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URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER PITTSBURGH FISCAL YEAR IN REVIEW | JULY 1, 2014 - JUNE 30, 2015


MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh is to enable African Americans to secure economic self-reliance, parity and power, and civil rights.

Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh Board of Directors July 1 2014 – June 30, 2015 Chairperson Annie Hanna Cestra First Vice Chair Honorable Dwayne D. Woodruff Secretary Tracey McCants-Lewis, Esq.

VISION STATEMENT We believe it is imperative that appropriate resources of the greater Pittsburgh community be marshaled to ensure equal, social, political and economic justice for all Americans. To that end, the Urban League will provide bold leadership and innovative programs, services and policies, which will contribute to the strength of the greater Pittsburgh region by ensuring that African Americans achieve their full potential. With the active engagement of community partners, the Urban League will serve as a premier advocate for economic opportunity and justice that lead to significant improvement in the quality of our lives.

ON THE COVER - Spoken Word and Visual Artist Vanessa German delivers a resounding “Call to Action” at the conclusion of the 2015 State of Black Pittsburgh Conference at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, May 16, 2015

PICTURED ACROSS - Esther L. Bush, President & CEO, and the Honorable Judge Dwayne D. Woodruff, Board of Directors Chair, at the Ronald H. Brown Leadership Awards Gala on December 4, 2015.

Assistant Secretary Charlie Batch Treasurer Alan Trivilino Assistant Treasurer Mark T. Latterner President & CEO Esther L. Bush Directors Branden D. Ballard James J. Barnes, Esq. Kaye Bealer Robert Boulware Ray H. Carson, Jr. Candi Castleberry-Singleton Bruce Court Jody Doherty Joy L. Evans Ralph A. Falbo Bob Foley Lisa B. Freeland, Esq. Daniel Friedman Reverend Glenn G. Grayson Reverend Brenda Gregg Robert Hill Abigail Horn Robbee Baker Kosak K. Chase Patterson Izach Porter David Rudolph Chuck Sanders Andrew Stockey Allegra Wakefield Lara Washington Bishop David A. Zubik


FROM THE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT & CEO AND BOARD CHAIR Dear Friend, Fiscal year 2014-2015 was a year of great growth in the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh as a new programmatic blueprint began to take shape, with a reconfiguration of employment and youth-serving departments into the Center for Economic Self Reliance and the African American Leadership Development Institute. While the Housing Department and the Family Growth & Child Development Department each retained their parameters of vital services, elements previously contained in the Employment Department or the Education & Youth Development Department have been reassigned to one of the two new service hubs, sorted by primary objectives of (1) attaining economic self-reliance or (2) nurturing leadership, articulating policy and systems change positions, and orienting and deploying advocates. Looking to the 100th year of service in 2018, we have begun to undertake a process of transformation that will focus the organization’s resources and efforts on bringing African Americans into the economic renaissance that Pittsburgh and the region have begun to enjoy. It will take programs and services such as are outlined in this report along with innovative, new approaches in order to realize this objective. It will take leaders from neighborhoods, corporations, non-profit, civic and religious organizations, working in partnership to bring this vision to life. This report contains the positive results yielded by many such collaborations from the Fiscal Year 2014-2015, encouraging evidence of what we can accomplish as we continue to work together for a most livable city and region for all of our citizens.

Yours in the Movement,

Esther L. Bush President & CEO

Judge Dwayne D. Woodruff Chair, Board of Directors


JULY 1, 2014 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2015

PROGRAMS & SERVICES HIGHLIGHTS AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE •

A combined total of seventy-two (72) students from Westinghouse and University Prep participated in the African American Achievement Trust Collective Focus graduation coaching and mentoring program that is made possible by the dedicated commitment of 110 African American Trust volunteers. Forty-four of the enrolled students were public housing residents. Sixty-three students were paired with mentors. Forty-three wrote a formal post-secondary plan; thirty seven of these included formal research on an identified career path. All seventy-two students partook of at least one Healthy Life Choices Workshop Series. Seventeen students increased their GPA while in the program. All eleven participating seniors graduated.

