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Pre-Purchase Survey of ……. at ………. Boatyard, ………. 11th ………. 2013 For ……….

Survey Report ………. Prepared by Jonathan Massey BEng (Hons), DipMarSur


Contents General ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 Client Information .............................................................................................................................................. 4 Limitations .......................................................................................................................................................... 4 Scope of Survey .................................................................................................................................................. 4 Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 5 Recommendations .............................................................................................................................................. 5 Hull, Deck and Structure .................................................................................................................................. 6 Vessel Details...................................................................................................................................................... 6 Hull below Waterline .......................................................................................................................................... 6 Topsides above Waterline including Rubbing Strake ......................................................................................... 7 Deck and Coachroof Moulding ........................................................................................................................... 8 Cockpit ................................................................................................................................................................ 8 Hull/Deck Join ..................................................................................................................................................... 9 Bulkheads and Structural Stiffening including Internal Mouldings .................................................................... 9 Steering, Stern Gear and Skin Fittings .............................................................................................................. 9 Steering .............................................................................................................................................................. 9 Stern Gear .......................................................................................................................................................... 9 Cathodic Protection .......................................................................................................................................... 10 Skin Fittings and other Through-hull Apertures ............................................................................................... 10 On Deck ......................................................................................................................................................... 11 Main Companionway and other Accesses to Accommodation ........................................................................ 11 Portlights, Windows etc. .................................................................................................................................. 11 Guardrails ......................................................................................................................................................... 12 Ground Tackle and Mooring Arrangements ..................................................................................................... 12 Other Deck Gear and Fittings ........................................................................................................................... 12 Davits and Boarding Ladders............................................................................................................................ 13 Covers ............................................................................................................................................................ 13 Cockpit cover .................................................................................................................................................... 13 Safety ............................................................................................................................................................ 13 Navigation Lights and Sound Signals ............................................................................................................... 13 Bilge Pumping Arrangements ........................................................................................................................... 13 Firefighting Equipment ..................................................................................................................................... 14 Lifesaving and Emergency Equipment.............................................................................................................. 14 Engines .......................................................................................................................................................... 15 Engine and Installation ..................................................................................................................................... 15 Fuel System....................................................................................................................................................... 16 Accommodation and Onboard Systems ......................................................................................................... 17 Accommodation General .................................................................................................................................. 17 Gas Installation ................................................................................................................................................ 17 Fresh Water Tanks and Delivery ....................................................................................................................... 17 Heads................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Electrical Installation ........................................................................................................................................ 18 Electronic and Navigation Equipment .............................................................................................................. 18 Heating and Refrigeration ................................................................................................................................ 19 Dinghy and Outboard ....................................................................................................................................... 19 Suggestions.................................................................................................................................................... 19 Appendix ....................................................................................................................................................... 21

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Pictures ............................................................................................................................................................. 21 Gelcoat Repairs ................................................................................................................................................ 22 Seaworthiness and Security .............................................................................................................................. 22 Seacocks and Skin Fittings ................................................................................................................................ 23 Osmosis and Moisture Readings ...................................................................................................................... 23 Safety................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Petrol Containers/LPG cylinder Stowage .......................................................................................................... 26 Regulations....................................................................................................................................................... 26

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GENERAL Client Information Client Address Contact details Type of survey and instruction

Location and conditions Date of survey

………. ………., PO9 3LU, the ‘Client’. M: ………. Pre-Purchase Survey. This is the Client’s first boat purchase and intends to use on inshore waters. ……….. A sea trial was conducted ………. water, the vessel was seen in a hoist for 45 minutes then afterwards at a pontoon berth in ………. Boatyard. Warm and dry conditions. ……….

Limitations Parts of the vessel were covered, unexposed or inaccessible due to fixed panels, mouldings and coatings etc. These areas were not examined and cannot be said to be free from defects other than where specified. No fittings or fastenings were removed for examination other than where specified. It is important to note some latent and hidden defects cannot be detected without destructive testing and since this cannot be done without the owner's consent, no such tests were carried out on unless specified in the text. This report is for the use of the Client and no liability is extended to others who may see it. Scope of Survey This survey was carried out as a pre-purchase measure to assess the structural and material condition of the vessel. Each section of the report includes details of the actual inspections and testing conducted, the resulting points to note and any recommendations and suggestions. The points to note comments relate to the specific inspections and tests carried out and are limited to unsatisfactory results and issues of interest. Recommendations and suggestions are defined as follows: 

Recommendations (red) may affect insurability, safety and/or seaworthiness and should be addressed within a defined period, and;  Suggestions (green) are aimed at helping the client make general improvements to function, operation and safety. These are not considered essential and the Client will take his own view on the importance or otherwise of these comments. Recommendations are also listed in the Summary for quick reference and suggestions at the back of the report. Further information which may be of interest is set out in the Appendix. References to condition are in relation to the vessel's age (i.e. good condition does not necessarily mean as new). The numbering convention used is from the bow e.g. ‘portlight starboard 3’ refers to the third portlight from the bow on the starboard side.

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SUMMARY The interior of ………. is in above average condition for a vessel of this age with good standard upholstery and little wear and tear. The cockpit has an excellent cover, almost new and well-fitting and there are many good features including new anchor windlass. A vessel of this age will generally require some attention and this vessel is no exception. In terms of cost the main issue is the condition of the sterndrive unit, which is showing corrosion in several areas and the possibility of it being widespread. There are a number of important issues (Recommendations) which will require time and resources, with a number needing rectification prior to use. There are indications that maintenance of the vessel recently has not been to a high standard including worn sterndrive anodes, and dislodged waste hose. Recommendations The following items should be addressed within the period defined and may affect insurability, safety and/or seaworthiness. For convenience these are hyperlinked to the relevant text in the report. R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6

Confirm proof of ownership and VAT paid status – PRIOR TO PURCHASE. ..................................................... 6 Replace port and starboard tilt rams and cylinders – BEFORE USE. .............................................................. 10 Thoroughly clean the entire stern drive unit and inspect for corrosion – WITHIN 3 MONTHS..................... 10 Replace stern drive anodes – WITHIN ONE MONTH. .................................................................................... 10 Remove prop for checking and balancing by a specialist. Allow for prop replacement - BEFORE USE. ....... 10 Replace fractured engine lid recess drain plastic skin fitting port side aft and corresponding non-standard fitting starboard side – BEFORE USE.............................................................................................................. 11 R7 Replace starboard forward portlight – PRIOR TO USE IN FRESH CONDITIONS AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS. .... 12 R8 Replace forward guardrail deck socket fittings – WITHIN 6 MONTHS. ......................................................... 12 R9 The windlass motor terminals must be insulated so there is no danger of the chain coming into contact with the live terminals – PRIOR TO USE OF ANCHOR AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS ............................................ 12 R10 The electrical cable to the windlass motor should be securely routed away from the chain so there is no danger of chafe – WITHIN 6 MONTHS. .......................................................................................................... 12 R11 Replace boarding ladder – BEFORE USE. ....................................................................................................... 13 R12 Properly secure waste hose to elbow fitting and elbow fitting to tank. Replace hoseclip – PRIOR TO USE. 18 R13 Fit an insulated cover to windlass circuit breaker under fore berth starboard side – BEFORE USE OF LOCKER. ......................................................................................................................................................... 18 R14 Secure port battery – BEFORE USE IN FRESH CONDITIONS AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS. ................................. 18 R15 Obtain VHF radio licence – PRIOR TO USE. .................................................................................................... 19

