jewelry /Metals

Artisanry Faculty Like the representative work shown on these pages, the Artisanry faculty come from a variety of disciplines, linked by a network of closely allied studios: ceramics, jewelry/metals, textile design/fiber arts, and wood/furniture design. They seek to encourage their highly creative students with a strong sense of originality and vision. Through the study of the evolving traditions of craft, as well as techniques, materials, and processes of building finely crafted objects, they prepare students to be successful studio artists and designers.


1

I

ssues of UMass Dartmouth are produced for the 40,000 alumni, 9,500 students, 1,200 employees, and countless partners of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. The information contained in this publication is intended to engage readers in the work of UMass Dartmouth which is critical to the social and economic development of the region.

Eric Lintala

Around the campanile Five faculty earn prestigious Fulbright awards 2 Campus hosts gubernatorial debate 3

Bioengineering program first in UMass system 3

We welcome letters from our readers, and encourage your feedback. You can email your comments to publicaffairs @umassd.edu or mail them to Public Affairs, Rm 331A, Foster Administration, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300.

UMass Law receives major gift 4 Hall of Fame inductees 5

Feature stories

Managing Editor

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant Chancellor for Public Affairs

Freedom Festival photos 8

Assistant Chancellor of Advancement

Michael Eatough ’09

Journey to the pagan Kalash people of Pakistan

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Alumni Relations Hayami Arakawa Wood

10

Lori Jacques

Faculty discuss a rebound from the “great recession”

Design/illustration

Rachel Cocroft

15

Photographers

The Blue & Gold Gala 18

D. Confar, Liz Friar ’12, Jennifer White ’07

Library renovations 20

Alumni Class Notes

Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Alumni & Family Weekend 22

Alumni news Class Notes & Faculty News

25

Interview: Sustaining U.S. Navy’s strength through innovation

James Lawton Ceramics

26 Alan Burton Thompson White House tree ornament (see pg. 5)

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010


2

Five faculty earn prestigious Fulbright awards

F

ive UMass Dartmouth faculty members, from four different colleges, were named Fulbright Scholars this year, a new record for the campus, earning it national recognition as a "top producing Fulbright institution.” “These honors illustrate the excellence and passion that our faculty bring to our teaching, discovery, and engagement mission,” Provost Anthony Garro said. “UMass Dartmouth stands out because we have faculty across the disciplines who engage in global inquiry and then bring those discoveries back to our classroom to share with our students.” The 2011 UMass Dartmouth Fulbright Scholars are (l-r): > Associate Professor of Education Maureen Hall who will travel to India to conduct research on the Super Accelerated Learning Theory (SALT). This work grows out of her collaborative efforts with the UMass Dartmouth Center for Indic Studies. > Associate Professor of Design Vicki Crayhon who will travel to Russia to photograph urban and rural public space and industrial landscapes. She will teach classes in photography and photo history as well. > Associate Professor of Management and Marketing Catherine Curran who will travel to the Rouen Business School in France and the University College Dublin, where her teaching and research will focus on the regulation of commercial communications in the EU, especially in the context of children’s food marketing and advertising regulation. > Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Lisa Knauer who will travel to Guatemala to teach and conduct research focusing on migration from that country to New England. > Associate Professor of English Jerry Blitefield who will travel to Esterhazy-Karoly College in Eger, Hungary where his teaching and research will focus on rhetoric and writing related to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

“Securing a place as a Fulbright top producing school is a testament to the quality of the applications a school’s students and faculty submit.” — U.S. Department of State In addition, UMass Dartmouth recently received a Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) grant to support students to study at the Catholic University of Portugal and Trier University in Germany. The theme for these studies is Global Citizenship. Dr. Michael Baum, chairperson of the Department of Political Science, is the UMass Dartmouth program director. The U.S. Department of State recently designated UMass Dartmouth as a “top producing Fulbright institution” and issued the following statement: “Both President Obama and Secretary Clinton have made clear that international educational exchange is a critical element of the U.S. international engagement and the Fulbright Program is consistent with this “smart power” approach. Securing a place as a Fulbright top producing school is a testament to the quality of the applications a school’s students and faculty submit.”

Visit umassd.edu/publicaffairs/magazine to watch interviews with our Fulbright scholars.


New s of N ote Net Impact Chapter honored The Charlton College of Business Net Impact Chapter—formed to leverage business principles into positive social, environmental and economic impact— has achieved silver status among its international counterparts for the second year in a row. This designation places the Charlton College student team among the top 23 of 270 chapters located around the world, joining business schools at the University of California Berkley, University of Chicago and Columbia University. The Charlton team was cited for a wide variety of campus activities, including lectures, networking events, curriculum changes, and the development of a sustainability studies program. While formed as a graduate chapter, Net Impact UMass Dartmouth welcomed undergraduates to the group in 2010. The UMass Dartmouth chapter is featured in the 2010 edition of Business As UNusual, the student guide to graduate programs published yearly by the San Francisco-based Net Impact organization, highlighting that students can integrate sustainability into their MBA and business school degrees.

Times of London ranks UMass system among best in world The five-campus UMass system, which UMass Dartmouth joined in 1991, is ranked 56th in the world, according to The Times of London’s 2010 rankings. UMass is the only public university in New England to make the prestigious list, and sixth in New England behind only Harvard, MIT, Yale, Tufts and Brown. The newspaper describes its list as “the gold standard for world-class research institutions.” UMass Dartmouth Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said: “The Times of London ranking certainly confirms that the fivecampus University of Massachusetts has an international reputation for providing access to excellence in learning, discovery and engagement. Each campus keeps world class opportunities within reach of students, both financially and geographically, and prepares its students to prosper and engage in the global community.”

Campus hosts gubernatorial debate UMass Dartmouth hosted a gubernatorial debate featuring (l-r) Green Party candidate Jill Stein, Governor Deval Patrick, Independent candidate and state Treasurer Tim Cahill and Republican candidate Charlie Baker on September 30. The debate, moderated by Professor of Political Science Shannon Jenkins, was sponsored by the SouthCoast Alliance, a consortium of media, business, and civic organizations and drew nearly 600 people from campus and the community. Questions focused on state support for higher education, commuter rail expansion to the SouthCoast, and a proposed sales tax cut impact on local services.

New health program launched SouthCoast residents working in the allied health field now have a new educational track available to them at UMass Dartmouth. Health Care professionals with either an associate degree or certificate in an allied health field may now complete a baccalaureate degree in Medical Laboratory Science, acquiring knowledge, skills, and abilities in the areas of business methods, health care policy, and people management. The university, through the Division of Professional and Continuing Education, will offer the program in collaboration with the Department of Medical Laboratory Science to build on the academic experiences of professionals in more than 50 different careers.

New bioengineering program first in UMass system The College of Engineering has unveiled a first-in-the-UMass system

U M a s s

bioengineering undergraduate program that will prepare students to prosper in the fast-emerging biotechnology/ biomedical device industry or go on to medical or other graduate schools. “Students will be trained to be the future leaders and innovators at the intersection of the life sciences and engineering,” Dean Robert Peck said. “Demand for the bachelor's degree in this field has more than quadrupled over the past five years and U.S. Department of Labor projections indicate the number of biomedical engineering jobs will increase by 72 percent through 2018. UMass Dartmouth is now well-positioned to meet that demand.” The bioengineering program will begin accepting students as early as spring 2011 with an anticipated enrollment of 50 students by the fall. Bioengineers do a wide variety of tasks, from developing medically important processes and products, to making and

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

3


Around the Campanile

4

testing new materials, finding ways to protect the environment, improve human health, and boost food production. A core faculty of five will be teaching a dozen newly-designed bioengineering undergraduate courses and a half dozen graduate courses. Bioengineering majors will have a new home department, the first added to the College of Engineering in more than eight years. The department is among several university-wide initiatives that will raise the research and education profile of the campus and serve as a resource for the community.

Marine scientists guide scallop fleet to protect flounder Scientists at the School for Marine Science and Technology have successfully implemented a strategy to protect the dwindling yellowtail flounder population without burdening the scallop fishing fleet. Scallops, one of the best-managed fisheries in the U.S., produce about $400 million of product, including $200 million in New Bedford. Several times over the past five years, however, scallopers from New Bedford and other ports were forced to prematurely halt their pursuit of scallops because they exceeded their allocation of yellowtail flounder, a species that is over-fished. This created

“We were overwhelmed with the level of participation from the fleet and very pleased that the fishermen used the information to actively avoid yellowtail bycatch,” said Cate O'Keefe, an SMAST PhD student and the director of the project. “This is an economic and conservation success.”

UMass Law receives first major gift

Charles J. Hoff

an economic hardship for hundreds of scallop-fishing families. Last year, for example, the catch of scallops was reduced by more than 2 million pounds valued at $16 million at the dock because fishing grounds were closed early due to yellowtail flounder catch limits. Many of the large scallops left on the sea floor then died and the habitat for new scallops to thrive was reduced. SMAST scientists this year responded by producing maps of the Nantucket Lightship Area, which were used by fishermen to avoid flounder while catching scallops. More than 60 scallop vessels participated in the daily reporting program.

UMass Law received its first major private scholarship gift on July 1, the same day that the school officially accepted a $23 million donation of facility, land, and cash assets from the former Southern New England School of Law. UMass Lowell alumnus and former UMass Trustee Charles J. Hoff (’66) made the gift of $210,000 to support graduates of all UMass campuses who want to attend law school and pursue public interest-related law. The gift brings the Hoff Family’s lifetime commitment to the UMass system to more than $6 million and, with matching funds included, builds on the $10 million Charles J. Hoff Scholarship program that benefits more than 150 students on all five UMass campuses each year. The Hoff Scholarship Program is the largest privately initiated scholarship program in the university’s history.

