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Technische Universit채t M체nchen Faculty of Architecture

Emerging Technologies Mario Cucinella Semester 2013


Impressum Technische Universität München Faculty of Architecture Chair for Emerging Technologies Arcisstrasse 21 D 80333 München www.et.ar.tum.de

EDITING + GRAPHIC DESIGN Ulrike Fuchs Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM TEXT Robert Marino Ulrike Fuchs Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM PHOTOGRAPHY Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM PRINTING Grafik + Druck, München This imprinting is subject to copyright. All rights are re­served, whether the whole or part of the materials is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, re­ printing, re-use of illustrations, recitation, broad­casting, reproduction on microfilms or in other ways, and storage in data banks. For any kind of use, per­mission of the copyright owner must be obtained. COVER 3D printed pavillion by Shiro Studio

1. Edition // April2013


Technische Universit채t M체nchen Faculty of Architecture

Emerging Technologies Mario Cucinella Semester 2013


CONCEPT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES


CONCEPT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

Chair for Emerging Technologies The Chair for ´Emerging Technologies´ gives an engineering-oriented view onto the whole process of architecture. The focus of the teaching is to produce architectural projects that demonstrate the latest and most revolutionary heights of structural and material developments and is placed between architecture and industrial design. The field ranges from parametric design to the building of 1:1 prototypes in the context of digital production processes. Munich is a city touched by the grandeur of the Alps and by the technological achievement of the twenty-first century. The TUM enhances the programme the new Chair for ´Emerging Technologies´ through its surrounding high technology environment. Design and building processes are guided by the cooperations with partners from the industry, such as aerospace or car production (BWM, Eurocopter, Siemens, Audi, SGL Carbon, etc.). The pressure to reduce carbon emissions is one of the main factors in building and engineering processes which have to become most efficient. A strong interest in researching and the close cooperation with the Munich School of Engineering and the Centre for Energyefficient construction is obligatory.

3D printed pavillion by Shiro Studio

Alternating Visiting International Professors run the design courses of the new Chair for ´Emerging Technologies´. This ensures both innovation and variety in the teaching process and gives the students an interesting and wide-ranging view into the international field of architecture and product design.

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Visiting International Professor WS 2012/13 Mario Cucinella


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Emerging Technologies


VISITING PROFESSOR | MARIO CUCINELLA

Mario Cucinella

Aosta, University of Valle d’Aosta; Project by Mario Cucinella Architects

Mario Cucinella is the founder of MCA (Mario Cucinella Architects), an architecture firm based in Bologna, where he leads an international team of architects and engineers. With more than 20 years of professional practice, MCA has developed an extensive experience in architectural design and urban planning with particular attention to energy issues and environmental impact of buildings. Among Cucinella’s most significant projects it is worth mentioning the Sino-Italian Ecological Build­ ing (SIEEB) in Beijing; the Municipal Building in Bologna (Italy); the Centre for Sustainable Energy Technologies in Ningbo (China) and the Headquarters of 3M Italy in Milan. Mario Cucinella was born in Palermo (Italy) in 1960. In 1987 he received an advanced degree (Lau­ rea) in Architecture from the University of Genoa, where he was mentored by Giancarlo De Carlo. From 1987 to 1992 he worked as project manager for Renzo Piano in Genoa and in Paris. From 1998 to 2006 he taught at the Faculty of Architecture in Ferrara (Italy) and since 2004 he has been a visiting professor at the University of Nottingham and from 2013 at the Technische Universität of Monaco. In January 2012, Mario Cucinella founded Building Green Futures a non-profit organization that promotes sustainable development through green architecture and urban regeneration. The goal is to create built environments that incorporate clean technologies and local knowledge for better living conditions and sustainable access to natural resources in developing and least developed countries. The flagship project of Building Green Futures is “A Green School for Gaza”, developed in partnership with UNRWA. Mario Cucinella’s work has been internationally recognised. In 1999 he received the prestigious ‘Forderüngs Prize’ for Architecture by the Akademie der Künste of Berlin, in 2004 (Denver) the ‘Out­ standing Architect’ award by the World Renewable Energy Congress and in 2005 (Paris) the MIPIM Architectural Review Future Projects Award and ‘Energy Performance + Architecture Award’. In 2009 was honoured with the US Award in the Architecture category and the MIPIM Green Building Award in 2009 and in 2011.