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HULL, DECK AND STRUCTURE Vessel Details The vessel was built in 1997, however is likely to have come into service in the UK after the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) came into force on 16th June 1998 therefore must comply with these regulations. A CE plate indicating conformity (at build) was seen near the helm position (pic). The vessel is rated RCD category C – ‘designed for voyages in coastal waters, large bays, estuaries, lakes and rivers where conditions up to, and including, wind force 6 and significant wave heights up to, and including, 2m may be experienced.’

Name ………. Model Bayliiner 2885 Ciera Builder Bayliner, Washington, US Year 1997 HIN ………. Type Sports Cruiser The following information from websites and not verified: Length Overall 8.53 m Beam 2.95 m Draft 0.51 m 8 cylinder Mercruiser petrol engine model MCM 5.7L LX Engine EFI plus Mercruiser sterndrive Fuel Tank 1 x 416 litres Water Tank Unknown Points to Note 1) No proof of ownership or VAT paid status documentation was seen. Recommendation and Suggestions R1 Confirm proof of ownership and VAT paid status – PRIOR TO PURCHASE. S1 Ensure Operating Manual available (as required by RCD). Hull below Waterline The hull is of cored GRP construction with spray rails. Conditions for taking moisture readings were good with air temperature 19.8°C, 8.9°C above dew point, surface temperature 18.2°C, relative humidity 51.4%. Inspection and Tests  Hull construction type (sighted from inside).  Delamination, voids (lightly hammer sounded at intervals all over. Not heavy enough to damage the coatings).  Damage, stress crazing, deflections and distortions, signs of repair, condition of coatings and other defects (sighted, spike tested).  Moisture ingress into FRP laminate (Sovereign Quantum capacitance-type moisture meter). Readings taken above waterline for reference then meter run over underbody to identify significant areas including through-hull fittings, areas of damage.

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 Readings then taken at random positions around the underbody (moisture meter on a relative scale of 0-100, not moisture content as a percentage of dry weight. Refer to the Appendix which contains important information on the interpretation of moisture readings and osmosis.). Points to Note 1) Readings were taken after the boat had been lifted out of the water only 30 minutes earlier. In these conditions the hull can expect to indicate higher levels of moisture than if allowed to dry out for a period (of a few weeks). In this situation the condition of the gelcoat, examined where test patches were scraped should be regarded as the most significant indicator of hull condition. 2) Test patches were scraped using a planing effect which, where seen, showed the gelcoat to be in good condition. 3) Moisture readings were at a level where there is a risk of moisture-related defects occurring. All GRP hulls will absorb water over time, but the formation of blisters relies on the migration of water to voids where hydrolysis creates an osmotic pressure. Please note that it is possible for well laid-up FRP hulls, i.e. with minimal voids from the manufacturing process, to have a high water content and not blister. Moisture readings were as follows: Table 1 Hull moisture readings

Position Above waterline

Port side 15

Starboard side 15

Below waterline distance from bow in metres 0-4

28-32

28-38

4-6

32-39

28-35

Transom

35

40

No increase in readings when switched to ‘deep’ mode. 4) From the test patches scraped the condition is considered to acceptable for a vessel of this age. Topsides above Waterline including Rubbing Strake The vessel has a grey plastic rubbing strake set in an aluminium channel at the hull/deck moulding join. Inspection and Tests  Major abrasion damage, significant repairs, crazing around hardspots, distortion, general cosmetic condition and condition of coating (sighted, x10 magnification, spike).  Delamination, voids (lightly hammer sounded at intervals all over. Not heavy enough to damage the coatings).  Moisture ingress (limited samples using Sovereign moisture meter). Points to Note 1) There is damage to the gelcoat around the mooring U bolt at the stem. The fastenings were tested and found not as secure as they should be. 2) At the starboard bow there is damage to the rubbing strake and gelcoat above; it has lifted away from the hull. Cosmetic only. 3) There are deep gouge marks at the cavita line starboard side with penetration to the laminate. 4) There are extensive scuff marks around the entire hull and some deeper gauges, many gelcoated over. 5) There is evidence of a repair to the port quarter below the rubbing strake. The repair hammertested sound however some gelcoat is peeling off. Cosmetic only.

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Suggestions S2 Re-seat U bolt at bow to prevent leakage, repair damaged gelcoat as per Appendix. S3 Repair damage to topsides where laminate has been exposed to prevent moisture ingress, as per Appendix. S4 Consider rubbing back the flaking gelcoat at the repair port quarter and polishing. S5 Cut back and polish out scuff marks. Consider entire hull polish to improve cosmetic appearance and provide UV protection. Deck and Coachroof Moulding This is the moulding above the rubbing strake including the boarding platform, excluding cockpit. Inspection and Tests  Deck and coachroof stiffness (bounce-tested underfoot).  Bonding, delamination of deck and coachroof (lightly hammer sounded at intervals all over. Not heavy enough to damage the coatings, sighted).  Moisture ingress, particularly around fittings (moisture meter).  Damage, deflections and distortions, signs of repair, condition and other defects, particularly around load bearing fittings (sighted).  Handrail security (vigorous force by hand). Points to Note 1) Moisture readings 10-20, 24 around the windlass, considered satisfactory. Cockpit There is a large moulded cockpit with L-shaped seat to port and fold-away transverse seat aft. Stowage for warps and mooring equipment is under L-shaped seat. A removable cockpit table was seen in the aft cabin. Fold-away foot bar fitted aft of L-seat. Cockpit drainage via entry gate. Drainage for engine hatch recess either side. Drainage holes diameter 35mm from access door well, downflooding height 100mm. Inspection and Tests  Sole condition and stiffness, delamination, voids (sighted, bounce tested, hammer sounded).  Cosmetic condition, damage, distortion, stress cracking and crazing (sighted).  Engine compartment hatch condition, security and seal (sighted).  Locker lids and securing arrangements (sighted, fixings sampled with screwdriver).  Cockpit drainage (sighted). Points to Note 1) Some movement of the helm seat was found, due to wear in the sliding adjustment mechanism. Not significant. 2) The cockpit table leg did not screw down securely to the sole fitting due to a worn plastic thread. The table is usable with caution. 3) Most of the upholstery for the cockpit seats have small areas of damage. 4) Some repairs were seen to the gelcoat, a little messy but at least providing protection against moisture ingress. 5) Holes were noted starboard side at the base of the arch which will allow moisture ingress. 6) Foldaway foot bar pin missing. 7) The starboard cockpit speaker was damaged (pic). Suggestions S6 Repair cockpit upholstery. S7 Fit new screw connector for cockpit table leg. S8 Fill holes at base of arch starboard side to prevent moisture ingress.