At the conclusion of the 7- day residential program that kicks off the yearlong Black Male Leadership Development Institute, 80 enrolled high-school aged African American young men had been exposed to the basic tenets of leadership and values. Successful African American men from across many sectors spoke with participants about decision making, responsible behavior, relationships, understanding and tolerance of other people, cultures and societies. 46 of the 80 (58%) completed the year-long program, with nine earning the coveted BMLDI leather jacket for perfect attendance and fulfillment of program requirements.

Funding was secured for the design and piloting of a Black Female Leadership Development Institute which would be launched in the subsequent fiscal year.

The Health Education Office in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh Clinical & Translational Science Institute sponsored six (11) Lunch and Learn events addressing health disparities of African American across the lifespan to, on average, 30 attendees. The partnership continued with monthly publication of “health pages” in the New Pittsburgh Courier. 460 people were provided health education/information services, 96 from the Urban League’s Mature Workers Program and 14 from the Urban Youth Empowerment Program (young adults, out of school and unemployed.) 117 individuals received health information from nursing students in the Health Education Office. The Health Education office in collaboration with the Urban League Guild of Greater Pittsburgh hosted its annual National Healthy Awareness Day focusing on “Understanding Lupus” to over 15 individuals managing this debilitating condition.

President & CEO Esther L. Bush continued her work in advocating for systems change in education via the Equity & Excellence Project (National Urban League partnership), the Campaign for Fair Education Funding (Pennsylvania coalition), and the African American Achievement Trust (identifying, recruiting and engaging African Americans to volunteer with African American youth to improve academic outcomes.)


CENTER FOR ECONOMIC SELF RELIANCE •

21 high school youth took on the Digital Connectors challenge of building expert computer skills, including CISCO certifications, and sharing those skills with others through community service projects. Toward the end of FY2014-15, the program added the ability to convey additional levels of CISCO training and certification, and broadened to include eligible young adults.

15 Techno Teens (grades 9 – 12) embarked on the yearlong program, beginning with the Gamestar Mechanics curriculum. Seven of the teens progressed far enough to be able to work with Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy faculty to learn requisite computer language and successfully write robotics programming.

Job developers provide general Employment Services for 608 job searches, referring 539 candidates to prospective employers, with 171 known to have achieved employment.

115 men and women joined the Mature Workers Program, with 110 of them successfully placed in on-the-job training positions, 47 converting into employment at an average earning of $8,667 (within Social Security recipients’ limits.)

Between January 1, 2015 and June 30, 2015, Bank On Greater Pittsburgh made 889 referrals, resulting in unbanked and under-banked consumers opening 276 checking accounts and 265 savings accounts.

FAMILY GROWTH & CHILD DEVELOPMENT •

Through Family Support Centers at Duquesne, Northview Heights, and East Hills, 281 families with children 0- 5 years of age, received counseling or referrals for assistance on matters ranging from health insurance, kindergarten preparedness, child development, parenting skills, alcohol and/or substance recovery, mental health, family stabilization, reunification, or adoption goals. 465 children received developmental screenings and/or social/emotional screenings.

HOUSING •

Hunger Services staff and volunteers accommodated 516 persons who qualified for the Emergency Food Pantry. 1,133 clients were pre-screened for eligibility and applications submitted for Supplemental Nutritional Assistance.

27 prospective homeowners enrolled in Operation Home workshop series, which presents a no-cost homeownership curricula that takes participants from budgeting and credit-correction to understanding mortgages, and determining how to make a home purchase.

398 Allegheny County residents and 1,140 City of Pittsburgh residents received rental assistance, homeownership and/or credit repair training, or mortgage foreclosure prevention counseling.


FINANCIAL REPORT STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITY JULY 1, 2014 TO JUNE 30, 2015


Copies of the complete audited financial statements may be obtained by writing to the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, 610 Wood Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

FINANCIAL REPORT STATEMENT OF PROGRAM EXPENSES JULY 1, 2014 TO JUNE 30, 2015

Unrestricted: Membership Dues, Fundraising, Solicited Income, Administrative Income

$1,243,707

Grants, Governmental Agencies Children, Youth, and Families (Allegheny County) Duquesne Family Support Center (Allegheny County) Youth Program (Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board) UYEP Program ( Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board) East Hills Family Support Center(Allegheny County) Family Stabilization Program (Allegheny County) Housing Counseling Services (Allegheny County) Housing Assistance Program (Allegheny County) Housing Counseling Services (City of Pittsburgh) Hunger Services ( City of Pittsburgh, State of PA,,PCSI) Jail Collaborative (Allegheny County) Northview Heights Family Support Center (Allegheny County) National Mortgage Foreclosure(National Urban League, PHFA) Operation Home (National Urban League,PHFA,Allegheny County/HACP) Pittsburgh Summer Youth Employment Program(City of Pittsburgh) Subtotal Government Agencies

