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United Methodists Living T heir Faith S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R

FIVE CLUES FOR SUCCESSFULLY CHANGING WHILE GROWING

WESLEY PILGRIMAGE INSPIRES TODAY'S LEADERS

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CAMPUS MINISTERS PROVIDE A CRITICAL LINK


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Contents SEPTEMBER

Change is Certain

OCTOBER

It is sometimes said the only certainties are death and taxes. Add one more to the list: change. Small or large, welcome or unwelcome, for the better or for the worse – change is a constant in nearly all of our lives.

We can usually say we are living in a season of change. Americans are experiencing one of the most turbulent, contentious, divisive political seasons in our history. Change always follows the election of a president. Whether the change is anticipated as positive or negative, things will be different. As United Methodists, we are experiencing the turmoil and uncertainty change brings. As a denomination, we are in the midst of decisions and work that will bring outcomes we do not yet know. Some welcome this season with joy; others weep with equal emotion. In many congregations, change is evident where new people have been preaching for several months or vision and mission are being examined and reworked to meet changing needs – outside as well as inside the church walls. Experiencing change is difficult. Outcomes are unknown. There is the chaos as change is occurring – moving back and forth between old and new while steps toward change are taken, relationships end and begin and new ways are introduced. Often there is grief at leaving what is familiar, even as one anticipates what can be good in the future. Finally comes the settling in and adapting to the new – and realizing the transition is never complete as even the most carefully thought-out, planned change brings something unanticipated. “Navigating change” is the theme for this issue of Interpreter. The stories of congregations that are successfully changing will offer hope for your church. So will the profiles of five churches who received One Matters awards this year at their annual conferences. As you read the responses of readers to the “We asked, ...; you said, ....” question, may you find both hope and inspiration for your own life. And, as you read, may you be reminded of one more constant, one more certainty: the never-ending, abiding and abundant love and grace of God that surround us, which both embrace and go before us. As you awake each day, hold tight to the words of hymn writer Brian Wren: “This is a day of new beginnings, time to remember and move on. ... Christ is alive, and goes before us to show and share what love can do. This is a day of new beginnings; our God is making all things new.” (“This is a Day of New Beginnings,” The United Methodist Hymnal, 383)

Navigating Change 21 Navigating change

23 When you have a new pastor ...

24 Moving to multiethnicity is not easy, but worth it 28 Churches begin, die and live again

31 Five clues for successfully changing while growing

33 Thinking about adding or changing a worship service?

Kathy Noble, Editor

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United Methodist Interpreter

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SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

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Contents

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F E AT U R E S

36 Wesley Pilgrimage inspires today’s leaders In July, United Methodist Communications staffers traveled to England as part of the Wesley Pilgrimage. This is the first in a series of articles based on their experiences.

38 U.S. bishops begin new assignments Fifteen new bishops are settling into their offices and preparing for official welcomes to their areas.

40 Bishops’ executive committee affirms unity, moves forward 4

A framework is ready for implementing the Commission on a Way Forward.

47 Campus ministers provide a critical link Campus ministers are the link between the youth groups of students’ high school years and the congregations of which they will become a part as young adults.

50 More ordinands are UM-seminary grads Almost two-thirds of the United Methodist deacons and elders ordained in 2015 received their seminary degree from a United Methodist-affiliated institution.

51 Outreach, willingness to change common thread for One Matters churches

D E PA RT M E N T S

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The Publisher’s Page Transformational change

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It Worked for Us Family-friendly event in the midst of Fiesta San Antonio; cold water for mail carriers; books accompany candy; confirmands honor police

12 IdeaMart Boomerstock – evangelizing older adults; World Communion Sunday, Oct. 2; Laity Sunday, Oct. 16; NEXT to aid discernment

16 ‘We asked ...,’ ‘you said ....’ How does your faith help you get through times of change?

56 I am United Methodist Meet Wanda Carpenter from Faith United Methodist Church in Mooresville, North Carolina.

57 Technology @LocateWesley links students with Wesley foundations.

58 To Be United Methodist

How can we keep faith when the world seems wicked?

Discipleship Ministries recognized 80 United Methodist churches with the One Matters Discipleship Award.

SED FUTURE-FOCU MISSION DRIVEN TOGETHER IN MISSION FOR

COVER PHOTO: Adobe Stock (© morkdam)

SAKE OF THE WORLD

EXCLUSIVELY FOR INTERPRETER READERS: LINK TO NEW WORLD OUTLOOK AND THE 2016 STATE OF THE CHURCH REPORT.

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

Interpreter (ISSN 0020-9678 Periodical #9154) is published six times a year by United Methodist Communications, 810 12th Ave. S., P.O. Box 320, Nashville, TN 37202-0320; 615-742-5107; www.interpretermagazine. org. Periodicals postage paid at Nashville, Tenn., and additional offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Interpreter, P.O. Box 320, Nashville, TN 37202-0320. Subscription Questions: For individual subscriptions, duplicate/ missing issues, enrollment forms and subscription corrections, call 888-346-3862 or e-mail subscriptions@umcom.org. Change of Address: Send the mailing label with your new address and name of your church to Interpreter Subscriptions, P.O. Box 320, Nashville, TN 37202-0320; call 888346-3862, or e-mail subscriptions@umcom.org. Allow six weeks for changes. Indicate if you hold any offices. Advertising: Contact Fox Associates, Inc., Fox-Chicago, 116 W. Kinzie St., Chicago, IL 60654; 312-644-3888, 800-4400231, 800-440-0232; (Fax) 312-644-8718 The publication of advertising in Interpreter does not constitute endorsement by Interpreter, United Methodist Communications or The United Methodist Church. Advertisers and their agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements printed or representations made therein. Reprints: Local churches, districts, annual conferences and other United Methodist-related entities may reprint, photocopy or create Web links to any materials from Interpreter, except items bearing a copyright notice. Please include “Reprinted from Interpreter Magazine, a publication of United Methodist Communications” and add the issue date on your copies. For more information, call 615-742-5107. Publisher | Dan Krause Editor | Kathy Noble Editorial Assistant | Polly House Contributing Editor | Julie Dwyer Multimedia Editor | Joey Butler Photographer | Mike DuBose Photo Researcher | Kathleen Barry Advertising Manager | Jane Massey Production Manager | Carlton Loney Subscription Fulfillment | 888-346-3862

54 Anticipating Advent Advent 2016 begins on Sunday, Nov. 27. New studies and devotional books and resources to invite, welcome and worship will help congregations and individuals prepare to celebrate the birth of Christ.

United Methodist Communications, Inc. September/October 2016 Vol. 60, No. 5

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Dan Krause

Transformational change

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hange. When reading that word, what comes to mind? Do you cringe? Do you feel fearful? Does your imagination soar? At United Methodist Communications, we have spent the recent summer months engaging in conversations about change as we undertook strategic planning for the organization. What needs to change? What doesn’t? And why? Our openness to reimagining United Methodist Communications is biblically based, as the Scriptures show us that Jesus was the perfect change agent, a person who, according to one definition, is a catalyst for change. He may have understood better than anyone about the necessity to change. The Bible is filled with examples of people whose lives were transformed after meeting Jesus, including blind people who gained sight, sick people who became well and wayward people who found direction. Paul’s transformation was so dramatic that, in his conversion, Jesus told him to change his name from Saul to Paul. He became one of the most influential leaders in the early church, whose words continue to inform believers to this day.

Likewise, the Old Testament includes stories where change was necessary to fulfill God’s plans. Abraham changed from a wealthy and comfortable man to one who followed God to a new land where he would become the father of the nation of Israel. David changed from a timid boy to one with courage in order to defeat Goliath and, ultimately, become the king of Israel. Esther changed from a reluctant young girl to a bold queen who saved her people. In our world today, we find that the mission statement of The United Methodist Church embodies the essence of change: The mission of the Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. Of course, transformation is another word for change. The real question then becomes how do we, as United Methodists, change the world? What actions can we take in our annual conferences, in our local churches and individually to make disciples of Jesus Christ? In this issue of Interpreter, you’ll read about changes that inevitably occur in our world and churches, including neighborhood demographics, worship styles and others, and how United Methodists

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

are navigating those changes. You’ll read how we are reaching across cultures and differences to remain a vital and relevant force in the world. The changes we seek at United Methodist Communications are driven by much of what we see happening in our local churches. We seek solutions for communicating our message in the digital age, especially developing best practices for using the many social media platforms. We explore effective ways to engage with the growing number of seekers in our society. We strive to create meaningful resources to connect our global church. Change in The United Methodist Church is not new. The Book of Discipline, in its rationale for our mission, cites change as the primary result of how God has and continues to use the church. “Throughout its history, God has used The United Methodist Church to save people, heal relationships, transform social structures and spread scriptural holiness,

thereby changing the world” (The Book of Discipline 2012, Section 1, ¶ 121). During our time of strategic planning at United Methodist Communications, we found that rather than instilling fear, discussing change has been invigorating. While it’s true that change means stepping into the unknown, the new ideas and new initiatives have revitalized our day-to-day routines. I look forward to what promises to be an exciting new era at United Methodist Communications as we implement the strategies that have resulted from strategic planning. I also look forward to seeing what God does in The United Methodist Church in the coming quadrennium and beyond as we open ourselves to experiencing an ongoing transformation by the Holy Spirit. Dan Krause is general secretary of United Methodist Communications in Nashville, Tennessee, USA, and publisher of Interpreter.

WE WANT MAIL! Interpreter welcomes Letters to the Editor related to the content of the magazine or other issues of interest to United Methodists. Letters should be limited to 150 words and include the writer’s name, local church, city and state. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send letters to interpreter@umcom.org or Interpreter, P. O. Box 320, Nashville, TN 37202-0320.

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Success Stories From Local Churches

It Worked for Us

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he Rev. Diana Phillips and Michael Christopher turned around and stood in awe. The pastor and lay leader of Colonial Hills United Methodist Church in San Antonio, Texas, stood still for a few minutes and watched as more than a thousand children and adults enjoyed themselves during Fiesta Night. “We just paused and soaked all this in,” said Phillips. Colonial Hills hosted the family-friendly Fiesta Night in late April as part of its city’s 10-day Fiesta San Antonio celebration. More than 100 volunteers handle the details to make sure that attendees

– especially children – have a good time. The church has hosted Fiesta Night for the community for 26 years. Christopher became the chair three years ago. The smell of food, music and laugher filled the air as children rode ponies, petted goats and rabbits, climbed on giant inflatables, played games and took train rides around the church grounds. Vendors sold food and beverages for low cost. Christopher introduced barbeque pulled pork sandwiches to the menu, and people keep coming back for more. “It’s a family friendly

KAREN BIRKELBACH

Fiesta Night fun for families, children

“It Worked for Us” is written by Christine Kumar, a freelance writer and administrator, Baltimore Metropolitan District, Baltimore-Washington Conference. Send story ideas to interpreter@ umcom.org. Find more “It Worked for Us” at Interpreter OnLine, www.interpretermagazine.org.

environment,” said Christopher. “We don’t serve any alcohol and families can just have fun.” Christopher and Phillips said that the event is not for fund raising, Pony rides are a favorite with children enjoying Fiesta but for extend- Night at Colonial Heights United Methodist Church. ing Christ’s love Fiesta San Antonio honors to the community. “I am so proud of the church’s outreach the heroes of the Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto. to the community,” Phillips Christopher and his team said. “Our vision is to radiate God’s love and grace.” She add- are now planning the 27th family-friendly fiesta on April ed that the energy and enthu27, 2017. siasm are very contagious.

Colonial Hills United Methodist Church | 5247 Vance Jackson, San Antonio, TX 78230 | 210-349-2401 | chumc@chumc.org | www.chumc.org | Lead pastor: Rev. Diana Phillips | Average worship attendance: 251 | Rio Texas Conference

Cold water for mail carriers

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n Mondays during the hot summer months, members of City on a Hill United Methodist Church in Woodstock, Georgia, make mail carriers very happy by giving them bottles of ice cold water. “It’s a super simple and a thoughtful gesture,” said Marrianne Butler, missions coordinator at City on a Hill. The idea to give the postal workers a cold bottle of water

came from a church member whose dad was a mail carrier. She would leave cold water and a note of thanks for him in her mailbox. Eight to 10 volunteers, dressed in bright yellow t-shirts that read “Special Forces” on the back, recently passed out cold bottled water at the corner of a busy street in the Woodstock area. The outside of each bottle carries the church’s logo and a word of God’s love on the label.

Handing out water bottles is one their “100 Ways to Serve” projects. The Rev. Chris Bryant said the church is mission-focused and many of the church members participate in more than one mission project during the year. The church engages in a day of service in August where many projects are underway including a single moms’ gas giveaway, popsicles in the park, planting and weeding on

the church grounds, making repairs in the church and handing out food from the food pantry. Worship each Sunday has a “Moment of Mission” when church members learn of approaching volunteer opportunities, how to get involved and what is needed. “I love being in mission,” Butler said. “It’s about random acts of kindness.”

City on a Hill United Methodist Church | 7745 Main Street, Woodstock, GA 30188 | 678-445-3480 | coah@cityonahillumc.org | www.coahumc.org | Lead pastor: Rev. Chris Bryant | Average worship attendance: 322 | North Georgia Conference

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

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it worked for us

Success Stories From Local Churches

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t’s time for many churches to plan for Trunk or Treat. As some volunteers are gathering treats and preparing to decorate their trunks for the Halloween season festivity, others are thinking of “extras” to enhance the event. For the past nine years, children of all ages have been celebrating Halloween in the parking lot at West Heights United Methodist Church in Wichita, Kansas. The first few years, the event featured candy bars, hard candy, gumdrops, gum and other goodies. “In 2009 or 2010, we added

free hot dogs,” said Jackie Jewett, children’s ministry director. “Each year it evolves as we see other things that can make it more inviting.” In 2014, church members donated new and gently used books to add to the candy in 12-20 trunks and give to the 400-500 costumed children who attended. Jewett said they also have prizes and allergen-free treats. “One of the things I absolutely love about Trunk or Treat is that it serves so many purposes,” she said. “It provides an amazing fellowship for the volunteers and those

attending. It allows us to serve others and teach them that people who go to church can be kind, fun and loving.” Serving the hot dogs, chips, hot apple cider and cocoa in the church’s foyer lets guests become familiar with the inside of the building. Jewett and volunteers at the church serve with gladness as they see excited children receiving their treats and other goodies. They plan to continue Trunk or Treat annually – complete with treats, books and possibly other items for the children.

COURTESY PHOTOS

Special treats for Trunk or Treat

The Rev. Cindy Watson, former lead pastor, offers books to some of the Trunk or Treat guests.

West Heights United Methodist Church | 745 N. Westlink, Wichita, KS 67212 | 316-722-3805 | westheights@westheightsumc.org | westheightsumc.org | Lead pastor: The Rev. Randy Quinn | Average worship attendance: 284 | Great Plains Conference 10

September–October 2016 issue

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SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

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AN AWARD-WINNING MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO UNITED METHODISTS IN MISSION


Success Stories From Local Churches

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n the fall of 2015, a community and a church mourned the loss of a fallen sheriff’s deputy, Steven Sandberg, who was killed in the line of duty. Sandberg, a member of Aitkin United Methodist Church in Aitkin, Minnesota, was loved by many as he offered his time and service to the church’s ministry. Among those who remember him are members of the 2016 confirmation class. Sandberg mentored one of the class members, Carter Kjelstrom. Sandberg’s wife, Kristi, also mentored some of the students. With their confirmation

day on May 15 – part of National Law Enforcement Week – the timing worked well for a community project to show appreciation for law enforcement personnel. “We are a cop-friendly church,” said the Rev. Dawn Houser, pastor. “We do things to love on them, and we want to show God’s love.” The 2017 confirmands will probably do the same community project, reaching out to police and sheriff’s officers in Aitkin County, she said. The young people assembled cinch sacks filled with candy bars, lint rollers, sunblock,

toothbrushes, water and other items. The officers received gift certificates from local restaurants and businesses. They also distributed 40 donated tickets from Three Bears Water and Theme Park for the officers’ children. Even Loki, the K9, received a blanket with embroidery from a local store. The youth made an additional 18 bags for the deputies who traveled to Washington

on May 13 to honor Sandberg as his name was added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial. Houser said she is intentional about connecting the church and the community. “We are here, as a church, to serve and care for our bankrupt souls,” she said. “This will also help the confirmands to see why it is important to be there for the community.”

COURTESY AITKIN UMC

Showing appreciation for law enforcement

it worked for us

Confirmands and Aitkin County Sheriff’s Office personnel gather after the youth presented gift-filled cinch bags to the law enforcement personnel.

AT A GLANCE Aitkin United Methodist Church | 104 2nd St. NW, Aitkin, MN 56431 | 218-927-3242 | aumc@aitkinunitedmethodist.org | The Rev. Dawn Houser | Average worship attendance: 57 | Minnesota Conference 11

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SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016


Ideamart Boomerstock: Evangelizing baby boomers

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s the over-60 age group explodes with aging baby boomers, annual conference and local church leaders will gather to learn new ways to engage people who sometimes are spiritual but not religious, or have left the church. Boomerstock, hosted by Discipleship Ministries, will offer a comprehensive look at how the church can reach members of a generation now encountering spiritual issues and questions differently than in the past. The conference will be Sept. 28-Oct. 1 in Nashville, Tennessee. “This event is an opportunity for church leaders to come and learn both from people who are extremely knowledgeable of the baby-boomer generation and from each other about what is working and how we can creatively explore new ideas,” said the Rev. Will Randolph, director of the Office of Aging and Older Adult Ministries at Discipleship Ministries. Randolph said many baby boomers left the church in the 1960s and 1970s as they became adults. Today many claim to be spiritual, but not religious. “The boomers going into retirement and, perhaps, the most spiritual time of their

lives, offer the church another opportunity to be engaged by the church in ministry.” Baby boomers have driven change in the population’s age structure in the United States since their birth. By 2029, all of the boomers will be 65 years of age and over and encompass more than 20 percent of the total population, according to the Census Bureau. “Boomerstock is about understanding how to minister to a group of emerging older adults who do not even want to claim the mantle of being older adults and to understand how older adult ministry is changing,” Randolph said. “The old models don’t work for baby boomers because they are a totally different culture. “One of the mistakes that we have made in the last 50 years with older adult ministries is that we assumed every generation would be the same and what worked for our parents’ generation would also work for the baby boomers. But it hasn’t and it won’t,” he said. Find a list of speakers, other program details and registration information at http:// bit.ly/28YbXTw. Discipleship Ministries

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

World Communion Scholar connecting church, society

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nnie Solis Escalante wants “to understand the current needs of churches and the boundaries that need to be crossed to reach justice and peace.” The World Communion Scholarship helped the young Peruvian woman take steps toward doing that. Solis Escalante completed a master’s degree in social management at the Cayetano Heredia University in Peru. The special gifts United Methodists make on World Communion Sunday – Oct. 2 this year – provided Solis Escalante’s scholarship. Fifty percent of the offering supports World Communion scholarships awarded by the General Board of Global Ministries to students around the

COURTESY ANNIE SOLIS ESCALANTE

Inspiration & Resources

Annie Solis Escalante (holding the white bag) attends a United Nations AIDS meeting with church leaders as part of the fifth World Council of Churches Assembly in 2015.

second stage, Solis Escalante served in social work projects through the Methodist Church of Peru. “That experience helped me,” she says. “Social justice issues are not yet properly addressed by churches, especially at the grassroots level. It seems like there is a divorce between churches and society.” FIND RESOURCES to promote and celebrate World Communion Sunday at To address that gap, www.umcgiving.org/resource-articles/worldshe planned to return communion-sunday-pastors-leaders-kit. to school following her While the first Sunday in October – Oct. 2, fellowship to study 2016 – is the official date for the observance, theology and social churches needing to celebrate and receive the offering on another day may do so. development. “Being a World Communion scholar means being part of world. The remainder funds a big fellowship of Christians the Ethnic Scholarship and trained and committed to the Ethnic In-Service Training programs administered by transforming themselves and the communities they serve,” the General Board of Higher she said. Her studies and her Education and Ministry. work as a mission intern told Soon after graduation, her that God equips people Solis Escalante became a with the courage, patience Global Mission Fellow, one and skills to help people get of the short-term missionary better opportunities in life. programs for young adults of the General Board of Global Sandra Brands is a writer and Ministries regular contributor to www. Her first assignment umcmission.org. This article is was in project management adapted from a posting at www. with the World Council of umcgiving.org. Churches in Geneva. In the

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Inspiration & Resources

Laity Sunday 2016: Living Vital Worship

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N DISCIPLESHIP MINISTRIES

s worship a noun or is it a verb? Is worship something you go to, or is it something you live? This year’s theme for Laity Sunday, “Disciples Called to Action: Living Vital Worship,” urges seeing worship not as passive spectators, but as active participants. Indeed, worship is something that we live! The scripture references for Laity Sunday, Oct. 16 this year, unfold worship in several different ways: » Worship as love: Matthew 22:37-39 » Worship as discipline: Matthew 16:24 » Worship as justice: Micah 6:8 » Worship as evangelism: Matthew 28:19-20 Looked at from this perspective, worship breathes life and vitality! Disciples of Jesus Christ are called to be engaged in worship through the love of God and neighbor, through personal spiritual disciplines, through acts of justice, and by going and taking God’s love into the world. Worship really is transformational discipleship, and the Wesleyan movement was a vivid example of worship as a verb — living... vital. In The United Methodist Church, laity take seriously their call to live worship through ministry as lay leaders, lay servants, lay ministers, missionaries, deaconesses, home missioners, class leaders, liturgists, lay speakers, congregational care ministers, youth directors, Christian

NEXT empowers collegians to combine faith, gifts, passions

educators, United Methodist Women, United Methodist Men and in many other roles. Laity Sunday this year celebrates that true worship can only happen when laity and clergy live it together. Without the vital ministry of the laity, The United Methodist Church would not be as it is today. Laity and clergy are disciples called to action, to living vital worship! Laity Sunday worship resources downloadable from the Discipleship Ministries website include an order of worship, notes for worship and music leaders and preaching notes. Find those and other planning aids at http://bit. ly/2aqPTQL. Adapted from “Laity Sunday 2016: Living Vital Worship” by Jodi Cataldo, director of laity in leadership, originally published at Discipleship Ministries, www. umcdiscipleship.org.

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

EXT 2016 is Nov. 4-6 in Atlanta, Georgia’s historic Tabernacle Theater. The event will equip college students with the skills needed to merge their gifts with innovative discipleship and effect immediate change within their communities. “The Imagine What’s Next community is a unique space created out of the United Methodist Student Movement,” organizers say. “As we grow and connect across the globe, NEXT serves as a pool of partners, perspectives and resources to help you in your faith and leadership development. Most importantly, doing good work is not a chore, it’s who we are as United Methodists. It is a way of life.” Organized by college students, campus ministers and others from across the United Methodist connection, NEXT (NextUMC.org) is sponsored by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry’s Office of Collegiate Ministry. “NEXT is a unique gathering of young adults who are discerning, or reimagining, ways to pursue their desire to make a difference in the

United Methodist Interpreter

world,” said the Rev. Sheila Bates, director of student faith and leadership formation at GBHEM. “It is a dynamic space where faith and action intersect with creativity and passion. NEXT is more than an event, it’s a movement!” The program includes worship, exhibits and opportunities to connect with community experts, advocates and service organizations in Atlanta. Register at NextUMC.org. The early registration fee – through Sept. 15 – is $125.

