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and Loan, he again served as president and board chairman. He retired in 2002. For nearly 60 years he spent Saturdays in the fall attending Terps football games in College Park. He was also a longtime Orioles fan and a duckpin bowler and had a regular pitch-card game with friends that went back more than 50 years. Surviving are his wife of 63 years, the former Dorothy Patricia Haas; a son, Steven; two daughters, Deborah Burgio and Diane Freeland; a sister, Doris Elsnic Rogers; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Jeane Mast ’49, a retired Foreign Service officer, died April 18 in Bethesda, Md. She was 85 and had Parkinson’s disease, according to The Washington Post. Mast joined the Foreign Service in 1984 and had overseas postings in South Africa, Zaire (now Congo) and Malaysia. In the mid-1990s, she worked as office manager for Sen. Russell B. Long (D-La.), then returned to the State Department. She worked for the Africa and Near East Asia bureaus before retiring in 2008. Mast was an office manager of her former husband’s dental practice in Washington from the mid-1960s until late 1970s. Her marriage to David Mast ended in divorce. Survivors include five children, Carol Beach, Joanne Valentine, Patricia Mast, David M. Mast and Margaret Ziegler; a sister; 12 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Photos taken by Alfred Danneger (left) during his nearly 50-year tenure at UMD included an image of the third-floor offices in the old Agriculture Building (now Symons Hall), featured in the April 1948 issue of Old Line magazine, and a circa 1971 picture of story time at the Center for Young Children.

Alfred Danegger ’50, a noted photographer and nearly 50-year employee of the university, died Feb. 21 at his Lewes, Del., home. He was 89. Danneger grew up in Milford, N.J., where his father operated Danegger’s Hi-Way Nursery. He enrolled at Maryland and completed one semester before enlisting in the Army two days after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Danegger served in the Signal Corps as a combat photographer, then after the war returned to Maryland to complete his degree. On his graduation day, he began working for the Office of University Relations as university photographer. An avid traveler, he guided European bicycle trips for the American Youth Hostels and later spent 10 years serving on its board of directors. He also served as chaperone for the university’s theater and dance groups for international tours. He was a leader in the University Photographers Association, serving as president twice, and served as president of the Maryland Industrial Photographers Association. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Dorothy; two children, Robert and Anna Jarrell; and three grandchildren. 42 TERP SPRING 2013

Alfred Zimmerman ’49, former director of the old D.C. Board of Parole and Probation and a longtime hospital volunteer, died Jan. 20 following complications from a fall, according to The Washington Post. He was 94. Zimmerman served in the Navy before World War II, and rejoined the Navy during the war, serving with an intelligence unit in Baltimore. He briefly worked for the FBI before joining the Maryland corrections department. He shifted to the D.C. parole board in 1957, became director in the 1960s and retired in the late 1970s. Zimmerman lived in Silver Spring, Md., before retiring to Leisure World, also in Silver Spring. He volunteered for 30 years at what is now MedStar Montgomery Medical Center, primarily in the addiction and mental health center. His wife Photos courtesy of University Archives

Terp Magazine :: Spring 2013  
Terp Magazine :: Spring 2013