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BACKGROUND | PHILOSOPHY

10 Emerging Technologies


BACKGROUND | PHILOSOPHY

Creative Empathy

CSET, Centre for Sustainable Energy Technologies; Ningbo, China Summer Environmental strategies

All change comes about gradually, unless a major unexpected event occurs. For several dec­ ades we have been witnessing a slowly maturing concern with environmental issues, citizens’ rights and the quality of democracy. We are in search of a new equilibrium, ensuring justice and respect in all fields, from economics to architecture, from diet to basic rights. A recent book entitled “Complain” by Stephan Hessel - co-editor of the 1948 Universal Dec­ laration of the Rights of Man - describes the need to revive and practise a peaceful revolution. The Universal Declaration is based on simple but basic definitions. These would suffice to bring radical change to present-day politics which, even in this field, has lost its way, harried by conflicting interests and a crushing economic system. This is not beside the point: it is es­ sential we realize where we stand and what is happening, since architecture is an expression of a period’s culture, politics and ambitions. We must therefore understand this period of ours. There is a pronounced gap between ambitions and reality when it comes to sustainability - a term whose meaning I would leave to common sense and not get involved in defining. The gap is due to the historical situation: we come from a culture of major industrial transforma­ tion which has both improved our quality of life, technology and development, and belatedly presented us with a steep environmental and social bill that has planet-wide repercussions in terms of survival. Whenever anything degenerates, someone always suffers and in this case it is nature: silent, unrepresented, unprotesting. And not only nature: other areas losing out are basic rights, social conquests and the under-represented half of society who raise their voices on the networks and via humanitarian associations. What seems to me most unusual and challenging here is the progressive rise of an illusory reality muscling in on real reality, living a life of its own - more to the point, living our lives. A new car advertisement bids us imagine a world where we can drive at breakneck speed, scale mountains and safely traverse empty, clean, unpolluted landscapes or cities. This is a far cry from reality. But this is what many nowadays believe in, despite the evidence of traffic,

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BACKGROUND | PHILOSOPHY

pollution and the paradox of power-speed-consumption. The problem is not making clean cars, but that they no longer fit in our towns. Our relationship with technology is alien in the 03/04/13 extreme: we don’t know what we are using, we are unable to mend it, so we chuck it away. We confuse the polystyrene wrapping our foodstuffs with food safety instead of food specula­ tion - and maybe not so safe after all. When we see fruit on the tree we are afraid it may not be good, uncertified and without a plastic wrapper. An odd way of viewing reality. Architecture itself has got into this pattern with peaks and troughs of delusory reality. It too has gone ‘pop-commercial’. It uses the communication media of advertising and consumer­ ism: it too cons us it is building wacky towns and crazy buildings where we lose sight of the connection with town living, while the relationship with man, technology and the environment comes second, if not nowhere at all. Buildings defying the laws of gravity and the canons of vulgarity, straining for a modern idiom that is uncultured and often alienating. But where’s the harm in it? There are who will tell us these are times of consumerism and communication, that this is expedient. We talk of democracy, environment, expediency, then decide it can all wait till some other time. The antidote to facile expediency/opportunism is the labour of implementing democracy, a fragile mechanism most of the time, beset by habit and entrenched privilege. But where does sustainability come in? In this far from easy situation, given the state of the market and our need to structure our work, sustainability gets reduced to an accessory, like throwing in another level of complexity, often of a bureaucratic kind, or something for engi­ neers to get their teeth into. Such an approach is far too bound up with the technological performance of constructions, or at best with reducing consumption. But consumption all the same. A technical and a logical approach seeing building as primarily a great industry to consume technology and energy, and a town as a place to exploit the ground, much like intensive farming. With such a mentality there is no room for real change.Far too long we have believed in this illusion of technology, clean and simple, all artificially controlled, light- and airconditioning, curtainwalls regardless of climate however brilliantly manufactured, work space and conditions worthy of the assembly belt. Why, oh why did we sweep away the relationship/

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INTRODUCTION | CREATIVE EMPATHY