After Sept. 15, the fee is $150. Campus ministers’ registration is waived with five or more student registrants. General Board of Higher Education and Ministry

COURTESY GBHEM

ideamart


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Readers respond

”We asked … you said …“ Several weeks prior to finishing each issue of Interpreter, we send a question to all readers for whom we have email addresses, asking them to respond with a short answer. Read some of their answers here and more at Interpreter OnLine, www.interpretermagazine.org. We hope you will join the conversation.

WE ASKED

How does your faith help you get through times of change?

YOU SAID ...

Faith is not about everything turning out OK; faith is about being OK, no matter how things turn out. Roy Baldwin, Helotes Hills UMC, Helotes, Texas

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When my precious, talented 16-yearold daughter, Marlee, was killed with two friends by a train on Valentine night 1992, my life and my family’s was changed forever. God, church and prayer were important to us, but now there was a cannonball-size hole through my chest. Where was God now? Eventually Easter came. I always knew, in my head, about Jesus’ death and God’s salvation plan, but I never knew how I NEEDED it until then. Slowly I understood Easter’s reality: I will see Marlee again. Jan Bretz, Tenth Avenue UMC, Hutchinson, Kansas For my fiancé and me, we are literally going through a major life change for both of us. Our faith in God has allowed us to embrace this change with an unmistakable peace. When we pray and read the Bible together, it brings us closer to God. We literally feel his peace in our souls when we pray about our future together. God is great! Isaac Dorrel, Whitcomb UMC, Brookville, Indiana My faith is born from Jesus Christ, the greatest agent of change in history. Jesus changed the entire focus of our faith, moving us away from the restrictions of rules and laws and encouraging us to em-

brace love and kindness. For me, I cannot fully embrace Christianity without the idea of changing, of evolving into someone else as my faith and my relationship with Jesus grows. Change is exciting - it keeps me growing! Mike Morrison, First UMC, Covington, Tennessee Change is good and generally healthy in the majority of events, situations and conditions. However, we have, as United Methodists, the Wesleyan quadrilateral to entertain when change is sought. My faith has evolved out of the scriptures and the ministry of Jesus Christ and the point of view of the Apostle Paul. In some instances as the world advances, there is need for change, but there are always exceptions that should over rule that are scripturally based. Murray Nickerson, South Tamworth (New Hampshire) UMC My faith, the hope in what is not seen, guides me during times of change and, on occasion, turmoil. Faith that all things will work to glorify God brings me assurance. (The Rev.) Cathy Partridge, Christ UMC, Princeton, Texas When faced with potential change, listen more than you speak for it is in the listening that you will find your answers. Then pray and again listen carefully for the Lord will impress upon your heart the path to follow. But, be awake to the possibility that a path not considered is

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the one to be taken. Step out in faith, but know it is ok also to be a bit scared of the unknown. Rick Ramsey, Trinity UMC, Eugene, Oregon Change we fear or do not expect is frightening. Change we expect is exciting. When I am faced with change, I count on my faith. When change is a challenge, I know God will provide the strength and guidance to negotiate the change, that Christ forgives me if I fall, and the Holy Spirit leads me safely to the other side. When change is good, my faith reminds me that I have been blessed. Paul Reinert, Trucksville (Pennsylvania) UMC As my world changes, I turn to scripture. I know worldly things come and go but our God is forever. Hebrews 13:8 tells me Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever. This gives me hope and encouragement to keep going. I then sit down and write out some plans. Karen Tate, Hinsdale (Illinois) UMC When faith is the prism through which we observe or evaluate an issue that demands our response, then a strong faith in God will give a person “hopeful courage” to accept and live into the change. It does not mean you will be happy if the change is negative, but you will have the capacity to engage the matter and not be drowned by it. (The Rev.) John Wolfe, retired, Birmingham UMC, Canton, Georgia


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ASK ALMOST ANY CHURCH MEMBER: DO YOU WANT YOUR CHURCH TO GROW? CERTAINLY, MOST PEOPLE WILL RESPOND. BUT ASK IF THEY WANT THAT SAME CHURCH TO CHANGE, AND WATCH THEM BACKTRACK, STUTTER, SPUTTER AND WONDER ALOUD WHY A GOOD THING NEEDS TO CHANGE. For pastors and lay leaders, navigating necessary change and desired change is a river voyage fraught with treacherous rapids and tricky sandbars. Yet Christianity nearly always calls the faithful into change and their leaders need to help them find the way through. “The world is constantly changing, and the church responds to the needs of the world,” says the Rev. Thomas Elliott Jr., an assistant professor of practical theology at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology. He also has 26 years of experience as a pastor. “So the church is also going to change,” Elliott says. “Church is really about joining God and God’s mission in the community and the world. I think most folks want their lives and their churches to make a difference to the world, inviting people to respond to God’s mission and helping them to discover their unique gifts.” The Rev. Bob Whitesel says churches successfully change and grow when ideas about change are presented carefully and with forethought. First, he recommends consulting congregational leaders and others invested in keeping the status quo. “The people who want to keep things the way they are. What

United Methodist Interpreter

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CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION

COURTESY INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

The Rev. Bob Whitesel

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successful change leaders do is they carefully define change boundaries as they’re defining the vision for the change.” “Let’s say, they want to start a new service,’”says Whitesel, professor of Christian ministry and missional leadership at Wesley Seminary at Indiana Wesleyan University. “One boundary might be, ‘We won’t change the time for our current service. We’re still going to have a choir for our traditional service.’ You figure out what people are concerned about and then you address those concerns and tell them how you won’t infringe upon those concerns.”

LISTEN TO THE NAYSAYERS

The leader must bring the naysayers on board, say the experts in church change. They also say: listen to the naysayers. Recognize why some may be fearful. Realize even those who seem supportive may, at the last minute, back away from the best pastoral planning. And keep your eye on the cross, letting God guide you. The Rev. Cheryl Jefferson-Bell of Leawood, Kansas, outlines five strategies she sees as essential to change. “Prayer, discernment, openness, listening and faith,” she says. “Helping bring change is not a black-and-white thing. People are not going to always jump in.

“I think it’s interesting when we as a church get stuck in our ways. There isn’t always even that immediate idea of making a change. But when we look at Jesus and Jesus’ ministry, Jesus was all about change. He said, ‘We’re not going in the right direction. We need to go this way.’” Elliott concurs. Working with seminarians, he stresses change’s communal impact. “It’s not just about me and Jesus,” he said. “In my own case there was always a little bit of uncertainty (about moving) to a new church. You’re going into a new church and everyone knows you and you don’t know them and maybe what’s happening. For me, I committed to answering the call to ministry and I haven’t been to a place where God is not there. “There’s an excitement in that. You do it a few times and you figure out, ‘Wow, God, it’s an adventure.’”

REMEMBER THE MISSION

Still, change disrupts churches and denominations because “castle tending is easier than kingdom building,” says the Rev. Junius Dotson, the new general secretary of Discipleship Ministries. “People have a vested interest in maintaining their perspective of tradition, order and power,” Dotson says. “It’s even

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The Rev. Cheryl Jefferson-Bell

more difficult to enact change on a general church level because people become more interested in preserving the institution rather than advancing the Spirit of movement.” Proponents of change – or the people charged with bringing it into being – make it past the obstacles and the difficult times by remembering the mission, Dotson says. “Focus on the mission. Clarify the mission. Pursue the mission,” he said. “Eventually, we get back to remembering what is most important and even as we make change we do so in a way that enhances our ability to live out the mission of making disciples for the transformation of the world.” Like it or not, there is a connection between how other organizations change and how churches change, says Whitesel, whose books include ORGANIX: Signs of Leadership in a Changing Church (Abingdon Press). Too many volumes on changing the church and leading it into change focus on one example in a particular context that cannot be applied in another, he said. But his examination of thousands of case studies shows strategies designed for organizations can be adapted to church life and leadership. Those steps are outlined in a new Abingdon Press book, re:MIX: Transitioning Your

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The Rev. Thomas Elliott Jr.

Church to Living Color by Mark DeYmaz and Whitesel.

CONNECT WITH THE BIBLE

After taking those steps, “then you don’t do the change alone,” he says. “I call it a coalition because you have to have people who are for the status quo. You form a coalition with some on it who are not for the change or who are hesitant. With them you create change boundaries. Then you attach it to a biblical story.” The biblical connection proves critical. “Research has shown that if people have a story to associate with change, people are much more likely to embrace it. Change happens then about 85 percent of the time.” Pastoral leaders should preach about the story so congregants will remember it. “Then the next step is creating short-term wins,” Whitesel said. “Things like projects or programs you can undertake on a short-term basis.” Dotson also recommends a win-win approach. Recognize, he says, that the person in front of you is “not someone to be conquered. What if we could create a path that focused on ‘healing and wholeness’ rather than ‘I win and you lose.’”

LISTEN, ENGAGE OTHERS

Clergy and laity at all levels must be open to new ways of thinking, must learn to listen,


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COURTESY CANDLER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHENYOUHAVEANEWPASTOR ... BY SOPHIA AGTARAP

We are in a season of change.

The Rev. Junius Dotson

must improve their listening skills, Dotson says. They have to confront what they’re afraid of and expand their awareness, struggling to see things from a different perspective. Then, they can collaborate. “Change begins with me but it can only be enacted when I engage others in creating a new future together. Collaboration is the energy that fuels a new way of being.” Jefferson-Bell, now a congregational care pastor at the multi-site United Methodist Church of the Resurrection, has pastored small, medium and large-membership churches in rural and urban areas. And she has been a district superintendent. Through it all, she’s learned that bringing the idea – and the data – to the table is just the beginning of initiating change. The best, most well-intentioned leader should also be open to God’s spirit and to hearing from others. “There may be someone at the table who has the experience and everything you need,” Jefferson-Bell said. “But if you’re not willing to listen and to be open, you can be stabbing yourself in the foot.” Longtime religion writer Cecile S. Holmes is an associate professor and head of the journalism sequence at the University of South Carolina School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Pastors have been in their new churches for several months and are beginning to understand their new congregations. A presidential election is approaching in the United States. Students have returned to school. Change is inevitable, and we respond to it in various ways. Here are some suggestions to consider as your congregation makes the transition that accompanies a change in pastors. 1. Acknowledge that everyone has a different perception of change. For some, the one who left may be the only pastor they had known, or they may not understand the itinerant system of The United Methodist Church. What may seem like a major change to you may be minor to someone else. Keep this in mind as a way to manage expectations and frustration. 2. Welcome them. Welcoming your first female pastor or bishop or someone of a different ethnicity is new for everyone. Remember that your pastor or bishop has been sent to lead you. Be open to, and show respect for, that leadership. 3. If you are receiving new staff, whether it is a senior pastor or a new office administrator, as a general rule, treat them with the same regard you treated your outgoing staff, regardless of gender. The staff at The General Commission on the Status and Role of Women adds, “This includes not underestimating their experience or ability to handle difficult challenges. While the leadership style of your incoming leadership may seem different to you, different is not bad, and might even provide some new insights. Remain inquisitive about where processes that are new may lead.” 4. Be encouraging. Often, we are quick to point out and verbalize our dislikes. It is rarely that we take a moment to express our appreciation for someone. During transitions, words of encouragement and offers of assistance go far in cultivating an atmosphere of generosity and hospitality. It is not appropriate, however, to comment on another’s physical appearance (makeup, nail polish, hairstyle, legs, shoes, skirts or

United Methodist Interpreter

pants, suits or dresses). 5. Recall Isaiah 43:18-19a: “Do not remember the former things, or consider the things of old. I am about to do a new thing: Now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?” . Goodbyes can be difficult for pastors, their families and the congregation they’ve served. Take extra measures to watch, and notice the ways God is moving in this time of transition, and give thanks. Ask: How can we be a part of this movement of the Spirit? 6. Acknowledge people’s fears and anxieties. Pastoral transitions can induce stress and anxiety. Acknowledge this. Laity who are leaders in their churches can contribute much to a smooth transition and good beginning for the church and the newly appointed pastor. The mere act of creating space for people to voice their thoughts shows you are a leader (and a community) that wants to journey together. Whether you do it as part of your sermon, or hold a community forum, create the space for questions. Whatever steps you take to help your church navigate it, continue to acknowledge that change is scary. Tell stories of others who have navigated change successfully – and some of those who haven’t. Telling stories helps listeners see through the eyes of others. They can be an important and helpful tool during this time. What are some helpful ways you have navigated change? What have you learned along the way? See what other Interpreter readers say on Page 16. Sophia Agtarap is a freelance writer and media consultant living in Nashville, Tennessee.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES “Tips for Navigating Change,” University of Minnesota: http:// upgrade.umn.edu/assets/pdf/Tips_Navigating_Change.pdf A Guide to Pastoral Transitions, www.umcom.org/learn/a-guideto-pastoral-transitions-part-1-the-first-30-days Pastoral Transitions, Great Plains Conference: www.greatplainsumc.org/pastoraltransitions

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MOVE TO MULTIETHNICITY IS NOT EASY, BUT WORTH IT B Y E M I LY S N E L L

“If heaven is not segregated, why on earth is the church?”

The work of Mark DeYmaz inspired the Rev. In-Yong Lee to challenge her congregants to think about this question. Lee is pastor of Cokesbury United Methodist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. Her church has been striving to become a more multiethnic congregation. In the early stages of its renewed emphasis on diversity, Lee said Cokesbury hosted small groups, which intentionally met outside of the church building, to discuss The Multi-Ethnic Christian Life Primer (Mosaix) by DeYmaz, who is a pastor, author and leader on multiethnic ministry. This was important in “challenging our preconceived notions about race and pushing us to the higher level of cross-cultural competence,” Lee said. Change consultants often cite Garfield Memorial United Methodist Church in Cleveland as an example of a successful

multicultural body. The Rev. Chip Freed said the church views its multiethnicity as “a faithful commitment to the great commission, to go and make disciples of all nations, not just some nations. “We’re really serious about reaching non-church people. Non-church people live in diverse environments. It’s only church people who live in segregated environments.” For Freed, the church’s multiethnic identity is about “presenting a credible witness to the gospel.” “If we want to be relevant, if we want to connect with a growing new generation of people, we need to commit to this, or people will write us off as irrelevant,” he said. In 2011, the Rev. DeAndre Johnson began serving as pastor of music and worship at Westbury United Methodist Church in Houston — another congregation focused on reaching diverse people. As Westbury saw its neighborhood demographics change, Johnson said, the SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

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congregation began asking, “How do we let our multicultural identity shape everything about us?” The church envisioned being “a church for all people with more than enough love to go around.” “We are committed to maintaining and living out what it means to come from different places but have a common vision and life together,” Johnson said. The church’s first core value is “multicultural inclusivity.”

MINISTRY FOR RECONCILIATION

The Rev. Bob Whitesel, author, professor and national church change consultant, said multiethnic ministry is about reconciliation. “We are given the ministry of reconciliation. Reconciliation is more than just reconciliation to God. That’s the most important, but it also means reconciliation of people from different cultures,” he said. In his latest book, re:MIX: Transitioning


COURTESY WESTBURYUMC

The Rev. Hannah Terry (with microphone) leads the Fondren Apartment Ministry in community prayer at More Than Enough Love Day in November 2013 at Los Arcos Apartment Complex in Houston.

Your Church to Living Color (Abingdon Press), written with DeYmaz, Whitesel said multicultural identity is a crucial aspect of the church’s mission on earth. “We’re never going to reconcile people unless we get the established church today to embrace this, to embrace a church of living color,” he said. Moving toward multiculturalism, Cokesbury decided that listening sessions would allow groups within the church to learn. “We’ve realized, not only in different ethnic groups but across the economic divide, there are so many classes and groups that are divided from one another,” Lee said. “They all act out of preconceived notions, assumptions, prejudices. So we are intentionally breaking those barriers between us by reaching out and listening to one another.” Cheryl LaTanya Walker, director of African-American ministries at Discipleship Ministries, said her goal is to “demystify” differences and break down “assumptions based on race or class.”

“We can worship together, be vital together if we break down the assumptions on what we see with the physical eye but look to God’s spirit,” she said. “We will see that we are more the same than we are different.” To that end, Walker suggests that historically black churches begin by “doing pulpit exchanges” with congregations that seem different. “Take your congregation, confirmation class and other ministry groups to churches that have different worship styles and persons who are outside of the African descent family,” she said. “Tour the facilities. Observe what is on their bulletin boards. Listen to the announcements. What are they doing in the community? Listen and observe what they are doing that may be the same or different.”

START WITH LEADERSHIP

At Garfield Memorial, “empowering diverse leaders was a very important strategy,” Freed said. “We don’t want the people on stage to be all one race. We try to 25

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is your piece to get them in the congregation? Once they’re in the congregation, you begin the disciple process and inviting them to be involved.” That involvement is not limited to Bible study or even to something in the church building, she adds. “Particularly for our young folks, they are the ‘do’ generation. Sitting in a service for two to three hours doesn’t make a lot of sense to them, unless they see some output from doing that,” she said, “but they will go volunteer.” In July, Garfield Memorial hosted “freedom week,” similar to vacation Bible school, at its South Euclid campus. “It’s focused around teaching some of

COURTESY IN-YONG LEE

represent diversity from top to bottom in our staff.” Whitesel agrees that diverse leadership is a crucial point, “Oftentimes, the dominant culture will have a tendency to try and run a multicultural church,” he said. “We teach in this book about shared leadership. It’s almost impossible to grow a multiethnic church without having multiethnic leadership in place first. You have to include these people and their voices in the decision-making process before you make structural change.” Walker observes, “Bishops are assigning black pastors to historically Anglo churches that were in downtown with

The ministry has led the congregation to be “tremendously blessed” as people from all over the world join in Westbury’s worship services. “Many of these dear friends of ours have also become part of our worship life,” Johnson said, adding that they “faithfully participate” in worship despite some language struggles. “You can watch them begin to feel comfortable in the space and to take ownership of their own place here.” “A person who doesn’t know the love of Christ, they’re our VIPs,” Freed said. The mentality is, “I’ll do whatever it takes. I’ll set aside my personal preferences to reach those who are unchurched. When you do that, diversity will walk through your door.” As churches embrace new cultures, Whitesel said, it’s important to create short-term wins. “Demonstrate to the congregation that this is going to work, that this is a worthwhile way to go.”

HUMILITY, COURAGE, VULNERABILITY

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It’s a picture of multiethnic diversity when the congregation of Cokesbury United Methodist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina, gathers.

a specific mission of moving that pretty much Anglo congregation with some black members, to a more diverse, more multiethnic congregation,” she said.

the Civil Rights movement,” Freed said. “As part of that, we have police officers come in and talk to the youth. They played a whiffle ball game.”

RENOVATE WORSHIP, OUTREACH

PARTNER WITH SCHOOLS

Westbury shifted from a “traditional, middle class, Anglo worship service” to something “in the language and style of peoples worldwide.” “We started singing in languages other than English — some represented in our congregation and some not,” Johnson said. “We did this to nurture this sense of multicultural inclusivity within us and to challenge us to go further.” Another key for all of the churches was a renewed vision for ministry in the community. Walker pushes congregations to be creative in their outreach. “What mission things are you doing for the neighborhood?” she asks. “What

Cokesbury and other churches are working to “do even more for the school” in their neighborhood. “Every time we meet and talk, we sense that it is not we who are doing this, but God is guiding us,” Lee said. Garfield Memorial hosts an annual back-to-school event to assist low-income families by providing health screenings, haircuts, backpacks and supplies. “We’re trying to meet a need,” Freed said. “We’re bringing joy to the city. We want to make Cleveland a better place.” Westbury also created the Fondren Apartment Ministry (FAM), a ministry at a nearby apartment complex, which houses many refugee families.

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DeYmaz emphasizes that, if a congregation tries to grow into a multiethnic church, “there is a 100 percent chance to offend each other.” “Humility is the only way to approach one another,” Lee said. “We will offend the others without meaning to, because we don’t know them well, but we will be willing to approach each other. If offense happens, (we apologize), and mutually we will learn better together.” Moving toward diversity requires pastors to take risks — and not worry about themselves. “When you venture out to something new, there is a big possibility of failure,” Lee said. “Only when you are ready for failure can you do something. “Those of us, when we are trying to grow in diversity, we need patience, persistence and perseverance. It’ll turn out to be a blessing to your local church, to your community and to yourself, so do something!” Emily Snell is a freelance writer living in Nashville, Tennessee. She writes frequently for Interpreter and other publications.


CHURCHES BEGIN, DIE AND LIVE AGAIN B Y P O L LY H O U S E

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THE STORY OF CHRIST IS THE STORY OF BIRTH, DEATH AND RESURRECTION. That’s also the story of some selfless churches.

BIRTH

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You gotta love New Orleans. Following Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, some people thought the city was finished, but no way. Energy and love still abounded. So much so, that mostly white First

The Rev. Shawn Anglim leads worship at First Grace United Methodist Church in New Orleans.

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United Methodist Church and mostly black Grace United Methodist Church came together and birthed a baby – First Grace United Methodist Church – a thriving, racially diverse congregation. It wasn’t a simple courtship, but neither was it an arranged marriage. The two churches spent time together, learned about each other and finally decided to become one. Grace had more than 150 years of tradition and First Church was even older when Katrina hit. First, located on Canal Street, a major thoroughfare, had been in a steady membership decline since the 1970s. Although damaged, its building survived the storm. Grace’s structure was heavily damaged; its 100 or so members scattered. The Rev. Shawn Anglim had been a campus minister at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge for six years when now retired Bishop William Hutchinson appointed him and three other clergy to eight storm-damaged churches in New Orleans. Hutchinson’s instructions to Anglim were simple: Start working where he felt the Holy Spirit leading.

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When Anglim began working with First and Grace, they were still meeting separately in their damaged buildings. Following a lot listening and prayer, Anglim approached each with a question: “Don’t you think we can do more for this city as one body of Christ rather than as two bodies of Christ separated by one long mile?” They did. At first, the two congregations, each with its own identity, shared space in First’s large building. They decided to begin a mid-week meal there. The Dollar Dinners brought together Katrina volunteers, people in the neighborhood and the homeless and working poor. Working together, members of both congregations began to get to know each other. After a few months, it became clear that it was time to merge. They began worshipping together in June 2007. In October, First Grace UMC was born!

The church continues to expand its ministry to New Orleans. It opened Hagar’s House, a residence for homeless moms and their children where women can stay as long as they need to. Project Ishmael is a free immigration center providing direct representation for children. The church hosts a Spanish-language worship service and classes for students learning English and Spanish. Children from First Grace United Methodist Church listen to They also provide space in the their vacation Bible school lesson. building for a school for children Everywhere you look, God has given us an with autism. “These kids see the love of opportunity.” Jesus when they are here,” Anglim said. Anglim said his people know that well. “I think Jesus would be glad to walk these halls.” “It’s funny to think that God could use DEATH an event as horrific as Katrina to bring The last thing the Rev. Sam Geyer ever about so much good, but he has,” he said. thought he would do was to be the last pas“There are never-ending ways for us tor of a church that closed. Nevertheless, it to connect to the city. It’s all right here. happened in 2015. 29

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resurrection, so I trust that although the church ceased to exist, God continues to be with the good people of the church and community as they continue to use the building for the benefit of everyone. “It’s sad the church’s life came to an end, but during its life it brought joy, peace and love to the people of Kahlotus. Its life was well lived.”