453,924 358,740 57,616 11,371 271,689 508,772 86,305 265,726 94,273 243,775 61,920 287,165 78,282 102,328 29,243 $2,911,129

Other Support African American Achievement Trust Collective Focus (Pittsburgh) African American Achievement Trust (United Way) Bank on Greater Pittsburgh (United Way) Black Male Leadership Development( Robert Morris Univ, Buhl Foundation, Roy Hunt Foundation) Clinical Translational Program (Univ of Pgh) Digital Connectors (Comcast) Techno Teens (Comcast) Technology Grant (UPS Foundation. Misc) Educational Improvement Tax Credits(Comcast,First Commonwealth Bank, Fifth Third Bank) Equity in Excellence Program (National Urban League) Hunger Services (Allegheny County Bar Foundation,Southminster Presbyterian Church, Eat'n Park) JP Morgan Training Grant (National Urban League) Mature Workers Program ( National Urban League) Project Ready Mentor (National Urban League) Project Ready STEM (National Urban League) Summer Dreamers Academy (Pittsburgh Public Schools) Urban League Empowerment Program (National Urban League) Subtotal Other Support

71,114 112,500 175,367 170,003 75,029 13,000 17,174 20,717 126,356 48,518 16,775 13,011 885,777 7,845 9,380 19,500 128,663 $1,910,729

Total Support

$6,065,565


URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER PITTSBURGH STAFF DURING THE PERIOD OF JULY 1, 2014 TO JUNE 30, 2015

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

E D U C AT I O N & YO U T H D E V E L O P M E N T D E PA R T M E N T

Michelle Y. Thompson Job Developer/Counselor

Lorrine Rue Interim Director

U R B A N YO U T H E M P O W E R M E N T PROGRAM

Tyler Butler Program Coordinator

Nena A. Ansari Project Director

Monique McIntosh Vice President of Programs & Services

Deryk Benton Program Assistant

Gina M. Brooks Career Coach

Andrea Hudley Executive Assistant to the Vice President of Programs & Services

Tanzania M. Guinyard Program Assistant

Georgette Rue Instructor

Alexis K. Stinson Program Instructor

FA M I LY G R O W T H & C H I L D DEVELOPMENT

T E C H N O L O GY

AFRICAN AMERICAN ACHIEVEMENT TRUST COLLECTIVE FOCUS

Debra Squires Director

Winford Craig Director

Teanna Medina Program Manager

D U Q U E S N E FA M I LY S U P P O R T CENTER

C L I N I C A L & T R A N S L AT I O N A L SCIENCE INSTITUTE

BLACK MALE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE

Brenda M. Sorrentino Project Director

Vianca Masucci Health Advocate

Ryan Scott Program Manager

Maria C. Allen Van Driver/Family Center Worker

Marcus Poindexter Health Advocate

Norlex Belma Program Assistant

Barbara Y. Arnold Malone Van Driver/Family Center Worker

DEVELOPMENT & EXTERNAL R E L AT I O N S

Manden McCaskill Program Assistant

Michelle Gilbert Family Development Specialist

Mary Kay Filter Dietrich Vice President of Development & External Relations

E M P L OY M E N T & T R A I N I N G D E PA R T M E N T

Olive L. Hamilton Family Development Specialist

Lynette Taylor-Criego Director

Leslie A. Hill Central Data Manager

Jacqueline E. Carter Administrative Assistant

Lisa M. Queen Family Development Specialist

Barry Powell Employment Specialist

Chantel Wallace Family Center Worker

Darlene Wanamaker Senior Employment Specialist

E A S T H I L L S FA M I LY S U P P O R T CENTER

ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL C O L L A B O R AT I V E

Valerie A. Chavis Project Director

Carolyn Settles Program Manager/Instructor

Whadena Estes Family Development Specialist

M AT U R E W O R K E R P R O G R A M

Dennis C. Johnson Fatherhood Program Coordinator

Esther L. Bush President & Chief Executive Officer Mia VanAmburg Executive Assistant to the President & Chief Executive Officer