Two professors working to reduce textbook costs

Professors Godwin Ariguzo (left) and Professor Steven White meet with campus bookstore director Cathy Hickey.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Charlton College of Business professors D. Steven White and Godwin Ariguzo are at the forefront of efforts to reduce textbook costs for students, and they are getting some innovative help from the Campus Store. Dr. White, who is increasingly using open source e-books and free online materials in his classes, participated in a national press conference calling attention to a new federal law designed to empower textbook consumers. “Professors share students’ concern about cost and generally would prefer to assign less expensive books,” said Dr. White. “The new law empowers professors to readily identify lower-cost options that suit their instructional needs.” White is one of thousands of professors nationwide already exploring the use of open textbooks in college classrooms. This fall, he estimates that switching to open textbooks will save his 98 students approximately $11,000. “Affordable, high-quality alternatives like open textbooks could mean serious competition for traditional publishers,” noted Dr. White. “Especially now that professors know how much books cost.” Dr. Ariguzo is using the law as a lever in negotiating with textbook publishers. He was able to negotiate double-digit discounts for his busness students, teaching them a tangible lesson along the way. Meanwhile, the campus store is implementing several new strategies, including e-books and book rentals to lower costs.

Visit umassd.edu/publicaffairs/magazine to hear the interview with Professors Ariguzo and White or listen for them on WUMD 89.3 FM


New s of N ote UMass Dartmouth Corsair Hall of Fame 2010

Class of 2010 Corsair Hall of Fame inductees (l-r): Bob Carroll (UMD ’94) Nancy Fistori, accepting on behalf of her late husband Paul Fistori, Bill Edward (SMU ’73) and Rich Volkmann (SMU ’85)

“Once again, the Hoff Family is making a tangible and transformative investment in UMass students,” said UMass Dartmouth Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack. “This donation will make it possible for 10 students per year to pursue their law school aspirations and then use their UMass Law degrees to serve their communities.”

CVPA to create ornament for White House Christmas tree The College of Visual and Performing Arts has been selected to create the state tree ornaments on behalf of New Bedford, the city chosen to represent Massachusetts at this year’s National Christmas Tree Lighting event hosted by the National Park Foundation and National Park Service. This year, one artist and youth group were selected from each U.S. state, territory, and the District of Columbia

to design and create 26 ornaments. Twenty-five of the ornaments will be hung from the state or territorial tree as part of the National Christmas Tree display on the Ellipse. One of the ornaments will decorate the White House Visitor Center Christmas tree which showcases each state/ territory ornament. New Bedford Mayor Scott Lang asked CVPA Dean Adrian Tió to help the city participate in this national program. Dean Tió stated that this would be an ideal opportunity to showcase the talents of students working and studying at the college’s downtown New Bedford location. University students were coordinated by Professors Kathy Miraglia, Alan Thompson, and Susan Hamlet. Art Education students of Professor

U M a s s

Miraglia worked with fifth through eighth grade students at nearby Nativity Prep to produce the ornaments. Professors Thompson and Hamlet oversaw the efforts of students in the Jewelry/Metals Program housed at the university’s Star Store location. The two groups prepared more than a dozen highly decorated ornaments featuring images of New Bedford and the SouthCoast. “We are delighted to have UMass Dartmouth and the city of New Bedford participating in this year’s National Christmas tree display,” said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. “This event is a wonderful example of how our national parks connect us as a nation.”

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

5


Around the Campanile

6

Women’s Leadership Breakfast encourages young women to pursue their dreams Felicia Holmes, a sophomore member of the women’s basketball team and a resident assistant, was a panelist at the recent Women’s Leadership Breakfast. Felicia, who was raised by her grandmother, talked about overcoming the challenges she has faced, including the deaths of two of her brothers. She said she chose UMass Dartmouth “because people cared and supported me,” and perserveres, knowing that, “It is not where you start but rather where you finish.” Also speaking at the event, which was hosted by Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack in collaboration with the Women’s Fund of Southeastern Massachusetts, was Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Cynthia Cummings. ”I encourage students to be risk takers and to change their lives by going to college, and to separate themselves from people who do not support their dream and who do not want you to move forward,“ she said.

Admissions staff: back (l-r): Steve Kesman, Kathy Magnusson, Cathi Fowler, Arnie, Mike Lynch, Teresa Mauk, Matt Ducharme and Jessica McCaughey. front (l-r): Michelle Rocha-Alves, Kathy Norcross, Denise Sturtevant, Verna Drayton and Kelley Mahoney

Alumni make the best ambassadors for potential UMass Dartmouth students That is one of the key messages that new Associate Vice Chancellor Teresa Mauk (back, third from right) and Director of Admissions Michael Lynch (back, fourth from right) have brought to campus as they seek to attract a dynamic and diverse Class of 2015. “Alumni of UMass Dartmouth and its predecessor institutions truly love this place and, more than anyone, know the power of the university to transform UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

lives,’’ said Mauk, who came to campus with 20 years of experience, most recently at Texas Woman’s University. “We want those who know us best to be actively engaged in telling the university’s story to high school students and community college students.” “One of the best parts of this job is connecting with potential new students and hearing about their aspirations, and introducing them to graduates who are

achieving their own goals thanks to a UMass Dartmouth education,“ said Lynch, who comes to UMass Dartmouth with 16 years of experience, most recently at Rollins College in Florida. “We are also fortunate to have an excellent admissions staff that loves to tell our story of keeping a world class education within reach of students.”


New s of N ote

The Corsair field hockey team won the 2010 Little East Conference Championship and advanced to the NCAA Division III tournament with a 3-1 victory over Bridgewater State. This was the second year in a row that the team advanced to a national tourney.

For the first time since the 1977 season, the golf team is headed to the NCAAs, scheduled for May 10–13 at the Grandover Resort in Greensboro, NC. (front l-r) Kevin Rewinski, Matt Connolly, Billy Guilford, Matt Munden, George Gillmore, and Scott Woodacre. (back l-r) Brendan Kelleher, Nick Jagoe, John Coucci, Brandon Oldham, Coach Joel Baptista.

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

7


8

Freedom Festival 2010


9

UMass Dartmouth An estimated 20,000 people came out for the annual Freedom Festival July 2, the university’s signature community event, which is made possible with support from the Bristol County Savings Bank.


10

Map recreated from composite maps online at Globalsecurity.org

The lost children of Alexander A journey to the pagan Kalash people of Pakistan UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


11

By Brian Williams

the Great

(from top left) The Kalash women, unlike their Muslim counterparts, wear brightly colored dresses instead of burqas and do most of the manual labor. A “jingle truck” winds through the Taliban-controlled Swat Valley. A mother and daughter watch from the porch of their home. Kazi, the holyman of Rumbur, recognized Brian and Adam as fellow “pagans” and welcomed them to stay in his village.

U M a s s

or a number of years now I have been teaching a class for the History Department where I do a “tour” of the great Empires of antiquity, from Pharaonic Egypt to Viking Europe. For all their interest in Assyrians, Babylonians, Egyptians and Romans though, it is the exploits of Alexander the Great that inevitably lead to the most questions from my students. This spring one of my students in History 101 asked me during class what happened to the far flung garrisons of the Greeks and Macedonians who were settled in the far corners of Alexander’s vast empire. I told her that over the succeeding centuries they disappeared or were absorbed by succeeding waves of invaders. All that was left of the Greeks who left their Mediterranean homeland to settle in distant lands of Africa and Asia was the occasional coin, spearhead or amphitheater testifying to the conquests of one of history’s greatest leaders. Then, after some thought, I corrected myself and told her the legend of the Kalash people of Pakistan. High in the snow-capped Hindu Kush Mountains on the Afghan-Pakistani border lived an ancient people who claimed to be the direct descendants of Alexander the Great’s troops. While the neighboring Pakistanis were dark skinned Muslims, this isolated mountain people had light skin and blue eyes. Although Pakistan proper converted to Islam over the centuries, the Kalash people retained their pagan traditions and worshiped their ancient gods in outdoor temples. They produced wine much like the Greeks of antiquity did. This, in a Muslim country that forbade alcohol. Tragically, in the 19th century the Kalash were brutally conquered by the Muslim Afghans. Their ancient temples and wooden idols were destroyed; their women were forced to burn their beautiful folk costumes and wear the burqa or veil; and the entire people were converted at sword point to Islam. Only a small pocket of this vanishing pagan race survived in three isolated valleys in the mountains of what would later become Pakistan. D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2009


12

(left) Adam and Brian visited the Moghul Mosque in Lahore on their trip north to the Chitral Valley. (Below) Brian stands with a local man far above a Pashtun village in the Swat Valley.

local people. They also used it as a springboard for sending suicide bombers throughout Pakistan. “But all hope is not lost,” Rafay continued. “The Pakistani army just reconquered most of the valley this winter and have opened the main road through it. If you don’t stray from the road, and there is no fighting, you just might be able to pull it off.” Nervous about the prospect of adding a journey through a war zone to our trip to the Kalash, Adam and I then traveled to the capital of Islamabad. There, after much searching, we found an ethnic Pashtun driver who claimed to have once traveled to the remote homeland of the Kalash. He not only knew the route but had an off-road Hilux pickup truck to get us there. After haggling for the price of the trip, we set out driving across the burning plains of Pakistan where the heat soared to 120 degrees. Finally, after traversing the country from the Indian border to the Afghan border we arrived at the mountains.

The Swat Valley, Pakistan

After class the student came to me and asked me if I’d ever visited the Kalash tribe of the Hindu Kush Mountains. Wistfully, I told her I had not, but it was my dream to do so. I remember her response vividly. “Dr. Williams,” she said, “you’re always telling us to get passports and get out to see the world. Why don’t you take your own advice and just do it?”