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Kahlotus, Washington, is a town of fewer than 200 people. Early pioneers there founded what became Kahlotus Community United Methodist Church in 1906. For its first 16 years, the church had no pastor. Occasionally a visiting preacher would come, but by and large, the congregants took care of themselves and did ministry in the community. Kahlotus Church was a faithful and fruitful congregation. Generations of families and friends shared faith, hosted annual hunters’ breakfasts, organized Easter egg hunts and offered vacation Bible school to all the community’s children. They also managed a food bank used sometimes by half the town’s population. Eventually, each of these ministries ended. “The church faced closure multiple times,” Geyer said. “Each time they faced it, they remembered they were tasked with being the light of Christ for their community and kept going. One thing we did when I was appointed their pastor in 2014 was to engage in an intentional and holy discussion about what the future held for them.” While the remaining members had many ideas, they lacked the energy to do the work. They had the desire, but didn’t have the people and the means to keep going. With that reality, the best option was to close the church. They gave themselves a year to end well. Geyer and the church members soon met with Kahlotus Mayor Patti Hamilton, the Rev. Juli Reinholz, district superintendent, and Pacific Northwest Conference treasurer Brant Henshaw. Geyer and the congregation wanted to discuss options for further use of the church building, hoping to find a way to allow it to continue serving the community. It was a good structure. At that meeting, all parties agreed to sell the church building to the city. The mayor and city council envisioned a new city hall and library there. They also wanted to bring the food bank back to the church location. The almost 4,500-squarefoot building would have a second life of service. “Closing the church was a time of sadness and a time of joy,” Geyer said. “I have to admit, it does feel like a close friend died. But, I know that with death comes

RESURRECTION

St. Croix Valley United Methodist Church in Lakeland, Minnesota, had been a good church for a long time. It still was. Its members were family to each other. But churches have a life span, and St. Croix’s was ending. It was dying. “The vision of the church has always been to know Christ and to make him known,” said Dave Deming, then-council chair at St. Croix. The question became how to continue to make that happen? “The reality was, we were dying,” Deming said. “As the number of young families diminished, we just didn’t attract other young families.” Remarkably, in the face of death, the church embraced resurrection. Embrace Church, a United Methodist congregation in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, was thriving. Its weekly worship attendance increased a whopping 1,437 percent between 2009 and 2014, making it the fastest-growing United Methodist Church in the United States. Embrace wanted to start a new campus and decided Lakeland, about 15 miles east of St. Paul, would be a good location. The Rev. Clay Oglesbee, district superintendent, and the Rev. Cindy Gregorson, director of ministries for the Minnesota Conference, approached the Valley leaders and said they had a big, audacious, takeyour-breath-away proposal. They said, “It is going to turn your life upside-down, but we believe God is in it. Will you consider it? Will you give over your building, your identity, your way of being church to Embrace so they can start a new campus in your building?” And, they added, we want you to do this in three weeks. Deming said, “We heard God knocking – and not softly – he was kicking the door down! Here is an opportunity.”

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

The Rev. Austin Walker

St. Croix made the selfless, brave and bold decision to give over all it had to allow Embrace to start a new campus there. There were no ashes in this death, only new life. “Seeing something altogether new grow and blossom as another church plants itself here, well, if that’s not resurrection, I don’t know what is ,” said the Rev. Jeff Utecht, Valley’s then-interim pastor. The Rev. Adam Weber, Embrace lead pastor, praised the St. Croix congregation for its sacrifice and vision. “Here is a congregation at the table because they do love the Lord and have a vision for something greater,” Weber said. “They are saying, ‘We want to reach our kids and grandkids.’” In September 2015, St. Croix closed its doors. Almost everything about it ceased to exist. But, in November, it came back to life! Embrace St. Croix launched with two services and 438 people attending. “We have stories of people from all walks of life who are coming and seeing their lives changed,” said the Rev. Austin Walker, campus pastor at Embrace St. Croix. Weber added, “This is not the story of Embrace. It’s the story of a church body setting aside what they prefer for the sake of the kingdom, for the sake of seeing people come to Christ. That’s the story of Embrace St. Croix.” Polly House is a freelance writer and editor living in Nashville, Tennessee. Information in this article was based on reporting from the Louisiana, Pacific Northwest and Minnesota annual conferences.


FIVE CLUES

Today we’re amazed at how far we have come, but we can’t take the credit. We know it had to be God who did this.”

KEEP AN EYE ON THE VISION.

Before the Rev. Hazeline Jackson arrived at Ashford United Methodist Church in Houston as the new pastor, she spent five days alone fasting and praying, seeking God’s will for the church and for her pastorate. “By the time I got to Ashford,” she said, “God had already laid out a vision for the church. I walked in already believing in these people even when they didn’t believe in themselves. The first thing I did was to get an active prayer ministry going, because nothing happens without prayer.” Jackson’s former career in sales taught her the importance of having and holding a vision. “The church was in a slump, and some were resistant to change. But when we prayed together and began to share a vision of what this church could become, it all turned around.” Members also shared their concerns with Jackson in a series of home meetings. “That’s when I realized so many of them didn’t know their gifts,” she said. “My job was to help point out those gifts, and so we began with what we had and moved forward from there.” Before long, congregants were investing both time and dollars. They started to live by faith with a vision of possibilities. With a new vision clearly in their sights, members began door-to-door canvass-

FOR

SUCCESSFULLY CHANGING WHILE GROWING BY VINCE ISNER

It is true in life and it is true for churches. Every church needs to ask two questions: Why do some churches thrive in times of growth and change while others struggle just to survive? Why do some congregations resist change at all costs while others seek it out? Successfully changing churches leave clues as to what they are doing right. We found at least five.

EMBRACE CHANGE AS A GOD THING.

“Lots of people in the church wish for peace and calm all the time,” said the Rev. Jacqui King, director of leadership for congregational vitality at Discipleship Ministries in Nashville, Tennessee. “They don’t want the experience that Jesus and the disciples had on the water. But just as the disciples discovered, there they were in the boat with Jesus, and there’s a storm. Jesus had to show them it’s all part of the journey.”

Providence United Methodist Church in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, has seen nothing but change. Its eight years of astounding growth – a six-fold increase to a weekly average today of 1,400 – was not due to some fortunate location (the cement of its first building is barely dry.) Rather, Providence is an expert at embracing change – adapting to the needs of the community and focusing on connecting with disaffected and hurting seekers who are hungry for change. Dan Lins, Providence’s director of operations, spoke proudly of the church’s commitment to a welcoming spirit. “Jesus was always surrounding himself with the disconnected folks like the woman at the well and Zacchaeus. Our goal is to be like Jesus and welcome people Jesus would want to be with. “For the first seven and a half years we had a transient existence, meeting in schools, hotels and a movie theater. We worked hard to be a welcoming church.

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

COURTESY ASHFORD UMC

“Change is the only constant in life.” — Heraclitus, an ancient Greek philosopher

Volunteers from Ashford United Methodist Church take a quick break from their service at nearby Ray K. Daily School.

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COURTESY PHOTO

Watch and learn more about the steel pan drum ministry at Westchester United Methodist Church.

COURTESY PROVIDENCE UMC

congregation to gospel hymns converted to reggae and calypso beats. Giving has increased, attendance has tripled and next year God is “doing a new thing” at Westchester – building a new sanctuary. “Next year we will demolish Westchester’s old building and begin our new building plan,” Edwards said. “Two years from now Adding steel pan drums to the accompaniment was the first this church will look very, step in diversifying the music and parts of the worship service at very different.” Westchester United Methodist Church. It isn’t about being different just to be different. Rather, it is about listening to the needs ing of the neighborhood, listening and of both members and the community and learning about the needs of the communicreating a space for each person to share ty. Soon their program was vibrating with their unique gifts, trusting God to shape energy – new expanded worship services, and enrich the church’s ministry. a bi-annual supply drive for schoolteachers, a child enrichment center and a new Ashford welcome center. SEEK SERVICE, NOT SECURITY Every year the members of Providence Church hold a Sunday service called VALUE SPIRITUAL GIFTS; “Worship without Walls.” They gather PUT THEM TO USE. For several years, Westchester United Methodist Church in the Bronx borough of New York was winding down. Its predominantly white congregation was slowly dying out while the neighborhood demographics were shifting to a predominantly African-American population. It was time for the church either to evolve or grow silent. As everyone in the neighborhood now knows – the church did not choose silence. The Rev. Gordon A.R. Edwards, pastor of Westchester, recognized the membership included several young people of Caribbean descent. They had a passion for the steel drum music popular in the Caribbean culture. What Edwards encouraged as an occasional steel drum performance in worship grew into a regular rhythmfilled, spirit-led music ministry. Over time, the music has redefined the entire culture of the church. Today two steel drum groups draw in neighborhood young people and their families. WorshipProjects to be done in the church building and in pers now sing “The Lord’s Prayer” to steel the community were all part of Providence United drums. A new minister of music, steeped Methodist Church’s “Worship without Walls” day in the gospel tradition, is introducing the of service.

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United Methodist Interpreter

only long enough to pray, pack their tools, and head out into the community where they worship by serving in 80 community service ministries – from installing handicap access ramps to caring for animals at a local shelter. “We take Romans 12:1 seriously,” said Lins. “We ‘offer ourselves as a living sacrifice,’ and it reminds us to keep the main thing the main thing.”

KNOW IT’S ALL ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS

Relationships forged face-to-face (not just friended on Facebook) matter most to successfully changing churches. Ashford and Providence both emphasize home-based small groups to help forge loving, supportive, abiding relationships. At Providence, more than 50 groups of 12-20 meet weekly in the spirit of Acts 2 – breaking bread, praying and studying together. “That’s where community happens,” said Lins, “You walk through life together and get to know each other as families. At every gathering we read our vision aloud to remind ourselves of why we’re here.” King agrees that a church knowing why it exists is key. “One of the first things I learned at seminary was from our dean who told our class, ‘As you begin your ministry, you are entering a moving stream. You didn’t create the stream. You didn’t make the stream. The stream was already flowing. So now, you have a couple of decisions even before you take your first step. You have to figure out which way the stream is going. Then ask yourself if God is asking you to go with the stream or against the stream?’ “Sometimes we need to be in the flow, and sometimes we need to swim against it,” she continued. “But the stream is flowing and it’s constantly changing. And, yes, we are called to be part of it.” Successfully changing churches know that change, like a stream – or a storm at sea – is not an interruption of God’s plan; it’s part of God’s plan. Vince Isner is a writer, media producer and founder of PowerTools for Fathers, who lives in Franklin, Tennessee.


BY CINDY SOLOMON

DISCIPLESHIP MINISTRIES

THINKING ABOUT ADDING OR CHANGING A WORSHIP SERVICE? READ THIS!

Rev. Taylor Burton-Edwards

Before swatting at the potential hornet’s nest of tweaking or adding a worship service, consider the issues involved in making the change and learn from the experiences of

those who have been there, done that. It may take the sting out of doing something new or different. The pastor and church leaders are in the best position to change or add a service when the church has the capacity and opportunity to do so, explained the Rev. Taylor Burton-Edwards, director of worship resources with Discipleship Ministries. “Capacity,” Burton-Edwards said, “includes physical space, social space, requisite number of people on board for launch and time, tech and financial resources. Opportunity consists of the availability of a new time or place, ability to reach new worshippers and a service design aligned with the purpose of the service you are creating — whether 33

Provocatively Wesleyan

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COURTESY PHOTO

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT

UMNS/MIKE DUBOSE

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6. Signal before changing lanes. Don’t make noticeable changes without letting folks know you are doing it. Give enough lead time for the coming change to sink in. 7. Develop and share plans with key leaders for addressing structural and systemic changes. Changing worship – especially when it draws new people – may mean changes in other parts of a congregation’s life. 8. Communicate and implement with everyone as needed. Have your leadership on board before you take things public.

for discipling, evangelism or a principal public service.” Burton-Edwards highlighted the following changes or reactions — some subtle and some obvious — to consider and navigate once a church makes the decision to change or add a service: 1. Changing a service, rather than adding one, takes away a service from people who are accustomed to it. Expect grief reactions — including sadness, depression, anger, threats to leave and some ultimately leaving the church. 2. Some of the grief responses to adding a service, rather than changing one, are less likely to happen if the congregation is larger than 350. These churches have higher vitality with multiple kinds of services. 3. Expect more work — a lot more work. Whether you are adding a service or changing an existing service, you are substantially adding to the overall workload of those responsible for planning, leading and supporting the worship services. 4. Be aware of the need for more sophisticated and careful organization and administration, particularly if you are adding a new service. Six months to a year is the recommended time frame for doing the groundwork to launch a new service or change an existing one. 5. Change with confidence. A can-do attitude is essential for leaders. Being tentative increases the level of anxiety and critique.

The Rev. Debra Tyree (left) and Sylvie Ndjungu help lead morning worship at the 2016 United Methodist General Conference.

With three services already in place (two on Sunday morning and mid-week evening prayer), Franconia United Methodist Church in Alexandria, Virginia, added a new contemporary service in May 2015. The Rev. Catharine Guest says the catalyst for the service was a nine-month re-visioning process discerning how to best reach out to their community – a young community with young children. Preparation for the new service included researching what type of screen to install, defining the order of worship and involving the children’s ministry team leader so that Sunday school offered during the new service was up-to-date and relevant. Its worship leader was introduced prior to the first contemporary service. In addition, the church actively publicized the service for several weeks before via an electric outdoor sign, community publications, Facebook and the church’s website and bulletin. Guest’s words of wisdom to other church leaders include: » Keep the congregation informed throughout the process. » Constantly work to refine the service. Flexibility, information sharing and collaboration are critical. » Practice, practice, practice because there are so many moving parts – instruments, singers and technology. Grace United Methodist Church in Greer, South Carolina, went from a being part of a multi-church charge to a station

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

Rev. Robert Cox

church in early 2016. During the transition, the Rev. Robert Cox, pastor, church council members and leaders discussed the need for a second worship service. “With our worship attendance doubling from 45 to 90 over the last few years and my being available all Sunday morning, we decided the time was right to add another service,” Cox said. Conversations about the change began several years ago. “The first step was to talk about it in the church,” Cox said. “We gave time and space for informal conversation in order to allow anxiety and suspicion to lessen before we began any formal discussion in committees. Then for two years, we looked at our community and researched what style of worship would reach more unchurched people.” For Grace Church, the answer was a contemporary service. “In the worship team,” Cox said, “we talked about how best to create such a worship service. We determined that we did not have the musical skills in-house to do this so we ran articles in the local paper and on the church’s Facebook page and website (www.gracegreer.org). The responses we got helped us to form a band with a jazz guitarist to lead it. The leader had experience creating contemporary services and did an excellent job of recruiting volunteer musicians, creating a band and planning music.” “The biggest piece of advice that I can give is to plan years out,” Cox said. “This is not something that can be rushed in a couple of months; it must be done well from the very first Sunday.” Cindy Solomon is a marketing consultant, freelance writer and recent empty nester living in Franklin, Tennessee. See a longer version of this story at Interpreter OnLine, www.interpretermagazine.org.


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United Methodist Communications staffers Joe Iovino and Kathleen Barry joined 35 other clergy and laity from Liberia, Nigeria and across the United States on a July 1121 Wesley Pilgrimage in England. This is the first of a series of articles based on their experiences. See the full series, additional reports and photographs at UMC.org.

UMCOM/KATHLEEN BARRY

WESLEY PILGRIMAGE inspires TODAY’S LEADERS Pilgrims visit The New Room in Bristol, England, and listen to a lecture during the 2016 Wesley Pilgrimage.

BY JOE IOVINO AT FIRST GLANCE, THE WESLEY PILGRIMAGE TO ENGLAND looks to be

an exciting way to learn the history of The United Methodist Church. Pilgrims visit the childhood homes of John and Charles Wesley and Francis Asbury, Christ Church in Oxford where a group of students gathered and earned the name Methodist, and the New Room where the Methodist movement began to take hold. Ultimately, however, the pilgrimage is not about the Wesleys, but the work of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit of God that empowered the early Methodists calls us to follow where Jesus leads still today. From a small group of students in Oxford who encouraged one another to live out their Christian faith every day to the current mission statement of The United Methodist Church, “to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of

the world,” the Methodist movement has always been about making and shaping disciples of Jesus Christ. FAMILIES OF METHODISM

While more than 250 years and thousands of miles separate us from the early Methodists, they really were not very different from us. Like many of us, John and Charles Wesley were raised in the church. When pilgrims visit Epworth, they enter the home where Samuel and Susanna raised John, Charles and their brothers and sisters. They stand in the kitchen where young John and Charles saw their mother lead small groups. They go inside St. Andrew’s Church where Samuel served as rector (lead pastor). They see the font he used to baptize his children and the chalice from which they would have received communion for the first time.

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

Pilgrims also visit the childhood home of Francis Asbury, leader of the Methodist movement in America. Asbury grew up in a working class town and apprenticed as a metalworker before becoming a local preacher. Standing in the room where Asbury told his parents he was called to go to America, pilgrims imagine the emotions the family experienced. “Though it was grievous to flesh and blood,” he would write in his journal, “they consented to let me go.” Visiting the homes of these families makes pilgrims feel so close. The joys and struggles of raising our children to know Jesus and to let them go to serve him are not so different today. THE METHODIST MOVEMENT

When the time came, John and Charles Wesley each attended university


in Oxford. As a student at Christ Church, Charles brought together a group of students to support one another in their spiritual journeys. He enlisted the help of his brother John, a recent alumnus of Christ Church who was working as a fellow at nearby Lincoln College. They prayed, worshipped and served together earning the name Holy Club and later Methodists. When pilgrims visit Oxford, their bus drops them off near Oxford Castle, the prison where Holy Club members visited inmates regularly. While serving at Lincoln College, John Wesley struggled with a call to travel to Georgia as a missionary. Pilgrims visit the chapel at Lincoln College and see a stained glass window depicting the Jonah story. There Wesley wrestled with this decision to travel across the sea. Leaders in the faith are often characterized as making decisions that change the world. In Oxford, pilgrims remember that these journeys started from humble beginnings: a group of students seeking to

grow in their faith and struggling to understand God’s call. Soon after Wesley’s return from Georgia, a Methodist preacher invited him to continue his ministry of open air preaching in Bristol. Wesley’s preaching and organizational skills were so effective that within months of arriving, the Methodist societies began building a meetinghouse called the New Room. Pilgrims visit the New Room and stand in the pulpit where John Wesley and other early Methodist preachers boldly called people to follow Jesus in every part of their lives. They notice the New Room has no first floor windows to protect those who attended the meetings there. They learn that the pews in the building today were not part of the original plan, because the chapel was also used as a schoolhouse for poor children and a mission station

to serve the people of Bristol. Above the chapel are rooms where Wesley and early Methodist preachers gathered for renewal, study and rest. This is holy ground. Sitting in the New Room in Bristol or St. Mary’s Church in Oxford where Wesley also preached, pilgrims sense what it must have been like to be part of this new movement of the Holy Spirit, and how they might continue that ministry today. This is the real power of the Wesley Pilgrimage to England. Pilgrims touch the past to continue the ministry of being disciples of Jesus Christ who make more disciples for the transformation of the world. The Rev. Joe Iovino is a content writer for UMC.org and Kathleen Barry is manager of digital assets at United Methodist Communications in Nashville, Tennessee.

THE WESLEY PILGRIMAGE is sponsored annually by Discipleship Ministries, the General Commission on Archives and History and the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry. Leading it are the Rev. Steve Manskar, director of Wesleyan Studies for Discipleship Ministries, and the Rev. Paul Chilcote, professor of historical theology and Wesleyan studies at Ashland Theological Seminary. 37

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016


South Central: Bishop Ruben Saenz Jr., 3rd ballot, leader of the connectional ministries and missions vitality center, Rio Texas; Bishop Jimmy Nunn, 21st ballot, director of mission and administration, Northwest Texas; Bishop Robert “Bob” Farr, 35th ballot, director of congregational development, Missouri. Southeastern: Bishop Sharma Lewis, 1st ballot, Atlanta-Decatur-Oxford District superintendent, North Georgia; Bishop David Graves, 4th ballot, Church Street UMC, Knoxville, Tennessee, Holston; Bishop Leonard Fairley, 7th ballot, Capital District superintendent, North Carolina; Bishop Sue HaupertJohnson, 10th ballot, Gulf Central District, Florida; Bishop Robert Lawson Bryan, 10th ballot, senior pastor, First

U.S. BISHOPS BEGIN new ASSIGNMENTS

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After the elections, the denomination’s five jurisdictional conferences announced assignments, effective Sept. 1, for 46 active bishops serving episcopal areas in the U.S. Twenty-two will continue in the areas they have served at least since September 2012. The 2016 episcopal elections in the U.S. sparked both interest and controversy. Western Jurisdiction delegates meeting in Scottsdale, Arizona, elected the denomination’s first openly gay bishop, Bishop Karen Oliveto, despite a prohibition against gay clergy in The Book of Discipline. Reaction to her election has ranged from jubilation to disappointment to concern over how to uphold the current church doctrine. Delegates to the South Central Jurisdictional Conference have asked the Judicial Council – the denomination’s supreme court – to rule on the validity of Oliveto’s election. The Judicial Council announced Aug. 22 that it will add the petition to its Spring 2017 docket. At Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, the Southeastern Jurisdiction elected its first African-American woman as bishop

by electing the Rev. Sharma Lewis on the first ballot. That vote helped propel The United Methodist Church into electing the most women in any new class of bishops in this denomination or its predecessor bodies. In total, jurisdictional delegates elected seven women, four of whom are African American. The new bishops, ballot on which they were elected, previous appointment and conference are listed by jurisdictions. North Central: Bishop Tracy Smith Malone, 6th ballot, Chicago Southern district superintendent, Northern Illinois; Bishop Frank Beard, 6th ballot, senior pastor, Castleton UMC, Indianapolis, Indiana; Bishop David Bard, 10th ballot, senior pastor, First UMC, Duluth, Minnesota; Bishop Laurie Haller, 13th ballot, senior pastor, First United Methodist Church, Birmingham, Michigan, Detroit. Northeastern: Bishop Cynthia Moore-Koikoi, 11th ballot, BaltimoreMetropolitan District superintendent, Baltimore-Washington; Bishop LaTrelle Miller Easterling, 17th ballot, superintendent, Metro Boston Hope District, New England.

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BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON/MELISSA LAUBER

MOST OF THE 15 UNITED METHODIST CLERGY ELECTED AS BISHOPS IN THE UNITED STATES IN MID-JULY ARE NOW SETTLING INTO NEW HOMES AND PREPARING FOR OFFICIAL WELCOMES AND INSTALLATIONS WITHIN THEIR EPISCOPAL AREAS.

United Methodist Interpreter

Bishops LaTrelle Miller Easterling (left) and Cynthia Moore-Koikoi catch their breath before the service in which they were consecrated. They are the new bishops in the Northeastern Jurisdiction.

