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Published by Best Group. Ulviyya S. Best Group Ltd, 7 Neverland. Illustrated by K.Y Craft Printed in Baku


Cinderella

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Godmother

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The Ball

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Glass slipper

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nce upon a time, there was a beautiful girl named Cinderella. Cinderella’s mother died while she was a very little child, leaving her to the care of her father and her step-sisters, who were very much older than herself, for Cinderella’s father had been twice married, and her mother was his second wife. Now, Cinderella’s sisters did not love her, and were very unkind to her. As she grew older they made her work as a servant, and even sift the cinders; on which account they used to call her in mockery “Cinderella.”

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It was not her real name, but she became afterwards so well known by it that her proper one has been forgotten. She was a very sweet-tempered, good girl, however, and everybody (except her cruel sisters) loved her. It happened, when Cinderella was about seventeen years old, that the King of that country gave a ball, to which all ladies of the land, and among the rest the young girl’s sisters, were invited. And they made her dress them for the ball, but never thought of allowing her to go there.

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“I wish you would take me to the ball with you,” said Cinderella, meekly. “Take you, indeed!” answered the elder sister, with a sneer; “it is no place for a cinder-sifter: stay at home and do your work.” When they were gone, Cinderella, whose heart was very sad, sat down and cried bitterly; but as she sat sorrowful, thinking of the unkindness of her sisters, a voice called to her from the garden, and she went out to see who was there. It was her godmother, a good old Fairy. “Do not cry, Cinderella,” she said; “you also shall go to the ball, because you are a kind, good girl. Bring me a large pumpkin.”

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Cinderella obeyed, and the Fairy, touching it with her wand, turned it into a grand coach. Then she desired Cinderella to go to the trap, and bring her a rat. The girl obeyed, and a touch of the Fairy’s wand turned him into a very smart coachman.


Two mice were turned into footmen; four grasshoppers into white horses. Next, the Fairy touched Cinderella’s rags, and they became rich satin robes, trimmed with point lace. Diamonds shone in her hair and on her neck and arms, and her kind godmother thought she had seldom seen so lovely a girl. Her old shoes became a charming pair of glass slippers, which shone like diamonds. “Now go to the ball, my love,” she said, “and enjoy yourself. But remember, you must leave the room before midnight. If you do not your dress will return to its original rags. I approve of pleasure, but not of dissipation, and I expect that you will show your gratitude by obeying me.” Cinderella kissed and thanked her godmother.

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When Cinderella entered the ballroom at the palace, a hush fell. Everyone stopped in mid-sentence to admire her elegance, her beauty and grace. “Who can that be?” people asked each other. The two stepsisters also wondered who the newcomer was, for never in a month of Sundays, would they ever have guessed that the beautiful girl was really poor Cinderella who talked to the cat! When the prince set eyes on Cinderella, he was struck by her beauty. Walking over to her, he bowed deeply and asked her to dance. And to the great disappointment of all the young ladies, he danced with Cinderella all evening. “Who are you, fair maiden?” the Prince kept

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asking her. But Cinderella only replied: “What does it matter who I am! You will never see me again anyway.” “Oh, but I shall, I’m quite certain!” he replied.


Cinderella had a wonderful time at the ball, but, all of a sudden, she heard the sound of a clock: the first stroke of midnight! She remembered what the fairy had said, and without a word of goobye she slipped from the Prince’s arms and ran down the steps. As she ran she lost one of her slippers, but not for a moment did she dream of stopping to pick it up! If the last stroke of midnight were to sound‌ oh, what a disaster that would be! Out she fled and vanished into the night.


The Prince, who was now madly in love with her, picked up her slipper and said to his ministers, “Go and search everywhere for the girl whose foot this slipper fits. I will never be content until I find her!” So the ministers tried the slipper on the foot of all the girls… All the great ladies who wished to be a Princess tried to put it on, but in vain. Cinderella’s sisters tried, but it on, and then Cinderella might try. They laughed at Prince, hearing of her wish,

could asked her; sent

not if but for

get she the her.

She went with her sisters in her poor dress, but very clean, and at once put on the slipper.

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“That awful untidy girl simply cannot have been at the ball,” snapped the stepmother. “Tell the Prince he ought to marry one of my two daughters! Can’t you see how ugly Cinderella is! Can’t you see?” Suddenly she broke off, for the fairy had appeared. “That’s enough!” she exclaimed, raising her magic wand. In a flash, Cinderella appeared in a splendid dress, shining with youth and beauty. Her stepmother and stepsisters gaped at her in amazement, and the ministers said,

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“Come with us, fair maiden! The Prince awaits to present you with his engagement ring!� So Cinderella joyfully went with them, and lived happily ever after with her Prince.

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Cinderella Fairy Tale Story  
Cinderella Fairy Tale Story  
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