Page 15

m-file NEWSdesk UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

Working on Peace From the Inside Out TO MEET WHAT is per-

“The main reason why it’s so controversial is a great many people want ‘under God’ because they do think it’s an endorsement of religion ... And those of us who are opposed want it out because we also think it’s an endorsement of religion. …”

“Imagine a piece of spaghetti and imagine holding each end of that piece out to its full length while shrinking its width to zero.That’s what a string is, mathematically speaking.” —JIM GATES, PHYSICS, APPEARING ON A THREE-HOUR NOVA MINISERIES ABOUT STRING THEORY, OCTOBER 28 AND NOVEMBER 4

—MARK GRABER, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE, VOICE OF AMERICA, NOVEMBER 11

“The first thing we have to recognize is that hatred for Saddam Hussein does not translate into love for America.We didn’t learn that after toppling the regime last spring. And I think we must learn it now.” —SHIBLEY TELHAMI, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON THE CAPTURE OF SADDAM HUSSEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS ARTICLE PICKED UP BY DOZENS OF PAPERS NATIONWIDE, DECEMBER 2003

“Only in the West are we affluent enough to bear the ‘burden’ of exercising to stay in shape.” —CLAUDIA DEMONTE, ART, ON AMERICAN WOMEN NOT DOING A GOOD JOB IN “EXPORTING THE WOMEN’S REVOLUTION,” ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, NOVEMBER 4

“This is sort of the Lewis and Clark space expedition.We’re in the foothills, and we’ll soon be getting to the mountains in our view.” —FRANK MCDONALD, INSTITUTE FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, ON THE VOYAGER 1 SPACECRAFT EXPLORING THE EDGE OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM, NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, NOVEMBER 6

“The idea of universities representing themselves this way is part of the natural course. As the dinosaurs taught us, adapt or die.” —C.D. MOTE JR., UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PRESIDENT, (PICTURED BELOW WITH TERRY FLANNERY, UNIVERSITY MARKETING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR) ON BRANDING AND MARKETING AT UNIVERSITIES, CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, OCTOBER 24

12

TERP WINTER

2004

ceived as a lack in the country’s capabilities in public diplomacy, a 13-member advisory group was formed by Congress last summer to make recommendations for substantial changes in America’s international communications. Shibley Telhami, Anwar Sadat Chair for Peace and Development and professor in the Department of Government and Politics, was chosen to serve on the Advisory Group on Public Diplomacy for the Arab and Muslim World. He joins notable figures such as Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian, chairman of the group and founding director of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. Telhami is frequently quoted in the media, and he organizes the high-profile Sadat Lecture for Peace at the university, which this year features former President of Ireland Mary Robinson. (For details, see center spread) His best-selling book, The Stakes: America and the Middle East (Westview Press, 2003), will be updated for 2004 and was selected by Foreign Affairs magazine as one of the top five books on the Middle East last year. —MB

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Restoring Maryland’s Once-Bountiful Oyster Population OFFICIALS FROM THE state of Maryland have predicted that this year’s oyster harvest, ending on March 31, will be the worst ever, with a projected total yield of only 20,000 to 25,000 bushels.This saddening figure is less than half of last year’s record low of 50,000 bushels and reflects a dramatic decline from the 2.5 million bushels per year harvested from the Chesapeake Bay in the early 1980s. But don’t give up on the survival and resurgence of the Crassotrea virginica (the official name of the native Chesapeake Bay oyster) just yet, says Ken Paynter, associate professor and director of the Marine Estuarine Environmental Sciences, or MEES, graduate program. Paynter works with a group of University of Maryland scientists and students who have teamed up with federal, state and nonprofit groups in an ambitious effort to restore several Chesapeake Bay oyster habitats. “These restoration efforts will have both economic and ecological benefits,” says Paynter, explaining that a vibrant and healthy oyster reef, also called an oyster bar, helps to filter the bay’s waters while simultaneously promoting other marine life. A current project involves planting new oyster beds on top of oyster bars that were decimated during the past decade by a combination of over-harvesting, bivalve-related diseases such as Dermo and MSX, and the severe drought that occurred in 2001–2002, which affected the bay’s salinity.The first step in restoring these lifeless beds, Paynter says, is to remove any remain-

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

ing dead or diseased oysters and replace them with a fresh bed of empty shells.Then, disease-free oyster seed, called spat, is placed on the empty shells at a rate of one- to-two-million spat per acre. The spat is grown at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science oyster hatchery in Cambridge, with the actual restoration process carried out by the state’s Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Oyster Recovery Partnership, a nonprofit group that helps coordinate restoration efforts with state and federal agencies. Paynter, working with MEES graduate students and undergraduate biology students, is charged with monitoring and assessing the restored oyster bars. “Our divers will determine how many spat have survived, their growth rate, as well as their current disease status, if any,” he says. Some of the oyster bars that have been rehabilitated are already teeming with thousands of new and healthy oysters, as well as large numbers of other aquatic life. “We believe that this type of [oyster bar] restoration could really help restore entire ecosystems in the Chesapeake Bay,” Paynter concludes. —TV For more information on the University of Maryland’s involvement in oyster restoration in the Chesapeake Bay, go to www.oyster.umd.edu. TERP WINTER

2004

13

Terp Winter 2004  

Terp Magazine, University of Maryland

Terp Winter 2004  

Terp Magazine, University of Maryland