Lahore, Pakistan, June 2010 A student’s challenge can be motivational, so this past June my colleague from the Charlton College of Business, Dr. Adam Sulkowski, and I set out to travel into the Hindu Kush Mountains on the Pakistani-Afghan border to see this ancient race for ourselves.

“A student’s challenge can be motivational.” But when we arrived at our Pakistani host’s house in Lahore after flying through Abu Dhabi, Adam reacted with caution towards our bold dream of visiting the lost descendents of Alexander the Great. “It’s a dangerous two-day journey off road into the mountains,” he rightfully warned. “But that’s not the most important obstacle we’ll have to overcome. To get to the remote homeland of the Kalash we need to cut through the Swat Valley.” Rafay, our host, then pointed out our intended route on a map. Adam and I groaned. Our dream was falling apart. Swat Valley, we both knew, was a stronghold of the Pakistani Taliban. In 2007 the Taliban brutally conquered this beautiful alpinelike valley and enforced a puritanical version of Islam on the UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

And what mountains they were. The Hindu Kush or “Hindu Killers” are an extension of the Himalayas and soar to 25,000 feet. As we drove into the tree-covered mountains the temperatures began to drop. While we found respite from the heat everyone grew tense. Saki, our driver, warned us that we were now in Taliban territory. We had entered the Swat Valley. We did not travel far before we were stopped at the first of many Pakistani army checkpoints we would encounter. When the soldiers discovered that there were two Americans in the truck they strongly warned us to avoid leaving the road. One of them asked us to sign our names in a registration book and proclaimed that we were the first foreigners to enter the Swat since the Taliban had taken it in 2007. That night we stayed in Dir, a Swat Valley village that locals claimed had briefly served as hiding place for Osama Bin Laden when he fled Afghanistan in 2001 during Operation Enduring Freedom. Kidding or not, that night we slept fitfully. As a precaution, Adam piled chairs against our inn room’s door to keep out any Taliban or Al Qaeda intruders. In the


13

back of our minds we always had the tragic story of the Wall Street reporter Daniel Pearl who was captured by Al Qaeda in Pakistan and beheaded.

Kalash Village of Rumbur, Pakistan The next day we made it safely out of the Swat Valley after crossing a mountain pass at 10,000 feet and a nearby glacier. We were now in the scenic Chitral Valley. We drove up this valley for several hours before our driver grew excited. Gesturing to the dark mountains on our left, he said one word with a grin —“Kalash.” With mounting excitement we left the main road, crossed a large river and began to drive up a mountain trail straight into the mountains. This continued for a couple of hours before the narrow valley opened up and our exhausted driver announced that we had finally arrived in Rumbur, the most isolated of the Kalash valleys. Having made our way from Boston to Abu Dhabi to Lahore to Islamabad to Swat to Chitral, we had finally reached our destination in the high mountains on the Afghan border. It was now time to meet the Kalash. It did not take us long to find them. Adam was the first one to spot a Kalash shepherdess in the trees wearing a stunningly bright peasant costume. After seeing the faceless burqas of the women of the Swat the juxtaposition between Muslim women and this Kalash woman could not have been greater. As we drove along we saw several more brightly clad Kalash women. But when we tried to take their pictures they shyly ran off and hid behind trees. Worried that we might break some local taboo on photography we continued on our way. Soon we entered the Kalash village of Rumbur. The wooden houses were built in steps above one another up the valley’s walls and the village square filled up with Kalash curious to see us. Among them was Kazi, the village holy man. Everyone stood back as he approached us and heard our request to stay with the Kalash for a few days and learn about their culture. Kazi, a wise man with twinkling eyes, heard us out and thought about it for a while. After some thought he finally smiled and gave us his blessing. He proclaimed that as blue-eyed pagans (the Kalash

Adam photographs the drivers of a broken down jingle truck as it tried to cross Lowari Pass at 10,000 feet. A local guide, typical of the fair complexioned, blue-eyed Kalash, stands in front of ancient wooden idols.

believe Christians worship three gods, the Trinity) we were like the Kalash and welcome to stay with them. Everyone’s shyness was forgotten and the village men and women proudly posed for photographs and allowed us into their homes. Once again the comparison to the Pashtun Muslims in Swat and greater Pakistan was tremendous. The conservative Muslims of Swat had women’s quarters in their houses where no outsiders were allowed. Here the women were free and dressed in beautiful folk costumes that seemed to belong to a different era. During our stay we hiked up into the mountains overlooking the Afghan border and were taken to the Kalash people’s outdoor temples. There they made sacrifices of goats to their ancient mountain gods. Sadly most of their ancient wooden idols had, however, been stolen or defaced by neighboring Muslim iconoclasts who found them to be heathen abominations. We were also told that one of the local leaders who fought in the courts to protect the Kalash from such problems had recently been assassinated. On many levels we sympathized with the Kalash—who were losing numbers to conversion to Islam—as a dying race facing an existential threat. And I must say that after

“After the heat, pollution and crowds of Pakistan proper, we found this pristine mountain enclave filled with incredibly hospitable farmers and shepherds to be a veritable Shangri-La.” the heat, pollution and crowds of Pakistan proper, we found this pristine mountain enclave filled with incredibly hospitable farmers and shepherds to be a veritable Shangri La. U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010


14

The wooden goat heads adorning a sacred Kalash temple stand in sharp contrast to the Muslim mosque silhouetted at sunrise in neighboring Chitral Valley. Brian and Adam were warmly invited for dinner at the home of a village elder in Rumbur where a local women agreed to pose.

Over and over again we were invited by smiling Kalash into their simple wooden houses for meals where we talked about life beyond their remote valley. Most Kalash had only left their valley a few times in their life, then usually to go to a neighboring Kalash valley for a marriage or to celebrate a great festival. On our final evening in Rumbur the villagers held a great feast for us. We celebrated with the famous Kalash red wine. My most endearing memory of the mystical night was of Adam mimicking a local elder snapping his fingers rhythmically and dancing lower and lower in the center of the clapping audience. The next morning we were woken to the sound of cows being led by children through the misty village. We said our goodbyes to everyone and drove out of Rumbur. As I looked back I saw several Kalash girls standing on a terraced hill above us in their bright costumes waving to us. With our driver Saki, a Pashtun Muslim, we took leave of our hosts and left this fragile mountain enclave to make our long journey out of mountains. It was now time to reenter Pakistan proper, a land that seemed far removed in space and time from the ancient rhythms of the Kalash. UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Back in the USA When I returned to America two weeks later the whole thing seemed surreal and difficult to explain to my friends in Boston. As I unpacked my Kalash headdress, downloaded my photographs, and recovered from a case of food poisoning acquired on the 18-hour plane ride home, the memories of the Kalash began to fade. But then I remembered I had one last important task to fulfill. I found the e-mail address of the student in History 101 who had boldly dared me to go in the first place and emailed her the photo (above) of myself with a Kalash woman. The message was simply, “What I did for summer vacation, a visit to the Kalash.” I will always remember her response for it drives home the real joys of teaching at UMass Dartmouth: “Awesome prof! Hope you said hi to Alexander’s peeps for me. You will be proud of me too, I got my passport and am working this summer to save money to go to France next summer!” Brian Williams is a professor of history. For more photographs visit brianglynwilliams.com.

Visit umassd.edu/publicaffairs/magazine to watch an interview with Professor Williams.


15

“Can we rebound?” UMass Dartmouth Magazine recently brought together three of our faculty members to talk about the current state of the economy, its place in history, and whether we have the capacity to rebound from the Great Recession. Dr. Michael Goodman, chair of the Department of Public Policy, moderated the discussion. Dr. Goodman is co-editor of Massachusetts Benchmarks, the quarterly economic journal published by the University of Massachusetts in collaboration with the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, that tracks the economy of the state and its regions. He joined the UMass Dartmouth faculty last year. Dr. Chris Papenhausen, who has been teaching strategic management at the Charlton College of Business for the past seven years after working in the financial services industry, also participated in the conversation. Dr. Papenhausen’s research is focused on economic history

and how technological revolutions defuse throughout the economy. Dr. Papenhausen was the faculty speaker at the 2010 Graduate Commencement exercises. Dr. Kara Miller, who joined the English department this fall as a professor of journalism, is a keen observer of Massachusetts culture. Miller writes the “Culture Club” blog for Boston.com, has appeared on National Public Radio, and is a frequent panelist on the “Beat the Press” segment of WGBH’s Greater Boston with Emily Rooney. She has been a contributing columnist for the Boston Globe, Boston Herald, the International Herald Tribune, and Metrowest Daily News.