RA, GHANA

OAS, ACC

r kWht/m2 yea 0 heating 2 year 110 kwhf/m

Environmental Design  –  IrradiaRon  Mapping  

cooling

wellbeing model in favour of complex artifice? Vastly expensive, to boot. Changing means rethinking certain basic aspects of the relationship with technology and with context, reconstructing identity landscapes. In our towns, in Italy especially, we need to restructure the way we live in our buildings, as well as revising our professional image. We shall never succeed in changing anything if we don’t change the basis of our habits and relationships and fail to accord architecture its proper dignity. The height of absurdity is when we lavish care on mainly aesthetic sustainability and not on the quality of human relationships - loyalty, trust, respect. The point is that sustainability is being seen not as a great opportunity to review the basis of the rules, but only to add another one to them. Respect for the environment, why yes, but only so long as it doesn’t begin to mean real change. The fallacy that is beginning to emerge now in this unfamiliar environmental chicanery is that we think nothing needs changing in order for everything to change - which just doesn’t work. Instead of pipe-dreams, we should be pursuing our real dream of a more inhabitable city with no cars and lots of public transport, helping us socialize more and see this town of ours as the place of human relations, joyful mingling in buildings that strive to keep up to date but with more empathy, less alienation. Cities where noise is replaced by silence or sound, where instead of being a problem of energy of quality, buildings become the solution to energy and socializing, not places that make us ill, but ones that nourish (through relations, work and culture), places of peace and quiet, not fear. I am not one of those who justify modernity by the principle of breaking with the past in one long exhausting provocation for provocation’s sake. Who knows, anyway, how long the set up we happen to live in will last? Maybe the most interesting signals are coming from the grass roots, the people who live in towns, too long designed by arrogant planners without consult­ ing them. But these, like many another sign of change, are side-issues to a world bound up with profit and development and success, unaware that progress is something subtly other. There are many issues on which we need to do some hard thinking, a whole new approach to architecture and its priority themes: the environment, consumption, comfort, beauty. I am

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BACKGROUND | PHILOSOPHY

03/04/13

not positing a world without master piece of architecture: that is fundamental for the future, an expression of intelligence, talent and the culture of our times. My point is that we should urgently change our approach to the rules, the targets we set ourselves, if we really want a new (and ecological) era to begin. I would like to see a genuine peaceful student revolution demanding more rigour and more qualified teaching in school, with environmental issues heavily present on syllabuses. Too often we detect a kind of guardedness here: the sector is too self-referential, cut off in its own jargon like a closed system with its own awards and ‘in’ culture, oblivious to reality. But how on earth can reality not be part of this process? That shows the fragility of a system when it stems from illusion and not from an inspiring dream. The laws of illusion go with exclu­ sive processes, profits for the few, an economic machine that even manages to keep politics in thrall to illusion. Illusion creates frustration. Dreams inspire campaigns (I have a dream). The delusion of politics is that our contemporary image is really about skyscrapers - simple, anonymous, repetitive: that is the law that suits global economies. Politicians are the last to have bothered to understand our cities’ character, their DNA; and so we have a glut of point­ less monuments to power, obliterating character and identity. Milan built a modern avantgarde identity for itself by Milanese research - sophisticated, painstaking, innovative - and thus created an international culture. But the international culture we are witnessing these days will turn Milan into one of many world look-alikes in the banalization that is globalization. Such buildings suck us into globalization to the delight of global finance but not the citizen. The city the people see is a mushrooming illusion which they fail to recognize; meanwhile they are asking for more public parks, more art, and more pedestrian street. They demand more respect, more clean air, more consideration for their children. Amid the clash of this worldwide conflict, cities are degenerating, globalizing against themselves. The gap widens between their past, rooted in a unique and personal culture, and this image which is totally alien to the city. Globalization, that illusory dream of modernity, has lost credibility; it will be swept away by a much more real vision: closer to dreams, but this time real dreams. Sustainability on our view should respond to this dimension, take root in the networks and