UMC, Montgomery, Alabama, AlabamaWest Florida. Western: Bishop Karen Oliveto, 15th ballot, senior pastor, Glide Memorial UMC, San Francisco, California-Nevada. Linda Bloom is a United Methodist News Service multimedia reporter based in New York. Follow her at twitter.com/umcscribe.

COURTESY NORTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION

PACIFIC-NORTHWEST/PATRICK SCRIVEN

Bishop Karen Oliveto is consecrated affter being elected the only new bishop in the Western Jurisdiction.


Bishop Ruben Saenz Jr. and his wife, Maria, are introduced as the new episcopal family for the Great Plains Conference. Saenz was the first of three bishops elected in the South Central Jurisdiction.

Bishop Sharma Lewis is consecrated in a service at Lake Junaluska, N.C., on July 16. She was the first bishop elected in 2016 and the first African-American woman to be elected in the Southeastern Jurisdiction.

BURT WILLIAMS

GREAT PLAINS CONFERENCE/EUGENIO HERNANDEZ

Now Bishop Tracy Smith Malone (left) is introduced to the North Central Jurisdictional Conference by Maggie Jackson, chair of the Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. Smith Malone was the first of four bishops elected in the jurisdiction.

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U.S. BISHOPS ASSIGNED

FORTY-SIX BISHOPS SERVING IN THE UNITED STATES ARE BEGINNING THEIR 2016-2020 ASSIGNMENTS. THE ASSIGNMENTS ARE LISTED BY ANNUAL CONFERENCES RATHER THAN EPISCOPAL AREAS. ITALICS INDICATE A NEW ASSIGNMENT FOR THAT BISHOP. NORTH CENTRAL Dakotas/Minnesota: Bishop Bruce Ough Detroit/West Michigan: Bishop David Bard East Ohio: Bishop Tracy S. Malone Illinois Great Rivers: Bishop Frank Beard Indiana: Bishop Julius Trimble Iowa: Bishop Laurie Haller Northern Illinois: Bishop Sally Dyck West Ohio: Bishop Gregory V. Palmer Wisconsin: Bishop HeeSoo Jung

NORTHEASTERN Baltimore-Washington: Bishop LaTrelle Easterling Eastern Pennsylvania/ Peninsula-Delaware: Bishop Peggy A. Johnson Greater New Jersey: Bishop John R. Schol New England: Bishop Sudarshana Devadhar New York: Bishop Thomas J. Bickerton Susquehanna: Bishop Jeremiah J. Park Upper New York: Bishop Mark J. Webb West Virginia: Bishop Sandra L. Steiner Ball Western Pennsylvania: Bishop Cynthia MooreKoikoi

SOUTH CENTRAL Arkansas: Bishop Gary E. Mueller Central Texas: Bishop J. Michael Lowry Great Plains: Bishop Ruben Saenz Jr. Louisiana: Bishop Cynthia Fierro Harvey Missouri: Bishop Robert “Bob” Farr North Texas: Bishop Michael McKee Northwest Texas/ New Mexico: Bishop Earl Bledsoe Oklahoma/Oklahoma Indian Missionary: Bishop James G. “Jimmy” Nunn Rio Texas: Bishop Robert C. Schnase Texas: Bishop Scott J. Jones

SOUTHEASTERN Alabama-West Florida: Bishop David Graves Florida: Bishop Ken Carter Holston: Bishop Mary Virginia Taylor Kentucky/ Red Bird Missionary: Bishop Leonard Fairley Mississippi: Bishop James Swanson Tennessee/Memphis: Bishop Bill McAlilly North Alabama: Bishop Debra Wallace-Padgett North Carolina: Bishop Hope Morgan Ward North Georgia: Bishop Sue Haupert-Johnson South Carolina: Bishop Jonathan Holston South Georgia: Bishop Lawson Bryan Western North Carolina: Bishop Paul Leeland Virginia: Bishop Sharma Lewis

WESTERN Alaska Missionary/Pacific Northwest/OregonIdaho: Bishop Elaine Stanovsky California-Nevada: Bishop Minerva Carcaño California-Pacific: Bishop Grant Hagiya Desert Southwest: Bishop Robert Hoshibata Rocky Mountain/ Yellowstone: Bishop Karen Oliveto


BISHOPS’ EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AFFIRMS UNITY, MOVES FORWARD MEETING IN CHICAGO JULY 19-20, THE UNITED METHODIST COUNCIL OF BISHOPS’ EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE APPROVED A FRAMEWORK FOR IMPLEMENTING THE COMMISSION ON A WAY FORWARD AND TOOK A STEP TOWARD A CALLED SESSION OF THE GENERAL CONFERENCE IN 2018.

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The bishops acknowledged that the landscape of the church has changed dramatically since the General Conference approved the Council’s proposal for the commission in May, but re-affirmed their commitment to lead the church forward. “The reported declarations of non-compliance from several annual conferences, the intention to convene a Wesleyan Covenant Association and the election of the Rev. Karen Oliveto as a bishop of the church have opened deep wounds and fissures within The United Methodist Church and fanned fears of schism,” said Bishop Bruce R. Ough, Council president, in a detailed statement (bit. ly/commissiononawayforward) outlining the actions taken. “The church finds itself in an extremely fragile, highly contested season.” The statement further reads, “We affirm that, as disciples of Jesus, we are all called to maintain unity in the bond of peace. As a Council, we re-affirm our commitment to lead the church in discerning and charting a way forward. We intend to do so with prayerful attention to both urgency and thoughtful preparation.” The Council adopted a purpose statement for the Commission, including its mission, vision and scope. It will be composed of 20-25 members to be identified by Aug. 31 with a target of October for an initial meeting. Each bishop will nominate up to five people to serve on it. Names of potential members that have previously been submitted to either the president or executive secretary of the Council will be considered as well. A search is underway for a professional facilitator to design and guide the Commission’s discernment process. Bishop Ken Carter of Florida, Bishop Sandra Steiner Ball of West Virginia and Central Congo Bishop David Yemba will serve as

a team of moderators to preside, provide spiritual guidance and pastoral care. Updates on the Commission’s actions will be provided through regular press releases every 4-6 weeks. An invitation to prayer for the Commission involving the entire church, called “Praying Our Way Forward,” will be

launched in October. More details regarding that initiative will be forthcoming. The executive committee will bring the matter of a called special session to the full Council for consideration in November. Only the full Council of Bishops can authorize such a session. In a related action, the executive committee voted to urge the Judicial Council to include the South Central Jurisdictional Conference’s request for a ruling on the validity of the election of Bishop Karen Oliveto on the docket for its Oct. 25-28 meeting. Council of Bishops, The United Methodist Church

THE COMMISSION ON A WAY FORWARD Mission

Vision

The Commission will bring together persons deeply committed to the future(s) of The United Methodist Church, with an openness to developing new relationships with each other and exploring the potential future(s) of our denomination in light of General Conference and subsequent annual, jurisdictional and central conference actions. We have a profound hope and confidence in the Triune God, and yet we acknowledge that we do this work in a climate of skepticism and distrust, from a human point of view.

The Commission will design a way for being church that maximizes the presence of a United Methodist witness in as many places in the world as possible, that allows for as much contextual differentiation as possible, and that balances an approach to different theological understandings of human sexuality with a desire for as much unity as possible.

We are a connection, and we admit that our communion is strained; yet much transformative mission across our world is the fruit of our collaboration. The matters of human sexuality and unity are the presenting issues for a deeper conversation that surfaces different ways of interpreting Scripture and theological tradition. The work is meant to inform deliberation across the whole church and to help the Council of Bishops in their service to the next General Conference in finding a way forward.

This unity will not be grounded in our conceptions of human sexuality, but in our affirmation of the Triune God who calls us to be a grace-filled and holy people in the Wesleyan tradition.

Scope We should be open to new ways of embodying unity that move us beyond where we are in the present impasse and cycle of action and reaction around ministry and human sexuality. Therefore, we should consider new ways of being in relationship across cultures and jurisdictions, in understandings of episcopacy, in contextual definitions of autonomy for annual conferences, and in

the design and purpose of the apportionment. In reflection on the two matters of unity and human sexuality, we will fulfill our directive by considering “new forms and structures” of relationship and through the “complete examination and possible revision” of relevant paragraphs in The Book of Discipline. We will give consideration to greater freedom and flexibility to a future United Methodist Church that will redefine our present connectionality, which is showing signs of brokenness. If we ignore this work, fracturing will occur in more haphazard and even self-interested ways across the church. If we do this work only to address our preferences and self-interest, we will fail to place our complete trust in God’s steadfast love and faithfulness. If we do this work with complete surrender to God’s unlimited imagination and kingdom purposes, we will be blessed beyond our limited human imagination. God remains God; God is with us; God will never let us go. To God be the glory!

Excerpted from the Council of Bishops’ statement following the July 19-20 meeting of its executive committee. Read the full statement at bit.ly/commissiononawayforward.

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter


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College, College,University UniversityAND ANDSeminary SeminaryShowcase Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase CHRISTIAN CHRISTIAN CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGICAL CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY Founded by abolitionists in 1855, CTS Founded by abolitionists in 1855, CTS

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MCMURRY MCMURRY MCMURRY UNIVERSITY MCMURRY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Founded in 1923 as a United Methodist institution, McMurry University is a vibrant and comprehensive

Founded in 1923 as aasUnited Methodist institution, Founded in 1923 a education United Methodist institution, center of undergraduate with a national McMurry aisvibrant and comprehensive Founded inUniversity 1923 as a isUnited Methodist institution, McMurry University a vibrant and comprehensive reputation for excellence and value through the center of undergraduate education with a national McMurry University is a vibrant and comprehensive center of undergraduate educationand with a national achievements its faculty, students reputation for of excellence and value with through the center of undergraduate education agraduates. national reputation for excellence and value through the We offer students diverse academic curriculum achievements itsa faculty, students and graduates. reputation for of excellence and value through the achievements of its faculty, students and graduates. with majors inofthe business, education and the We offer students aarts, diverse academic curriculum achievements its faculty, students and graduates. Wemajors offer students diverse academic curriculum sciences. McMurry isaguided by our core values: with in theaarts, business, education and the We offermajors students diverse academic curriculum with in arts, business, and the Christian Faith as the the foundation of education life, sciences. McMurry is guided by our corePersonal values: with majors in the arts, business, education and the sciences. McMurry is guided by our core values: Relationships for as the ChristianMcMurry Faithasasthe the foundation of Learning life, sciences. iscatalyst guided by life, our corePersonal values: Christian Faith as the foundation of life, Personal journey ofFaith life,asExcellence as for thelife, goal of life, and Relationships as the Christian asthe thecatalyst foundation of Learning life, Personal Relationships as the of catalyst life,ofLearning as the Service as measure life. journey ofthe life,as Excellence as for thefor goal life, and Relationships the catalyst life, Learning as the journey of life, Excellence as the goal of life, Service as of life. journey ofthe life,measure Excellence as the goal of life, andand Service as the measure of life. Service as the measure of life.

ILIFF ILIFFSCHOOL SCHOOL ILIFF SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY OFTHEOLOGY THEOLOGY ILIFF SCHOOL OF OF THEOLOGY Through a wide range of courses, student-led groups, Through a wide range ofexperiences, courses, student-led groups, field education, immersion and rigorous

CENTENARY CENTENARY CENTENARY COLLEGE COLLEGEOF OF CENTENARY COLLEGE OF LOUISIANA LOUISIANA COLLEGE OF LOUISIANA LOUISIANA Founded in 1825, Centenary is a selective, residential, Founded in 1825, Centenary is a affiliated selective, with residential, national liberal arts college proudly the

ILIFF SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 2323 E. ILIFF AVE.THEOLOGY ILIFF SCHOOL ILIFF SCHOOL OF OF THEOLOGY DENVER, CO 80210 E. 23232323 E. ILIFF AVE.AVE. ILIFF SCHOOL OFILIFF THEOLOGY

CENTENARY COLLEGE OF LOUISIANA 2911 Centenary Boulevard CENTENARY COLLEGE LOUISIANA CENTENARY COLLEGE OF OF LOUISIANA SHREVEPORT, LA 71104 2911 Centenary Boulevard 2911 Centenary Boulevard CENTENARY COLLEGE OF LOUISIANA

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admission@centenary.edu SHREVEPORT, LA 71104 www.centenary.edu admission@centenary.edu admission@centenary.edu www.centenary.edu www.centenary.edu admission@centenary.edu

Through a wide range of courses, student-led groups, field education, immersion experiences, and rigorous curriculum, Iliffimmersion offers opportunities for and students to field education, experiences, rigorous Through a wide range of courses, student-led groups, curriculum, Iliff offers opportunities for students to be relevant to the 21st century church. Our commitcurriculum, Iliff offers opportunities for students to field education, immersion experiences, and rigorous be relevant to the 21st century church. Our commitment to analysis of social structures, ideologies, and be relevant to the 21st century church. Our commitcurriculum, Iliff offers opportunities forideologies, students toand ment topractices analysis of social structures, embodied educates students to think critiment to analysis social structures, ideologies, and be relevant to practices theof21st century church. Our commitembodied educates students toand think critically about their social locations, privilege, what embodied practices educates students to think critiment to analysis of social structures, ideologies, and cally about their locations, privilege, what effect these have on social professional and vocational concally about their social locations, privilege, andand what embodied practices educates students to think critieffect these have on professional and vocational contexts as ministers, religious and non-profit effect these have oneducators, professional and vocational concally about their social locations, privilege, and what texts ministers, as ministers, educators, religious non-profit community leaders. The Master of Divinity Journey texts religious andand non-profit effectas these have oneducators, professional and vocational concommunity leaders. Master of Divinity Journey program (a combination of online on-campus community leaders. TheThe Master of and Divinity Journey texts as ministers, educators, religious and non-profit program (a combination of online and learning) makes it possible students to on-campus remain program (a combination of for online on-campus community leaders. The Master of and Divinity Journey learning) makes it possible for students to remain rooted in(a their community. learning) makes it possible students to remain program combination of for online and on-campus rooted in their rooted in makes their community. learning) itcommunity. possible for students to remain rooted in their community.

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HUSTONHUSTONHUSTONTILLOTSON HUSTONTILLOTSON TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY As a historically black institution located in Austin, Texas, Huston-Tillotson University’s mission is to nurture a legacy

As aAs historically black institution located in Austin, Texas, a historically black institution located in Austin, Texas, of leadership andblack excellence in education, knowlHuston-Tillotson University’ s mission is to nurture a legacy As aHuston-Tillotson historically institution located inconnecting Austin, Texas, University’ s mission is to nurture a legacy edge, power, passion, and values. The University offers assoof leadership and excellence in education, connecting knowlHuston-Tillotson University’ s mission is to nurture a legacy ofand leadership excellence in education, connecting knowlciate master’ sand degrees in in addition Bachelor of Arts and edge, power, passion, and values. The to University offers assoof leadership and excellence education, connecting knowledge, power, passion, andinvalues. The University offers assoBachelor of Science degrees more than 19 areasoffers study. ciate and master’ s degrees in addition to Bachelor ofofArts and edge, power, passion, and values. The University associateoldest and master’ s degrees inmore addition to Bachelor of Arts and •Bachelor The institution of higher education inofof Austin, of Science degrees in than 19 areas study. ciate and master’ s degrees in addition to Bachelor Arts and Bachelor ofinstitution Science degrees inhome more than 19in areas of study. Texas—the state’ sdegrees capital and of19SXSW • The oldestScience of in higher education Austin, Bachelor than areas of • Theofoldest institution ofmore education instudy. Austin, Offering master’ s, capital bachelor’ shigher , and associate’ s degrees Texas—the state’ and home of SXSW •• The oldest institution of higher education in Austin, Texas—the state’ s capital home of SXSW • Texas—the 15:1 student/teacher ratio Offering master’ bachelor’ s,and and associate’ s degrees state’s, capital and home of SXSW • Offering master’ sand , bachelor’ s, and associate’s degrees Competitive men’s women’s intercollegiate 15:1 student/teacher ratio •• Offering master’ s, bachelor’ s, and associate’ s degrees • 15:1 student/teacher ratio intercollegiate athletic programs Competitive men’s and women’s • 15:1 student/teacher ratio • Competitive men’s and women’s intercollegiate Scholarships and other financial intercollegiate aid available for athletic programs •• Competitive men’s and women’s athletic programs eligible students • athletic Scholarships and other financial aid available for programs • Scholarships and other financial available Affiliated withand Theother United Methodist Church eligible students •• Scholarships financial aidaid available for for eligible students • eligible Charter member ofUnited the UNCF Affiliated with The Methodist Church students • Affiliated with The Methodist Church Charter member of theUnited UNCF • Affiliated with The United Methodist Church • Charter member of the UNCF • Charter member of the UNCF

Founded in liberal 1825, Centenary isproudly a selective, residential, national arts college affiliated with the United Methodist Church. recognize national liberal arts college Our proudly affiliated with the Founded inMethodist 1825, Centenary isOur astudents selective, residential, United Church. students recognize the world as rapidly changing and wholeheartedly United Methodist Church. Our students recognize national liberal college proudly with the the world as arts rapidly changing andaffiliated wholeheartedly embrace its cultures, beginning with the world asinterconnected rapidly changing and wholeheartedly United Methodist Church. Our students recognize embrace its in interconnected cultures, beginning with the Centenary Paris experience that sends all embrace its interconnected cultures, beginning with thethe world as rapidly changing and wholeheartedly Centenary in Paris experience that sends all first year students to France to kick off their college the Centenary in Paris experience that sends all embrace its interconnected cultures, beginning with first students togo France to kick off their college careers. Our graduates ontotokick study first yearyear students to France offmedicine their college thecareers. Centenary ingraduates Paris experience that sends all (we(we Our go on toacceptance study medicine have a 90 percent medical school rate careers. Our graduates go on to study medicine (we first year students to France to kick off their college have apast 90 percent medical school acceptance rate over the 5 years), law, business, and the arts and have a 90Our percent medical school acceptance rate(we careers. graduates go on to study medicine over the past 5 years), business, arts sciences, entering the workforce asacceptance culturally compeover 5 years), law,law, business, andand thethe arts andand have the a 90past percent medical school rate sciences, entering workforce as culturally competent creative thinkers. sciences, entering thethe workforce as culturally compeover and the past 5 years), law, business, and the arts and tent creative thinkers. tent andand creative thinkers. sciences, entering the workforce as culturally competent and creative thinkers.

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HAMLINE HAMLINE HAMLINE UNIVERSITY HAMLINE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY As Minnesota’s first university, and the only United

Methodist university in the state, Hamline boasts As As Minnesota’s firstfirst university, and thethe only United Minnesota’s university, and only United aMethodist history ofuniversity excellence education andonly fosters ininthe state, Hamline boasts As Minnesota’s first university, and the United Methodist university in the state, Hamline boasts an ethic ofofuniversity social justice and civic Hamline responsibility. a history excellence inthe education and fosters Methodist in state, boasts a history of excellence in education education since and fosters Trusted Providing quality 1854. ethic –ofof social justice civic responsibility. aan history excellence inand education and fosters an ethic of social justice and responsibility. Variety ––ofMore than 50 areas of civic study in business, Trusted Providing quality education since 1854. an ethic social justice and civic responsibility. Trusted – Providing quality education since 1854. law, education and arts. – business, Hamline Variety –– More thanliberal 50 areas ofQuality study in Trusted Providing quality education since 1854. Variety – More than 50 areas of study in business, ranks first in itsand class in areas Minnesota according to U.S. law, education liberal arts.ofQuality – business, Hamline Variety – More than 50 study in law,& education andin liberal arts. Quality – Hamline News World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. ranks first in itsand class Minnesota according to U.S. law, education liberal arts. Quality – Hamline ranks first–inStudent its class infaculty Minnesota according to U.S. Personalized ratio of 13:1.to Af-U.S. News & World Best Colleges. ranks first in itsReport’s class intoAmerica’s Minnesota according News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. fordable – More than 95% of students Personalized – Student toAmerica’s faculty ratio of 13:1.need AfNews & World Report’s Bestreceive Colleges. Personalized –than Student to ratio of 13:1. Afor merit-based gift aid. fordable – More 95% of faculty students Personalized – Student to faculty ratioreceive of 13:1.need Affordable – More than 95% of students receive need or merit-based gift aid. fordable – More than 95% of students receive need or merit-based or merit-based giftgift aid.aid.

McMURRY UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF ADMISSION 1 MCMURRY UNIVERSITY #278, ABILENE, TX 79697 McMURRY UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF ADMISSION 800-460-2392 McMURRY UNIVERSITY OFFICE 1 MCMURRY UNIVERSITY #278, ABILENE, TX ADMISSION 79697 McMURRY UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF OF ADMISSION

HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY 900 CHICON STREET HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY AUSTIN, TEXASSTREET 78702 HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY 900 CHICON HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY

HAMLINE UNIVERSITY 1536 HEWITT AVENUE HAMLINE UNIVERSITY SAINT PAUL, MN 55104 HAMLINE UNIVERSITY 1536 HEWITT AVENUE HAMLINE UNIVERSITY

McM.edu admissions@mcm.edu McM.edu admissions@mcm.edu admissions@mcm.edu

#geniusgeneration #IAmThePipeline #be_HT AUSTIN, TEXAS 78702 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78702 www.htu.edu #geniusgeneration #IAmThePipeline #be_HT www.htu.edu #geniusgeneration #IAmThePipeline #be_HT #geniusgeneration #IAmThePipeline #be_HT

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1 MCMURRY UNIVERSITY #278, ABILENE, TX 79697 800-460-2392 1 MCMURRY UNIVERSITY #278, ABILENE, TX 79697 admissions@mcm.edu 800-460-2392 800-460-2392

McM.edu McM.edu

CHICON STREET AUSTIN, TEXAS 78702 900900 CHICON STREET

www.htu.edu www.htu.edu

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

HEWITT AVENUE SAINT PAUL, MN 55104 15361536 HEWITT AVENUE

www.hamline.edu www.hamline.edu

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College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase DUKE DUKE DUKE DIVINITY DIVINITY DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL SCHOOL DIVINITY SCHOOL SCHOOL Duke Divinity School prepares graduates transforDuke Divinity School prepares graduates for for transformational leadership and service to God’s call through Duke Divinity School prepares transformational leadership and service to graduates God’s call for through one of our five masters, doctoral, and three dual mational leadership and service to and God’s call through Duke School prepares graduates for transforone of Divinity our five masters, twotwo doctoral, three dual degree programs. At Duke, you’ll become a one programs. of leadership our five At masters, two doctoral, and three mational and service to God’s call through degree Duke, you’ll become partpart of aofdual community in theological inquiry degree programs. Atengaged Duke, become part of a onevibrant of our five masters, two doctoral, and three dual vibrant community engaged inyou’ll theological inquiry with faculty who both world-class scholars vibrant community engaged in become theological degree programs. Atare Duke, you’ll partinquiry of and a with faculty who are both world-class scholars and committed towho the church. invite to join us with community faculty are both world-class vibrant engaged in theological inquiry committed to the church. WeWe invite youyou toscholars join us and and experience all that Duke University has to offer. committed to the church. We invite you to join withexperience faculty who world-class andus and allare thatboth Duke Universityscholars has to offer. Engage your heart and mind. Renew your spirit. and experience all Duke University has tousoffer. committed toheart the church. WeRenew invite you tospirit. join Engage your andthat mind. your your church and world. Engage your heart and mind. Renew your spirit. andTransform experience all that Duke University has to offer. Transform your church and world. Transform your and church andRenew world. your spirit. Engage your heart mind. Transform your church and world.