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2009


16

Goodman: We have been through this extraordinarily difficult economic period that started somewhat before the big crash in the fall of 2008 but now we find ourselves here in 2010 and we are still recovering. Here in Massachusetts the analysis that my colleagues and I at Mass Benchmarks have done strongly suggests that Massachusetts is doing much better. We are growing about two and a half times as fast as the nation is presently. And even in this very difficult year we’ve been adding jobs every month and growing at a pace, in that respect, that we haven’t seen in many decades, but at the same time, we have this extraordinarily difficult set of circumstances facing some of our neighbors and some of our colleagues. And so, from my point of view, we’ve got this severe feast and famine economy on our hands. Papenhausen: By looking at the first four technological revolutions in the last 200 years what we see is the pattern sort of changes about halfway through, which is where we are. It moves from an entrepreneur financial driven growth — where financial capital moves new sectors…entrepreneurs and new organizations develop and install the overall technology — to a second half which can be more of a generalized growth pattern, almost a golden age… What needs to happen is a move, probably a more institutional-political move, to harness the technologies to let them defuse more broadly. So I agree that Massachusetts has both strengths and weaknesses in this area. Goodman: What you’ve said is infused with at least some hope and optimism that we may be able to get to some stage in this evolution of this general technology cycle where, notwithstanding this horrible disruption we’ve all been living through, the future could look bright…I find that when I’m interacting with the media, what I end up getting back often

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

is a fundamental pessimism and skepticism that things could not possibly be going well…So, I wonder if Kara, given your experience, is there some kind of pessimistic lens that the various media outlets are running all of these facts through that predetermines that bad times are going to last forever? Miller: I think media is often on the back end of this. I don’t think they have a good sense of what the markets are and why they move and that kind of thing…I think there are the real issues with the economy and then there are the perceived issues with the economy. And on the real side, I honestly think there is a real gap. If you look at the unemployment figures, people with bachelor degrees are just over four percent unemployment rate, whereas our national average is over nine percent. People with only high school degrees are well into the teens in terms of unemployment rates. There’s also a major racial divide; the unemployment rate for whites is about half of what it is for African-Americans. There’s also the reality of the stock market, which has recovered tremendously from the depths. So if that is where your money is you’re doing pretty well. Then, there’s what I think people perceive to be the case, just general anxiety, and we see it in the political turmoil this year, the rise of the Tea Party. I think people are generally just worried. What does it mean we are in so much debt? What does it mean that Medicare and Social Security may not be fully funded? What does it mean to have something like the rise of China? And to hear all the time that China and India are so good at producing all these engineers and we can’t keep up? So I think there are the real anxieties which for some people don’t really exist and for other people are terribly acute. Goodman: Education, as you said, is a dividing line. Race, frequently, is a dividing line. The Massachusetts regions have dividing lines as economic opportunities are substantial, but they are largely concentrated in one or two regions of the state. Regions of the state, like the one we serve here at UMass Dartmouth, often can be left behind. I think we are talking about profound economic change. The profile of our population is changing and a lot of folks who traditionally would find themselves in the middle class and are used to being in a position of privilege, find the ground shifting under their feet and they’re both scared and angry and you see that every day in the newspaper and in our political discourse.

What needs to happen is a move, probably a more institutional-political move, to harness the technologies to let them defuse more broadly. —Papenhausen

Papenhausen: We are at a turning point. We’ve faced these kinds of crises before, and we’ve managed through trial and error to a great extent

Visit umassd.edu/publicaffairs/magazine to watch the interviews or listen for them on WUMD 89.3 FM


17

to come through stronger than ever, and that is the basis of my optimism. We’ve done it in the past. I do think this is going to be a difficult next 5 or 10 years. So when I speak optimistically, I think probably it is longer term optimism. For example, there are tremendous opportunities using information technology to reduce our dependency on energy. Those kinds of solutions can come from more of a social collective effort— partnerships with organizations, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, local venture capitalists. This is an area where I think Massachusetts is really strong and can lead the nation as well as the world into innovation. So that gives me hope, but it’s not going to be individual efforts where everyone just bucks down and works harder. We need to come together and build institutions, a new sort of framework.

I think you can see from the political rhetoric that people are interested in cutting taxes, yet the same people are not threatening to take away Social Security and Medicare. — Miller

Miller: I remember when the market was down around 8,000 and people were really worried and several people said to me, “I can’t take the pain anymore, I am going to change the allocation in my 401k, and my money that is in stocks. I’m putting it into a money market or I’m putting it into bonds or whatever.” Since then we’ve seen the market go up 50 percent. I wonder if that kind of concern about the markets can cripple people. There is a good buying opportunity, but the people are so worried and they don’t understand the cycles of the market and so they get out. Papenhausen: There’s no question there is a psychological element on what we place value on in the economy that can ebb and flow with peoples’ moods. I am short-term pessimistic about financial markets. I believe they are not functioning in a way that people feel they are getting a fair shake. The people who are getting wealthy are the Wall-Streeters who are taking commissions and have some advanced knowledge of where things are going, highly paid CEOs, entrepreneurs who are capturing a lot of the money. But it’s not flowing through. The rules of the game are not as fair for the regular middle class. Once those rules become a little more on the side of the middle class then I think you can see a real strong rebound. Goodman: We think about the Great Depression, and we certainly haven’t lived through anything like that so far, although, you could argue it is a blue collar depression for the reasons we are discussing...We had major institutional changes that took place. We had the transformation of social programs, the development of Unemployment Insurance, Social Security and a wholesale change in the social contract between the

citizens and the workers in this country and the role of our federal and state government. I’m not sure I see on the horizon anytime soon the kind of will and political momentum to make something like that (happen). Miller: I don’t know that we do have the capacity at this point to do what needs to be done. I think you can see from the political rhetoric that people are interested in cutting taxes, yet the same people are not threatening to take away Social Security and Medicare. And those two things are on a collision track obviously. I think you can see this deep anxiety in some of the signs that we’ve seen in Washington when people have marched— “Keep your hands off my Social Security”…People clearly want a smaller role for government. They are deeply concerned by overspending, yet I don’t know if they are willing to endure the cuts that it would take. And I do think we have a generational issue —25-year-olds are fine with the Social Security age being 70, 60-year-olds, not so much. Papenhausen: I think you have asked the essential question for the next five or ten years. What is the political system really going to be able to solve? The 1930s and 40s was almost a unique experience in U.S. history. The level of consensus and agreement on what to do was overwhelming. I think about the civil war and the revolutionary war and go back to those times, and there was a real polarization there... We are not getting things done because we can’t agree, but at the same time, what I find in history is, eventually, that gives way. Some consensus develops. How effective —still an open question, but at some point, and it could be generational, the younger generation gets tired and says we’ve got to move ahead. n

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2009


18

The 2010 Blue and Gold Gala, held at the School of Law, attracted friends of the university to the annual fundraising event to raise money for scholarships. The gala was also a chance to celebrate the Commonwealth’s first and only public law school exceeding all projections by attracting 168 first-year students and enrolling a total of 318. Among the first UMass Law class are two dozen inaugural public interest fellows, who received scholarships in return for a pledge to dedicate themselves to public service law upon graduation.

Joyce Leblanc and MarDee Xifaras UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h


19

Under the stars

Cynthia and Bruce Rose

Claire T. Carney

Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack

(l-r) Lynn and Len Sullivan John and Judith Lima

Dean Robert Ward and guests

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2009


20

Under construction The campus is moving forward with a three-year $170 million capital plan to create new learning and discovery opportunities for its students and faculty while also strengthening the SouthCoast region’s innovation economy. The centerpiece of the plan is a $43 million renovation and expansion of the Claire T. Carney Library, which moved into the full-scale construction phase in November and is planned to be completed in 2012. “The time is right for the university to make the strategic investments that our students, faculty, and community partners need and deserve in order to reach our collective aspirations,” Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. “Our plan is designed to strengthen UMass Dartmouth’s position as a powerhouse for learning, discovery, and engagement.” The plan also includes:

>

UMass

$35 million energy conservation project, including construction of a high-efficiency co-generation plant, retrofitting of lights, and installation of photo-voltaic roof technology to create a renewable source of energy.

|

D a r t m o u t h

>

>

>

>

$26 million bio-manufacturing facility, which will provide world class space and equipment for emerging life science companies to test their products, and create opportunities for UMass Dartmouth students and faculty to receive hands-on experience and research opportunities. $45 million expansion of the School for Marine Science and Technology. $10 million information technology upgrade to expand high-speed and wireless connectivity.

$4.5 million main campus laboratory, art studio and classroom renovations.

>

$5 million renovations of first-year student residence halls.

>

$5 million expansion and renovation of fitness and athletic facilities.

The plan is financed through a combination of university bonding, state bonding, private funding and grant funding, as well as savings realized from the energy-related investments.


21

Looking southwest from the Liberal Arts building towards the front entrance of the library

East gallery with cafĂŠ

Grand reading room

Looking west from the Campus Center towards the front entrance of the library

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010


22

Alumni & Family

pizza taste off a m F ro

to rock wa

l

l lc

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

im

n bi

g

an

d


23

f ro

m

Black Violin performs for an enthusiastic crowd

o fo

t

finger painting o t l l ba


24

Class Notes

We want to hear from you —send us your news—www.umassd.edu/alumni/ or Alumni Association, 285 Old Westport Rd., N. Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

’50s

Robert Clifton Randall ’54, mechanical engineering, New Bedford, NBIT, received the Morris H. Crompton Award for excellence in machine design, visited the university, and shared with us a photo of his generational UMass Dartmouth family of graduates: his son, Robert Carter Randall ’87 electrical engineering; his grandson, Robert Craig Randall ’03 electrical engineering and ’09 MS computer engineering, is working on his PhD. Both of his granddaughters, Tammy Lynn Gibson Ferreira ’08, crime and justice studies, and Tina Lillian Randall ’07, Spanish are also graduates of UMass Dartmouth.

’60s

The Class of 1960 enjoyed their 50th reunion this past spring and shared wonderful memories. This group was honored with special events, gold robes during Commencement, and an all encompassing warm gracious welcome. Donald G. Wood, Chair of Reunion Weekend activities, asks his classmates to please keep in touch with the university and contact him with any ideas on how to show their appreciation to UMD. Donald G. Wood ’60, 312 Archer Street, Fall River, MA 02720 or 508.675.0680 or donald.wood@ bristolcc.edu.

Class of 1961 50 th REUNION

WEEKEND May 20-22, 2011 Dr. James Stahley ’62, electrical engineering, Burnsville, MN, is a professor of doctoral studies at the Center for Graduate Studies at Baker College.

Dr. Gerald J. Mauretti, ’65 textile technology, ’10, Honorary, PhD, Business Administration, was named to the Techtextil North America Advisory Council. The 2011 Advisory Council consists of six well-respected professionals known for their contributions to the technical textiles and nonwovens industry who attend and exhibit at Techtextil North America. Dr. Mauretti is an accomplished international businessman and founder of EY Technologies, a specialty technical textiles company located in the Fall River Industrial Park. Dr. Mauretti was appointed Adjunct Professor of The Institute of Textiles and Clothing at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University from May 2010 through 2013. Dr. Charles Manley ’64, chemistry, Ringwoood, NJ, retired a few years ago as vice president, Science & Technology of Takasago International Corporation, a global flavor and fragrance company.