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S9 S10

Locate pin for cockpit foot bar at fitting. Replace cracked cockpit speaker starboard side.

Hull/Deck Join The hull-deck joint is an overlapping type design, overlaminated on the inside, with the rubbing strake on the outside. Inspection and Tests  Movement (vigorous force by hand).  Leaks where accessible (sighted, not leak tested).  Fastenings where accessible (sighted).  Damage to external area (sighted). Points to Note Nil. Bulkheads and Structural Stiffening including Internal Mouldings The vessel hull is of FRP cored construction strengthened longitudinally with spray rails and additional stringers. Plywood bulkheads are bonded to the hull. The internal sole boards were fixed in position which prevented sighting of large areas of internal structure. Inspection and Tests  Structural components checked where accessible (sighted).  Bulkheads for de-bonding where accessible (hammer sounded, spike tested). Points to Note Nil. STEERING, STERN GEAR AND SKIN FITTINGS Steering Steering is hydraulic linked to the outdrive. Inspection and Tests  Metal elements for corrosion where accessible (sighted).  Security of linkages (sighted, not tested).  Steering bush play (forced by hand).  Lock to lock test (operated).  Hydraulic oil (sighted). Points to Note Nil. Stern Gear Mercruiser sterndive fitted with stainless steel right-handed propeller marked ‘SOLAS 17 ¾ x 21R’ (diameter x pitch in inches). Fitted with tabbed securing nut. Stainless steel Bennett trim tabs are fitted. Inspection and tests  Propeller for damage and corrosion (sighted, hammer sounded, spike tested).  Propeller security (hand).  Transom shield security (fixture sampled with spanner), moisture (moisture meter).  Gimbal ring security (forced vigorously by hand).  Drive unit bellows and clamps (felt for pliability, part sighted).  Paint coating condition (sighted).  Metal corrosion (sighted). 12 September 2013

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 Hydraulic lift mechanism leaks (sighted).  Trim tab oil reservoir (sighted). Points to Note 1) There was a moderate build up of marine growth which, together with coatings that were degrading, made inspection and an accurate assessment of condition difficult. 2) All anodes were severely degraded (% worn as follows): 2 x ventilation plate 80%, trim cylinders 80% worn, mercathode 100%, trim tab port and starboard 70% worn. It is important that anodes are replaced when no more than 50% worn to provide corrosion protection to the sterndrive and engine. 3) Worn anodes indicate that they have been effective in providing cathodically protection however evidence of corrosion was seen at the aft ends of both tilt ram housings and also to the cavitation plate. This could be indicative of extensive corrosion of the unit, presently obscured by the coatings. If corrosion was found to be extensive then major refurbishment and or replacement of the sterndrive parts will be necessary. 4) The trailing edges of all three prop blades appear to have been filed from top dead centre to the root, presumably due to damage. It is difficult to assess the extent of material removed since all blades have been filed to a similar extent. Removal of material will not only affect the hydrodynamic shape and therefore thrust from the prop, but will also affect the balance. 5) Trim tab oil requires filling. Suggestion R2 Replace port and starboard tilt rams and cylinders – BEFORE USE. R3 Thoroughly clean the entire stern drive unit and inspect for corrosion – WITHIN 3 MONTHS. R4 Replace stern drive anodes – WITHIN ONE MONTH. R5 Remove prop for checking and balancing by a specialist. Allow for prop replacement - BEFORE USE. S11 Fill trim tab oil reservoir to correct level. S12 Consider servicing stern drive unit Cathodic Protection The heads inlet seacock is bonded to earth, and with the engine is bonded to zinc anodes fitted to the outdrive tilt rams and leg units. Trim tabs have anodes fitted directly. Inspection and Tests  Engine to earth continuity (tested with multimeter between sternshield and rocker cover bolt).  Condition of anodes (Stern Drive section). Points to Note 1) See Stern Drive section. Skin Fittings and other Through-hull Apertures There are two skin fittings below the waterline: heads inlet situated under the saloon steps double clipped with ball valve seacocks mounted on plywood pad and echo sounder in engine compartment starboard side. Inspection and Tests No skin fittings or valves were dismantled as part of this survey.     

Condition (sighted from outside and inside). Operated – opened/closed (not operated). Fixing bolt security (sample bolts hammer tested). Security of valve bodies (hammer tested). Security in hull of inside fittings (vigorously by hand).

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 Security, condition of hoseclips (sighted, vigorously by hand).  Condition of plywood mounting pads (not fitted). Points to Note 1) Note that where seacocks were not operated, these cannot be said to be free of defects. It should further be noted that the condition, including wall thickness, of seacocks, through-hull fittings and tailpipes cannot be ascertained with a visual inspection alone. This would require dismantling and internal inspection which was not part of this survey. 2) Engine lid recess drain plastic skin fitting port side aft of the two (pic 4) has cracked. This is above the stationary waterline but will be submerged when underway. The skin fitting immediately forward of this looks equally weathered and should also be replaced. 3) The lid recess drain starboard side has been fitted to the hull with non-standard fitting. Recommendation and Suggestions R6 Replace fractured engine lid recess drain plastic skin fitting port side aft and corresponding nonstandard fitting starboard side – BEFORE USE. S13 Consider replacing seacocks and skin fittings with bronze or DZR brass. S14 Appropriate sized softwood bungs should be attached to both seacocks for use in an emergency. S15 Consider carrying an underwater-curing epoxy repair kit to provide a rapid seal to cracks in FRP or wood. S16 Regularly check and service seacocks. ON DECK Main Companionway and other Accesses to Accommodation This refers to the folding saloon access door and fore hatch. Inspection and Tests  Fairness to deck/coamings (sighted).  Security of hatches, hinges (sampled fixings with screw driver).  Security and condition of panels (sighted)  Security and condition and leaking of gaskets (sighted, not hose tested).  Downflooding assessment (sighted). Points to Note 1) The top port corner of the folding access door is damaged. Cosmetic only, not affecting strength. Portlights, Windows etc. This includes the aluminium-framed windscreen with hinged centre panel, small hatches at either side of the saloon, portlights either side in the fore cabin, heads and in the aft cabin opening into the cockpit. Portlights are fitted with an anti-fly screens. Inspection and Tests  Fairness to deck/coamings (sighted).  Security of frames (tested by hand).  Condition of panels (sighted). Points to Note 1) The starboard forward portlight was fractured (pic 2). This is situated in the sheerline and weakness in this area is a threat to watertight integrity. 2) The heads portlight (starboard) has a damaged cowling on the outside, cosmetic only (pic 1). 3) One of the windscreen wiper blade retaining circlips is missing. Blade is corroded. 4) The hinge for the main access hatch is loose.