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OHIO OHIO OHIO NORTHERN OHIO NORTHERN NORTHERN UNIVERSITY NORTHERN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Ohio Northern University (ONU) has a 93 percent job Ohio Northern (ONU) has 93long-standing percent job and graduateUniversity school placement rate.aIts

Ohio Northern University (ONU) has a 93 percent job and graduate school placement rate.rate. Its long-standing success is partly because of excellent professors, partly and graduate school placement Its long-standing Ohio Northern University (ONU) has a 93 percent job success is partly because of excellent professors, partly because ambitious students, and partly because the success isofpartly because of excellent professors, partly and graduate school placement rate. Its long-standing because of ambitious students, and partly because the University alwaysstudents, been rooted the future. Atthe ONU, because of has ambitious andin partly because success is partly because of excellent professors, partly University always been in partly the future. At graduate ONU, students move toward a rooted career long they University has always been rooted inbefore the future. At because ofhas ambitious students, and because theONU, students move toward a career long before they graduate – and ONU’ alumni successes prove it.future. With top-ranked students move toward a career long before they graduate University hassalways been rooted in the At ONU, –students and ONU’ s and alumni successes it. With top-ranked programs opportunities outside the classroom, any – and ONU’ stoward alumni prove it. With top-ranked move asuccesses careerprove long before they graduate programs and opportunities outside the classroom, any path a student chooses at ONU will it. be grounded in any programs and opportunities outside the classroom, – and ONU’ s alumni successes prove With top-ranked path a student chooses at ONU will be grounded in concrete applications future. Established 1871 path a student choosesfor atthe ONU willthe be classroom, groundedininany programs and opportunities outside concrete applications for at the future. Established in 1871 and of five colleges (Arts &grounded Sciences, Business concrete applications for the future. in 1871 path acomprised student chooses ONU will beEstablished and comprised of five colleges (Arts &Established Sciences, Administration, Pharmacy, andBusiness Law), and comprised ofEngineering, five (Arts & Sciences, concrete applications forcolleges the future. inBusiness 1871 Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law), ONU’ s beautiful residential campus made up of more Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law), and comprised of five colleges (Arts &isSciences, Business ONU’ s beautiful residential campus is made up of than 60 modern residences and academic buildings and ONU’ s beautiful residential campus is made upmore of more Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law), than 60smodern residences and academic buildings provides a vibrant campus experience. than 60 modern residences and academic buildings and ONU’ beautiful residential campus is made up of and more provides vibrant campus experience. provides a vibrant campus experience. than 60 amodern residences and academic buildings and provides a vibrant campus experience.

CENTRAL CENTRAL CENTRAL METHODIST METHODIST CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY METHODIST UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Missouri’s only Methodist-affiliated univerMissouri’s only Methodist-affiliated univer-

Missouri’s only Methodist-affiliated univerbeen doing more students since sitysity hashas been doing more forfor students since Missouri’s only universityNestled has been more for students since 1854. Nestled inMethodist-affiliated the historic mid-Missouri 1854. indoing the historic mid-Missouri sity hasNestled been doing for students since 1854. in themore historic mid-Missouri community of Fayette, CMU enrolls about community of Fayette, CMU enrolls about 1854. themain historic mid-Missouri community ofinFayette, CMU enrolls about 1,100 on beautiful main campus 1,100 onNestled its its beautiful campus andand community CMU enrolls about 1,100 4,000+ on4,000+ itsof beautiful main campus and another in its online and off-campus another inFayette, its online and off-campus 1,100 on An itsAn beautiful main campus and another 4,000+ in itsnew online andMinistry off-campus programs. exciting new Music Ministry programs. exciting Music another 4,000+ in its online and off-campus programs. An exciting new Music Ministry major complements strong programs in health major complements strong programs in health programs. Anthe exciting new Music Ministry major complements strong programs in health professions, sciences, teacher education professions, the sciences, teacher education major complements strong programs in health professions, theCMU’s sciences, teacher education and much more. CMU’s new Center Faith and much more. new Center forfor Faith professions, teacher education muchismore. CMU’s new Center for Faith and Service ishub a sciences, hub of activity for students and Service athe of activity for students of of much more. CMU’s new Center for Faith and Service is a hub of activity for students of all denominations. alland denominations. and Service is a hub of activity for students of all denominations. all denominations.

CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY 411 CENTRAL METHODIST SQUARE CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY 411 CENTRAL METHODIST SQUARE FAYETTE, MISSOURI 65248 411 CENTRAL METHODIST SQUARE CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY FAYETTE, MISSOURI 65248 FAYETTE, METHODIST MISSOURI 65248 411 CENTRAL SQUARE

admissions@centralmethodist.edu FAYETTE, MISSOURI 65248 admissions@centralmethodist.edu www.centralmethodist.edu admissions@centralmethodist.edu www.centralmethodist.edu www.centralmethodist.edu admissions@centralmethodist.edu www.centralmethodist.edu

UNIVERSITYOF OF UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS The University of Indianapolis is a private compreThehensive University of Indianapolis a private compreinstitution of higheriseducation, affiliated with The University of Indianapolis is a private comprehensive institution higher education, affiliated with The United Methodist Church. just minutes hensive institution of higher education, affiliated with The University ofofIndianapolis isLocated a private compreThe United Methodist Located just minutes from downtown Indianapolis, UIndy is affiliated distinguished The United Methodist Church. Located just minutes hensive institution ofChurch. higher education, with from downtown Indianapolis, UIndy is distinguished by its smallMethodist class Indianapolis, sizes,Church. personalUIndy attention, opportunifrom downtown is just distinguished The United Located minutes byfrom its class sizes, personal attention, ties to learn through real-world experience and high by small its small class sizes, personal attention, opportunidowntown Indianapolis, UIndy is opportunidistinguished ties to learn through real-world experience and high touch career development and advising. Founded ties learnclass through experience and high by itstosmall sizes,real-world personal attention, opportunitouch career development andand Founded in 1902, the university has aadvising. home campus of 5,400 touch career development advising. Founded ties to learn through real-world experience and high intouch 1902, the university has a home campus of 5,400 students as well as two has partnership sites Founded in China. in 1902, the university a home campus of 5,400 career development and advising. students well astotwo partnership sites in China. make an exceptional private educastudents as university well as two partnership sites in of China. inUIndy 1902,asstrives the has a home campus 5,400 UIndy strives to make an exceptional private education affordable atwo wide of students through UIndy strives anvariety exceptional private educastudents as welltoto asmake partnership sites in China. tion affordable ato wide variety ofMethodist students through financial aid,toto including grants. tion affordable a wide variety of students through UIndy strives make anUnited exceptional private educafinancial aid,aid, including United Methodist grants. financial including United Methodist grants. tion affordable to a wide variety of students through financial aid, including United Methodist grants.

METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN OHIO 3081 COLUMBUS PIKE, DELAWARE, OH METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN43105 OHIO METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN OHIO 800-333-6876, 740-363-1146 30813081 COLUMBUS PIKE, DELAWARE, OH 43105 COLUMBUS PIKE, DELAWARE, OHIN 43105 METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL OHIO

OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY 525 S. MAIN STREET OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY 45810 S.ADA, MAIN STREET 525 S. OHIO MAIN STREET OHIO 525 NORTHERN UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS 1400OF E. HANNA AVENUE UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS, INAVENUE 46227 1400 E. HANNA AVENUE 1400 E. OF HANNA UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS

www.mtso.edu admissions@mtso.edu admissions@mtso.edu www.mtso.edu www.mtso.edu admissions@mtso.edu

admissions-ug@onu.edu ADA, OHIO 45810 onu.edu admissions-ug@onu.edu admissions-ug@onu.edu onu.edu onu.edu admissions-ug@onu.edu

uindy.edu/admissions INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 www. uindy.edu uindy.edu/admissions uindy.edu/admissions www. uindy.edu www. uindy.edu uindy.edu/admissions

800-333-6876, 800-333-6876, 740-363-1146 3081 COLUMBUS PIKE,740-363-1146 DELAWARE, OH 43105 admissions@mtso.edu 800-333-6876, 740-363-1146

www.mtso.edu

ADA, 45810 OHIO 45810 525ADA, S.OHIO MAIN STREET

onu.edu

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 1400 E. HANNA AVENUE

www. uindy.edu


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College, College,University UniversityAND ANDSeminary SeminaryShowcase Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase ASBURY ASBURY ASBURY THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGICAL ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY Asbury Seminary is aiscommunity called. WeWe areare an an Asbury Seminary a community called. evangelical, multi-denominational graduate school,

Asbury Seminary is a community called. We areschool, an evangelical, multi-denominational graduate steeped in the Wesleyan tradition. With approxievangelical, graduate school, Asbury Seminary is a community called. We are an steeped inmulti-denominational the Wesleyan tradition. With approximately 1600 students andtradition. more than 200200 faculty, your steeped in 1600 the Wesleyan With approxievangelical, multi-denominational graduate school, mately students and more than faculty, your experience isstudents grounded intradition. the Word of God, honed mately 1600 and more than 200 faculty, your steeped in the With experience isWesleyan grounded in the Word ofapproxiGod, honed with immense spiritual growth and sharpened by experience is grounded in the Word of God, honed mately students and more than faculty, your with1600 immense spiritual growth and200 sharpened by global engagement. WeWe offer a variety academic with immense spiritual growth and sharpened by experience is grounded in offer the Word ofofGod, honed global engagement. a variety of academic and professional degrees through our Kentucky and global engagement. We offer a variety of academic with immense spiritual growth and sharpened by and and professional degrees through our Kentucky Florida Dunnam campuses, online, and our Memphis and professional degrees through our Kentucky and global engagement. We offer a variety of academic Florida Dunnam campuses, online, and our Memphis Tennessee cohort. Florida Dunnam campuses, online, and our Memphis andTennessee professional degrees through our Kentucky and cohort. Tennessee cohort.campuses, online, and our Memphis Florida Dunnam Tennessee cohort.

ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY CAMPUS ASBURYKENTUCKY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY KENTUCKY CAMPUS 204ASBURY N. LEXINGTON AVENUE, WILMORE, KY 40390 KENTUCKY CAMPUS THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 204 N. LEXINGTON AVENUE, WILMORE, KY 40390 204 N. FLORIDA LEXINGTON AVENUE,CAMPUS WILMORE, KY 40390 KENTUCKY DUNNAM CAMPUS FLORIDA DUNNAM CAMPUS 204 VALENCIA N.FLORIDA LEXINGTON AVENUE, KY 40390 8401 COLLEGE LN., WILMORE, ORLANDO, FL 32825 DUNNAM CAMPUS 8401 VALENCIA COLLEGE LN., ORLANDO, FL 32825 8401 VALENCIA COLLEGE LN., ORLANDO, FL 32825 FLORIDA DUNNAM CAMPUS 1.844.GO.TO.ATS 1.844.GO.TO.ATS 8401 VALENCIA COLLEGE LN., ORLANDO, FL 32825 1.844.GO.TO.ATS

admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu 1.844.GO.TO.ATS admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu

BOSTON UNIVERSITY BOSTON UNIVERSITY BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY THEOLOGY THEOLOGY Boston University School of Theology was founded Boston“the University School of Theologyaswas founded to foster principles of Christianity, exhibited Boston University School of Theology was founded to foster principles of Theology Christianity, asfounded exhibited in Wesleyan Methodism.” known was as to foster “the“the principles of Long Christianity, as the exhibited Boston University School of in Wesleyan Methodism. ”School Long known asexhibited the School of“the theMethodism.” Prophets, the is deeply comin known asasthe to Wesleyan foster principles ofLong Christianity, School of the Prophets, the School iscultivating deeply committed to knowledge ofknown God, School of pursuing the Prophets, theLong School is deeply comin Wesleyan Methodism.” as the mitted to pursuing knowledge ofisGod, cultivating leaders for communities of faith, the mitted to knowledge of enriching God, cultivating School of pursuing the Prophets, the School deeply comleaders for communities of faith, enriching the academy, seeking peace with justice in athe diverse leaders forand communities of faith, mitted to pursuing knowledge ofenriching God, cultivating academy, and seeking peace with justice a diverse and interconnected world. School equips outacademy, seeking peace with justice in ain diverse leaders forand communities ofThe faith, enriching the and interconnected world. The School equips outstanding leaders for world. thepeace present and future church and interconnected The School equips outacademy, and seeking with justice in a diverse leaders for the present future church through excellent teaching, community life,church and standing leaders for the present andand future andstanding interconnected world. The School equips outthrough excellent teaching, community vocational mentoring. through excellent teaching, community life,life, andand standing leaders for the present and future church vocational mentoring. vocational mentoring. through excellent teaching, community life, and vocational mentoring.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 745 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA.THEOLOGY 02215 BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF OF THEOLOGY 617-353-3050 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA. 02215 745745 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, 02215 BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MA. THEOLOGY 617-353-3050 617-353-3050 745 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA. 02215 sthadmis@bu.edu 617-353-3050

www.bu.edu/sth sthadmis@bu.edu sthadmis@bu.edu www.bu.edu/sth www.bu.edu/sth sthadmis@bu.edu www.bu.edu/sth

YALE YALE YALE DIVINITY DIVINITY YALE DIVINITY DIVINITY Part of one of the world’s great universities, YaleYale Part of one of the world’s great universities, Divinity School prepares scholars, ministers, and

PartDivinity of one of the world’s great universities, Yale and School prepares scholars, ministers, leaders a time ofworld’s dramatic change in the global Divinity School prepares scholars, ministers, and Part offor one ofa the great universities, Yale leaders for time of dramatic change in the global theological Students from ainfull spectrum leaders forSchool alandscape. time of dramatic change the global Divinity prepares scholars, ministers, and theological landscape. Students from a full spectrum of Christian denominations and faiths, and from theological landscape. Students from a full spectrum leaders for a time of dramatic and change in the of Christian denominations faiths, andglobal from aoftheological wide range of cultural andand ethnic backgrounds, Christian denominations and faiths, landscape. Students from aand fullfrom spectrum a wide range of cultural ethnic backgrounds, gather at YDS to begin a lifetime of transformative aof wide range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds, Christian denominations and faiths, and from gather at YDS to begin a lifetime of transformative service church andand world. world-class faculty gather atto YDS to cultural begin a lifetime of transformative a wide range of andThe ethnic backgrounds, service to church world. The world-class faculty pursue their teaching and scholarship at the highest service to church and world. The world-class faculty gather at their YDS teaching to begin aand lifetime of transformative pursue scholarship at the highest levels, eager to accept the educational challenges of of pursue their teaching and scholarship at the highest service church and world. The world-class faculty levels,toeager to accept the educational challenges the new global century. levels, eager toteaching accept the educational challenges of pursue their and scholarship at the highest the new global century. the neweager globaltocentury. levels, accept the educational challenges of the new global century.

YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL

409 PROSPECT STREET, NEWSCHOOL HAVEN CT, 06511 YALE DIVINITY 409 PROSPECT STREET, NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 203-432-5360 409 PROSPECT NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 YALESTREET, DIVINITY SCHOOL 203-432-5360 409 PROSPECT203-432-5360 STREET, NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 herron.gaston@yale.edu 203-432-5360 herron.gaston@yale.edu

divinity.yale.edu herron.gaston@yale.edu divinity.yale.edu divinity.yale.edu herron.gaston@yale.edu divinity.yale.edu

ADRIAN ADRIAN ADRIAN COLLEGE ADRIAN COLLEGE COLLEGE COLLEGE At Adrian College we believe in the “intrinsic worth” At Adrian College we believe in the “intrinsic worth” of each and every person. Founded by abolitionists At Adrian College we believe in the “intrinsic worth” ofAdrian each and every person. Founded by abolitionists in 1859, today we arewe known forinour in theworth” ofAteach and every person. Founded bywork abolitionists College believe the “intrinsic in 1859, are known for in the fight against human trafficking. a inof1859, today we we are known forAdrian College is ourour work in the each andtoday every person. Founded by work abolitionists fight against human trafficking. Adrian College is four-year residential institution offering a focused fight against human trafficking. Adrian College is in 1859, today we are known for our work in thea a four-year residential institution offering a focused undergraduate education with an advanced 4+1 four-year residential institution offering a focused fight against human trafficking. Adrian College is a undergraduate education with an advanced Master’s program. Theinstitution College offers 40 majors and undergraduate education with an advanced 4+14+1 four-year residential offering a focused Master’s program. The College offers 40 majors and pre-professional programs, 32 athletic and Master’s program. The College offers 40teams majors and undergraduate education with an advanced 4+1 pre-professional programs, 32offers athletic eight institutes dedicated to32 a diverse and personalpre-professional programs, athletic teams andand Master’s program. The College 40 teams majors and eight institutes dedicated to a diverse and personalized approach education. eight institutesto dedicated to a32 diverse andteams personalpre-professional programs, athletic and ized approach to education. ized approach todedicated education. eight institutes to a diverse and personalized approach to education.

ADRIAN COLLEGE

110 SOUTH MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, MI 49221 ADRIAN COLLEGE ADRIAN COLLEGE SCHEDULE ASOUTH CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITHMIADMISSIONS MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, MI 49221 110110 SOUTH MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, 49221 ADRIAN COLLEGE SCHEDULE A CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITH SCHEDULE A CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITH ADMISSIONS 110 SOUTH MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, MI ADMISSIONS 49221 800-877-2246 SCHEDULE A CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITH ADMISSIONS

adrian.edu 800-877-2246 800-877-2246 adrian.edu adrian.edu 800-877-2246 adrian.edu

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

DILLARD DILLARD DILLARD UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY DILLARD UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Founded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal Founded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal arts education in a setting where each student

Founded in 1869, in Dillard University offersstudent a liberal arts education a setting where each receives thethe personal attention needed to promote arts education in a setting where each student Founded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal receives personal attention needed to promote their growth academically and as global receives the personal attention needed tocitizens. promote arts education in a setting where student their growth academically and aseach global citizens. Located in one of America’s most vibrant cities, New their growth academically and as global citizens. receives personal attention needed to promote Locatedthe in one of America’s most vibrant cities, New Orleans, La., Dillard hashas consistently been ranked Located in one ofDillard America’s most vibrant cities, New their growth academically and as global citizens. Orleans, La., consistently been ranked among the very best Historically Black Colleges and Orleans, La., Dillard has consistently been ranked Located in one America’s most Black vibrant cities, New among the veryofbest Historically Colleges and Universities in the country. among the La., very best Historically Black Colleges and Orleans, Dillard has consistently been ranked Universities in the country. With 147 years of academic excellence to its name, Universities in the country. among the years very best Historically Black Colleges and With 147 of academic excellence to its name, Dillard continues its historical commitment to to With 147 years academic excellence to its name, Universities inofthe country. Dillard continues its historical commitment excellence in education and strives to position Dillard continues its historical commitment to With 147 of academic to its name, excellenceyears in education andexcellence strives to position itself as one ofeducation the nation’s centers for for  excellence in andpremier strives to position Dillard itsnation’s historical commitment to itself ascontinues one of the premier centers undergraduate research. itself as one of the nation’s premier centers for  excellence in education undergraduate research.and strives to position undergraduate research. itself as one of the nation’s premier centers for  undergraduate research.

DILLARD UNIVERSITY DILLARD UNIVERSITY

2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD DILLARD UNIVERSITY 2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD DILLARD UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 NEW 70112 2601ORLEANS, GENTILLYLABOULEVARD 504-283-8822 NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 504-283-8822

www.dillard.edu 504-283-8822 www.dillard.edu www.dillard.edu 504-283-8822 www.dillard.edu

CANDLER CANDLER CANDLER SCHOOL CANDLER SCHOOLOF OF SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY THEOLOGY THEOLOGY Candler School of Theology is grounded in the Candlerfaith School Theology is grounded in the Christian and of shaped by the Wesleyan tradition

Candler School of Theology is grounded in the Christian faith shaped by the Wesleyan tradition of evangelical piety, ecumenical and Christian faith andand by the Wesleyan tradition Candler School ofshaped Theology isopenness, grounded in the of evangelical piety, ecumenical and social concern. For more thanby a openness, century, weand have ofChristian evangelical piety, ecumenical faith and shaped theopenness, Wesleyan tradition concern. For more than aopenness, century, have educated faithful and creative leaders for we thewe church’s social concern. For more than a century, have ofsocial evangelical piety, ecumenical and educated faithful for the church’s ministries throughout thecreative world. Part of top-ranked educated faithful and creative leaders for thewe church’s social concern. Forand more than aleaders century, have ministries throughout the world. ofesteemed top-ranked Emory University, Candler has a leaders faculty of ministries throughout world. PartPart of for top-ranked educated faithful andthe creative the church’s Emory University, Candler has a Part faculty of esteemed scholar-teachers and the lowest ratio Emory University, Candler has astudent/faculty faculty of ministries throughout the world. of esteemed top-ranked scholar-teachers and the lowest ratio among our peer schools. Explore our 17 degrees, scholar-teachers and the lowest student/faculty ratio Emory University, Candler has astudent/faculty faculty of esteemed among our peer schools. Explore our 17 degrees, including new online Doctor of our Ministry and a ratio among oura peer schools. Explore 17 degrees, scholar-teachers and the lowest student/faculty including apeer new online Doctor ofour Ministry and two-year Master ofschools. Religious Leadership. including a new online Doctor of Ministry a a among our Explore 17 and degrees, two-year of Religious Leadership. two-year Master ofonline Religious Leadership. including aMaster new Doctor of Ministry and a two-year Master of Religious Leadership.

CANDLER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

RITA CANDLER ANNE ROLLINS BUILDING, DICKEY DRIVE CANDLER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SCHOOL OF1531 THEOLOGY ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30322 ANNE ROLLINS BUILDING, 1531 DICKEY DRIVE RITARITA ANNE ROLLINS BUILDING, 1531 DICKEY DRIVE CANDLER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30322 GEORGIA 30322 RITA ANNEATLANTA, ROLLINS BUILDING, 1531 DICKEY DRIVE candleradmissions@emory.edu ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30322

candler.emory.edu candleradmissions@emory.edu candleradmissions@emory.edu candler.emory.edu candler.emory.edu candleradmissions@emory.edu candler.emory.edu

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College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase DUKE DUKE UNITED DIVINITY DIVINITY DUKE THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL SCHOOL DIVINITY SEMINARY SCHOOL Duke Divinity School prepares graduates transforDuke Divinity School prepares graduates for for transformational leadership and service to God’s call through At United, we welcome a theologically andthrough culturally mational leadership and service to God’s call one of our masters, doctoral, and dual diverse community representing 39and denominations Duke School prepares graduates forthree transforone of Divinity our fivefive masters, twotwo doctoral, three dual degree programs. At Duke, you’ll become part and programs. 15leadership differentAtcountries. Of our morecall than mational and service to God’s through degree Duke, you’ll become part of440 aof a community engaged in theological inquiry students, 40% areengaged African American. onevibrant of our five masters, two doctoral, and three dual vibrant community in theological inquiry with faculty who both world-class scholars degree programs. Atare Duke, you’ll become partand of and a with faculty who are both world-class scholars committed to the church. We invite you to join With the ability to mix and match online, on-campus vibrant community engaged theological inquiry committed to the church. We in invite you to join us us and experience all that Duke University has to offer. intensive courses, United students can follow withexperience faculty who world-class and and allare thatboth Duke Universityscholars has to offer. Engage heart mind. Renew spirit. theiryour callyour with degree plans tailored toyour the needs committed to the church. WeRenew invite you to join us of Engage heart andand mind. your spirit. Transform your church and world. their careers, families and resources. and experience that Duke University has to offer. Transform your all church and world. Engage yourthe heart and mind. Renew your spirit. We offer following degree programs: Transform your church and world. Doctor of Ministry; Master of Divinity; Master of Theological Studies; Master of Arts in Christian Ministries; Master of Pastoral Theology.

DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL BOX 90965 SEMINARY UNITED THEOLOGICAL BOX 90965 DURHAM, NC 27708-0965 4501 DENLINGER ROAD DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL DURHAM, NC 27708-0965 DAYTON, OH 45426 BOX 90965 919-660-3436 DURHAM, NC 27708-0965 919-660-3436

44

KANSAS KANSAS PRINCETON WESLEYAN WESLEYAN KANSAS THEOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY WESLEYAN SEMINARY UNIVERSITY Discover Power of AND at Kansas Wesleyan Discover thethe Power of AND at Kansas Wesleyan University, where you can grow spiritually and

Educating Faithful Christian Leaders University, where you can grow spiritually and intellectually. Explore innovative majors such as Art Discover theExplore Power of AND at Kansas Wesleyan intellectually. innovative majors such as Art Therapy, Biomedical Chemistry, Emergency ManageAt Princeton Theological Seminary, classroom University, where you can growEmergency spiritually and Therapy, Biomedical Chemistry, Management, Forensic Computing and Christian Ministry. learning comes aliveinnovative in and practical and Ministry. engaging intellectually. Explore majors such as Art ment, Forensic Computing Christian With new Liberal Arts curriculum, you’ll become ways. Our faculty are world-renowned for their Therapy, Biomedical Chemistry, Emergency ManageWith ourour new Liberal Arts curriculum, you’ll become a strong communicator, a critical thinker, a global scholarship and service to the church, and share a Computing and Christian Ministry. ament, strongForensic communicator, a critical thinker, a global citizen anLiberal ethical professional. Campus Ministries commitment to educating the next generation of With our new Arts curriculum, you’ll become citizen andand an ethical professional. Campus Ministries at KWU isleaders. committed to awakening, equipping Christian strong a critical thinker, a global ata KWU iscommunicator, committed to awakening, equipping andand sending students Christ. Students enjoy weekly citizen and an ethical professional. Campus Ministries sending students for for Christ. Students enjoy weekly services, small Fellowship of Christian at chapel KWU is committed togroups, awakening, equipping and chapel services, small groups, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, service experiences, counseling, prayer sending students for Christ. counseling, Students enjoy weekly Athletes, service experiences, prayer support and many other opportunities for spiritual chapel services, Fellowship of Christian support and manysmall othergroups, opportunities for spiritual growth.service experiences, counseling, prayer Athletes, growth. support and many other opportunities for spiritual growth.

KANSAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY KANSAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 100 E. CLAFLIN AVE. 100 E. CLAFLIN AVE. SALINA, KS 67401-6196 EXPLORE THE FULLNESS OF GOD’S CALL KANSAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY SALINA, KS 67401-6196 100 E. CLAFLIN AVE. SALINA, KS 67401-6196 www.kwu.edu/admissions

admission@div.duke.edu 800-322-5817 admission@div.duke.edu www.united.edu 919-660-3436 admission@div.duke.edu

www.kwu.edu/admissions ptsem.edu/admissions www.kwu.edu/admissions

METHODIST METHODIST DREW THEOLOGICAL METHODIST THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLIN IN OHIO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL SCHOOL OHIO SCHOOL IN OHIO MTSO offers opportunities and resources unique in MTSO offerstheological opportunities and resources unique in graduate education.

OHIO OHIO OKLAHOMA NORTHERN OHIO NORTHERN CITY UNIVERSITY NORTHERN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Ohio Northern University (ONU) has a 93 percent job Ohio Northern (ONU) has 93long-standing percent job and graduateUniversity school placement rate.aIts

A community of scholars, ministers, and activists graduate theological education. gathered a beautiful, wooded campus—has trained MTSO opportunities and resources unique It fitsoffers youronlife: The Connections M.Div. offers a in rooted, innovative, and courageous leaders 150on graduate theological It fits your life: The Connections M.Div. offers aweek meaningful degreeeducation. requiring one full day afor years for augmented service to the the day academy, and meaningful degree one M.Div. full a week on campus, byChurch, hybrid online learning. It fits your We life: Thea requiring Connections offers a that society. are diverse andonline open community campus, augmented by hybrid learning. meaningful degree requiring one full day a week on dares It fits your to pursue finances: the love, One wisdom, in three MTSO and justice students at the campus, byscholarship, hybrid online It fits your finances: One in three MTSO students heart earns of aaugmented full-tuition the transformative gospel and oflearning. Jesus many Christ. othersWe earns aproudly full-tuition scholarship, and manystudents others areyour grounded Wesleyan/Methodist receive significant aid.in It fits finances: One in the three MTSO receive tradition of boldaid. ideas that impact people’s lives for earns a significant full-tuition scholarship, and many others It fits your commitment to sustainability: Our 80-acre theyour good. We believe that when ancientOur wisdom is in receive significant aid.campus It fits commitment to sustainability: 80-acre greater Columbus is home to Seminary Hill livelyColumbus engagement with contemporary challenges, great greater campus is home to Seminary Hill Farm, where we grow much of the food served in It fits yourare commitment things possible. to sustainability: Our 80-acreour Farm, where we grow much of the food served in our dining hall. We encourage you to come and visit. greater Columbus campus is home to Seminary Hill dining hall. We you visit.in our Farm, where weencourage grow much ofto thecome foodand served dining hall. We encourage you to come and visit.

METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN OHIO 3081DREW COLUMBUS PIKE, DELAWARE, OH METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN43105 OHIO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 800-333-6876, 740-363-1146 3081 COLUMBUS DELAWARE, OH 43105 36PIKE, MADISON AVENUE METHODIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL IN OHIO 800-333-6876, MADISON, NJ 07940 OH 43105 3081 COLUMBUS PIKE,740-363-1146 DELAWARE, admissions@mtso.edu 800-333-6876, 740-363-1146

www.mtso.edu admissions@mtso.edu theoadm@drew.edu www.mtso.edu www.drew.edu/theological admissions@mtso.edu www.mtso.edu

Oklahoma City University’s Wimberly School of Religion and graduate school placement rate.Methodist Its long-standing success isstudents partly because of excellent professors, partly educates in the United tradition Ohio Northern University (ONU) has a 93 percent jobof success is partly because of excellent professors, partly because ofreason, ambitious students, and partly because the scripture, tradition andrate. experience. We prepare and graduate school placement Its long-standing because of ambitious students, and partly because the University alwaysof been rooted in the future. AtcomONU, students forhas a variety in the church and success is partly because ofcareers excellent professors, partly University been in partly the future. Atstudy. ONU, students toward a rooted career long before they graduate munity ormove toalways embark upon further theological because ofhas ambitious students, and because the students move toward a career long before they graduate – and ONU’ salways alumniof successes prove it.future. With top-ranked We offer a Bachelor Arts in four of study: Youth University has been rooted inareas the At ONU, –students and ONU’ sReligious alumni successes it. With top-ranked programs and opportunities outside the classroom, Ministry, Education, Religious Studies, andany move toward a careerprove long before they graduate programs and opportunities outside the classroom, any pathONU’ a student chooses at ONU will beacross grounded in Religion &sPhilosophy. Students from the univer– and alumni successes prove it. With top-ranked path a student chooses ONU will bethe grounded inin any concrete applications theoutside future. Established 1871 sity mayand also minor at infor Interfaith Studies. Certification programs opportunities classroom, concrete applications for the future. Established in 1871 andYouth of five colleges (Arts Sciences, Business in Ministry andat Religious Education through path acomprised student chooses ONU will be&grounded in and comprised of five colleges (Arts &Established Sciences, Business Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, andMinistry Law), the General Board offorHigher Education and concrete applications the future. in 1871is Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law), ONU’ s beautiful residential campus made upBusiness of more available for undergraduate students. and comprised of five colleges (Arts &isSciences, ONU’ s beautiful campus is made up of more than 60 modern residences and academic buildings and The School ofresidential Religion has generous scholarships availAdministration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law), than 60sfor modern residences and academic buildings provides a vibrant campus experience. able undergraduates studying religion.  ONU’ beautiful residential campus is made up of and more provides vibrant residences campus experience. than 60 amodern and academic buildings and provides a vibrant campus experience.

OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY 525 S. CITY MAIN STREET OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY OKLAHOMA UNIVERSITY OHIO 45810 S.ADA, MAIN STREET 2501 N BLACKWELDER OHIO 525 NORTHERN UNIVERSITY ADA, 45810 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73106-1493 525 S.OHIO MAIN STREET

admissions-ug@onu.edu ADA, OHIO 45810 onu.edu admissions-ug@onu.edu 405-208-5000 onu.edu www.okcu.edu admissions-ug@onu.edu onu.edu

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

CENTRAL CENTRAL METHODIST METHODIST CENTRAL OTTERBEIN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY METHODIST UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Missouri’s only Methodist-affiliated univerMissouri’s only Methodist-affiliated univer-

University ismore a small private university sity been doing students since sityOtterbein hashas been doing more forfor students since nationally-recognized for its intentional blending Missouri’s only univer1854. Nestled inMethodist-affiliated the historic mid-Missouri 1854. Nestled in the historic mid-Missouri of liberal arts and professional studies through its sity has been doing more for students since community of Fayette, CMU enrolls about community of Fayette, CMU enrolls about renowned curriculum, and its commitment to expe1854. Nestled in the historic mid-Missouri 1,100 on its beautiful main campus and 1,100 on its beautiful main has campus and awards riential learning. Otterbein won many community ofin Fayette, CMU enrolls about another 4,000+ in its online and off-campus another 4,000+ its online and off-campus for community engagement. Otterbein was founded 1,100 onasAn its beautiful main campus and to welprograms. An new Music Ministry in 1847 one ofexciting the nation’s first universities programs. exciting new Music Ministry another 4,000+ its online andtooff-campus major complements strong programs in health come women andin persons ofprograms color its in community major complements strong health programs. Anthe exciting new Music Ministry professions, sciences, teacher education of teachers the and learners. Otterbein remains comprofessions, sciences, teacher education mitted to its more. relationship with The United Methodist major complements strong programs in health and much CMU’s new Center for Faith and much more. CMU’s new Center for Faith Church and its spirit of of inclusion. professions, teacher education and Service ishub a sciences, hub activity students and Service is athe of activity forfor students of of much more. CMU’s new Center for Faith all denominations. alland denominations. and Service is a hub of activity for students of all denominations.

OTTERBEIN UNIVERSITY CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY 1 S. GROVE ST., WESTERVILLE, OHIO 43081 411 CENTRAL METHODIST SQUARE

411 CENTRAL METHODIST SQUARE UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT: 614-823-1500 FAYETTE, MISSOURIUNIVERSITY 65248 CENTRAL METHODIST FAYETTE, MISSOURI 65248 GRADUATE 614-823-3210 411STUDIES CENTRALINFORMATION: METHODIST SQUARE admissions@centralmethodist.edu FAYETTE, MISSOURI 65248 admissions@centralmethodist.edu

www.centralmethodist.edu www.otterbein.edu www.centralmethodist.edu admissions@centralmethodist.edu www.centralmethodist.edu

PITTSBURGH UNIVERSITYOF OF UNIVERSITY THEOLOGICAL INDIANAPOLIS UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS SEMINARY OF INDIANAPOLIS The University of Indianapolis is a private compreThehensive University of Indianapolis a private compreinstitution of higheriseducation, affiliated with Founded in 1794, Pittsburgh Seminary has a rich hensive institution higher education, affiliated with TheUniversity United Methodist Church. just minutes history of preparing United Methodists for ministry. The ofofIndianapolis isLocated a private compreThe United Located minuteswith from downtown Indianapolis, UIndy is distinguished Rooted inMethodist the Reformed tradition andjust inaffiliated relationship hensive institution ofChurch. higher education, from Indianapolis, UIndy is distinguished by downtown its smallMethodist class sizes,from personal attention, with Christ-followers other traditions, Pittsburgh The United Church. Located justopportuniminutes byfrom its class sizes, personal attention, tiessmall to learn through real-world experience andfor high Theological Seminary forms and equips people downtown Indianapolis, UIndy is opportunidistinguished ties to learn through real-world experience and high touch career development and advising. Founded ministries familiar andpersonal yet to unfold, communities by its small class sizes, attention, opportunitouch career development and advising. Founded in 1902, thethrough university has a home campus of 5,400 present and yet to be real-world gathered. The Seminary offers ties to learn experience and high intouch 1902, theM.A., university haspartnership aM.A.T.S., home campus 5,400 students as well as two sites of inand China. M.Div., M.A.T.M., Th.M., D.Min. career development and advising. Founded students as well as two partnership sites in China. UIndy toasmake an exceptional private as well graduate in church indegrees, 1902,strives the university has acertificates home campus of educa5,400 UIndy torevitalization make an partnership exceptional tionstrives affordable to wide variety of private students through planting and (pending approval) and students as well as atwo sites in educaChina. tion affordable amake wide variety ofMethodist students through financial aid,toto including grants. urban ministry. UIndy strives anUnited exceptional private educafinancial aid, including United Methodist grants. tion affordable to a wide variety of students through financial aid, including United Methodist grants.

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS 1400THEOLOGICAL E. HANNA AVENUESEMINARY UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS PITTSBURGH INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 PA 15206 1400 E. HANNA AVENUE 616UNIVERSITY N. HIGHLAND AVE., OF PITTSBURGH, INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 1400 800-451-4194 E. HANNA AVENUE

uindy.edu/admissions INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 www. uindy.edu uindy.edu/admissions admissions@pts.edu www.www.pts.edu uindy.edu uindy.edu/admissions www. uindy.edu


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College, College,University UniversityAND ANDSeminary SeminaryShowcase Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase ASBURY ASBURY THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGICAL ASBURY McKENDREE SEMINARY SEMINARY THEOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY SEMINARY Asbury Seminary is aiscommunity called. WeWe areare an an Asbury Seminary a community called. evangelical, multi-denominational graduate school,

Established in 1828, McKendree is the oldest instituevangelical, multi-denominational graduate school, steeped in the Wesleyan tradition. With tion in the nation with continuous ties to approxithe United Asbury Seminary is a community called. We are an steeped in the Wesleyan tradition. With approximately 1600 students and more than 200 faculty, your Methodist Church. Committed to providing students evangelical, multi-denominational graduate school, mately 1600 students and more than 200 faculty, your experience is grounded intradition. the Word of God, honed with a high quality, affordable rigorous steeped in the With approxiexperience isWesleyan grounded in education, the Word ofour God, honed with immense spiritual growth and sharpened by academic programs coupled with our strong intellectumately students and more than faculty, your with1600 immense spiritual growth and200 sharpened by global engagement. Wesets offer aapart. variety academic al and spiritual climate us experience is grounded in offer the Word ofofGod, honed global engagement. We a variety of academic and professional degrees through our Kentucky and with immense spiritual growth and university sharpened and professional degrees through our Kentucky •Florida Named a top tier Midwest regional byby and Dunnam campuses, online, andof our Memphis global engagement. We offer variety academic Florida Dunnam campuses, online, and our U.S. News & World Report anda to “America’s 100Memphis Best Tennessee cohort. andTennessee professional degrees through our Kentucky and College Buys” cohort. Florida Dunnam campuses, online, and our Memphis •Tennessee 50 undergraduate cohort. majors, five graduate degrees, and a doctoral program in education • 33 NCAA Division II Sports Teams • 70 student organizations, including campus ministry and a Center for Community Service

ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY ASBURY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY KENTUCKY CAMPUS KENTUCKY CAMPUS 204ASBURY N. LEXINGTON AVENUE, WILMORE, KY 40390 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 204 N. LEXINGTON AVENUE, WILMORE, KY 40390 KENTUCKY CAMPUS FLORIDA DUNNAM CAMPUS FLORIDA DUNNAM CAMPUS 204 VALENCIA N. LEXINGTON AVENUE, 40390 8401 COLLEGE LN., WILMORE, ORLANDO, KY FL 32825 8401 McKENDREE VALENCIA COLLEGE LN., ORLANDO, FL 32825 UNIVERSITY FLORIDA DUNNAM CAMPUS 1.844.GO.TO.ATS 701 COLLEGE ROAD 1.844.GO.TO.ATS 8401 VALENCIALEBANON, COLLEGE LN., ORLANDO, FL 32825 IL 66254

MEMPHIS YALE YALE THEOLOGICAL DIVINITY DIVINITY YALE SEMINARY DIVINITY Part of one of the world’s great universities, YaleYale Part of one of the world’s great universities, Divinity School prepares scholars, ministers, and

Memphis Seminary DivinityTheological School prepares scholars, ministers, and leaders a time ofworld’s dramatic change in the global Part offor one ofa the great universities, Yale leaders for time of dramatic change in the global Memphis, TN-Founded, 1852 theological landscape. Students from a full spectrum Divinity School preparesStudents scholars, ministers, and theological landscape. from a full spectrum Memphis Theological Seminary is a graduate school of Christian denominations and faiths, and from leaders for a time of dramatic and change in the of Christian denominations faiths, andglobal from theological education located infrom one ofa full the South’s aoftheological wide range of cultural andand ethnic backgrounds, landscape. Students spectrum a wide range of cultural ethnic backgrounds, most culturally vibrant cities. Approved by the gather at YDS to begin a lifetime of transformative ofgather Christian denominations and faiths, and from at YDS to begin a lifetime of transformative University Senate of theworld. United Methodist Church, service to church and world-class faculty a wide range of cultural andThe ethnic backgrounds, service to church and world. The world-class faculty MTS prepares men and women for ordination and pursue their teaching and scholarship at the highest gather at their YDS teaching to begin aand lifetime of transformative pursue scholarship at the highest service within the church and world. The Seminary’s levels, eager to accept the educational challenges of of service church and world. The world-class faculty levels,toeager toof accept the educational challenges Methodist House Studies students the newnew global century. pursue their teaching and supports scholarship at thethrough highest the global century. alevels, uniqueeager set oftoWesleyan-related course offerings that accept the educational challenges of can a Certificate thelead newtoglobal century.in Wesleyan Studies. Onethird of the Seminary’s student body is comprised of students from the United Methodist, Christian Methodist Episcopal, and African Methodist Episcopal Churches.

YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL

409 PROSPECT STREET, NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 409 PROSPECT STREET, NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 203-432-5360 MEMPHIS THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL 203-432-5360 E PKWYSTREET, S, MEMPHIS, TN 38104 409 168 PROSPECT NEW HAVEN CT, 06511 herron.gaston@yale.edu 203-432-5360 herron.gaston@yale.edu

admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu 1.844.GO.TO.ATS admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu www.asburyseminary.edu McKendree.edu admissions.office@asburyseminary.edu

divinity.yale.edu admissions@MemphisSeminary.edu divinity.yale.edu memphisseminary.edu herron.gaston@yale.edu

BOSTON UNIVERSITY BOSTON UNIVERSITY WESLEY SCHOOL OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SEMINARY THEOLOGY Boston University School of Theology was founded Boston“the University School of Theologyaswas founded to foster principles of Christianity, exhibited

PERKINS ADRIAN ADRIANOF SCHOOL COLLEGE ADRIAN COLLEGE THEOLOGY COLLEGE At Adrian College we believe in the “intrinsic worth” At Adrian College we believe in the “intrinsic worth” of each and every person. Founded by abolitionists

www.asburyseminary.edu

“Traditions need to be transformed each generation. to foster “the of Christianity, asfounded exhibited in Wesleyan Methodism.” known aswith, the Theology must beprinciples reckoned with, wrestledwas tested Boston University School Long of Theology inreflected Wesleyan Methodism. ”School Long known theconSchool of“the theupon Prophets, the is deeply comand in light our experiences and to foster principles ofofChristianity, asasexhibited School of the Prophets, the School is deeply committed pursuing knowledge God, cultivating texts. It to is dead theology if it’s notofwrestled with ” in Wesleyan Methodism.” Long known as theanew. mitted pursuing knowledge ofisGod, cultivating leaders for communities of faith, enriching the School of to the Prophets, the School deeply com– Dr. Beverly Mitchell on leaders for communities of faith, enriching the academy, seeking peace with in a diverse mitted to and pursuing knowledge of justice God, cultivating John Wesley’s Quadrilateral. academy, and seeking with justice in a diverse and interconnected world.peace School equips outleaders for communities ofThe faith, enriching the and interconnected world. The School equips outstanding for thepeace present and futurein church academy,leaders and seeking with justice a diverse for the present and future church Seated inexcellent theleaders nation’s capital and centered in Christian through teaching, community life, and andstanding interconnected world. The School equips outthrough excellent teaching, community faith, Wesley Theological Seminary willfuture equiplife, youand for vocational mentoring. standing leaders for the present and church vocational mentoring. leadership in the church and the world. life, and through excellent teaching, community vocational mentoring. Apply by February 1 for merit-based financial aid.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY 745 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA.THEOLOGY 02215 BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF WESLEY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 617-353-3050 745 4500 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA. 02215 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OFNW THEOLOGY 617-353-3050 WASHINGTON, DC 20016 745 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, BOSTON, MA. 02215 sthadmis@bu.edu 617-353-3050

www.bu.edu/sth sthadmis@bu.edu 202-885-8686 www.bu.edu/sth www.wesleyseminary.edu sthadmis@bu.edu www.bu.edu/sth

divinity.yale.edu

An Academy for the Whole Church in the Whole ofAdrian each and every person. Founded by abolitionists in today we arewe known forinour in theworth” World At1859, College believe thework “intrinsic in 1859, today weperson. are known for our work in the fight against human trafficking. Adrian College is a of each and every Founded by abolitionists Onefight of five university-related theological schools of a against human trafficking. Adrian College is four-year residential institution offering a focused in 1859, today we are known for our work in the thefour-year UMC, Perkins Schoolinstitution of Theology — a graduate residential offering a focused undergraduate education with an Adrian College is advanced 4+1 fight against human trafficking. a school of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, undergraduate education with an advanced 4+1 Master’s program. Theinstitution College offers 40 majors and four-year residential a focused Texas — prepares women and menoffering for faithful leaderMaster’s program. The College offers 40 majors and pre-professional programs, with 32 athletic teams and undergraduate an advanced 4+1 ship in Christian education ministry. pre-professional programs, 32offers athletic and eight institutes dedicated to a diverse and personalMaster’s program. The College 40 teams majors and Degrees include: M.Div., M.T.S., M.A.M., M.S.M., eight institutes dedicated to a diverse and personalized approach to education. pre-professional programs, 32 athletic teams and M.Th. (English and Spanish), Doctor of Ministry, izedinstitutes approachdedicated to education. eight to a diverse and personalM.A. Ph.D. in studies. ized and approach to religious education. Certificates include: Hispanic, African American, Anglican, women’s studies, pastoral care, urban ministry. M.A.M. tracks include Christian Education, Urban Ministry, Theology and Social Justice, Christian Spirituality and Evangelism and Mission.