Phebe Burnham, shown above at her 90th birthday celebration and in her self portrait (inset), attended Swain School from 1937–39. She was employed for 4 years in the display department of the Gilchrist Company in Boston. After marrying and raising a family, she pursued her art at Columbia University School of Painting and Sculpture, the Art Students League in New York, and a number of California schools. For 10 years she designed and sold decoupage jewelry, “Eyeglass Arte,” in museum gift shops such as the Boston Art Museum and the Cochran Gallery in Washington. Now, she has returned to painting, entering shows locally and nationally. “The wonderful thing about art is that you can work at being creative forever. At 90 I am still loving it,” she said.

Arlene M. Dutra Pedjoe ’67, fashion illustration, Holden, the owner/director of the John Robert Powers modeling and acting school for twenty-six years and a licensed talent agent and manager for DreamMakers Productions, Inc. in Boston. Arlene has been married to Roger for thirty-six years and has two sons Joshua and Jared.

Richard C. Waring ’69, history, Sarasota, FL has finished his first book entitled “Beneath the Well of Souls.” Published by Peppertree Press, it should be available in December 2010.

’70s

Professor Richard Golen, ’74, management, Dartmouth, was named the Department Chair for Management and Marketing at the Charlton College of Business.


Cl ass N otes Steve Spataro ’74, management, Middleboro, served on the Gas and Electric Commission for nine years and has served two three-year terms on the Board of Selectmen. He is employed as manager of production marketing by EMC in Hopkinton. Frederick M. Kalisz Jr. ’79, management, ’09 MS policy studies/public policy, former mayor of New Bedford and current executive director of the Parents Alliance for Catholic Education, will be honored as the Prince Henry Society, New Bedford chapter, Person of the Year. Kalisz is pursuing his doctorate in public policy and law at Northeastern University. He has been recognized by numerous organizations for his efforts on behalf of cultural enhancement, the arts, the environment and economic development. He and his wife and son live in New Bedford.

Paul Kostek '79 electrical engineering technology, will be the Chair of the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference to be held in Seattle in 2011. The Conference will address technology projects such as reliable power, data connectivity and health records ID. It will bring together engineers, government officials, academe, and NGOs. Elaine Varelas ’79, psychology, Wellesley, managing partner of Keystone Partners in Boston, which consults with clients on their career management plans and helps executives chart their career paths. Varelas credits many of her undergraduate mentors at UMass Dartmouth for her success.

’80s

Anne Bisson ’81, psychology, Fall River, was appointed director of Taunton’s Department of Human Services.

Mike Hardman ’82, multidisciplinary studies, Stoughton, was named regional editor of Patch for the Boston area. Patch is a community-based website with AOL. Hardman is an award-winning editor and writer and has worked for several daily and weekly newspapers in Massachusetts. Donald Berube ’84, political science, Fall River, was appointed to the Latino-American Advisory Commission by Governor Deval Patrick. Berube’s three adopted children Connor, Elizabeth and Adam, now teenagers, are of Latino heritage and came to the United States as babies and toddlers. The interest they sparked in their father is now being used at the statewide level. Berube has a law practice in Fall River. Rosemarie David ’84, management, South Attleboro, a teacher in the Attleboro school

system, writes her daughter Brittney is a freshman at UMass Dartmouth in the College of Arts and Sciences studying psychology. Marianne DeSouza ’84, multidisciplinary studies, New Bedford, works as the Director of Public Health for the City of New Bedford, She is proud that her daughter Jocelyn Marie DeSouza ’10, accounting, graduated from the Charlton College of Business and is pursuing her master’s degree in business administration at UMass Dartmouth. Thomas Babington ’85, mechanical engineering, Dartmouth, Brookfield Engineering Laboratories announced his appointment to the position of Senior Product Development Engineer. Tom has over 25 years of industry experience in product development, serving a variety of industries. He has worked on

The Endeavor Scholarship is a four-year merit scholarship for new first-year students that pays for tuition, mandatory fees, and room and board provided that the recipient maintains a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 in full-time study and participates fully in academic and co-curricular programs and activities associated with the Endeavor Scholarship Program. “I always knew college was right for me. However, I wasn’t sure my dream would be possible since I had no way of funding college on my own. This scholarship did nothing short of change my life.”

umassd.edu/endeavor/ UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

— Nia Barbosa Business major Plymouth

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

25


Alumni news

26

Working to ensure the Navy’s superiority—Donald McCormack ’85

We put the Navy first in everything that we do, so we’re always challenging ourselves to find technologies and processes that we can recommend to the fleet as the best solution set—whether those solutions come from inside NUWC or from outside. We focus on being analysis-driven, so we can be confident that the solutions we’re recommending are the best and most affordable for the warfighter. The people part of the equation is by far the most rewarding aspect of my job. I get to work with scientists, engineers, and support folks who are all dedicated to providing the Navy with the best they can as efficiently as possible. The technology that we get to work on is cutting edge and it is rewarding when you see that technology or product transitioned to the warfighter. How often do you get to meet the men and women who serve in the Navy and listen to their feedback? I’m sure their battle-related experience is a huge asset to NUWC. (left) Yemi Akinsinde, NUWC Division Newport’s African American Special Emphasis Program Manager chats with Donald McCormack at a brown bag lunch where students discussed their summer working experiences as participants in the federal government’s Student Career Experience Program.

Newport-based Naval Undersea Warfare Center is the U.S. Navy’s research, development, engineering, and fleet support center for submarine systems. NUWC provides the technical foundation that enables the conceptualization, fielding, modernization, and maintenance of systems that ensure the Navy’s undersea superiority. Leading the center is Technical Director Donald McCormack ’85. He is directly responsible for the development, assessment, and introduction of new technologies for the Navy and oversees a budget of more than $1 billion, with a workforce of 4,200 employees across the country. We asked McCormack if he would answer a few questions about the center. So Don, when you were a kid did you dream of becoming the Technical Director of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center or did you have your sights on becoming the next star of the Boston Red Sox? When I was a kid, my neighbor’s nephew was a mechanical engineer at Northeastern. This was around the time that Star Wars came out and he decided to build his own R2D2 robot. I was hooked as I watched him design the frame and mechanical systems and saw the robot move around his basement. I actually did play for the Red Sox for awhile —just in the Medford Little League! Directing the activities of the NUWC is an imposing position, what do you find to be the most challenging aspect of your job and what is the most rewarding?

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Absolutely! Our main message at NUWC is, “Our Reason for Being is the Fleet We Serve.” This expresses our commitment to what we call full-spectrum, total life-cycle involvement in undersea warfare. We conduct research, develop products and services, and serve as the technical authority for these products. We back it all up with rapid, direct technical support any place, any time. We have on-site representatives stationed throughout the globe. We have uniformed folks directly from the Fleet working side-by-side with the engineers and scientists to make sure the products are the best they can be. This melding of the uniform and civilian side truly makes the products fit with what the warfighters need to do their jobs. The technological advances in today’s generation are changing so quickly that it would seem hard to keep ahead of the curve. How do you combat the constant shift in technology, especially in long-term planning? Well, our first line of defense, so to speak, is our innovative scientists, engineers, and technicians. They constantly challenge one another to think outside of the box, and they regularly engage their counterparts in academia and industry to share information and explore new avenues. Our folks—the graybeards and the new hires — brainstorm in innovation cells, and apply concept generation, concept development, modeling and simulation, experimentation and even Web 2.0 technology like Second Life to address current and future warfighting needs. NUWC is a leading employer of UMass Dartmouth graduates. In fact, one of your senior staff is an alumna, Pamela Lisiewicz ’80. Is there a particular approach that UMass Dartmouth alumni have that makes them good employees at NUWC?


Cl ass N otes

UMass alumni have a good, solid foundation of learning and each individual really brings their unique qualifications to the job. The visual, technical and cognitive skills that the new kids come to work with are outstanding and they jump right into programs and contribute immediately. Like Pam, UMass Dartmouth alumni often have local ties, which means they tend to make their careers here and they care about the local community. One other advantage they have —and that we want to strengthen — is the relationship between NUWC alumni and UMass. When I was a student, several of my professors (retired NUWC alumni like Tom Curry) had real-world experience working on Navy problems. Having someone discuss how they used their engineering knowledge and how the formulas /equations and problemsolving techniques were used to solve real-world issues was extremely interesting and motivational. I recently hosted UMass Dartmouth Chancellor Jean MacCormack (the other Jean McCormack — my wife, is the first!) talk about increasing the interaction of the UMass faculty and students through various programs that we have established. NUWC has spent considerable effort reaching out to the community and working with colleges and schools of all ages. What do you see as the greatest benefit of having students become invested in science, math and technology? If you haven’t read the National Academies’ Rising Above the Gathering Storm I recommend that you do. The United States’ prosperity and security have been rooted in technical innovations, yet the country is falling behind in graduating a diverse group of scientists and engineers who are U.S. citizens. I’m convinced that education is the key to our continued success and that we must plant the seeds of curiosity in our youngest students to get them excited about math, science, engineering, and other technical fields. Frankly, our nation is in a technology war, and fostering the development of future scientists and engineers contributes to our ultimate success. Lastly, what do think is the most important thing you learned at UMass Dartmouth and how has it helped you in your career? I have lasting memories of the project management class that Professor Curry taught where he split us up in teams and assigned us a project. He provided the requirements and we had to do the rest. It was a great way to take what we learned in project management, engineering, English, and even psychology (always helpful when working in a team) and then design and present it. It really got me ready for doing my first project at NUWC.