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Suggestions R7 Replace starboard forward portlight – PRIOR TO USE IN FRESH CONDITIONS AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS. S17 Consider replacing damaged portlight frame for heads. S18 Test portlights and deadlight for leaks with high pressure hose. S19 Replace windscreen wiper blades. S20 Secure main hatch hinge. Guardrails Inspection and Tests  Guardrail condition (sighted), security (bolts sampled with screwdriver), deck flexing/cracking (full weight applied). Points to Note 1) The most forward guardrail deck socket fittings are corroded (pic 3). Some strength remains however may fail under heavy load. Monitor for security . Suggestion R8 Replace forward guardrail deck socket fittings – WITHIN 6 MONTHS. Ground Tackle and Mooring Arrangements CQR type anchor, 9kg stowed on bow. Chain 6.4mm in locker reported 12m plus 6m warp. New anchor lift electric windlass Inspection and Tests  Anchor, chain suitability (sighted).  Anchor, chain, shackles, swivels, rope, snubber, chain lock condition, bitter end secure (no snubber, chain lock fitted).  Anchor, chain stowage and security (sighted).  Cleats, bollards (forced with crowbar).  Windlass security, condition (sample fixings tested).  Mooring warps, fenders (sighted). Points to Note 1) The bitter end of the chain was secured to around the windlass motor (pic 6). Additionally the chain stowage is close to and in danger of touching the un-insulated windlass motor terminals and is piled on top of the cables with possible chafe. These represent potentially lethal electrical hazards (pic 6). 2) The fixings for the mooring cleat on the foredeck by the windlass were found not adequately secure. Suggestions R9 The windlass motor terminals must be insulated so there is no danger of the chain coming into contact with the live terminals – PRIOR TO USE OF ANCHOR AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS R10 The electrical cable to the windlass motor should be securely routed away from the chain so there is no danger of chafe – WITHIN 6 MONTHS. S21 Secure the bitter end of the anchor warp to an appropriate fitting. S22 Secure foredeck mooring cleat fixings. Other Deck Gear and Fittings Inspection and Tests  Security, condition (sighted, vigorously forced by hand).  Attachment points for stress cracking (sighted).

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Points to Note 1) Redundant cap for waste tank starboard aft of cockpit. Davits and Boarding Ladders A boarding ladder is fitted starboard side aft. A stainless steel pad is fitted at the aft port side of the cockpit for a davit (stowed in aft cabin fitted with block and tackle). A folding aluminium passerelle (boarding plank) is stowed in the aft cabin. Inspection and Tests  Security, condition (sighted, vigorously forced by hand, davit not fitted).  Attachment points for stress cracking (sighted).  Extension below waterline for MOB recovery (sighted).  Passerelle operation (not seen fitted). Points to Note 1) The boarding ladder is severely corroded and weakened due to it being constantly immersed with no cathodic protection. Suggestions R11 Replace boarding ladder – BEFORE USE. COVERS The new cockpit can be fully enclosed with roll up covers with acrylic panels. Cockpit cover Inspection and Tests  Condition of panels and fabric (sighted).  Condition of stud fastenings (sighted). Points to Note Nil. SAFETY Navigation Lights and Sound Signals Combined ‘bicolour’ port and starboard nav lights at bow, all-round white/anchor light on arch at stern were seen. Inspection and Testing  Compliance with regulations (sighted).  Operation (operated). Points to Note 1) No compass light was observed. Suggestion S23 Check compass light operation for night use. Bilge Pumping Arrangements Diaphragm manual pump at aft end of cockpit port side with adjacent handle stowage. Electric bilge pump under engine. Both the MCA code (MGN 280) and RYA (Boat Safety Handbook) provide useful guidelines for bilge pumping. Inspection and Tests  Adequate size and quantity (inaccessible not sighted).  Strum boxes fitted (not sighted).  Pipework security, siphon potential (sighted).

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 Pump operation (operated).  Float switch operation (not sighted). Points to Note 1) Manual bilge pump cover seen cracked, cosmetic only. Suggestion S24 Verify bilge pump float switch operation and that inlet fitted with strum box. S25 Replace manual bilge pump plastic cover. Firefighting Equipment A 0.6kg FM20 dry powder fire extinguisher is located aft of the galley. Inspection and Tests  Adequate size, type and quantity (sighted).  Condition, service dates, pressures (sighted).  Galley fire blanket condition (not fitted).  Smoke alarm (not fitted).  Engine automatic fire extinguisher (sighted). Points to Note 1) A Kidde FyreWatch automatic extinguisher for the engine compartment indicator light is located by the helm position. The light did not illuminate when engine running indicating inactive/no charge. 2) A corroded aerosol ‘FirePro’ container is located in the engine compartment near the battery selector switch, disconnected. It is possible this had been connected to the FyreWatch system. 3) No extinguisher in any of the cockpit lockers. This could assist entry to the cabin. 4) Pleasure craft of less than 13.7 metres are not covered by any statutory requirements however above this size they must comply with Merchant Shipping (Fire Protection…) Regulations 1998. It is suggested that the Client should consider equipping the vessel to these standards which are set out in the Appendix. The ‘RYA Boat Safety Handbook’ also provides a useful reference. Suggestions S26 Dispose of corroded FirePro aerosol in engine compartment. S27 Consider fitting automatic extinguisher system for engine compartment. S28 Fit fire blanket near galley. S29 Fit extinguisher in cockpit to aid cabin entry in event of fire. S30 Consider fitting smoke alarm. S31 Consider fire-fighting equipment as required for vessels over 13.7m. Lifesaving and Emergency Equipment The following stowed under saloon seat: 1 x XM Quickfit self-inflating 1 x children 100N lifejacket with integral harness 1 x buoyancy aid Inspection and Tests  Adequate for vessel and area of operation (sighted).  Liferaft security, condition, service dates (not fitted). Points to Note 1) XM Quickfit lifejacket has corroded gas bottle.