ADRIAN COLLEGE

110 PERKINS SOUTH MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, MI 49221 ADRIAN COLLEGE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SCHEDULE CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITH ADMISSIONS 110ASOUTH MADISON STREET, MI 49221 5915 BISHOP BLVD.ADRIAN, ADRIAN COLLEGE SCHEDULE A CAMPUS OR SPEAK WITH DALLAS, TOUR TEXAS 75275 110 SOUTH MADISON STREET, ADRIAN, MI ADMISSIONS 49221 800-877-2246 SCHEDULE A CAMPUS TOUR OR SPEAK WITH ADMISSIONS

adrian.edu 800-877-2246 214-768-2138 adrian.edu www.smu.edu/perkins 800-877-2246 adrian.edu

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

DILLARD DILLARD HIWASSEE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY DILLARD COLLEGE UNIVERSITY Founded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal Founded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal arts education in a setting where each student

Hiwassee College, in founded in where 1849 and affiliated arts education a setting each studentwith receives thethe personal attention needed to promote The United Methodist Church, is a needed liberal arts and apFounded in 1869, Dillard University offers a liberal receives personal attention to promote their growth academically and as education global citizens. plied science institution of higher providing arts education in a setting where student their growth academically and aseach global citizens. Located inthe one of America’s most vibrant cities, New quality instruction in America’s an attention environment that to celebrates receives personal needed promote Located in one of most vibrant cities, New Orleans, La., Dillard hashas consistently been ranked learning, faith and service. On ouras four-hundredtheir growth academically and global citizens. Orleans, La., Dillard consistently been ranked among the very best Historically Black Colleges and acre campus, near the Great Smoky Mountains, our Located in one America’s most Black vibrant cities, New among the veryofbest Historically Colleges and Universities inpractical the country. students learn ways to integrate been faith into Orleans, La., Dillard has consistently ranked Universities in the country. With 147 years of academic excellence to its name, their education no matter what a student’s emphasis – among the years very best Historically Black Colleges and With 147 of academic excellence to its name, Dillard continues its country. historical commitment to to Dental Hygiene, Forestry Technology, Universities inEquine the Dillard continues its Science, historical commitment excellence in education and strives to position Interdisciplinary Studies, or one of our other unique With 147 of academic to its name, excellenceyears in education andexcellence strives to position itself as one of the nation’s premier centers for for  programs. Dillard itsnation’s historical commitment to itself ascontinues one of the premier centers undergraduate research. excellence in education undergraduate research.and strives to position itself as one of the nation’s premier centers for  undergraduate research.

DILLARD UNIVERSITY DILLARD UNIVERSITY

2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD 2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 DILLARD UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 2601 GENTILLY BOULEVARD 504-283-8822 NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 504-283-8822

www.dillard.edu 800-356-2187 www.dillard.edu Hiwassee.edu 504-283-8822 www.dillard.edu

CANDLER CANDLER ASHLAND SCHOOL CANDLER SCHOOLOF OF THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY SEMINARY THEOLOGY Candler School of Theology is grounded in the Candlerfaith School Theology is grounded in the Christian and of shaped by the Wesleyan tradition

LEARN BY LIVING Christian faith and shaped by the Wesleyan tradition ofCandler evangelical piety, and ofecumenical Theology isopenness, grounded in the Life631 is aSchool residential initiative* that will equip you of evangelical piety, ecumenical openness, and social concern. For more thanby a century, we have Christian faith and shaped the Wesleyan tradition for social a lifetime of ministry and than spiritual formation. Our concern. Forcreative more aopenness, century, have educated faithfulpiety, and leaders for thewe church’s of evangelical ecumenical and innovative curriculum will give you applied educated faithful and leaders forministerial thehave church’s ministries throughout thecreative world. Part of top-ranked social concern. For more than a century, we experience. LIFE631 leads the to ATS accredited Master ministries throughout world. Partfor ofesteemed top-ranked Emory University, Candler has a leaders faculty of faithful andofcreative the church’s ofeducated Divinity and Master Arts in Practical Theology Emory University, Candler has a Part faculty of esteemed scholar-teachers and the lowest student/faculty ratio ministries throughout the world. of top-ranked degrees. Ask details. and the lowest student/faculty ratio scholar-teachers among our peer schools. Explore our 17 degrees, Emory University, Candler has a faculty of esteemed Seminary.Ashland.edu or call 1-866-287-6446 among our peer schools. Explore our 17 degrees, including a new online Doctor of Ministry and a ratio scholar-teachers and the lowest student/faculty including apeer new online ofour Ministry andup a two-year Master ofschools. Religious *Ifamong admitted will receiveDoctor a Leadership. housing scholarship ouryou Explore 17 degrees, two-year aMaster of Religious toincluding 100% new online DoctorLeadership. of Ministry and a two-year Master of Religious Leadership.

CANDLER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

RITAASHLAND ANNE ROLLINS BUILDING, DICKEY DRIVE CANDLER SCHOOL1531 OFSEMINARY THEOLOGY THEOLOGICAL GEORGIA 30322 RITACANDLER ANNEATLANTA, ROLLINS BUILDING, 1531 DICKEY DRIVE 910SCHOOL CENTER ST. OF THEOLOGY ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30322 ASHLAND, OHIO 44805 RITA ANNE ROLLINS BUILDING, 1531 DICKEY DRIVE candleradmissions@emory.edu ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30322

candler.emory.edu candleradmissions@emory.edu Whall4@ashland.edu candler.emory.edu ashland.seminary.edu/apply candleradmissions@emory.edu candler.emory.edu

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College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary Showcase College, University AND Seminary College, University AND Seminary Showcase Showcase ANABAPTIST ANABAPTIST ANABAPTIST MENNONITE MENNONITE ANABAPTIST MENNONITE BIBLICAL SEMINARY BIBLICAL MENNONITE BIBLICALSEMINARY SEMINARY BIBLICAL SEMINARY AMBS offers excellent academic programs with AMBS offers excellent academic programs with

UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT OF MOUNT UNIVERSITY OF MOUNT UNION UNION OF MOUNT UNION UNION The University of Mount Union, founded in 1846, is Thea University of Mount Union, founded inin 1846, is four-year, private institution grounded the liberal

GARRETTGARRETTGARRETTEVANGELICAL EVANGELICAL GARRETTEVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL THEOLOGICAL EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY SEMINARY Founded in 1853, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Founded in 1853, Garrett-Evangelical Seminary serves the church and theTheological world by prepar-

ANABAPTIST MENNONITE BIBLICAL SEMINARY 3003 BENHAM AVE. SEMINARY ANABAPTIST MENNONITE BIBLICAL ANABAPTIST MENNONITE BIBLICAL SEMINARY ELKHART, INAVE. 46517 BENHAM 3003 BENHAM AVE. ANABAPTIST 3003 MENNONITE BIBLICAL SEMINARY

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GARRETT–EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 2121 SHERIDAN RD. GARRETT–EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY GARRETT–EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY EVANSTON, ILRD. 60201 2121 SHERIDAN 2121 SHERIDAN RD. GARRETT–EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

AMBSspiritual deep offers excellent formation academic with a strong programs emphasis with on deep spiritual formation with a strong emphasis on deep spiritual AMBS peacemaking, offers excellent formation creation academic care with and a strong social programs justice. emphasis withWeon peacemaking, creation care and social justice. We peacemaking, deep offer special spiritualUMC formation creation scholarships care with and a strong and social ourjustice. emphasis partnership Weon offer special UMC scholarships and our partnership offer Garrett–Evangelical peacemaking, with special UMC creation scholarships care Theological and and social our Seminary justice. partnership We with Garrett–Evangelical Theological Seminary with Garrett–Evangelical offer allows special you toUMC complete scholarships anTheological approved and our United Seminary partnership allows you to complete approved United allows with Methodist Garrett–Evangelical you Master to complete of an Divinity an Theological approved degree United in Seminary a diverse, Methodist Master of Divinity degree in United aindiverse, Methodist allows globally-connected you Master to complete ofcommunity Divinity an approved degree setting. aPlease diverse, globally-connected community setting. Please globally-connected Methodist schedule a Master personalofcommunity visit Divinity to seedegree first-hand setting. in aPlease diverse, how our schedule a personal visit to opportunities see first-hand ourour schedule globally-connected small class a personal sizes provide community visit to see first-hand setting.how toPlease grow how in small class sizes provide opportunities to grow in our small schedule biblical class understanding, a personal sizes provide visit theological opportunities to see first-hand fluency, to grow how cultural in biblical understanding, theological fluency, biblical small discernment class understanding, sizes andprovide spiritual theological opportunities maturity. fluency, tocultural grow cultural in discernment andand spiritual maturity. discernment biblical understanding, spiritual theological maturity.fluency, cultural discernment and spiritual maturity.

ELKHART, IN 46517 ELKHART, IN 46517 3003 BENHAM AVE.

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FERRUM FERRUM FERRUM COLLEGE FERRUM COLLEGE COLLEGE COLLEGE Ferrum College was founded in 1913 by members of the Methodist Church to bring literacy to

Ferrum College founded in 1913 by members Ferrum College waswas founded inBlue 1913 by members underserved children in the Ridge of the Methodist Church to bring literacy to Ferrum College was founded inliteracy 1913 bytoMountain members of the Methodist Church to bring region of Appalachia. Today, we continue to underserved children in the Blue Ridge Mountain of the Methodist Church to bring literacy to provide underserved children in the Blue Ridge Mountain uniqueof opportunities and anBlue excellent region Appalachia. Today, we continue to provide underserved children in the Ridgeeducational Mountain region of Appalachia. Today, we continue to provide experience that will transform our students’ uniqueof opportunities and an we excellent educational region Appalachia. Today, continue to lives provide unique opportunities and an excellent educational within aopportunities welcoming, supportive community. We want experience that will transform our students’ lives unique and anour excellent educational experience that will transform students’ lives our students, from all walks of our life, to be empowered within a welcoming, supportive community. We want experience that will transform students’ lives within a welcoming, supportive community. We want to discover their potential, their and our students, from allsupportive walksachieve of life, to be goals, empowered a welcoming, community. We want ourwithin students, from all walks of life, to be empowered make a difference inalltheir communities. The Ferrum to discover their potential, achieve and our students, from walks of life, their to be goals, empowered to discover their potential, achieve their goals, and experience is richpotential, with opportunities forgoals, internships, make a difference in their communities. The Ferrum to discover their achieve their and make a difference in their communities. The Ferrum hands-on learning, and for domestic experience is rich with opportunities internships, make a difference ininternational their communities. The Ferrum experience is rich with opportunities for internships, travel, scholars programs, personal development, and hands-on learning, international and domestic experience is rich with opportunities for internships, hands-on learning, international andand domestic service to learning, the community. travel, scholars programs, personal development, hands-on international domestic and travel, scholars programs, personal development, and servicescholars to the community. travel, programs, personal development, and service to the community. service to the community.

FERRUM COLLEGE

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IT IS A FITTING ANALOGY FOR AN OLYMPIC YEAR, BUT THE REV. MARY HAGGARD THINKS OF HERSELF AS THE SECOND LEG OF A “SPIRITUAL RELAY TEAM.” Haggard, campus pastor and executive director of the University of Delaware Wesley Foundation, said, “To me, it’s like baton passing. The youth leader should be passing the baton to the campus pastor, and we pass that baton to their future pastor.” When young people head to college, churches pray somebody there will nurture their spirits. This is a time where they wrestle with huge questions in life. Part of a campus minister’s job is to make sure God is still a big part of the conversation. One might assume campus ministries would always have to keep up with the latest pop culture trends and incorporate radical ideas for outreach. That’s not always the case, Haggard said. One of the activities most popular with her students is helping the United Methodist Women group with their annual soup fundraiser. “The students love it because it’s literally being in a room full of grandmas. It’s adorable! It’s not edgy, but often the familiar is what works.” Of course, edgy can be fun, too. The Rev. Mara Bailey, chaplain at Simpson College in Des Moines, Iowa, hosted a 2015 event she dubbed “Tattoo Spirituality.” “We had some students do henna, invited in a tattoo artist who really

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SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016


CAMPUSMINISTRY101

COURTESY MARY HAGGARD

not cheap,” Haggard said. “Every summer during band camp, we give freeze pops to the marching band. The water brigade during freshman move-in will pass out 1,500 bottles.” It’s also vital that churches forward the names of their students to the campus minister of the colleges they will attend. “At annual conference, my mantra is always ‘If they’re coming to me, please tell me,’” Haggard said. The Texas Annual Wesley Foundation students were among those participating in a candlelight Conference is developing an vigil on the University of Delaware campus. online reporting system to make it easier for churchwith the ‘nones,’” she said. embraces the concept of his work as voes to timely and securely Moore looks at nones differcation and invited students to share their report their students’ ently. tattoos and the stories behind them as a information to campus “Studies indicate that students way to consider meaningful moments in ministers. If successful, this are not less spiritual, but less inour lives and how we mark them,” Bailey could prove a useful model stitutional,” he said. “That means said. “It was a fun night that I would deem for other conferences. that there is a great opportunity very successful!” One other thing Haggard to connect with many students so “Much of it is just good old-fashioned truly appreciates is a little long as the institution is not the hospitality,” Haggard said. “During freshhousekeeping help. goal, but the tool that supports man move-in, we do a welcoming picnic Rev. Tim Moore “Students aren’t the best efforts to connect with students.” and a water brigade, passing out bottled The church’s focus on recruiting young at cleaning up after themselves. I’ve heard water while parents unload the car with of UMW groups who come once a year people to its pews and pulpits is someeverything their freshman owns.” and make the Wesley Foundation building times at odds with its actions, as some The Rev. Tim Moore, director of Colspic and span, and those campus ministers conferences have reduced or cut out fundlegiate Ministry Resources and Training LOVE them for it.” ing for campus ministry entirely. at the General Board of Higher Education Higher Education and Ministry offers “The number-one common factor in and Ministry, said it is important that the a number of resources to support campus clergy under the age of 35 is a positive ministry is designed for a particular place ministries, including grant programs, campus ministry experience,” Haggard and that the minister is well-suited to that trainings, spiritual renewal retreats, consaid. She takes pride that in her nine years context. sultations and partnerships with annual of campus ministry in a small annual “What makes a ministry endure is conference, she’s helped six people answer conferences, colleges and schools. continuous assessment, implementation, “We are always wanting to hear from a call to ordained ministry. reassessment and adaptation,” he said. collegiate ministers,” Moore said. “The “Pennsylvania has the highest number board is creating a general survey with of four-year institutions of any state in CHALLENGES input from campus ministers to help us the union, and United Methodist campus Every report on demographics menbetter respond to the needs of those colleministries don’t have much of a presence tions the rise of the “nones” — those who giate ministers.” there. That’s a problem,” she added. claim no religious affiliation — and the Haggard noted that the Baltimorechallenge it presents for churches trying Washington Conference has begun to reach them. Campus pastors are on UNIQUE MINISTRY OPPORTUNITIES appointing campus ministers also to serve the frontline to meet that challenge as A campus minister encounters young increasing numbers of millennials identify as associate pastors of local churches. people when they’re trying to learn how to Some think this will encourage local as “none.” be an adult, and that process can be paincongregations to collaborate with campus Haggard and her peers have noticed a ful. Like all campus ministers, Haggard ministry rather than for it to be a separate shift. Activities that used to be big draws has seen the good and the bad. entity. aren’t attracting the same numbers, so “I’ve had to take someone who was she’s adjusted her approach. Their peers, sexually assaulted to the hospital, and we’ve though, may be the biggest factor in reach- WHAT CAN CHURCHES DO FOR CAMPUS had to look for students whose friends were ing unaffiliated students. afraid they were contemplating suicide. And MINISTERS? “I can invite ‘til I’m blue in the face, but relationships, bad break-ups. You name it. Financial help is always welcome. often it’s a student inviting their roomBut I also get the great stuff: I did four wed“We give a Wesley Study Bible at the mate to Bible study that gets more traction end of each student’s first year. They’re dings one year for former students.”

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United Methodist Interpreter


To emphasize the unique nature of campus ministry, Haggard singled out a program at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. Florida State’s Wesley Foundation building stands between sorority row and the freshman women’s dorms. On the day sororities announce their pledges, Foundation staff and volunteers set up a tent. As each young woman passes by, she receives a white rose telling her that even if a sorority didn’t accept her, she is still a precious child of God. “One year the campus pastor wondered why all these girls were walking past his building crying,” she said. “When he learned it was because they’d just been rejected by a sorority, he realized this is a perfect opportunity for grace. No local church would have the opportunity to know this is a need.” College is an atmosphere full of achievement and expectations, and failure can be devastating. That’s where it’s good to know a campus pastor is there to provide support without judgment. “We love on them and care for them and try to be a positive adult in their life while they’re in college,” Haggard said. “We don’t grade them on anything. If you bombed on that paper, you can still come to Bible study.” Joey Butler is a multimedia producer/editor at United Methodist Communications, Nashville, Tennessee.

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Almost two-thirds of the United Methodist deacons and elders ordained in 2015 received their seminary degree from a United Methodist-affiliated institution. This represents the highest concentration of ordinands from denomination-related institutions in recent years, according to a report by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM).

Now retired Bishop Michael Coyner is joined by Louisiana Bishop Cynthia Fierro Harvey as he lays hands on a ordinand during the 2015 Indiana Annual Conference.

More ordinands are

graduates of the United Methodist seminaries,” said the Rev. Myron Wingfield, associate general secretary for the agency’s Division of Ordained Ministry. “If that is the case, it is even more encouraging to see the continued uptick in ordinands emerging from our 13 schools of theology.” “UM-affiliated institutions make many different contributions to the mission of The United Methodist Church. The report only examines one type of contribution and does not intend to suggest the value of some institutions over others based on a single metric,” said Mark McCormack, director of research and evaluation at GBHEM. “It’s good to see positive changes from year to year, as with the increase in percentage from 2014 to 2015, but it’s even more encouraging and compelling to see a clearly discernible upward trend over a longer period of time,” McCormack said. “Being able to see this upward movement over a period of seven years gives us a greater degree of confidence in saying there’s something happening here.” To obtain the full GBHEM report, go to bit.ly/seminariesordinands.

UM-SEMINARY

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Of the 438 total ordinands in the United States, 273 earned degrees from United Methodist institutions, an increase of 4 percent over the previous year. The figure represents a continued upward trend that began in 2009, when just over half of the ordinands earned degrees from United Methodist institutions. “We are pleased that the percentage of ordinands who receive their training from UM schools is rising,” said the Rev. Kim Cape, general secretary at Higher Education and Ministry. “Their United Methodist identity is strengthened by the background, education and training from United Methodist seminaries. “These study results are a testament to the resources and support being given at an annual conference level and at a local church level. A denominational emphasis on young

GRADS clergy will be a factor in continuing this trend in a positive direction.” Each year, all United Methodist annual conferences complete a report listing the names of those ordained that year and the seminary from which each graduated. Higher Education and Ministry has been collecting this information over the past several years to understand better where ordinands in the denomination are receiving their seminary education. Asbury Theological Seminary remained the most predominant institution among ordinands, with 57 individuals, or 13 percent, in 2015, the report says. Closely following Asbury was Duke Divinity School, the single most predominant United Methodist-affiliated institution, with 52 individuals, or 12 percent, of the 2015

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

ordinands. Candler School of Theology was the second among the denominationally-affiliated institutions with 38 individuals, or 9 percent, of 2015 ordinands. Wesley Theological Seminary, Perkins School of Theology and Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary rounded out the top five United Methodist institutions, each with around 6 percent of the 2015 ordinands. A total of 108 ordinands, or 25 percent, received their degrees from institutions other than Asbury and the United Methodist schools. The two with the greatest number were Hood Theological Seminary with 11 graduates, and Vanderbilt Divinity School with nine. “At GBHEM, we regularly receive feedback from boards of ordained ministry that their strongest candidates tend to be

United Methodist Interpreter

General Board of Higher Education and Ministry


Outreach, willingness to change common threads for

ONE MATTERS churches

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BY POLLY HOUSE

Discipleship Ministries this year recognized 80 United Methodist churches that showed remarkable gains in annual baptisms, professions of faith and discipleship implementation. Each of these churches, nominated by their annual conferences, received a One Matters Discipleship Award. “The One Matters Discipleship Award is meant to lift up a bright spot in each conference around discipleship,” says the Rev. Jeff Campbell, director of annual conference relationships at Discipleship Ministries. “We are looking for churches that are turning things around with a renewed focus on making disciples.” Annual conferences work with Discipleship Ministries to celebrate churches that have moved in recent years from zeros in professions of faith and baptisms to positive numbers and to share what has been working in their context. Each church receives a plaque and $1,000 from Discipleship Ministries to continue their work in discipleship. Some conferences match the funding and give more than one award.

NORTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION

One Matters Spotlight: Arthur United Methodist Church, North Dakota, Dakotas Conference Arthur is a small farming community northeast of Fargo. Since 2002, the population has declined 16 percent. Now a few more than 300 people call it home. When the Rev. Justin Iverson became the church’s pastor in July 2015, the church had to go back to 2007 to find someone who had made a profession of faith there. Not a good statistic. In 2016, six youth made commitments to follow Christ – after the Arthur church began placing a strong emphasis on its confirmation class ministry. Arthur’s confirmation classes – and its new junior high youth group – welcome youth from other

United Methodist Interpreter

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist churches in the area. They enter the life and ministry of the church and take the first steps to becoming disciples of Christ. Iverson said the church attendance varies with the season. “During the school year, we have about 60 regular attenders,” he said. “But, like a lot of churches, during the summer it goes down with people on vacation, at the lake and such.” Prayer is an important emphasis for all members of Arthur. “We ask our people to pray at 5:17 each afternoon, either at the church or wherever else they are,” Iverson said. “We pray for The United Methodist Church, our jurisdiction, our conference and our local church.” Other North Central Jurisdiction recipients: DAKOTAS – Gary UMC, Clear Lake, South Dakota; DETROIT – Wisner UMC, Akron, Michigan; ILLINOIS GREAT RIVERS – Pleasant Grove UMC, Farmer City; Christ UMC, Fairview Heights; IOWA—Varina UMC,


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Early; Colo UMC; Carson UMC; First UMC, Marion; Bloomfield UMC, Des Moines; MINNESOTA – First UMC, Lindstrom; WEST MICHIGAN – Coloma UMC; WEST OHIO – Anna UMC; Bath Community UMC, Lima; First UMC, Bellefountaine; First UMC, Greenfield; Flatwood UMC, Pomeroy; Hope UMC, Canal Winchester; Old Fort UMC; Perintown UMC, Milford. NORTHEASTERN JURISDICTION

One Matters Spotlight: Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, Colora, Maryland, Peninsula-Delaware Conference About an hour northeast of Baltimore, Colora is a historic town of about 2,500 people. In 2015, the Mt. Pleasant church celebrated 175 years of ministry, but, sadly, welcomed no new church members that year. But, in the first half of 2016, they received five new members by professions of faith! What happened? After being appointed to Mt. Pleasant, the Rev. David Burke quickly developed a plan. He challenged the members to live out their faith by looking outside the church walls, reaching out to the “least and the lost.” Members responded to the challenge with enthusiasm. Inspired by Burke’s relevant preaching, they began to accept responsibility for their own spiritual development, learning how to grow in relationship with Christ.