Steven Leahy ’91 announced his first solo show at the SAART Gallery (www.saartgallery.com) in Stoughton, Massachusetts on January 16, 2011 from 1- 8 pm. This show will feature the range of his new super miniature artwork on substrates as varied as razor blades and even single grains of rice. The main focus of the show will be five individual pieces of art representing each branch of the military painted directly on standard dog tags (shown larger than actual size). All the proceeds from the sale of these five paintings will be donated to the U.S. Wounded Soldiers Foundation which provides aid to wounded soldiers and their families overseas. See more work at www.stevenleahy.com.

everything from toys and power tools to automotive sensors. Tom’s focus keeps Brookfield on the front edge of new technologies while incorporating his existing knowledge and experience into Brookfield products. He has also been developing ways to streamline manufacturing processes, reducing lead times and improving product consistency. Michelle Bernard ’87, management, Winthrop, works as the senior director, operations for Network Health, Inc. Bernard received the 2010 Top Leadership Teams in Healthcare award in the health plan category from HealthLeaders Media, a leading provider of health care business information. The award was based on the work of Network Health’s ten member Senior Leadership Team. HealthLeaders Media only chooses one winner per category to receive this national honor each year.

U M a s s

Matthew Phaneuf ’89, chemistrybiochemistry, Ashland, married Tina Scuderi Phaneuf ’89, textile chemistry; they have two children and have owned Bio-Surfaces, Inc., a medical device research and development company in Ashland for the last eight years. Dr. Francine Roy ’89, mathematics, Portsmouth, RI, was appointed Assistant Superintendant of the Fall River Public School system.

’90s

Christopher Cooney ’90, BA Economics, was recently named New England Chamber of Commerce Executive of the Year by the New England Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives at their annual conference. Cooney is President and CEO of the Metro South Chamber of Commerce serving 18 communities and located in Brockton. He currently serves on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Committee of 100. Cooney earned an MPA from Suffolk University and resides in Berkley with his wife and three daughters.

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

27


Alumni news

28

Three generations of the Roberts family with their respective UMass Dartmouth diplomas. Suzanne J. Pelletier ’90, French, ’97 MS professional writing, Dartmouth, the Director of the UMass Dartmouth Foreign Language Lab and Mulit-Media Center, married longtime foreign language department faculty member Professor Emeritus Giulio Massano. The wedding took place on August 19, 2009 at the Manoir Rouville-Campbell, Mont St. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada. Renee Ouellette ’91, art education, ’98 MS art education, works as the artist and owner of PAINT PAPER INK STUDIO in Rochester. Steven Leahy ’91, visual design, illustration, Stoughton, is a photorealistic airbrush artist who specializes in working with waterborne paints. He is the author of How Airbrushes Work, published in 2008 by Wolfgang Publications, and his works have been published in Airbrush Magazine, Naval Aviation News, and Airbrush Action Magazine. He has exhibited at the Society of Illustrators Annual Exhibit and the Smithsonian Museum. See story on page 27. William Ashworth ’93, civil engineering, P.E., Narragansett, RI, works as the Rhode Island Office Manager/Principal for Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. Ashworth was chosen as a 2010 “40 Under Forty” award recipient by the Providence Business News and was honored at the Newport

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Tennis Hall of Fame event in July. He previously worked as a traffic engineer for the Massachusetts Highway Department. Michelle Duarte ’93, psychology, Westport was the winner of a six-way race and elected to the school committee in Westport. Duarte attended Westport schools and has three children who are or will attend town schools. She has been active in Westport youth sports programs as a coach and girl scouts leader. Kelly McGuire ’93, accounting, Southlake, TX. Watermere at Southlake named Kelly McGuire director of accounting. McGuire joined Watermere at Southlake from Citigroup where she served as associate director of financial planning. With nearly 20 years of industry experience, McGuire has served as a financial analyst and director of finance for a variety of organizations. She received her master’s degree from Suffolk University in Boston. Scott Rigney ’93, business information systems, Stevens, PA, works for Johnson & Johnson as an IT project manager. Scott and Tonyah Rigney married in 2001 and are parents of a daughter, Regan and a son, Evin. Christopher Markey ‘94 JD, South Dartmouth, was elected as a Massachusetts State Representative.

Jeff Schoonover ’94, physics, MS physics ’99, Somerset, was named the Rhode Island winner of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Winners of this Presidential honor receive a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation to be used at their discretion. He traveled to Washington, D.C. for an awards ceremony and several days of educational and celebratory events, including visits with members of Congress and science agency leaders. Schoonover was nominated for the award based on his leadership in establishing the Physics First science curriculum at Portsmouth High School, RI.

Michael J. Bargfrede ’95, biology, Abington, works as the senior project manager of clinical pharmacology and molecular medicine for Millennium Pharmaceuticals: The Takeda Oncology Co. in Cambridge. Michael S. Taylor ’95, accounting, North Attleboro, celebrated his thirteenth year in public accounting and his fifth year in his own firm. Michael and his wife Julie are expecting their fourth child in December 2010. Bonnie Seeman ’96, MFA artisanry, Plantation, FL, creates work that expands the visual dialogue of botanical imagery and the concept of beauty. Bonnie is a globally recognized artist, whose works are in many private and public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Carnegie Museum of Art. She received her BFA from the University of Miami, where she is a Senior Lecturer in Art and Art History. James Charrette ’97, management, Somerset, retired from state service in June 2009, and enjoyed a 34-state, 7-week motorcycle trip cross-country with his wife Joan.

Jeanne Fernandes ’97, management, Acushnet, was sworn in as the director of communications at the Massachusetts Health Information Management Association and received the association’s Outstanding New Professional Award. Fernandes will oversee the association’s website, social media, and community outreach activities. The Outstanding New Professional Award recognizes a promising new professional who demonstrates significant potential for future leadership, innovation, creativity and administrative capacity. Fernandes completed her acute care practicum in the fall of 2009 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. In March of 2010, she joined Brigham and Women’s Hospital as ACD project specialist, responsible for representing the Health Information Services Department as the hospital implements an electronic health record application for acute care. Nicole Boudria ’98, English, ’00 MA professional writing, Fall River, works as a tutor specializing in English with the Star Kids Scholarship Program in Middletown, RI. Steve Gordon ’98, marketing, Saugus, works as the offpremise district manager of Massachusetts for Pernod Ricard USA, the premium spirits and wine supplier in the U.S. Aaron Charpentier ’99, humanities and social sciences, New Bedford, has written a book Memoirs of Love: At Summer’s End and other Short Stories in which he draws upon his youth, and experiences as a New Englander traveling throughout Asia as a critical reference as to how he perceives human relations in and around the world. Charpentier works as an English lecturer based in Shanghai and has held appointments at both Korean, and Chinese universities.


Cl ass N otes

Theresa Silveira has it all wrapped up Like most business owners, Theresa “Terri” Silveira ’92 started small but had an ambitious goal—to operate the largest and most recognized gift basket company in the country. Of course, the first year was less than glamorous as she and her business partner packaged and boxed all of their gift baskets in the basement of her home in North Attleboro. Today, GreatArrivals.com is still located in North Attleboro, but in a 12,000 square foot warehouse that employs eight full time year-round employees and 50 additional employees during the holidays.

Rebecca Hope Woods ’99, visual design, Winter Harbor, works at the College of Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine as the Director of Creative Services.

’00s

Rebecca Stanley Cardillo ’00, political science, Johnston, RI, married Anthony Cardillo on May 28, 2010 in Siesta Key, FL. She works as a Claims Management Consultant for Starkweather & Shepley in Providence. Christopher Delmonte ’00 JD, Bridgewater, was promoted to Chief of Police of the Bridgewater Police Department. Meloney Irwin ’00, management, Kennesaw, GA, moved to Atlanta, where she works as the human resources generalist for the southern territorial headquarters of the Salvation Army. Melanie Ducharme ’01, visual design/graphic design/letterform,

“I realized after I received my MBA that I wanted to build my own business,” says Silveira. “At the same time I tried to order a gift basket from an online company and found that there were only a few companies who offered a limited selection. The commerce side of the Internet was just starting to take off and I thought this was a great opportunity.” A 1992 UMass Dartmouth graduate and one of the first Commonwealth Scholars, Silveira began working as an economic forecaster for Data Resources Incorporated soon after graduating. After studying the energy industry as a forecaster, she was promoted to sales and later Profit Marketing Manager in the company. This collection of positions and other experiences has helped her navigate the challenging aspects of running a small business. “When we first looked at models, my business partner and I had two choices. We could network with pre-made gift basket companies and focus on the marketing side or we could hold the inventory and make our own gift baskets. We chose the latter and now we drop-ship for many other companies,” says Silveira. “We are the primary provider of gift baskets for Honey

Coventry, creates work that expresses memory, emotion, and identity. Currently studying for her Master’s in art education at Rhode Island College, she is an artist member of Gallery X in New Bedford, and is a contributing member of the of the Pop Icon and Cocktail Club podcast. Lourenco (Larry) Lopes, Jr. ‘01 JD, New Bedford, was promoted to Chief Probation Officer of the Massachusetts Trial Court Probation Department for the New Bedford District Court.

Baked Hams and service numerous other companies. It was more work to start but the end product has been rewarding.” For 10 years, Silveira has been relentless in her pursuit of success, a trait she learned at UMass Dartmouth. “UMass Dartmouth was the most fulfilling experience I could imagine. There wasn’t a facet of the school in which I wasn’t involved—honors program, student government, department activities, etc. I really dug in and took advantage of everything I could. Now I seize every opportunity I see. I honestly believe that things happen for a reason and so I try to learn from both success and failure,” said Silveira. The responsibility of running a successful gift basket company can be enjoyable but the downside is that Silveira is away from her 9-year old son for the two busiest months of the year. Interestingly, this drawback provided a unique opportunity to help another UMass Dartmouth graduate. “My husband and I are slammed during the holiday season and we decided to hire a nanny this year to help out for two months. One of the applicants was a recent graduate of the College of Nursing. As you might expect, I hired her and it is a great comfort knowing she is a fellow alum.”