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2) Regulatory requirements apply as for fire-fighting equipment (i.e. >13.7 metres). Again, it is suggested these are referred to when equipping the vessel (see Appendix). Also, the RYA Safety Handbook offers guidance for on equipment. 3) The RNLI offers a free and confidential service, ‘Advice Onboard’, that takes place on your boat and looks at the safety aspects: http://rnli.org/safetyandeducation/stayingsafe/seasafety/Pages/Advice-on-board.aspx. Suggestion S32 Service Quickfit self-inflating lifejacket. S33 Consider fitting lifesaving equipment as suggested in Boat Safety Scheme of RYA Boat Safety Handbook. ENGINES Engine and Installation The vessel has an 8 cylinder Mercruiser petrol engine model MCM 5.7L LX EFI rated at 250hp. Serial number worn off transfer and not seen. Engine instrumentation fitted: tachometer, speed (mph), oil pressure, temperature, volts, fuel. Control is by a Quicksilver 3000 Classic lever incorporating trim and trailer setting. Kill cord fitted. Engine compartment lid is held open with two gas struts. Sea Trial Inspection and Tests  Engine starting (hot started, not started from cold).  Engine run at idle speed, half throttle, full throttle with rpm, temp, oil, volts and speed recorded (operated).  Instrumentation functioning (sighted).  Exhaust smoke (sighted but discharge below water).  Vibration (monitored).  Engine leaks – oil, water (part sighted).  Throttle movement (operated).  Plotter (operated).  Steering full range (operated).  Engine trim (operated).  Trim tabs (operated). The engine was running on arrival and not started from cold. Hot starting was later shown satisfactory. Points to Note 1) Two sea trials were conducted. The first outing proved unsatisfactory with a maximum speed achieved of only 12.7 knots due to fouled propeller, observed at haul out. After haul out and cleaning, the following data was recorded: RPM TEMP OIL VOLTS SPEED SLOW 1180 180 45 13.9 3.7 HALF 2600 180 45 13.9 10.5/10.7 FULL 3600 180 45 14.1 24.0/24.7 Speeds were recorded in two directions with both recorded above. 2) The manufacturer’s manual max rpm is stated as 4400-4800 therefore the engine performed below the rated rpm. 3) A squealing noise was heard from the fan belt, this stopping briefly when lubricating fluid applied. Considered to be slight pulley misalignment, possibly from oil pump. 4) The LPG/petrol switch was unserviceable (LPG removed).

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Static Inspection and Tests  Engine hours (not recorded).  Cracked blocks, oil and coolant leaks where accessible (part-sighted including with mirror).  Condition of beds, bearers, mounts where accessible (hammer tested, part-sighted including with mirror).  Cooling system hoses condition, security, leaks (sighted).  Exhaust system security, cracks, chafe, corrosion (partially sighted).  Engine oil level, consistency (sighted).  Drive oil level (sighted).  Compartment insulation and lid seal (insulation fitted to lid only).  Engine instrumentation (sighted).  Engine blower (not functional). Points to Note 1) Engine oil level 10mm below ‘add’ mark. 2) Drive oil level 10mm below ‘hot’. 3) Poor seal around engine compartment lid. 4) The Steel brackets holding gas struts for engine compartment lid are corroded and not secure. 5) The engine blower did not operate. Suggestions S34 Investigate engine performance including compression test. S35 Fill engine and drive oil to correct levels. S36 Replace seal around engine compartment lid. S37 Repair/replace corroded brackets for engine compartment lid gas struts. Fit means of securing lid open to ensure it does not close on persons in compartment. S38 Consider a separate engine survey by a qualified marine engineer. S39 Service engine prior to launch. S40 Repair or replace engine blower. Fuel System A 416 litre aluminium fuel tank is located at the forward end of the engine compartment. Fuel is supplied via an appropriate standard hose, marked ‘SAE J1527 1 ½ ISO 7840 A2”. Fuel supplied to engine via similar marked hose size 5/8. Inspection and Testing  Tank condition, security (aft face only sighted, forced by hand).  Pipework and hoses: condition, material (visual, forced by hand).  Shut-off valve position, condition (not fitted).  Fuel gauges (sighted). Points to Note 1) No fuel shut off valve installed however it is thought than an anti-siphon valve is fitted at the tank which is acceptable. Suggestion S41 Remove fuel supply hose from tank and check anti-siphon valve. If not fit stop cock to allow fuel to be shut off. S42 Keep the fuel tank full to reduce condensation.

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ACCOMMODATION AND ONBOARD SYSTEMS Accommodation General The interior is in generally good condition for a vessel of this age. The upholstery is clean and wellfitted. There are fitted window blinds that can be rolled up. A saloon tables is located to starboard which can be used to form a double berth. An Origo 4300 E alcohol cooker with two burners is fitted to port. Inspection and Testing  All lockers for cracks, damp (sighted).  Condition of linings, furniture, upholstery, bulkheads (sighted).  Saloon sole and bilge area (partially sighted only due to fixed floor and carpet).  Galley and ventilation (sighted, cooker not tested). Points to Note 1) Some water (ca. a cupful was seen in the forward-most compartment under the berth. This coming from poorly seated U bolt fitting, bolts tested not firm (see Topsides section for suggestion). 2) The saloon table leg is not firm in the sole fitting, making the table unstable. 3) The cooker cover is a little stiff at the hinge care to be taken on opening. Warning instructions not displayed. Suggestion S43 Fit new screw connector to saloon table leg. S44 Ensure hatch above cooker is open when using appliance. S45 Display cooker warning instructions so visible when operating the stove. Gas Installation No gas installation fitted. Fresh Water Tanks and Delivery Fresh water (unknown capacity) tank is fitted under cabin sole together with Jabsco electric pump pressurised water. Filler cap starboard side near heads portlight. Shower at port aft end of cockpit. Calorifier located port side of engine compartment heated by engine and AC element. Inspection and Testing  Tank material, condition, security (not sighted due to fixed sole).  Electric pump operation (operated).  Macerator pump (operated).  Calorifier corrosion, leaks (sighted). Points to Note Nil. Heads Heads area is fitted with shower which drains into the bilge area accessed in front of the saloon steps. This is pumped dry with an electric Flojet pump with auto activation float switch and prefilter. An electric pump located to starboard of engine with macerator. MARPOL regulations cover overboard discharges at sea including what and where this is allowed. This can be seen on the MCA website: http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home Inspection and Testing  Bowl security, condition, leaks (sighted, forced by hand).  Hose vented loops (not sighted).