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INTRODUCTION | CREATIVE EMPATHY

in relationships, not just in financial plans. As Jaime Lerner says, it should practise urban acupuncture, heal our towns. Energy is invisible, and what can’t be seen can be described however anyone likes - which is its worst feature. But with this new outlook maybe for the first time ever we are tackling a truly global, planet-wide topic on which each of us has something important to contribute, for the planet and for the people. Imagining sustainable buildings means establishing a deep connection with the climate and locality. Imagine a new style of building in which the relation between architecture and engi­ neering is not just technological but genetic. In form and matter and not just machinery. We must imagine low-tech buildings where form and materials are made to work more, becom­ ing new agents of the result, materials performing a task. Such a process seems to me much closer to the complexity of nature and less like mechanical artifice. We need to ask ourselves the questions all over again. Do we want buildings that reduce CO2 emissions? Then we must make sure architecture takes on board the basic values that under­ pin the architect’s trade. We must contain and check that non-creative extravagance which leaves idle space and indulges in scene-painting that fails to speak. Amid the complexity of things we must learn once more to see the fundamental values, such as people’s basic rights. Sustainability will not come without determination to defend the people and give them the tools to live together properly. Over and above technology and performance we must set the beauty of emotions, the pleasure of being together and sharing space in common. Until we shake off the legacy of last century and its entrenched habits, it will be hard to express a new society through architecture, a new way of cherishing our social capital and natural capital. Here lies the challenge: despite those who see sustainability as a surface ac­ cessory or trend, we must daily strive to improve our work, build better buildings; imperfect, no doubt, but marking the dawn of a new era. It is time we believed in a dream and left behind us the world of illusion.

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Design Task Digital Fabrication Revolution


DESIGN TASK | DIGITAL FABRICATION REVOLUTION

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DESIGN TASK | DIGITAL FABRICATION REVOLUTION

Digital Fabrication Revolution The aim of the course is to explore current progress in the field of digital fabrication applied to design and architecture, with a particular focus on 3D printing for buildings, and on op­ tions offered by emerging paradigms. How far can a new technology go in influencing the way buildings are designed? The prob­ lems related to the theme of sustainability are still far from being solved. In this context, it is appropriate to investigate the relationship between technological progress in the pro­ duction of artefacts, and social change, with the ultimate aim of rethinking the integration between sustainable technologies and architectural design. The new relationship between form, materials and performance enabled by emerging technologies can open new sce­ narios in the way we design and construct buildings. The objective remains the creation of 0 CO2 buildings with low technology and high performance. However, the way we get to this objective can be radi­ cally modified if we use tools and processes offered by emerging technologies.

D-Shape 3D printer – Dinitech SpA www.dinitech.it

The first step will be to build a common glossary, a shared basis of knowledge and termi­ nology. The core part of the course will be dedicated to the design of a housing prototype, where shape and performance are profoundly linked: winter and summer strategies are integrated in the shape of the building and are based on an attentive analysis of climate data. We will measure interiors’ daylight quantity/quality and solar irradiation through simple tools. The design exercise will take into consideration current progress and changes in the produc­ tive processes brought about by emerging trends like the makers movement, open source cul­ ture and different bits-to-atoms strategies. The challenge is for new technological paradigms to develop new design languages that respond to both aesthetic and environmental criteria.

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DESIGN TASK | DIGITAL FABRICATION REVOLUTION

MakerBot Replicator 2

20 Emerging Technologies

PowerWasp – Wasp Project (www.wasproject.it)


DESIGN TASK | DIGITAL FABRICATION REVOLUTION

The course will also feature an exercise aimed at raising the awareness of participants on the relationship between geometry and material lightness in architectural design. The exer­ cise will consist of a simulation in which students will be asked to effectively build digitally designed structures, by associating fragile materials like spaghetti, cardboards and wires with items like 3D printed joints and milled finishes. At the beginning of the course, each student will be asked to develop her/his own housing concept. One of the designed concepts will be then selected for an in-depth analysis of the environmental issues linked to alternative design and construction solutions. The analysis will be carried out investigating the options offered by digital fabrication processes and in­ novative materials. A special focus will be placed in considering any possible modification in the relationship between building and builder, designer and final user.