Vera Parker Receptionist

Mike Buzzelli Executive Assistant & Communications Associate F I S C A L D E PA R T M E N T

Vince Lepera Vice President of Finance Kathleen M. Helicher Fiscal Specialist Anna M. Harrington Fiscal Specialist Regina A. Johnson HR/Fiscal Specialist Ramona E. Watkins Fiscal Specialist

Rodney Brown Program Manager


Alicia McDonald Family Development Specialist

C Y F C O U N S E L I N G A N D R E L O C AT I O N SERVICES

Nancy J. Brown SNAP Outreach Specialist

Teona Wakefield Family Development Specialist

Sakara Bey Housing Specialist

O P E R AT I O N H O M E

Tiffany Wilson Van Driver/Family Center Worker

Robert Clanagan Housing Specialist

A R T H U R J . E D M U N D S FA M I LY S U P P O R T C E N T E R AT N O R T H V I E W HEIGHTS

Danielle Haskin Intake Specialist

Sara Nevels Project Director Donnesha Coleman Van Driver Kimberly Fairly Family Development Specialist Sara Green Family Development Specialist Faith Harfield Van Driver/Family Center Worker Dawn A. Johnson Family Development Specialist Tanelle M. Robinson Central Data Assistant B A N K O N G R E AT E R P I T T S B U R G H

Rebecca Lobley Program Assistant

Arlene J. Hurt Housing Counselor Edward Johnson Housing Specialist Stephanie C. Johnson Program Assistant Mary Lomax Housing Specialist Larry J. McCleod Case Manager James W. Morris Program Manager LeaEtta Rhodes Housing Specialist Pamela Saunders Housing Counselor HOME SAFE

HOUSING

Angelicha Matthews Program Manager

Richard L. Morris Director

Robert Reaves Senior Housing Counselor

Delicious D. Arrington-Jones Data Specialist

H O U S I N G A S S I S TA N C E P R O G R A M

Sheila M. Poole Housing Counselor Andrea J. Trowery Intake Specialist II ALLEGHENY COUNTY HOUSING COUNSELING SERVICES

Elisa Frazier Housing Counselor

Scarlett M. Howard Reports Coordinator HUNGER SERVICES

James J. Jackson Program Manager Janet Baker Program Assistant David Greve SNAP Outreach Coordinator Jane Wright SNAP Outreach Specialist

Paulette Tarrant Homeownership Counselor Elizabeth Hill Program Assistant James Wood Program Assistant


URBAN LEAGUE SEEKS A SHARE IN PITTSBURGH’S ‘RENAISSANCE’

Linda Wilson – Philadelphia Tribune Friday, February 19, 2016

“There is an economic renaissance in Pittsburgh. I am so tired of asking for whom? Why isn’t it for everybody” – Esther L. Bush, president & CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh PITTSBURGH — The 31st annual Urban League Sunday worship service featured fiery and inspirational sermons from ministers in a Hill District church, brief remarks from politicians, rousing religious and gospel music from a choir and an appearance by a former Steelers player who is now a judge. The annual event celebrates and commemorates the relationships between church and community as they work toward their goals of secure economic self-reliance, parity and power, and civil rights. As Pittsburgh celebrates its 200th anniversary this year and the Urban League marks its 98th, “economic renaissance” and a new “put our children first” campaign were recurring themes at the Wesley Center A.M.E. Zion Church. The Rev. Glenn G. Grayson, pastor of Wesley Center A.M.E., gave the opening prayer for the more than 200 people in the pews. Esther L. Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, said, “There is an economic renaissance in Pittsburgh. I am so tired of asking for whom? Why isn’t it for everybody?” “I read that Pittsburgh is a ‘cool’ place to live and ‘cool’ people are moving here. But Pittsburgh is still a city where a large number of working-age African Americans are not working” and a large percentage of African-American children grow up in poverty, Ms. Bush said. “There are efforts being made, but it’s still not enough.” She pointed out that the audience included Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Forest Hills, U.S. Attorney David Hickton and retired Steelers’ defensive back Dwayne D. Woodruff, now an Allegheny Common Pleas Court judge and chairman of the board of directors of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. As Mr. Peduto mounted the pulpit to make his remarks, he said, “Thank you, my favorite President Bush.” “We need to talk about race relations and community and police relations,” Mr. Peduto said. “We have to make sure that places like the Hill, East Liberty and Hazelwood remain affordable. We will only get there if all of us work together.” Mr. Fitzgerald said, “We have so many great things happening, but they have to happen for everybody. We have to make sure our young people and everybody enjoy the fruits of our labors.” Songs by the Pittsburgh Combined Male Choir were interspersed throughout the two-hour service. The choir was