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 Holding tank condition, security, leaks (sighted). Points to Note 1) The waste tank inlet hose is only partially connected to the plastic elbow fitting, the hoseclip is corroded and the elbow fitting appears cross-threaded at the tank connection (pic 5). Failure of this connection will lead to the discharge of the waste tank contents into the engine space!! Suggestion R12 Properly secure waste hose to elbow fitting and elbow fitting to tank. Replace hoseclip – PRIOR TO USE. Electrical Installation The vessel has a 240 volt AC and 12 volt DC system. Two batteries in engine compartment, 360 CCA (cold cranking amps) to starboard for engine start and 90 Ah leisure battery to port. Selected via a ‘1, BOTH, 2’ selector switch located in the engine compartment. Battery charging by Guest Charge Pro 10 A charger in engine compartment. Shore power connection on deck port side feeding AC fuse panel to port side in saloon. Shore power cable stowed in locker under cockpit L-seat. AC power sockets located at aft of saloon behind sliding panel near galley and port forward of aft cabin. AC power required for microwave and refrigerator operation. Shaver socket in heads. Please note that survey tests carried out do not constitute a guarantee of safety or conformity with standards. Inspection and Testing  Battery condition, terminals covered (sighted).  Battery security, ventilation, isolating switch (sighted).  Charging arrangements (sighted).  DC circuit condition, fuses/circuit breakers (part sighted).  AC circuit condition, RCD (not sighted), circuit breakers, 30 A galvanic isolator (sighted).  Lighting (operated) Points to Note 1) New wiring has been fitted for the windlass including an 80 A circuit breaker under the fore cabin berth starboard side. This locker will be used for stowage however the terminals are exposed. 2) DC wiring seen is not of a high standard e.g battery terminations and presence of screw connector blocks (chocolate block) – seen for calorifier and other in engine compartment. 3) The port battery was located in a 3-sided tray and not secure laterally. 4) Neither battery had insulated terminal covers fitted. 5) Engine manual recommends engine start battery capacity 375 CCA (360 CCA fitted). Suggestions R13 Fit an insulated cover to windlass circuit breaker under fore berth starboard side – BEFORE USE OF LOCKER. R14 Secure port battery – BEFORE USE IN FRESH CONDITIONS AND WITHIN 3 MONTHS. S46 Fit insulated terminal covers to both batteries. S47 Consider replacing engine start battery with capacity 375 CCA as specified by manufacturer. S48 Replace screw connector blocks with correct connectors. S49 Terminals should be kept clean, coated with vaseline. S50 Battery life can be prolonged by regular charging and keeping electrolyte levels topped up. S51 A full electrical system check by a qualified electrician should be considered. Electronic and Navigation Equipment Inspection and Testing  Power up (random menu items tested). 12 September 2013

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Points to Note The following was seen operating, except where indicated: 1) Simrad CE32 plotter - no local card fitted. 2) Stereo cassette Audiovox IM-200. 3) Cobra DSC VHF - not interfaced with GPS, no callsign or MMSI seen. A radio licence is required to operate the radio. This can be obtained from: http://licensing.ofcom.org.uk/radiocommunication-licences/ships-radio/ 4) Hummingbird depth indicator. Suggestions S52 Fit appropriate card to plotter. S53 Interface GPS to VHF to provide DSC functionality. R15 Obtain VHF radio licence – PRIOR TO USE. Heating and Refrigeration Norcold fridge in saloon. Inspection and Testing  Power up (not tested, no shore power).  Condition, corrosion (sighted) Points to Note 1) Broken sheathing to fridge shelves. Dinghy and Outboard N/A SUGGESTIONS The following is a summary of the suggestions contained in the text. These are not considered essential and are set out merely to assist the Client when considering improvements to function, operation and safety. The Client will take his own view on the importance or otherwise of these comments. S1 Ensure Operating Manual available (as required by RCD). ............................................................................. 6 S2 Re-seat U bolt at bow to prevent leakage, repair damaged gelcoat as per Appendix. ................................... 8 S3 Repair damage to topsides where laminate has been exposed to prevent moisture ingress, as per Appendix.......................................................................................................................................................... 8 S4 Consider rubbing back the flaking gelcoat at the repair port quarter and polishing. ..................................... 8 S5 Cut back and polish out scuff marks. Consider entire hull polish to improve cosmetic appearance and provide UV protection. .................................................................................................................................... 8 S6 Repair cockpit upholstery. ............................................................................................................................... 8 S7 Fit new screw connector for cockpit table leg. ................................................................................................ 8 S8 Fill holes at base of arch starboard side to prevent moisture ingress. ............................................................ 8 S9 Locate pin for cockpit foot bar at fitting. ......................................................................................................... 9 S10 Replace cracked cockpit speaker starboard side. ............................................................................................ 9 S11 Fill trim tab oil reservoir to correct level. ...................................................................................................... 10 S12 Consider servicing stern drive unit ................................................................................................................ 10 S13 Consider replacing seacocks and skin fittings with bronze or DZR brass. ..................................................... 11 S14 Appropriate sized softwood bungs should be attached to both seacocks for use in an emergency. ........... 11 S15 Consider carrying an underwater-curing epoxy repair kit to provide a rapid seal to cracks in FRP or wood. ....................................................................................................................................................................... 11 S16 Regularly check and service seacocks. .......................................................................................................... 11

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S17 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26 S27 S28 S29 S30 S31 S32 S33 S34 S35 S36 S37 S38 S39 S40 S41 S42 S43 S44 S45 S46 S47 S48 S49 S50 S51 S52 S53

Consider replacing damaged portlight frame for heads................................................................................ 12 Test portlights and deadlight for leaks with high pressure hose. .................................................................. 12 Replace windscreen wiper blades. ................................................................................................................ 12 Secure main hatch hinge. .............................................................................................................................. 12 Secure the bitter end of the anchor warp to an appropriate fitting. ............................................................ 12 Secure foredeck mooring cleat fixings. ......................................................................................................... 12 Check compass light operation for night use. ............................................................................................... 13 Verify bilge pump float switch operation and that inlet fitted with strum box. ........................................... 14 Replace manual bilge pump plastic cover. .................................................................................................... 14 Dispose of corroded FirePro aerosol in engine compartment. ..................................................................... 14 Consider fitting automatic extinguisher system for engine compartment. .................................................. 14 Fit fire blanket near galley. ............................................................................................................................ 14 Fit extinguisher in cockpit to aid cabin entry in event of fire. ....................................................................... 14 Consider fitting smoke alarm. ....................................................................................................................... 14 Consider fire-fighting equipment as required for vessels over 13.7m. ......................................................... 14 Service Quickfit self-inflating lifejacket. ........................................................................................................ 15 Consider fitting lifesaving equipment as suggested in Boat Safety Scheme of RYA Boat Safety Handbook. 15 Investigate engine performance including compression test. ...................................................................... 16 Fill engine and drive oil to correct levels. ...................................................................................................... 16 Replace seal around engine compartment lid. .............................................................................................. 16 Repair/replace corroded brackets for engine compartment lid gas struts. Fit means of securing lid open to ensure it does not close on persons in compartment. .................................................................................. 16 Consider a separate engine survey by a qualified marine engineer. ............................................................. 16 Service engine prior to launch. ...................................................................................................................... 16 Repair or replace engine blower. .................................................................................................................. 16 Remove fuel supply hose from tank and check anti-siphon valve. If not fit stop cock to allow fuel to be shut off. ......................................................................................................................................................... 16 Keep the fuel tank full to reduce condensation. ........................................................................................... 16 Fit new screw connector to saloon table leg. ................................................................................................ 17 Ensure hatch above cooker is open when using appliance. .......................................................................... 17 Display cooker warning instructions so visible when operating the stove. ................................................... 17 Fit insulated terminal covers to both batteries. ............................................................................................ 18 Consider replacing engine start battery with capacity 375 CCA as specified by manufacturer. ................... 18 Replace screw connector blocks with correct connectors. ........................................................................... 18 Terminals should be kept clean, coated with vaseline. ................................................................................. 18 Battery life can be prolonged by regular charging and keeping electrolyte levels topped up. ..................... 18 A full electrical system check by a qualified electrician should be considered. ............................................ 18 Fit appropriate card to plotter. ..................................................................................................................... 19 Interface GPS to VHF to provide DSC functionality. ...................................................................................... 19

