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Agency Media Report June, July, August

Media Report September, October and November 2016

Tim Stevens, chairman and CEO of the Black Political Empowerment Project, and Esther Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, at a press conference at police headquarters on the North Side as African American community leaders react to the resignation of Police Chief Cameron McLay. Full copies of Agency Media Reports are available upon request in print and electronically from the Development Office. If interested, please call 412-227-4229, or email development@ulpgh.org)


Date

9/12/2016

Topic

Event tries to bring hope for addition recovery

Media Outlet

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 9/13/2016

Childhood obesity

New Pittsburgh Courier

9/18/2016

18th Annual Community Recognition Celebration

Mount Ararat Baptist Church

Ad for Techno Teens 9/22/2016

Super Spread: Lynn Swann’s house is quite a catch

Post-Gazette

Mentions: Urban League 9/23/2016

NAACP 62 Annual Human Rights Dinner

New Pittsburgh Courier

10/5/2016

October Membership Orientation

Carnegie Library Hill District Branch

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 10/11/2016

Breastfeeding

New Pittsburgh Courier

10/12/2016

Research Opportunity for Seniors

New Pittsburgh Courier

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 10/25/2016

Community leaders urge employers to give ex-cons a chance Mentions: Esther L. Bush

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

10/25/2016

Milt Washington – Obituary

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 10/25/2016

Milt Washington – Obituary

Tribune Review

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 10/25/2016

Community Calendar

New Pittsburgh Courier

10/30/2016

Architect Henry Hornbostel builds dramatic circular structure in 1924 Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

11/01/2016

Doyle and McAllister trade shots at Great Debate

New Pittsburgh Courier

Mentions: Urban League and Esther L. Bush 11/01/2016

Businessman, philanthropist Washington dead at 81

New Pittsburgh Courier


Date

Topic

Media Outlet

11/05/2016

3rd Annual City League All Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Achieving Greatness, Inc. Ad: African American Leadership Development Institute Volunteer recruiting

11/4/2016

African American Leaders react to McLay’s resignation

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Mentions Esther Bush and the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 11/8/2016

Lewis joins Pittsburgh’s fight against violence

New Pittsburgh Courier

Mentions: Esther L. Bush, Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 11/11/2016

Palliative Care

New Pittsburgh Courier

11/15/2016

Region’s top prosecutor to resign

Tribune Review

Mentions: Esther L. Bush 11/15/2016

Visit the White House for Christmas Urban League Guild

11/15/2016

In the News: The Pittsburgh Courier Mentions: Esther Bush, the Urban League and Take Charge of Your Health Today article

African American Chamber of Commerce African American Chamber of Commerce

11/15/2016

Hate Crime Incidents in Pittsburgh among highest in Pennsylvania

WPXI

11/19/2016

A Thanksgiving Distribution

WTAE

11/19/2016

A Thanksgiving Distribution

WPXI

November 2016 40 under 40

Pittsburgh Magazine

Mentions: Ryan Scott, Director of Education Initiatives, Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 11/20/2016

25 Ways to Sample Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

11/30/2016

Community Calendar

New Pittsburgh Courier

Mentions: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh


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NAACP 62nd Annual Human Rights Dinner

(Photo by Rossano P. Stewart) The Pittsburgh Unit of the NAACP held its 62nd Annual Human Rights Dinner May 5 in the grand ballroom of the Westin Convention Center Hotel to a packed house.


Looking for a Few Good Leaders We would like for you to become a member of a unified effort to change educational outcomes for African American youth living in our region. By signing up for the “I Put Children First” Campaign, you will join with other adults who are either already involved in positively impacting youth, or who are interested and willing to become involved and would like to receive more information about volunteer opportunities. As the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh’s newly formed African American Leadership Development Institute becomes fully operational, you will receive regular information about volunteer opportunities and successes. You will be invited to training and networking sessions. Your efforts will combine with efforts of many others and we will work to capture and track the total impact and collective results. Even if you are unable to volunteer directly at this time, we will keep you updated on advocacy opportunities, in which your letter, phone call or email can help to reduce barriers and improve the playing field for youth who may otherwise be disadvantaged. Yes, I want to be counted as part of the “I PUT CHILDREN FIRST” Team NAME_______________________________________________________________________ EMAIL ADDRESS _______________________________________________________________ PHONE (DAYTIME/BEST WAY TO REACH YOU )_______________________________________ MAILING ADDRESS: ____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION (IF APPLICABLE) ________________________________________ IF YOU ARE ALREADY WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE, FORMALLY OR INFORMALLY, PLEASE DESCRIBE WHAT YOU’RE DOING. IF YOU ARE A VOLUNTEER WITH A PROGRAM AT YOUR CHURCH, COMMUNITY CENTER, SCHOOL, OR OTHER ORGANIZATION, please name the program, who operates the program, and your specific volunteer position. IF YOU ARE NOT CURRENTLY WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE, BUT WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT GETTING INVOLVED, CHECK HERE ____________________________________ THANK YOU! For more information, please visit www.ulpgh.org


African-American community leaders react to McLay's resignation November 4, 2016 11:05 PM

Tim Stevens, chairman and CEO of the Black Political Empowerment Project and Esther Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, at Friday’s press conference at police headquarters on the North Side.