As their passion for discipleship deepened, they developed stronger leaders and rallied around the unifying vision of becoming Christ to their community. They developed a stronger ministry with children and youth, involving them in all aspects of the life of the church. These efforts were fruitful. Not only has the church started to grow numerically, it has rediscovered its calling and now experiences the joy of following Jesus and transforming the world – beginning in a small corner of Maryland. Other Northeastern Jurisdiction recipients: BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON – Cumberland Hagerstown District: EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA – Familia Dei UMC, Norriston, Pennsylvania; NEW ENGLAND – Vida Abundante UMC, Providence, Rhode Island; Highlands UMC, Hampden, Maine; Cheshire (Massachusetts) UMC; NEW YORK – First UMC, Flushing; SUSQUEHANNA – Southern Potter County Charge, Coudersport, Pennsylvania; UPPER NEW YORK – Hilton UMC; WEST VIRGINIA – Forest Burdette UMC, Hurricane, West Virginia.

to stay the same in Hamlin. But don’t tell that to the members of First Church. In 2014, they averaged eight people in worship. In 2016, they are averaging about 70 attenders. On Easter Sunday this year, 109 people worshipped together! The Rev. George Price, Abilene District superintendent, credits the Rev. E.C. Ice, III, Hamlin pastor, with guiding the congregation to reach out to the community. “When E.C. was appointed in 2014, he had eight people in the church,” Price said. “To say the least, the situation was dire! E.C. arrived with this burning call on his life. He came from a prestigious – and lucrative – job in the business world in Houston. But, he was raised in Abilene and wanted to get back to make a difference in west Texas.” Ice started working with the eight people, encouraging them to see Hamlin as their mission field. They began to see opportunities everywhere. Price said, “Two things I see that E.C. has done. First, they have really stressed intercessory prayer for the church and the community. They let people outside the church know that they will pray for them. This has received great response from the community. JUSTIN IVERSON

MOUNTAIN SKY AREA/CHARMAINE ROBLEDO

The Rev. Mark Calhoun, his wife, Julie, and their son, Jake, receive the One Matters Award on behalf of Lander (Wyo.) United Methodist Church.

SOUTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION

One Matters Spotlight: First United Methodist Church, Hamlin, Texas, Northwest Texas Conference Hamlin is a small town about 40 miles north of Abilene. Its population has stayed at 2,000-plus for years. It doesn’t really grow; it doesn’t really shrink. Things tend SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

United Methodist Interpreter

Arthur United Methodist Church members fill backpacks to send to the Spirit Lake Ministry Center in North Dakota.


ONE MATTERS CHURCES

SOUTHEASTERN JURISDICTION

One Matters Spotlight: Trinity United Methodist Church, Paducah, Kentucky, Memphis Conference Trinity Church’s discipleship strategy is simple: Engage their members who are already there to reach out to those who haven’t joined them yet. That “yet” is the hook. The congregation is making its presence known in Paducah, a town of about 25,000 people, roughly halfway between Nashville, Tennessee, and St. Louis, Missouri. “Trinity knows that God has called us to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world,” said the Rev. Susan Engle, pastor. “We focus our time on defining what it means to be a disciple, using practical ways to develop our relationship with God and others, and learning what it means to offer Jesus to our neighbors.” Trinity encourages its members to serve, leading to a great deal of community involvement. They participated in the city Christmas parade, collaborated with a local elementary school to help kids improve

their reading skills and started a concert band with members from 10 years old to 60-plus. Creative missions and ministries attract active members to volunteer. Members invite friends to church, and some join. One new member first came after being invited to an Easter egg hunt. Another, an exchange student from Japan, came with his host family. He made a profession of faith and wanted to be baptized before returning home. He still participates in church life through Trinity’s Facebook page. For Trinity Church, making disciples is the secret to growing. Other Southeastern Jurisdiction recipients: FLORIDA – First UMC, Pahokee; Grace UMC, Plant City; KENTUCKY – Trinity UMC, Winchester; MEMPHIS – Bemis UMC, Jackson, Tennessee; Edith UMC, Riply, Tennessee; El Redentor UMC, Memphis, Tennessee; MISSISSIPPI – Crossroads UMC, Sarah; NORTH CAROLINA – Shiloh UMC, Stumpy Point; NORTH GEORGIA – Allgood Road UMC, Stone Mountain; RED BIRD MISSIONARY – Annville UMC, Kentucky; SOUTH GEORGIA – Bonaire UMC.

the sermon, a number of people who first worshipped outside the church walls have come inside. Knowing that hospitality today often begins online, the church webpage gives plenty of information to make potential visitors comfortable. A Lander native, Calhoun is a self-proclaimed “second career pastor.” He was appointed to Lander in 2012, after working in the family business, responding to a call to ordained ministry and attending Saint Paul School of Theology. Lander is his third appointment. “A big emphasis at the seminary was around contextual education,” Calhoun explained. “Hospitality is a big part of that emphasis. We went around Kansas City and learned how to identify the context of the community. That has made all the difference here. “We identified two main areas – increasing our presence in the community and the reshaping and updating of our space as our initial mission. Then the second year, we mixed in discipleship. After that, we began experiencing growth. We have grown from 87 to 134 in four years. In smaller churches that’s not too shabby!” Other Western Jurisdiction recipients: ALASKA – Korean UMC, Anchorage; WESTERN JURISDICTION CALIFORNIA-NEVAOne Matters SpotDA – Clovis Memorial light: Lander United UMC, California; Ely Methodist Church, The Rev. E. C. Ice III UMC, Nevada; First Wyoming, YellowTongan UMC, San Bruno, stone Conference California; St. Luke’s UMC, Richmond, In 2011, Lander Church recorded one California; Trinity UMC, Colusa, Caliprofession of faith and two baptisms. fornia; Wesley UMC, Fresno, California; Not exactly stellar, but better than some OREGON-IDAHO – Westside UMC, churches. Not satisfied, however, they Beaverton, Oregon; PACIFIC NORTHasked how they could do better. WEST – Rochester UMC, Washington; The Rev. Mark Calhoun encouraged ROCKY MOUNTAIN – Bristol UMC, the church to work on hospitality – and it Colorado. has. Since 2011, Lander Church has seen Polly House is a freelance writer based in 13 people baptized and welcomed 20 new Nashville, Tennessee, who is also serving as disciples through professions of faith. editorial assistant for Interpreter. Worship attendance continues to climb. After the church started live streaming COURTESY PHOTO

“Second, they are involved in the community. If there is a need, they want the community to come to them. For example, there was a person in town who needed a handicap-accessible porch, and the church took care of it. A few months ago, a tornado hit a small community nearby. The church not only sent water; they took it over themselves and helped people who had damage. “That speaks to people.” Other South Central Jurisdiction recipients: ARKANSAS – Midland Heights UMC, Fort Smith; CENTRAL TEXAS – Meadowbrook UMC, Fort Worth; First UMC, Hamilton; NEW MEXICO – Grace UMC, Alamogordo; St. Stephen’s UMC, Albuquerque; Asbury UMC, Odessa; OKLAHOMA INDIAN MISSIONARY – Boiling Springs UMC, Ada; Nanih Chito UMC, Durant; RIO TEXAS – Bastrop UMC; First UMC, Eldorado; First UMC, Kerrville; George West UMC; Floresville UMC; Liberty Hill UMC; Templo Emmanuel, Brownsville; TEXAS – Central UMC, Galveston.

United Methodist Interpreter

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Anticipating Advent NEW STUDIES, DEVOTIONALS, AIDS FOR PLANNING AND INVITING AVAILABLE Advent 2016 begins on Sunday, Nov. 27. Abingdon Press and The Upper Room have 10 new studies and devotional books for congregations, small groups and individuals to use as they prepare to celebrate the birth of Christ. ALL CHURCH, GROUP, ONLINE STUDIES

All I Want for Christmas

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Designed for all church, small-group or individual study, All I Want for Christmas (Abingdon Press) is the newest study from the Rev. James W. Moore, now retired and minister-in-residence at Highland Park United Methodist Church in Dallas. All I Want for Christmas focuses on the amazing, lifechanging gifts of Christmas that the miracle of God’s grace gives us. Designed as a five-week study, elements include a study book for adults, DVD and leader guide, a youth study and a children’s leader guide. The study book is available in large print and as an e-book.

Down to Earth Down to Earth: The Hopes and Fears of All the Years Are Met in Thee Tonight (Abingdon Press) will challenge readers to form a down-to-earth, servant’s faith, modeled after Christ. The adult component

of the allchurch, four-week study uses a book available in several formats and a DVD featuring 10-12-minute segments with the Rev. Mike Slaughter. Youth and children’s studies explore the same themes. Co-authoring the study with Slaughter, lead pastor at Ginghamsburg United Methodist Church in Tipp City, Ohio, is the Rev. Rachel Billups, executive pastor of discipleship and part of the preaching team for Ginghamsburg.

God Is with Us The 2016 study based on the scriptures from the Revised Common Lectionary is God Is with Us (Abingdon Press), written by the Rev. Robin Wilson, co-senior pastor of Dauphin Way United Methodist Church in Mobile, Alabama. The study is particularly useful in churches where pastors base

SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER 2016

their sermons on the lectionary Bible readings.

Prepare the Way Prepare the Way (The Upper Room) is the newest devotional book from the Rev. Pamela C. Hawkins, author and pastor. In the four-week study and prayer book, Hawkins invites readers to prepare their hearts through guided prayer, readings from Isaiah and Matthew and brief reflections on four scriptural themes: peace, justice, fearlessness and faithfulness. Available in print and digital formats, the book is also the basis for an online course. Accessible at any time, each segment of the e-course will feature a video, an audio recording of a scripture passage, a chapter of reading and a place to interact with others. Learn more about the course at http://elearning/upperroom.org.

The Redemption of Scrooge Is redemption possible for Ebenezer Scrooge? The Rev. Matt Rawle believes so as he discovers the teachings of Jesus in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. In The Redemption of Scrooge: Connecting Christ and Culture

United Methodist Interpreter

(Abingdon Press), Rawle introduces Scrooge, as well as the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future, and teaches about living with and for others in a world blessed by Jesus. Resources for the four-week study include the book, a DVD and a leader’s guide.

Underdogs and Outsiders In his Gospel, Matthew names five women in the family tree of Jesus: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba and Mary. Underdogs and Outsiders: A Bible Study on the Untold Stories of Advent explores the stories of each of these five women, showing how they all played a pivotal role in God’s purposes. Individuals and small groups can use the thematic Bible study during Advent. Each chapter offers discussion questions, a brief prayer and a focus for the week. The Rev. Tom Fuerst, associate teaching pastor at Christ United Methodist


Church in Memphis, Tennessee, wrote the study.

Why This Jubilee? In 24 reflections on wellknown carols and Christmas songs, James Howell explores the birth of Jesus, pondering the meaning of certain phrases and relating them to daily living. Why This Jubilee?: Advent Reflections on Songs of the Season (The Upper Room) arranges the four weeks of devotions by topic: The Place, The Men (Joseph, shepherds, magi), The Mother and The Child. The content is available in print and digital books and through an online course. Learn more about the e-course at http://elearning. upperroom.org or by writing UReLearning@UpperRoom.org

The Wonder of Christmas Each chapter of The Wonder of Christmas: Once You Believe, Anything Is Possible (Abingdon Press) centers on one element of the Christmas story. It looks to both the Nativity story and the stories of people today to offer inspiration and ideas for reflecting the light of Jesus at Christmas and throughout the year. The

And for more ideas ...

Rev. Ed Robb, senior pastor, and the Rev. Rob Renfroe, pastor of discipleship at The Woodlands United Methodist Church in Houston, wrote the four-week study. It includes a study book, DVD and resources to use with children and youth. INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY DEVOTIONS

Advent: A Calendar of Devotions 2016 Advent: A Calendar of Devotions 2016 (Abingdon Press) contains brief readings for each day in Advent, including a suggested scripture, a short devotion and a closing prayer. The Rev. Dale Clem, pastor of Monte Sano United Methodist Church, Huntsville, Alabama, wrote this year’s devotions. Each offers an opportunity for spiritual renewal and preparation for the coming of the Christ child. Sold in packs of 10, the booklets are designed to fit in a #10 envelope.

Christmas Is Coming! But Waiting Is Hard! Karen H. Whiting’s newest book, Christmas Is Coming! But Waiting Is Hard! (Abingdon Press) contains family devotions connecting Jesus and the symbols of Advent and Christmas. Each day includes a devotional, prayer, questions to discuss, the meaning of a Christmas symbol and suggested activities to put the scriptures into action. Reproducible pages will help with the symbol activities.

» DISCIPLESHIP MINISTRIES: On Thursday, Sept. 15, at 6:30 p.m. CT, the Rev. Taylor BurtonEdwards, director of worship resources at Discipleship Ministries, will host a free webinar on “Celebrating Extended Advent.” Register at http://bit.ly/extended-advent. The webinar will be archived and available at the same site for later listening. Find a wealth of other ideas and resources for planning worship and other events during Advent and Christmas at www.umcdiscipleship.org/ leadership-resources/advent-and-christmasleadership-resources. Included are plans for worship and retreats, music, books, videos and reflections, ideas to use with children, youth and families and much more. » GLOBAL MINISTRIES: Advent wreath lighting liturgies written by United Methodist missionaries are for use in home or church worship during Advent and on Christmas Eve/Day. The liturgies include a song from Cameroon to use as the sung response. Suggestions from the United Methodist Hymnal are also given. The liturgies and musical accompaniment will be available for download and printing on Oct. 1 at www.umcmission.org. (Search: “Advent Liturgy 2016.”) » IMAGINE NO MALARIA/UNITED METHODIST COMMUNICATIONS: Hope, peace, love and joy are the weekly themes for the Advent resources from Imagine No Malaria. Among the specific items are posters, shareable graphics, a video, sermon starters, worship elements and PowerPoint templates and ideas for using social media. Go to www.imaginenomalaria/ advent to access the resources. » RETHINK CHURCH/UNITED METHODIST COMMUNICATIONS: Rethink Church offers resources to invite guests and to use in worship at Christmas. Worship graphics, bulletin covers, sermon starters, direct mail postcards and door hangers are available with the national advertising theme, “Church can happen anywhere.” Go to www.umcom.org/rethink church for more information. » UNITED METHODIST MEN: UMM recommends using the Society of St. Andrew Advent study, available later this fall at http://endhunger.org/ advent.

Compiled by the Rev. Kathy Noble, editor, Interpreter and Interpreter OnLine. United Methodist Interpreter

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People, personalities, passions

I Am United Methodist

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hat we do serves as proof of what we believe,” says Wanda Carpenter, a member of Faith United Methodist Church in Mooresville, North Carolina, part of the Western North Carolina Annual Conference. Carpenter takes her responsibilities as a United Methodist Church laywoman seriously. “We are all called to minister,” she says. “As laity, we respond to God’s call to reach out to our communities. As laity, I believe our focus is doing and going.” Carpenter dreams of a church that is more than a place to go on Sunday, and we intentionally live out our faith serving our community outside the church walls. “Every day we are given an opportunity to impact someone’s life or to make a difference,” she says. “I dream of a United Methodist church where my twin granddaughters will want to join and become a part of a powerful ministry in reaching others for Christ.” A lifelong United Methodist, Carpenter wears many hats. In her local church, she has served as witness team coordinator and chair of the Church Council. She is associate lay leader for the Metro District in her annual confer-

ence. She has also served as project coordinator for Impact Community, a two-week summer camp for more than 65 children and youth in the community. She has also been a PlowPoint church-transformation team member and a member of the Strengthening the Black Church for the 21st Century coaching network. She works as associate director of Reynolds Ministries with the United Methodist Foundation in Huntersville, North Carolina. She is grateful for clergy who provide pastoral support and equip the laity to serve. “From the earliest days Methodism has been a lay movement,” she says. “This is proof to me that John Wesley relied heavily upon the laity in ministry. The development of effective and faithful lay servants is critical in helping our congregations move from maintenance to ministry.” Effective clergy and lay leadership lead to a vital congregation, and a vital congregation leads to a disciple-making church, she says, adding that nurturing vital congregations is a step in the right direction. “To fulfill most effectively our call to the mission of the church,” Carpenter adds, “we continue to reach and strive for innovative ways to reach more people for Christ. Although it may not be

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FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, MOORESVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA

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Wanda Carpenter

“I am United Methodist” is a regular department of Interpreter featuring stories of individual laity and clergy eager to claim and share their United Methodist identity. To suggest a person to feature, send an email to interpreter@umcom.org.

Wanda Carpenter

comfortable and popular, The United Methodist Church is having much-needed dialogue about the church looking like the kingdom (in terms of) diversity.” She says she longs for local churches that are not afraid to move from traditional ways of doing ministry to doing what is necessary to attract all people. Meeting people wherever they are and however they are is vital to the mission. Carpenter and her husband, James, strive to model discipleship. Every Tuesday evening, they facilitate Beyond the Walls Community Bible Study that draws 24 people. The study is held outside the four walls of the local church in downtown Mooresville. This study continues to be

unique; intergenerational and inclusive, reflecting the community. As it reaches beyond denominational walls, it offers an appreciation of ministry as mutual and relational. “We cast our nets and God provides the rest” is the theme. “We are intentional in inviting and engaging the community,” she says. “As we journey together, we come to the realization that we are a community of believers who truly care for one another, who pray for each other and who see God’s wisdom and grace in all we do. “Because we trust each other, we are willing to ask the hard questions that lead to transformation,” she said. “I rejoice in what God is doing through our ministry.”

Barbara Dunlap-Berg served as general church content editor at United Methodist Communications. She is now retired and living in Nashville, Tennessee.

United Methodist Interpreter


Getting wired for God

Technology

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in class. He knew there had to be a solution to help students make those connections – one that used the dialect of the millennials’ native technological language. While reading about twitter bots (automated Twitter accounts to help you do everything from find the weather forecast to tell you a joke), Balbaugh had an idea. What if there were social media accounts that could do the hard work of finding a Wesley Foundation or other United Methodist college ministry for anyone seeking one. Locate Wesley was born. Balbaugh went straight to the internet and registered @LocateWesley on Twitter and Instagram and set up a Facebook page. He sent out

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ach year, as college students were beginning their migrations to campuses, Robby Balbaugh, youth minister at First United Methodist Church in Weatherford, Texas, would make plans similar to those of thousands of youth workers and pastors: visit the students, send care packages, stay connected. He would think of visiting the students on campus, taking them out to dinner, getting to know their friends and helping to connect them with a local Wesley Foundation or United Methodist church, but it never happened quite like that. “Sometimes my intentions to do big things keep me from doing anything,” Balbaugh realized. His main hope for the students was for them to become involved in a faith community like a Wesley Foundation or other campus ministry so that their souls would be nourished along with their intellect. He firmly believes, “College is a fantastic time to grow your faith and not put it on hold.” Time after time, though, when his students came home for breaks and they would share coffee, Balbaugh discovered that young people who were deeply involved in youth ministry while in high school had never realized there was a Wesley Foundation a couple blocks away from where they were spending hours every day

Robby Balbaugh

information to his contacts letting them know that any student, parent or pastor looking for a Wesley Foundation could tweet or tag or post to these accounts the name of the university or the city. A reply would tell the location of

United Methodist Interpreter

the closest Wesley Foundation – and a virtual introduction if that ministry had an account on social media. It wasn’t long before the first tweet came in: Angelo State University. While a quick search showed no Wesley Foundation, that was not going to stop @LocateWesley from connecting the student to a faith community. Searching the conference website, it found a United Methodist congregation with a vibrant college ministry and made the connection. It also told the searcher that the United Methodist church participates in a local interdenominational college ministry. Balbaugh said, “The reality is that a simple Google search would not have turned up anything in this case and most people would probably give up.” You needed insider knowledge to look for the conference site and do the kind of digging that @LocateWesley did. @LocateWesley also lets users leverage other services like the Find Your Place tool provided by the Collegiate Ministries office of the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry in a conversational way on social media.

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@LocateWesley connects students, ministries

That is the hope of @LocateWesley. Balbaugh said, “We hope that we can bridge the gap between high school and college ministry and no longer accept that college is a time for students to wander away from the church and no longer allow hard-tofind information to make that wandering an easy choice.” This digital expression of the connection is another way that technological innovators in The United Methodist Church are translating information and resources into the language of social media. The Rev. Jeremy Steele is Next Generation minister at Christ United Methodist Church, Mobile, Alabama. He is also an author, blogger at jeremywords. com and a frequent contributor to MyCom, an e-newsletter published by United Methodist Communications.

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To Be United Methodist

Faith when the world seems wicked

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n times like these, we need to remind one another of the hope we know in Jesus Christ. Here are suggestions to keep the swirl of negativity from becoming all consuming. » Find some good news. Look for positive stories to lift your spirits. » Read the Good News. Spend some time reading Bible passages about hope and resurrection or read through one of the gospels. » Give thanks for what you have. In the midst of difficult times, there are still things for which we can be thankful. » Serve someone. Find places in your community to serve people in need. » Connect more deeply with your United Methodist church. Surround yourself with positive people who will help keep you grounded in the hope we know in Christ

Beliefs, practices, identity

» Pray. If you struggle to find things for which to pray, today may be a time to sit in God’s presence and listen. » Get some exercise. Moving your muscles releases endorphins that help you feel good. » Indulge beauty around you. We need beauty and goodness in our lives each day. » Take a break. Turn off the news alerts on your computer or smartphone for a while. As John Wesley preached, “Against hope, believe in hope! It is your Father’s good pleasure yet to renew the face of the earth. Surely all these things shall come to an end, and the inhabitants of the earth shall learn righteousness” (Wesley, John. “Upon Our Lord’s Sermon on the Mount, 2.” III.18). In the midst of all we are hearing, we believe in hope. Adapted from an article by the Rev. Joe Iovino published at UMC.org in November 2014.

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ritten by campus ministers and college and university chaplains, as well as by staff members of the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry, e Prophetic Voice and Making Peace embraces the possibilities of peace for God's people, which is the ground of human flourishing. e essays cover five key topics for campus life: ecology and environmental ethics; interreligious understanding and dialogue; systemic and interpersonal racism; sexual ethics; and Christian vocation. Contributors: Dori Grinenko Baker, Sheila Bates, Kimberly Williams Brown, Brittany Burrows, Matthew W. Charlton, Christopher Donald, Mark Forrester, L. Callid Keefe-Perry, David E. MacDonald, Rimes McElveen, Timothy Moore, Jane Ellen Nickell, Domenico Nigrelli, Stephen W. Rankin, Ron Robinson, Erin Simmonds, and T. L. Steinwert General Editors: Matthew W. Charlton and M. Kathryn Armistead

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