Page 5

living while tossed in a restless sea of anonymity is most people’s daily fare. Coastal Tasmania, by powerful contrast, is presented as so spectacular and restful to the eye that you’ll want to move there immediately. But you’ll also understand why Saroo Brierley feels compelled to knit these two disparate halves of his existence back together. You still have a couple of weeks to catch Lion before Oscar night. Find out for yourself why it’s on so many awards lists this year. And don’t forget the Kleenex. – Frances Marion Platt

Reminder of our rights Rosendale Theatre recreates Norman Corwin’s We Hold These Truths onstage on Sunday

Norman Corwin at his Wellworth Avenue apartment in Los Angeles, 1973

orman Corwin, who died in 2011 at the age of 101, was one of the most influential creative forces of the Golden Age of Radio. Starting out as a newspaperman, he made the transition to radio journalism in the early 1930s, hosting poetry programs and writing scripts for dramas that addressed contemporary social issues. He rose to fame during World War II by producing a series of documentaries that included An American in England (a collaboration with Edward R. Murrow), On a Note of Triumph and Fourteen August. After the war, Corwin traveled the world creating broadcasts for the United Nations, until McCarthyism drove him

N

out of the radio medium and into writing for the screen and stage. His 1956 film adaptation of Lust for Life, Irving Stone’s 1934 novel about Vincent Van Gogh, garnered him an Oscar nomination; and Ray Bradbury is said to have credited Corwin with the publication in 1950 of a collection of his short stories as The Martian Chronicles, now regarded as a classic of the science fiction genre. But the project that truly made Corwin’s career was We Hold These Truths, a radio play that he wrote, produced and directed, commissioned by the US Office of Education to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Bill of Rights. It was scheduled to air on December 15, 1941, followed by an address to the nation by president Franklin D. Roosevelt. Galvanized by the attack on Pearl Harbor that had coincidentally occurred one week earlier, some 63 million listeners tuned in: almost half of the US population at the time, and the largest audience in history for a dramatic performance. The show won Corwin his first Peabody Award. The Rosendale Theatre’s resident acting company, which has already wowed audiences with its spirited “live radio” performances of It’s a Wonderful Life and Vintage Hitchcock, will bring We Hold These Truths back to life at 3 p.m. on Sunday, February 19. The cast includes Sophia Skiles, Molly Parker Myers, Claudia Brown, Carol Fox Prescott and Joanna Rotte, with vocals by Machan Taylor and the brilliant sound effects work of percussion goddess Fre Atlast. Ann Citron directs. Best of all, admission is free. The Rosendale Theatre is located at 408 Main Street (Route 213) in Rosendale. It’s handicapped-accessible and has ample free parking in the rear. For more info, call (845) 658-8989 or visit www. rosendaletheatre.org.

Disturbing the Peace with filmmaker talk this Monday in Rhinebeck The documentary Disturbing the Peace tells the story of former Israeli

Put New Paltz on Your Calendar

www.newpaltz.edu/fpa (845) 257-3860

THEATRE www.newpaltz.edu/theatre (845) 257-3880

SHADOW OF A GUNMAN By Sean O’Casey March 2-12 Set in the 1920s as the Irish War of Independence is raging, this tragicomedy tells the story of two young men, one a poet, whose lives change dramatically when one is mistaken for a fugitive IRA gunman. COMEDY OF ERRORS By William Shakespeare April 20-30

MUSIC www.newpaltz.edu/music (845) 257-2700 Tickets $8, $6, $3 at the door Julien J. Studley Theatre

JAZZ FACULTY CONCERT February 21 at 8:00 p.m. MARKA YOUNG, violin and ALEX PEH, piano February 28 at 8:00 p.m. Mozart, Franck and Debussy

S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N E W Y O R K

The Shadow of a Gunman Jackie Evans as Minnie Powell and Zach Gibson as Donal Davoren.

5

ALMANAC WEEKLY

February 16, 2017

Your public university

soldiers from elite units and Palestinian fighters, many of whom served years in prison, who have joined together to challenge the status quo and say “Enough.” The film unfolds a variety of transformational journeys from soldiers committed to armed battle to nonviolent peace activists, all leading to the creation of Combatants for Peace. Co-director Steve Apkon, producer

Marcina Hale and several of the Combatants for Peace will be on hand when Disturbing the Peace is shown on Monday, February 20 at 2 p.m. at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck. Tickets cost $12 general admission, $10 for seniors and $8 for members and those under 16. Upstate Films is located at 6415 Montgomery Street in Rhinebeck. For more information, visit http:// upstatefilms.org. 30+ DEALERS IN OUR NEW LOCATION

ANNEX ANTIQUES Antique, Vintage & Collectible Items

ANNUAL FEB

The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Health Center

CLASSES EVERYDAY

SALE 20% - 50%OFF

STOREWIDE (Limited exclusions)

A warm and welcoming space for Yoga, Dance, I Liq Chuan, Kirtan, Meditation, Massage, Sauna & more

RED HOOK BUSINESS PARK 7578 N BROADWAY (RTE 9)

521 Main StreeW‡New Paltz

OPEN DAILY 11am-5pm SAT. 10am-5pm

(845) 255-821‡thelivingseed.com

845-758-2843

AMPLE PARKING & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

07 almanac composite esub  
07 almanac composite esub  
Advertisement