< Form 1 3D Printer – Form Labs http://formlabs.com/ > Project in building Laboratory Univer­ sity of Ferrara - 2002

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Organisation Visiting Professorship Courses | Design Studio | Organisation


FACILITIES | DESIGN STUDIO


FACILITIES | DESIGN STUDIO

Design Studio The design studio offers upper semester students the opportunity to improve their design skills. The unique approach in strongly combining research and teaching led to many outstanding projects, some of them built full scale. Prefered topics are habitation and mobility, microarchitecture, space architecture but projects range from housing to towers, inhabited bridges to arctic stations. Some of them are highly experimental others reach patenting status. Teaching focus is on innovation, conceptual and lateral thinking, new technologies, construction, interdisciplinary work, collaboration with industries and potential clients, multimedia presentation and model building up full scale mock-ups. Students learn the full range of skills an architects needs.

TEAM-WORK The project should be developed first in person and will be handled as a competition system where the students joun up later in bigger groups. Please work in our atelier - you will learn most while working together with other students! COACHING The assistants and professor team will help guide you and show how to optimise your design from concept to final presentation.Teaching hours are every monday and tuesday from 9:00am. Studio Emerging Technologies Room 4170 design critic

DESIGN PROCESS You are free to breake the rules and design new, fresh and innovative concepts!

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ORGANISATION | LECTURE

Dialogue between Architecture and EnvironThe lecture is about knowledge of contemporary architecture and design methods incorporating environmental design. International guests from an environmental research background will be invited as well to support the dialogue with the students.

>> obligatory to our design cours

Credits: 3 ECTS Hours: see time shedule Room: 4170 Lecturer: Prof. Mario Cucinella

and guests


ORGANISATION | TIMELINE

Timeline TIME

EVENT

LOCATION

COURS

16.04.2013 10.00 h 16.00 h

Introduction design task: Mario Cucinella Presentation kick off task

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL

22.04.2013 23.04.2013 23.04.2013

10:00 h 10:00 h 16:00 h

Group Breakfast: Presentation first exercise Introduction to 3D Printer, Tutorial Lecture 1

Room 4170 Room 4170 Room 4170

EM TECH I+II

29/30.04.2013

10:00 h

Design Reviews all day

Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL

EXCURSION: Bologna - Pisa (3D Printer) Workshop: Mario Cucinella Architects

Bologna - Pisa

EXCURSION

1.TESTAT: Deseign Selection Design Reviews all day Lecture 2

Room 4170 Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL

06-08.05.2013 13.05.2013 14.05.2013 14.05.2013

10:00 h 10:00 h 16:00 h

20/21.05.2013

EM TECH I+II

Bank Holiday: Pentecost

27/28.05.2013 14.05.2013

10:00 h 16:00 h

Design Reviews all day Lecture 3

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

03.06.2013 04.06.2013 04.06.2013

10:00 h 10:00 h 16:00 h

2.TESTAT Design Reviews all day Lecture 4

Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL

Room 4170

EM TECH I+II

10/11.06.2013 11.06.2013

10:00 h 16:00 h

Design Reviews all day Lecture 5

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

17/18.06.2013 18.06.2013

10:00 h 16:00 h

Design Reviews all day Lecture 6

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

24.06.2013 25.06.2013 25.06.2013

10:00 h 10:00 h 16:00 h

3.TESTAT Design Reviews all day Lecture 7

Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL

Room 4170

EM TECH I+II

01/02.07.2013 02.07.2013

10:00 h 17:00 h

Design Reviews all day Lecture 8

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

08/09.07.2013 09.07.2013

10:00 h 16:00 h

Design Reviews all day Lecture 9

Room 4170 Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

15.07.2013 16.07.2013

10:00 h 14:00 h

FINAL TESTAT EXAM

Vorhoelzer Forum Room 4170

DESIGN MA//DIPL EM TECH I+II

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EXCURSION | ITALY

03/04/13 Â

28 Emerging Technologies


EXCURSION | ITALY

EXCURSION: Bologna - Pisa DATES 06.05. - 08.05.2013 PROGRAMM 06.05.2013 07.05.2013 08.05.2013

Design Workshop at Mario Cucinella Architects Visit to Pisa with the 3D Printer Workshop: Grashopper

COSTS about 200€ including accommodation and travel

Studio Mario Cucinella Architects and D-Shape 3D printer – Dinitech SpA www.dinitech.it

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ORGANISATION | TEACHING TEAM

Teaching team at TU M端nchen

Mario Cucinella Visiting Professor

Dipl. - Ing. Ulrike Fuchs Teaching Assistant

Dipl. - Ing. Moritz Mungenast Teaching Assistant

CONTACT Technische Universit辰t M端nchen Faculty of Architecture Chair for Emerging Technologies Arcisstrasse 21 D 80333 M端nchen