Kathy Lee Dombrowski ’03, visual design, Walnut Creek, CA, works in Development as the Prospect Researcher for the Asian Art Museum. Dagmar Dockery ’04, nursing, Vineyard Haven reports she is 70 years young and still working as a nurse practitioner. She sends thanks to faculty and friends.

William A. Flanagan ’02, sociology /criminal justice, Fall River, was elected Mayor of Fall River and is the youngest mayor to serve in the city of about 90,000 people. His priorities are public safety, education and job creation.

Tyler Groth Drake ’04, accounting, ’06 MBA, Canton, an employee at Waldron H. Rand & Company, P.C., CPAs, passed her CPA exam in 2010. Drake began her career in public accounting five years ago. She provides accounting, auditing and tax services to a diverse client base. Prior to joining Waldron Rand, Drake was a senior accountant at McGladery & Pullen, LLP.

Jamie Lynn Despres ’03, visual design, Seattle, WA, works as the Senior Art Director of digital branding for Razorfish, Inc.

Hillary Harris ’04, management, New Bedford, works as the administrative assistant for the Town of Westport police

U M a s s

department. Prior to her appointment she was employed as the office manager for AdCare Hospital, supervising a staff of 10. Athena Mota ’04, English, New Bedford, and Gregory Westwater were married on February 16, 2010 at the Seamen’s Bethel Chapel in New Bedford. They live with their young son, Dominic James. Mota is the Director of Advocacy and Communications at the Southeastern Massachusetts YMCA; serves on the UMD Alumni Association Board of Directors; and will receive her masters degree in Public Administration at Bridgewater State University in June 2011. Taylor Courtney Stevenson ’04, textile design, Hermosa Beach, CA works for Ado Group and recently relocated to Montreal, Quebec in August. Aldo Co. is the manufacturer of footwear worldwide with 1500 stores.

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

29


Alumni news

30

Juan Jose Barboza-Gubo ’05, graduate painting program, Jamaica Plain, has been appointed instructor of visual arts at Northern Essex Community College. For the past five years, he has been an adjunct faculty member at Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston. Barboza-Gubo holds a Bachelor of Arts in sculpture from Pontifical Catholic

University in Peru, a master’s degree in art in painting from UMass Dartmouth, and a Master’s of Fine Arts in painting and sculpture from the Massachusetts College of Art & Design. He has received several international awards and his work has been exhibited in shows in museums and galleries throughout the United States, Peru, Japan, Italy and Greece.

2010 Digital Media “Distinguished Alumni Award.” Sharon Reiley ’98 BFA in photographic/electronic Imaging is the CEO, founder, designer and art director for Sweet Stuff Studios. According to her mother, Sharon was born “with scissors in her hands,” creating collages at an early age. Reiley has helped dozens of startup businesses with their marketing and design needs, as well as worked with large companies such as Hewlett Packard, General Motors, Radioshack, Novartis, Bayer, and Reuters. She has earned many marketing and design honors including two American Graphic Design Awards for excellence in communication design, and the prestigious AN-NE Award, recognizing outstanding marketing efforts in professional photography. Jamie Reiley ’98, BFA Visual design/photography has worked as art director, designer and animator at “Arnold World Wide” since 2005. Arnold Worldwide is a full-service advertising agency headquartered in Boston that offers creative advertising development, campaign planning, and brand management. Arnold has two full-service agencies in New York, Washington and a complete network of global offices in 75 countries around the world. The agency’s primary three East Coast offices in the US serve a host of fortune 500 brands such as Ocean Spray, The Timberland Company, Hershey, Titleist, Levi’s, ESPN, GlaxoSmithKline and Volvo. Jamie has been the recipient of numerous awards that recognize excellence in design and advertising. Some of the highlights include the New England Ad club’s Hatch Award, two International Webby Awards for excellence in web design, the Reggie Awards, the industry’s highest honor in intergrated marketing, and the New York Festival Award recognizing the world’s best in advertising. Sharon and James Reiley reside in North Attleboro.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Deaths April ’10-October ’10 Michael E. Kiteck ’34 Edward B. Wood ’50 Frank E. Souza ’51 Gordon Smith Bradley ’51 Russell C. Constantine ’51 Edward Cowell ’51 Glenn Gellis ’52 John E. McComb ’53 George Wright III ’56 Joseph R. Blanchard ’57 Bernal C. Dutcher, Jr. ’57 Frank Marco ’58 Roger A. Melanson ’58 John Simoes ’60 William H. Marginson ’62 Robert J. Nestor ’63 Marcel M. Nadeau ’63 Ronald A. House ’64 Robert L. Pelletier ’64 Helen Koss ’68, UMD Library Archivist Elise ‘Sally’ Wylde ’72 Eli Heimberg ’74 Dale S. Pickett ’75 Kathleen M. Riley ’76 James W. Veiga ’77 Robert T. Paleczka ’78 Donna M. Norton ’81 Karen L. Mottas ’86 Paul D. Fistori, Jr. ’90 Lynn C. Turner ’94 John Walling ’95 Elizabeth A. Sheffield-Fortin ’01 Sean D. Duarte ’04 Professor Janice McKeachern Dean, Chancellor Professor Richard J. Ward

David A. Hague ’05, electrical engineering, New Bedford, received a Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation Program (SMART) scholarship which provides an opportunity for students pursuing a graduate degree in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics disciplines to receive a full scholarship and be employed at a Department of Defense lab facility upon degree completion. Hague’s sponsoring facility will be the Naval Undersea Warfare

Center in Newport, RI. He is an Army veteran with tours of duty in Afghanistan in 2002 and Kosovo in 2006. Previously he worked for Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems in Tewksbury. In 2009 he returned to UMass Dartmouth as a research assistant at the Acoustic Signal Processing lab run by Dr. John R. Buck. Jason G. Plourde ’05, finance, Fall River, and Katie Cabral were married in a small ceremony on February 10, 2010. Plourde works as a customer service representative for Starwood and a part-time tennis instructor. Rachel Almeida Lopes ’06, political science, Fall River, was hired as the receptionist for Mayor William Flanagan ’02 in Fall River. Lopes graduated with a minor in Portuguese studies, speaks fluent Portuguese and conversational Spanish. Lopes studied and taught in Lisbon, was an administrative assistant for two years at her alma mater, and recently worked at Webster Bank in customer service. Jeffrey P. Pagliuca ‘06 JD, Taunton, joined Webster Bank, N.A. as Vice President of Business and Professional Banking and will serve the southeastern Massachusetts region. Rob Peragine ‘06 JD, Blue Point, NY, of Adler Law Group, LLC in East Hartford, Connecticut was selected for inclusion in the 2010 New England Super Lawyers Rising Stars list featuring outstanding young lawyers in New England. Mary Pitonak ‘06 JD, Hightstown, NJ, accepted a position with Merck & Co. in Kenliworth, New Jersey. Matthew J. McCann ’07, marketing, Methuen, received his Master of Arts in Theological Studies at the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary on May 1, 2010 in Springfield, Mo.


Cl ass N otes Alison Wells ’07, MFA fine arts painting, New Bedford, exhibited five of her paintings at the 2010 World Exposition in Shanghai, China. Two hundred countries, international organizations, and businesses participated in this event. Wells was one of five Trinidadian artists chosen to represent Trinidad and Tobago. Her paintings were from her series “The Urban Organic,” depicting the urban landscape and its effects on the human psyche. Wells is also a parttime art instructor at Bristol Community College, Fall River. Eric Bowlin ’08, economics, Worcester, 2nd Lt. Bowlin, who has been pursuing a Ph.D. in economics from Clark University; has been in the National Guard for four years. In preparation for his first deployment to Afghanistan in October 2010 with the 1st Battalion, 181st Regiment he took part in what military officials describe as one of the largest “pre-mobilization training exercises” at Camp Edwards in Bourne. SPC Benedict W. Guigas ’08, history, Norton, was deployed to Iraq in October 2009. Guigas received the George S. Patton Leadership Award, presented to the soldier who best expresses the qualities of leadership, honor, initiative, loyalty, high moral, courage, positive attitude, and consistent competitive spirit. During his deployment he is assigned with the HHT Third Brigade Combat Team/First US Cavalry. Toney Pacitti ’07, English/ writing & communications, Providence, wrote a book called My Best Friend is a Wookie: A Memoir, a coming-of-age tale framed around Lucas’ epic Star Wars. Pacitti has written for SouthCoast247.com as a features writer and video game reviewer and has had his short science fiction published at 365tomorrows. He has been the writer for the online comics

Alumni Association Board of Directors for 2010-11 Re-elected for second three-year term: Judith Lima ’87, Management, Dartmouth Athena M.G. Mota ’04, MBA, New Bedford Oliver P. Cipollini, Jr. ’78, psychology, Marston Mills Vincelo Mello ’71, sociology/anthropology, New Bedford Kevin Santos ’81, accounting, Dartmouth

Rudy Moreno ’10 JD, Edinburg, TX, opened The Law Office of Rudy Moreno LLC in Hartford, Connecticut.

Newly elected for first three-year term: Maureen Lynch Sylvia ’80, multidisciplinary studies, Fairhaven Donald G. Wood ’60, civil engineering,’70 MS mathematics, Fall River Appointed to one-year term: Steven Martins ’07, political science, New Bedford

RoboPlanet and The Silencer at Pandemonium Comics. Martha Grover ’08, MFA artisanry/ ceramics, Bethel, ME, received the Ceramics Monthly Emerging Artist 2010 People’s Choice Award. Visit marthagrover.com to view Martha’s portfolio. Fabian Powell ‘08 JD, Boston, opened Tanz & Powell, LLP in Quincy, Massachusetts with fellow graduate Jared Tanz ’08.