By Andrew Goldstein / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette African-American community leaders had visceral reactions to the announcement today of Pittsburgh police Chief Cameron McLay’s resignation. Many were stunned. Some cried. Adrienne Young said it felt “like someone kicked me in the stomach.” “I was very upset because the only thing I could think of was all the good work that he had initiated was now going to go down the drain, and that we were going to go backwards,” said Ms. Young, executive director of the Tree of hope and vice president of public safety council No. 5. Ms. Young was among representatives of various community organizations that held a press conference Friday evening in front of Pittsburgh police headquarters on the North Side to express their disappointment in Chief McLay’s departure. At the same time as leaders touted Chief McLay’s “progressive” policies and his willingness to work with the community, they lamented that rank and file police officers didn’t support the chief or his ideas and imparted fears that the police bureau would take steps backward in his absence. Chief McLay’s tenure in Pittsburgh, which lasted slightly longer than two years, was not without controversy. He often butted heads with the union that represents the city’s police officers and most recently was under investigation for giving a speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia while in uniform, potentially breaking a federal law. But Chief McLay was well-received in the local African-American community, where one leader described the chief as “a bold, confident leader who knew what needed to be done.” Chief McLay inherited a police force with low morale whose previous chief had been indicted for failing to file federal income tax returns among other crimes. Tim Stevens, chairman and CEO of the Black Political Empowerment Project, said that Chief McLay worked to rebuild the reputation of the police force and its relationship with the community. Mr. Stevens said he and other community leaders were devastated when they heard that Chief McLay was resigning because they did not want to abandon the policies that the chief had introduced to the city’s police force, such as training in less-than-lethal methods. He noted that while incidents of police brutality have led to violence and unrest in cities across the country in the past couple of years, Pittsburgh did not have a similar experience while Chief McLay was at the helm. “Many of us were not only saddened, we were quite emotional, distressed, upset, disappointed and sensing that today is a sad day for our city,” Mr. Stevens said of the news of Chief McLay’s resignation. “To some that may seem dramatic, but to many of us it is not.” The leaders were optimistic, however, that Assistant Chief Scott Schubert — who has been tapped as interim chief and could take over the role permanently — would keep the police bureau moving in the right direction Ms. Young said she was at first dismayed about Chief McLay’s resignation, but her initial reaction changed when she learned that Assistant Chief Schubert was named interim chief and was in line to take over the position. “I’ve known Scott Schubert probably for the last 20 years, and I’ve always known him to be fair and honest and a good police officer,” she said. “So it gives me great security to know that he will be stepping into Chief McLay’s place because we know that he upholds the same values as Chief McLay.” Andrew Goldstein: agoldstein@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1352.


PITTSBURGH - A new report released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows that hate crime incidents in the Pittsburgh area are among the highest in Pennsylvania. According to the 2015 report, there were 11 incidents of hate crimes involving race, ethnicity and ancestry. There were only six incidents in Philadelphia, which has more than five times the population of Pittsburgh. Kevin Lockett was attacked last year by five people, and told police the group taunted him with racial slurs. “However you feel, you don't have to act out on somebody,” Lockett said. Esther Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, said the increase in hate crime incidents does not surprise her. “We live in an extremely segregated community,” Bush said. Bush said she worries that numbers will be even higher next year after building tensions from the election. “This is what causes tension. This is what causes hate crimes -- cause we don't know each other,” she said. A link to the FBI's 2015 hate crime statistics can be found at the WPXI website.


25 Ways to Sample Pittsburgh

Full story follows‌


New Pittsburgh Courier (Pittsburgh,PA) 11/30/2016 "Community Calendar 11-30-16 - New Pittsburgh Courier" Source Website: www.newpittsburghcourieronline.com Community Calendar 11-30-16 New Pittsburgh Courier Community Conversation NOV. 30a "The Black Political Empowerment Project, the Alliance for Police Accountability, the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh and Black Women for Positive Change will sponsor "A Community Conversation with Acting Pittsburgh police Chief Scott Schubert, at 7 p.m., at the Kingsley Association, 6435 Frankstown Ave. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15206. For more information, call 412-212-8775 or email at cav.pgh@gmail.com. Community Dinner DEC. 1a "The Homewood Children's Village will host its December Community Dinner, 5:50 to 7:30 p.m. at the WARM Center, 717 N. Homewood Ave., Pittsburgh 15208. Call Hally Ramirez to confirm attendance at 412-727-7605 ext. 16.

Highlights: Pittsburgh, PITTSBURGH, Urban League, of Greater Pittsburgh


Media report September - November 2016