made up of singers from churches throughout the area. Despite the name, the choir included women. The keynote address was from the Rev. B. De Neice Welch, senior pastor at Bidwell Presbyterian Church. She blended traditional Bible lessons with modern-day topics. “Our children are dying on the streets,” Rev. Welch said. “Our children are being mis-educated. “It’s time for you to be out doing the work of the Urban League, doing the work of social justice. Be out there confronting brutality, confronting mass incarceration.” Judge Woodruff said he is “proud to serve one of the largest Leagues in the country. The Urban League works to level the playing field for all Americans” and “is taking down barriers and opening doors.” — (AP)


PITTSBURGH SCHOOLS THAT WORK

By Esther L. Bush & Jonathan Cetel January 26, 2015 Pittsburgh Tribune Review

Although it remains plagued by a racial divide that leads to disparate outcomes for its young people, Pittsburgh is a resilient city filled with little gems that undermine the myth that race and poverty are overwhelming barriers to success. One such gem is the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh Charter School, where over 80 percent of the school is low income and 100 percent of the student body is black. Recent results show that the school had a negative achievement gap, which means black students performed better, on average, than their white counterparts in district schools. Whereas the most recent round of test scores revealed that less than half of Pittsburgh’s black students can read and do math on grade level, as we dig deeper into the data, it becomes clear that charter schools are emerging as leaders in serving low-income and minority students. The two schools with the absolute lowest achievement gaps for elementary school reading were both charter schools. Excluding magnet schools, the two high schools with the highest proficiency rates for black students on the Keystone Literature exam were also both charters. Charter schools are simply free, open-enrollment public schools that are given additional autonomy over their personnel, budget and curriculum in exchange for more accountability. If you give good educators real power in their buildings and their classrooms, they will innovate and create strong cultures of success. Remarkably, Pittsburgh’s charter schools have been able to accomplish more while receiving less. Because districts are able to deduct certain expenses such as facilities and debt service when calculating their per-pupil allocation, charter schools actually operate on less than 80 cents on the dollar of traditional public schools. Charter schools are not the sole answer to closing Pittsburgh’s pervasive achievement gap, but they are certainly part of the solution. While Pittsburgh Public Schools has a 70 percent “market share” of Pittsburgh’s student population, only 40 percent of Pittsburgh students are choosing to attend their feeder schools. Students and their parents are understandably looking for those academic settings most likely to grant the student maximum life opportunity. Today, charter schools serve around 10 percent of the student population, with a waiting list of thousands. Make no mistake, our public school system has and will continue to educate the majority of school-aged children in Pittsburgh. In order for our community to deliver on our promise to provide a high-quality education to all students, we must act with a profound sense of urgency and focus on scaling up schools that work — charters as well as public neighborhood and magnets — and turning around those that don’t. Esther L. Bush is president of the Urban League of Pittsburgh and chairs the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh Charter School board of directors. Jonathan Cetel is executive director of PennCAN. Copyright ©, Pittsburgh Tribune Review, 2016, all rights reserved. Reprinted with permission. Fee is waived.


BANK ON GREATER PITTSBURGH: MAKING YOUR MONEY COUNT! The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh’s Bank ON Greater Pittsburgh (BOGP) is part of a national effort, modeled after San Francisco’s successful initiative. The goal of BOGP is to connect consumers with main-stream financial services and products and offer financial education. This is because individuals, who are unbanked or underbanked, often use Alternative Financial Services (AFS), such as payday lenders, check-cashing facilities, rentto-own, pawn shops and pre-paid debit cards that charge superfluous fees to use their services.