Jonathan Massey BEng(Hons), DipMarSur

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APPENDIX Pictures

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Gelcoat Repairs Firstly confirm the extent of the damage, it may be necessary to remove deck hardwear to gain full access. Ensure correct personal protective equipment is worn when carrying out repairs. Surface (Gelcoat) Damage only Where not extended through the gelcoat into the laminate, for cracks v-out the crack. Otherwise remove loose gelcoat and chamfer edges. Clean with acetone or styrene then fill with colourmatched gelcoat paste, letting it bulge slightly. When it begins to cure seal the surface with plastic or PVA. Fair and polish when cured. For deck voids, break away the cracked gelcoat then use a rotary grinding point to grind the interior surface of the cavity. Chamfer the gelcoat edges. Clean with acetone or wipe with styrene (better), fill cavity with a putty of polyester (laminating not epoxy) resin and chopped glass. When hard, fill with gelcoat, overfilling slightly. Roll a piece of plastic into the repair and seal edges with tape. Sand flush and buff when cured. Laminate damage Shallow gouge – use a scraper to open up the damage putting a smooth chamfer on each side of the gouge. Wipe the V with styrene to reactivate the surface then fill the V with polyester resin thickened with chopped glass. When the resin kicks fill the remaining depression with colourmatched gelcoat paste, letting it bulge slightly. When it begins to gel seal it with plastic or a coat of PVA. Fair and polish when cured. Deep gouge (deeper than upper two or three layers) – grind the damaged area into a depression with a 12-1 chamfer. Wipe with styrene and coat with polyester resin. Position and wet out increasingly large areas alternating mat (first layer) and cloth to the bottom of the gelcoat layer. When resin kicks brush on (or spray) 500 microns gelcoat paste. Fair and polish when cured. Consider applying additional laminate on the inside with epoxy to provide further strength. Seaworthiness and Security The Financial Ombudsman website http://www.financialombudsman.org.uk/publications/technical_notes/marine-insurance.html#seaworthy provides useful information. It should be noted that most insurance policies exclude losses caused by ‘unseaworthiness’. This is defined under the Marine insurance Act of 1906: ‘she is reasonably fit in all respects to encounter the ordinary perils of the adventure insured’. In looking at claims rejected on this basis the FOS will look for evidence as to whether the vessel was regularly and well maintained by a professional marine engineer – and whether the servicing and maintenance was carried out in line with manufacturer and industry recommendations. In addition there are basic checks and precautions that FOS believe reasonable to carry out include the following: 

checking the bilges (inside the bottom of the vessel), to ensure that there is no water in them – as this may be evidence of a leak;

inserting bungs into the drain holes at the back of the vessel, if it is being launched from a trailer;

closing all seacocks, to prevent water getting back into the vessel; and checking all safety equipment.

The FOS website also provides important information on security; that insurance policies often include additional security requirements e.g. a particular type of lock, dinghies being named,

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outboard motor serial numbers recorded etc. It is important to read the policy in detail to ensure the requirements are met. Seacocks and Skin Fittings Fittings used in this vessel are believed to be made from forged brass. Whilst these valves are in common use, ordinary brass such as this is subject to dezincification in sea water. The ISO standard relating to metallic valves and skin fittings below the waterline, ISO 9093-1, only requires the valves and associated fittings to have a service life of 5 years in terms of corrosion resistance. The valves and fittings in this vessel passed all the tests described above but consideration should nevertheless be given to replacing them with DZR (dezincification resistant brass) or bronze, both of which have a much longer potential life. Osmosis and Moisture Readings First of all, what is osmosis? All laminates in a marine environment, including epoxy, will allow water molecules to pass through them. During manufacture small voids are often created between the gelcoat and first ply of laminate, where the water will condense out and then start to break down (hydrolyse) components in the laminate. These include the ester linkages in the polyester as well as trapped dirt and debris. Breakdown products include a variety of acids, alcohols and metallic compounds. In older boats they include acetic and hydrochloric acids from the emulsion binder used in the manufacture of glass reinforcing cloth, which give blisters their characteristic ‘vinegary‘ smell. Glycols can also be released from the resin, these are hygroscopic, attracting further water and give blisters their ‘greasy’ consistency. So we now have tiny pockets of concentrated solution under the gelcoat and this is where osmosis begins. Osmosis is the process whereby water molecules pass through the gelcoat (a semipermeable membrane) to dilute the more concentrated solution. The water increases the fluid pressure in the cell which can eventually distort or burst the laminate or gelcoat. To fully assess the condition of the laminate a section would need to be ground out and chemically analysed, a process that is clearly not acceptable to the owner as part of the survey. During survey the condition of the gelcoat is assessed by removing the antifouling at several test patches around the underbody. This is done using a sharp, flat edge creating a planing effect that leaves the gelcoat intact but reveals any high spots, often the first stage of blistering. This information is combined with moisture readings taken using a Sovereign Quantum capacitance-type moisture meter. Moisture readings have to be considered in conjunction with the period the vessel has been ashore and the type of resin used. For example, orthophthalic resins were used up to the early/mid 1990s and tend to absorb and retain moisture; these yachts can be expected to show ‘ high’ readings for at least a week or two after lifting out, even where the laminate is sound. However since the mid1990s isophthalic and vinylester gelcoat resins have been widely used which can show satisfactory moisture readings within an hour or so of lifting out. Furthermore, if ashore for less than two weeks in summer or four weeks in winter (UK), readings below the waterline will be affected by surface moisture and can be expected to fall. Where an epoxy coating has been applied (usually with a brush or roller) the surface is full of micro fissures and voids which take up moisture and can double the length of time to dry out. It should also be noted that where temperatures are close to dew point and humidity levels are high, accuracy will be reduced. Due to the above it should be stressed that there is no direct correlation between moisture content and laminate condition. It is not uncommon for a well laid-up hull using good quality resin to have high moisture content and no visibly detectable moisture-related defects. Subject to these factors,

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readings for FRP solid laminates using a Sovereign Quantum moisture meter can be interpreted as follows: 0-15:

can be considered dry for all practical purposes.