Meredith Milliner ’10 marketing, Sutton, is a graduate assistant at the Center for Marketing Research.

Michelle Keith ‘10 JD, North Dartmouth, was selected as a Graduate Law Fellow to work as a judicial law clerk in the Massachusetts Superior Court. Erin Miller ‘10 JD, Plymouth, was selected as a Graduate Law Fellow to work as a judicial law clerk in the Massachusetts Superior Court.

Amy J. Kocher Sluszka ’10 JD, East Greenwich, RI, authored an article published in the “ABA Marine Resources Journal Vol. 13 No. 2 July 2010.” Jodi Stevens ’10, MFA artisanry/ textile design fiber arts, summerfield, NC, was one of two winners of the Creative Promise Awards for Student Excellence from the Surface Design Association. View her portfolio at jodistevensart.com

Jared Tanz ’08 JD, Newton Center, opened Tanz & Powell, LLP in Quincy, Massachusetts with fellow graduate Fabian Powell ’08. David Chandler ’09, MS public policy, New Bedford, received the Commissioner’s Award for recognition for outstanding service for the Department of Youth Services. Michael Rush ’09 JD, Boston, was elected to the Massachusetts State Senate. John (Jake) Skinner ’09 JD, North Dighton, opened Skinner Law PLLC in Manchester, NH.

’10s

Rose Ayres ’10 marketing, Marlborough, is a graduate assistant at the Center for Marketing Research. Joshua Hillman ‘10 JD, Hamden, CT, is working in the Connecticut Judicial Branch as a Temporary Assistant.

U M a s s

D a r t m o u t h

M a g a z i n e

|

Fall 2010

31


Alumni news

32

FACULTY NEWS Moon crater named after professor’s late father The late father of foreign literature and languages and music professor Weihua Zhang was honored recently by the International Astronomical Union with the naming of a moon crater after him. Dr. Zhang Yuzhe, considered the founder of Chinese modern astronomy, discovered the crater, one of

Dr. Douglas D. Roscoe, professor of political science, was named to the Charter Review Committee for the Town of Dartmouth.

(physics), Geoffrey Cowles (SMAST), Amit Tandon (physics), Saeja Kim (mathematics), Alfa Heryudono (mathematics), and Nima Rahba (civil engineering).

Robert Waxler, professor of English, recently wrote Courage to Walk, published by Spinner Publications, Inc.. Waxler’s 33-year-old son, a young attorney, suffered partial paralysis after being afflicted by a mysterious illness; his family battled formidable odds to ensure he returned to his friends and to the courtrooms he loved.

Richard Connors, Professor of biology, has found that like human Facebook users, male and female bottlenose dolphins spend their days building social networks. Connors’ findings were recently published in the prestigious Royal Society Journal Biology Letters and in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The two new studies show how important such networks are to intelligent species such as dolphins and the impact they have on reproduction. Connors has been studying dolphin behavior in Shark Bay, Australia since the 1980s.

three located by Chinese scientists. In 1923 he discovered asteroid 1125 and named it “Zhonghua” (‘China’) — the first time an asteroid was discovered and named by a Chinese scientist. In 1941 Dr. Yuzhe became the director of the Institute of Astronomy, Academia Sinica (now known as the Science Academy) and organized the Expedition for the Total Eclipse of the Sun in Gansu Province, the first observation and photography of a total solar eclipse in China.

Five UMass Dartmouth faculty members have been named Fulbright Scholars (see pg. 2 for complete story). Anna Dempsey, professor of art history, has been awarded a prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities-Winterthur Fellowship to continue her research into design history and modern/contemporary art. Her research interests include applying Benjamin’s critical concepts and theories of place to contemporary museum design, graphic design, architecture, images of the city, and gender and border spaces in film. royal hartigan, professor of music, received a $9,690 fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to continue his research on traditional percussion and sound in the Philippines. Dr. hartigan has studied and performed a wide spectrum of music in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas. Visit royalhart. com to experience his music.

UMass

|

D a r t m o u t h

Congressional Fellowship Awarded to Peter Friedman, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering who was selected by colleagues at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers to receive this congressional fellowship for 2011. Dr. Friedman is preparing for an exceptional year on Capitol Hill, meeting with government officials and participating in committee meetings and round table discussions on energy policy. Dr. Friedman wants to make a contribution to “a rational science-based energy policy that not only addresses the nearterm shortages, but also moves toward long-term sustainability.”

Brian Glyn Williams, professor of history, and law and business professor Adam Sulkowski traveled to Pakistan (see pg. 10 for complete story) Professors Robert Fisher and Sigal Gottlieb are leading an inter-disciplinary team that has secured $400,000 in grant awards from the National Science Foundation and Air Force Office of Scientific Research to establish a super-computing center on campus. This supercomputer will harness the power of graphical processing units — the same processing units existing in every computer and game machine — to tackle challenging problems in astrophysics, applied mathematics, oceanography, and materials science, economic competitiveness, medicine and many other fields. The goal of the project is to unleash the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) that exist within computers and game machines. GPUs possess enormous untapped computational capability, but are now limited to creating graphics on a screen. “Imagine that every Honda Civic carried a Ferrari V12 engine in the trunk, which was never used,” Fisher said. “This is essentially the situation with every computer on the planet.” The scientific team also includes: Cheng Wang (mathematics), Gaurav Khanna

Marguerite Zarillo, professor of physics, was awarded the 2010 UMass President’s Public Service Award for her work in traffic management and leading a UMass multi-campus Intelligent Transportation Systems initiative. Dr. Zarillo was one of five award winners from across the UMass system. “Through these awards, we celebrate the exemplary work of these faculty members who truly embody the University’s ethos of academic excellence and service,” said President Jack M. Wilson. “Dr. Zarillo is a world class teacher and scientist whose passion for discovery excites her teaching in the classroom and makes communities run better,” said Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack. Dr. Zarrillo’s newest research efforts involve the simulation of driving while performing other tasks such as using a cell phone, reading a changeable message sign or eating a donut. Dr. Zarillo’s work is also being used to improve traffic patterns around UMass Dartmouth, including Ring Road and its parking facilities, Old Westport Road and Route 6.


The Annual Fund proudly introduces New Faces of UMass Dartmouth James Chisholm ’12 School of Law James Chisholm is new to UMass Dartmouth but not to the School of Law. He is a father, husband, and officer in the United States Navy and current UMass Dartmouth Law School student who is making sacrifices for his family’s future. James is in his second year and embodies the value of a public law school. To support the Annual Fund, please visit www.umassd.edu/advancement or call 508.999.8200.

Donald Wood ’60, ’70 Donald Wood may not be a new face to UMass Dartmouth but his story is certainly refreshing. A graduate of Bradford Durfee College of Technology, Don Wood proudly tells everyone that he is a UMass Dartmouth alumnus. A longtime supporter of the university, Don and his wife, Sandra, have established three scholarships in the Civil Engineering department. Visit www.umassd.edu/advancement/media/donwood and www.umassd.edu/advancement/media/jameschisholm to watch the videos

Join us online umassd.edu/alumni

W

hether you are a graduate of Bradford Durfee Tech, New Bedford Tech, SMTI, SMU, Swain or any of the other predecessor institutions, you are a member of the UMass Dartmouth family. As such we all share in the same mission. As a member of the UMass Dartmouth family, you are part of a powerful network of 40,000+ alums worldwide. By contributing $25 a year, you become an active member of the Alumni Association and are entitled to a wide variety of benefits. As an active member, you’ll enjoy: > Annual subscription to UMass Dartmouth Magazine > Alumni Association Visa® Platinum Card

> > > > > > > > > > > > >

Voting and serving privileges on the Alumni Board of Directors Recognition in the “Annual Giving Report” 20% discount at Joseph A. Banks Clothier Auto and home insurance discounts through Liberty Mutual Hotel discounts Free passes for Boston Museum of Science & Mugar Omni Theatre Privileges at all libraries within the UMass system 10% discount at the Campus Store on all clothing and gifts Tripp Athletic Fitness Center membership discount Car decal and ID card Discount admission to varsity athletic games Volunteer and community service opportunities Business networking and social gatherings

Your active membership will help our Alumni Association to: • Increase the number of scholarships for deserving students • Initiate more programs to assist alumni • Expand our career networking programs which are especially valuable to younger members • Develop and maintain mutually beneficial relationships among the alumni, the faculty, the Dartmouth campus community, and the entire UMass system


285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

Non-profit Org. US Postage Paid New Bedford, MA Permit Number 149

Job, family and go back to school? Sure, it’s a balancing act. There’s no trick to getting a degree. It’s hard work, especially if you’re holding down a job and have a family. Who has the time? For that you need a level headed approach that makes taking classes convenient—and affordable. That’s what you’ll find with the Graduate Studies program and Professional and Continuing Education courses at UMass Dartmouth. Choose from a wide range of subjects in business, fine arts, engineering, nursing, marine sciences, education and now law. Or focus on one of our more than 25 graduate degree and certificate programs like our Charlton College MBA, Master of Arts in Teaching, Initial Teacher Licensure, Master of Arts in Psychology­— Applied Behavior Analysis Option, Master of Public Policy, and PhD programs in areas like Biomedical Engineering and Bio-Tech. Best of all, UMass Dartmouth offers a great balance of top quality education at a price that won’t upset your equilibrium. Learn more about the Graduate Studies or Professional and Continuing Education program at UMass Dartmouth by visiting umassd.edu. See how we’re putting world class education within reach.

World Class. Within Reach.

UMass Dartmouth Magazine Fall 2010  

a full-color magazine for alumni and friends of the university

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you