Dipl. - Ing. Robert Liedgens Visiting Teaching Assistant

Alexandra von Petersdorff Office Management

30 Emerging Technologies

Fon: +49 (0)89.289 22 491 Fax: +49 (0)89.289 28 408 E-mail: contact@et.ar.tum.de E-mail adresses assistants: surname.name@et.ar.tum.de


ORGANISATION | COOPERATION INSTITUTES

Cooperation institutes PROVISIONAL HEAD Chair for Architectural Informatics Prof. Dr.-Ing. Frank Petzold www.ai.ar.tum.de

COOPERATION INSTITUTES TU MĂ&#x153;NCHEN Faculty of Architecture: Chair for Climatic Design and Building Services Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Hausladen www.bk.ar.tum.de Chair for Energy efficient and sustainable Planning and Construction Univ. Prof. Dr.-Ing., M.Arch.II (UCLA) Werner Lang www.enpb.bv.tum.de Teaching and Research Unit for Technology and Design of Shell Constructions Prof. Dr.-Ing. Tina Wolf www.hk.ar.tum.de

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ORGANISATION | TEACHING TEAM

32 Emerging Technologies


ORGANISATION | PERMANENT TEACHING TEAM

Permanent teaching team

Dipl.- Ing. Ulrike Fuchs Teaching Assistant

Dipl.- Ing. Moritz Mungenast Teaching Assistant

2011-

Teaching + research dept. ‚Emerging Technologies‘, TUM

2011-

Teaching + research dept. ‚Emerging Technologies‘, TUM

2011-

Allmann Sattler Wappner Architekten, Munich

2009-

Teaching + research dept. of Prof. Wolf, TUM

2010

Swiss Architect Registration: SIA

2009

Teaching + research dept. of Prof. Horden, TUM

2010

Airport building department, consultant

2005-11

Auer + Weber, Munich

2008 -

Own practice in Munich: ARCHITEKTURFUCHS

2004-05

Shigeru Ban Architects, Paris

www.architekturfuchs.com

2004

SWA, Sydney

2008-11

Teaching + research dep. of Prof. Horden, TUM

2003

Auer + Weber, Munich

2008

German Architect Registration: Bayr. Arch. Kammer

2003

Diploma at TU München

2008

Eins zu 33, Munich

2002

Studied at UPC, Barcelona

2007

Britisch Architect Registration: ARB

2001

Studied at EPFL, Lausanne

2005-08

Horden cherry lee architects, London

1999-01

Studied at TU München

2005

Teaching + research dep. of Prof. Horden, TUM

1995-99

Studied at Univ. Kaiserslautern

2005

Blauwerk architekten, munich

1974

Born in Stuttgart

2005

Diploma at TU München

2003

Ackermann und Partner, Munich

2002-04

Kochta Architekten, Munich

2002-05

Studied at TU München

2000-02

Studied at BTU Cottbus

1979

Born in Munich

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Impressum Technische Universität München Faculty of Architecture Chair for Emerging Technologies Arcisstrasse 21 D 80333 München www.et.ar.tum.de

EDITING + GRAPHIC DESIGN Ulrike Fuchs Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM TEXT Robert Marino Ulrike Fuchs Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM PHOTOGRAPHY Chair for Emerging Technologies, TUM PRINTING Grafik + Druck, München This imprinting is subject to copyright. All rights are re­served, whether the whole or part of the materials is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, re­ printing, re-use of illustrations, recitation, broad­casting, reproduction on microfilms or in other ways, and storage in data banks. For any kind of use, per­mission of the copyright owner must be obtained. COVER 3D axonometrie student design by Frano Bazalo Daniel Kvalem 1. Edition // March 2013


Technische Universit채t M체nchen Faculty of Architecture Chair for Emerging Technologies Arcisstrasse 21 D 80333 M체nchen www.et.ar.tum.de

TUM_EmergingTechnologies_MarioCucinella2013  
TUM_EmergingTechnologies_MarioCucinella2013  

Semester Design Brochure of the Institute for Emerging Technologies at TU München, Visiting Professor Mario Cucinella

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