16-20: some moisture present but of no significance. 21-30: considered medium but at the top of this range approaching the point where the risk of moisture-related defects developing is becoming significant. 31-45: considered high and at a level where the risk of moisture-related defects being present but not yet physically detectable is significant. 46-60: very high and usually accompanied by physically detectable signs. Likely to be accompanied by a significant increase when switched to deep mode. >61:

extremely high and indicative of possible laminate damage in addition to osmotic blistering. Likely to be accompanied by a significant increase when switched to deep mode.

It is recommended that the vessel is laid up ashore for 2 to 4 months each winter and that an annual inspection is made of underwater sections in relation to defects relating to osmosis. Safety The RYA Boat Safety Handbook contains useful guidelines and tips covering safety. Gas Regulations concerning gas safety apply to: RCD vessels (including Denali) but at time of commissioning only Coded vessels Vessels to whom the Boat Safety Scheme applies (inland waterways) The following link provides sensible advice for all vessels: http://www.boatsafetyscheme.com/ Fire Merchant Shipping Regulations require vessels over 13.7m. to carry specific fire fighting equipment, as below. http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/pleasure_craft_information_packdec07-2.pdf Table 2 - Fire fighting appliances required on craft over 13.7m and under 24m

Every ship of 13.7 metres in length or over, but less than 24 metres in length, shall be provided with: Fire extinguisher

Not less than four multi-purpose fire extinguishers to a recognised standard, each with a minimum fire rating of 13N113B, or a combination of smaller extinguishers giving the equivalent fire rating; or a) Not less than two multi-purpose fire extinguishers as described above, and b) A fire pump capable of delivering one jet of water with a minimum throw of 6 metres with a 6mm nozzle to any part of the ship. The fire pump, which need not be a dedicated fire pump, shall have one fire hose of adequate length with a 6mm nozzle and a suitable spray nozzle, and shall be either: i. a hand powered fire pump, fixed or portable, outside any engine space with one sea and hose connection; or ii. a power driven fire pump outside any engine space, fixed or portable, with sea and hose connections; or

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iii.

a hand powered portable fire pump with a throw over sea suction and hose connection. Note: Multi-purpose fire extinguishers shall have a capability to deal with both Category A fires involving solid materials, and Category B fires, involving liquids or liquefiable solids. Portable fire extinguishers provided in compliance with these Regulations shall be of approved types and for technically equivalent to BS EN3. Fire buckets

Not less than two fire buckets with lanyards. Fire buckets may be of metal, plastic or canvas and should be suitable for their intended service.

The Boat Safety Scheme also contains sensible advice. Life-Saving Appliances Merchant Shipping Regulations require vessels over 13.7m. to carry specific life-saving appliances, as follows. Reference is as for fire-fighting equipment above. Table 3 - Life saving appliances required on craft over 13.7m but less than 24m in length

Distance voyaging off coast Less than 3 miles Lifebuoys, line thrower and buoyant lines

3 to 20 miles

20 to 150 miles

Over 150 miles

Four lifebuoys, two of which are fitted with buoyant lifelines and two with self-igniting lights and selfactivating smoke signals and a line throwing appliance A lifejacket suitable for a person weighing 32 kilogrammes or more for each Lifejackets such person on board; a Iifejacket suitable for a person weighing less than 32 kilogrammes for each such person on board. Lifejackets carried for persons on watch should be stowed in positions readily accessible from the manned watch station. Each lifejacket shall be fitted with a lifejacket light Lifejacket lights No requirement. complying with the appropriate MCA recognised standard. Flares 4 red hand-held, 4 white hand4 parachute flares, 4 red hand-held, 4 white hand-held held and 2 and 2 orange smoke flares orange smoke flares Training/instruction A training or instruction manual containing instructions and information on manual the life-saving appliances provided in the vessel and their maintenance. Lifesaving signals A copy of the table "Life-saving Signals and Rescue Methods, SOLAS No.1� or "Life-saving Signals and Rescue Methods, SOLAS No. 2". Maritime radio A maritime radio capable of transmitting and receiving, appropriate to the area of operation. 12 September 2013

Two lifebuoys, one of which is fitted with a self-igniting light and a buoyant lifeline at least 18m in length.

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Boarding ladder

In ships of Class XII of 13. 7m in length and over, an embarkation ladder shall be provided at each embarkation station extending, in a single length, from the deck to the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition under unfavourable conditions of trim of up to 10 degrees and with the ship listed not less than 20 degrees either way and where such distance exceeds 1 metre. Such ladder(s) may be temporarily attached. In ships of Class XII of 13. 7m in length or over, but less than 24m in length, such ladder(s) may be replaced by approved devices to afford access to survival craft when waterborne. No requirement Yes (see full regs) Yes (see full regs) Yes (see full regs)

One or more inflatable liferaft(s) with total capacity to accommodate those on board Petrol Containers/LPG cylinder Stowage The following is taken from the Boat Safety Scheme (http://www.boatsafetyscheme.com/).

Spare petrol containers must be stored in the open where any leaked petrol would flow overboard unimpeded, or in a suitable locker. Any locker used to store spare petrol must be:        

drained to the outside from the bottom; and, secure and constructed of a material of the required thickness, in good condition; and, free from objects that could block the drain, damage the petrol container or cause petrol vapour to ignite; and, fuel-tight to an equal or greater height that the top of the cap for the petrol container; and, self-draining and the drain hole must have a minimum internal diameter of 12mm (1/2 in) and must not be blocked; and, the locker must not open into any engine, battery or electrical equipment space; and, the drain line material including connections must be complete and in good condition.

Regulations The Merchant Shipping Regulations apply to all vessels under the UK flag and vessels in UK waters or operating from UK ports. These include COLREGS, MARPOL. Further information can be found at the following link: http://www.rya.org.uk/infoadvice/regssafety/pleasurecraftregs/Pages/PleasureCraftRegulations.asp x Information on regulations that apply to commercial vessels can be found at: http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mgn_280-2.pdf

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Sample Motorboat Pre-Purchase Survey by UK Yacht Surveyors  

Pre-Purchase Survey by UK Yacht Surveyors on a Bayliner 2885