By Sheila Beasley, Fall 2014 Taken from The Soul Pitt

Pictured above: Dr. Howard B. Slaughter, Jr., Chairman, Bank on Greater Pittsburgh, Esther L. Bush, President & CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Guhan Venkatu, Vice

BOGP has partnered with eight financial President and Senior regional Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Pittsburgh Branch, institutions and over twenty community Robert Nelkin, President and Chief Program Officer, United Way of Allegheny County and other partners to help reduce barriers for participants in BOGP’s Financial Institutions Symposium, hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of establishing banking relationships while Cleveland Pittsburgh branch. increasing access to the financial institutions. Bank On Programs bring together local government, financial institutions, and community organizations to design safe, affordable and convenient accounts for unbanked (person who has no checking or savings account relationship with a traditional financial institution) or under-banked (has an account, but is still a user of AFS). BOGP is an initiative of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh with its initial funding from the United Way of Allegheny County, and partnerships with City of Pittsburgh, Mayor Bill Peduto and Allegheny County Executive, Rich Fitzgerald, who both agree on the importance of BOGP for this region. Mayor Peduto stated at a press conference earlier this year that “He endorses BOGP as one of the top 100 items on his agenda in connection with the National League of Cities.” He also stated that “More than 10 percent of Pittsburgh residents have no bank account and another 19 percent rely heavily on risky alternative financial tools such as payday loans, check-cashing shops and rent-to-own arrangements.” The average unbanked person in Pennsylvania will pay approximately $800 a year and over $40,000 over a working lifetime in check fees and money orders. The goal of BOGP is to help people make better financial decisions and utilize less costly financial services. “Take the money you would have spent on a payday loan and add it to your grocery bill, or put it towards a car payment, there is a lot of common sense in this. Talking about financial literacy is part of getting people to plan their finances, rather than live paycheck to paycheck.” Esther L. Bush, President and CEO of the Urban League stated. Dr. Angela Reynolds, Director of programs for Financially Struggling Adults and Families at the United Way of Allegheny County, said, “Funding the Bank On Program takes consideration that people might live in neighborhoods where there’s no traditional bank, but there is a check-cashing place. Others might have grown up with the idea of keeping their money stored in the home. BOGP is providing access to those individuals with financial education and support for them to make the most of every cent earned and other resources.” Kevin Cameron (Cameron Professional Management, LLC) and Francine Cameron (Cameron Professional Services Group, LLC) are serving as aggregators of all data collected for BOGP which indicates over 2,00 new bank accounts have been opened since the launch of BOGP.


Financial partners include; Century Heritage Federal Credit Union, Citizens Bank, Dollar Bank, Fifth Third Bank, First Commonwealth Bank, First Niagara Bank, Hill District Federal Credit Union, Huntington Bank, PNC Bank and Northwest Savings Bank. Community Partners include: The University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, Family Support Programs, Just harvest, Small Seeds Development, Inc., PA Women Work, City/County/McKeesport Housing Authorities, Advantage Credit Counseling and others. For a full list of all partners please visit the website. “The positive impact of connecting unbanked and under-banked consumers with traditional banking services is tantamount to increased income for consumers, who will save immeasurably in fees, since the consumers will no longer be reliant on check cashing services, pre-paid debit cards and payday lenders,” said Dr. Howard B. Slaughter, Jr., Former Urban League Board Member and Chair of BOGP. “The initiative is having an impact, but there is still a way to go to move more people towards economic self-sufficiency and change the economy.” For more information visit the website www.bankongreaterpittsburgh.com or call (412) 227-4802 or email at hslaughter@ulpgh.org Copyright ©, Fall 2014, Soul Pitt Quarterly, 2016, all rights reserved. Reprinted with permission.


Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh 610 Wood Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.227.4802 WWW.U L P G H. O R G

Core Standards Big changes are coming to our children’s classrooms to make sure all of our children are better prepared for the world of today and tomorrow. 44 States are currently working to improve American academic standards to ensure that all students will receive a worldclass education and gain the skills they need to succeed in college, work and life. It’s about:

ENHANCED SKILLS INCREASED KNOWLEDGE BETTER PREPAREDNESS By raising and developing higher standards for everyone, we create a level playing field for all students regardless of family income, ethnicity or where they live.

CONTACT

3951 Westerre Parkway, Suite 350, Richmond, VA 23233, USA. (804) 747-4771 - Corporate HQ and Sales (877) 305-1745 - Customer Support Fax: (804) 747-5204

It’s time to put ALL of our Children first!

2014 2015 Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh Annual Report  
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