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members rk o tw e N t u 009 ine for Sco June/July 2 The magaz

NT I O P T O O M YA COME KEN RLD TO THE WO? MOOT

Wicked Scouting

Meet the purple people of East Lancashire

Rent or buy?

Our guide to a common problem

! H S A L P S A E K A M Network recruitment at university

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Your Scout Network Working Group Adrian Wray, UK Adviser (Scout Network)

Welcome

Emma Saunders, Programme and Development Adviser

Hot stuff

Contributions to: programme@scout.org.uk ADVERTISING Senior Sales Executive: Tom Fountain tom@thinkpublishing.co.uk Tel: 020 8962 1258

Lee Allwood welcomes you to the June/July edition of Network, well aware that it will soon be Christmas. By soon, he means six months The theme for the main magazine is ‘Summer Adventure’ and hopefully you and your Network are either planning or about to go away on your summer camp, or have been and are currently recovering from it! In this issue we take a look at the university challenge: a pilot scheme which aimed to recruit more students into the Scout Network.

Girl zone Following on from our hard-hitting article on testicular cancer last month, we get to grips with the important issue of breasts and, more accurately, breast and cervical cancer.

Purple reign

Network Names Pillage Network meets in north Bedfordshire, which in Viking times was a battleground between the Saxons and their Nordic invaders. Pillaging was a common activity back then, but now the Network put their energies into more wholesome pursuits (but still party like Vikings!)

For our Network in focus we take a closer look at the ‘purple people’ of East Lancashire and how a boost in image has helped them boost their Network. UK Adviser (and former editor) Adrian Wray makes a welcome return to the familiar ground of the supplement and has some useful information on making those first steps onto the property ladder.

Touch base Please keep your stories, comments, pictures and random thoughts coming in to us, as we are always on the look-out for content and welcome all your correspondence. Either send it to programme@scout.org.uk with ‘Network Supplement’ in the subject line, or get in touch with us via the Scout Network Supplement group on Facebook.

Contents 4 Putting the camp into campus Getting more univeristy students to join the Scout Network

6 Programme factory We go stateside for inspiration plus a random programme challenge for you to try

8 It’s a girl thing Detecting female cancers

11 The adventure starts here Degree courses tailor-made for outdoor enthusiasts

12 Broom broom! East Lancashire Network take to the moonlit skies

14 Problem page Renting vs buying – what you need to know

17 Moot point One world event not to miss

18 Formula fun Dates for your Network’s diary

scouts.org.uk/pol

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Your Scout Network Working Group Adrian Wray, UK Adviser (Scout Network)

Welcome

Emma Saunders, Programme and Development Adviser

Hot stuff

Contributions to: programme@scout.org.uk ADVERTISING Senior Sales Executive: Tom Fountain tom@thinkpublishing.co.uk Tel: 020 8962 1258

Lee Allwood welcomes you to the June/July edition of Network, well aware that it will soon be Christmas. By soon, he means six months The theme for the main magazine is ‘Summer Adventure’ and hopefully you and your Network are either planning or about to go away on your summer camp, or have been and are currently recovering from it! In this issue we take a look at the university challenge: a pilot scheme which aimed to recruit more students into the Scout Network.

Girl zone Following on from our hard-hitting article on testicular cancer last month, we get to grips with the important issue of breasts and, more accurately, breast and cervical cancer.

Purple reign

Network Names Pillage Network meets in north Bedfordshire, which in Viking times was a battleground between the Saxons and their Nordic invaders. Pillaging was a common activity back then, but now the Network put their energies into more wholesome pursuits (but still party like Vikings!)

For our Network in focus we take a closer look at the ‘purple people’ of East Lancashire and how a boost in image has helped them boost their Network. UK Adviser (and former editor) Adrian Wray makes a welcome return to the familiar ground of the supplement and has some useful information on making those first steps onto the property ladder.

Touch base Please keep your stories, comments, pictures and random thoughts coming in to us, as we are always on the look-out for content and welcome all your correspondence. Either send it to programme@scout.org.uk with ‘Network Supplement’ in the subject line, or get in touch with us via the Scout Network Supplement group on Facebook.

Contents 4 Putting the camp into campus Getting more univeristy students to join the Scout Network

6 Programme factory We go stateside for inspiration plus a random programme challenge for you to try

8 It’s a girl thing Detecting female cancers

11 The adventure starts here Degree courses tailor-made for outdoor enthusiasts

12 Broom broom! East Lancashire Network take to the moonlit skies

14 Problem page Renting vs buying – what you need to know

17 Moot point One world event not to miss

18 Festival of fun Dates for your Network’s diary

scouts.org.uk/pol

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Earlier this year, three universities became campsites for the day, as students were targeted to become Scouting volunteers. The approach was simple, but the response was unbelievable. Elis Matthews pieces together the story

Putting the cam T

he contradiction between the stereotypes of the undergraduate student and the Scouting volunteer is that one has loads of free time but is lazy and the other has no free time but is unable to say ‘no’. What if more students could be persuaded to give Scouting a go? What if some of that free time went into providing young people with new adventures, and taking the slack of our overburdened volunteer force? Partnering up with marketing agency Making Waves, Network members in Essex, Bedfordshire and West Lancashire ran recruitment days and taster activities, with the aim of recruiting 600 volunteers across the three universities.

Sausages on sticks The Scout marquees were sited in unmissable locations, with activities on hand that would attract passers by to have a go. A climbing wall competition, power bocking, games consoles and the all-important free barbecue ensured the students were enticed, and it was here that the Network members started conversations about Scouting. We discovered that many students wanted to 4

do some volunteering, either to add to their CV or for personal development. Those who had been Scouts when they were younger were surprised to learn they could still be involved, especially in the adventurous activities and international travel as members of the Scout Network.

‘It’s not short trousers, dyb dyb dyb and Kumbaya round the campfire! It’s about adventure, new experiences and friends, international travel and just huge fun!’ Taste test Details were taken (in exchange for a goodie bag) and the recruits were invited to an event to learn more about volunteering and joining Scout Network. The taster days, held at local campsites, gave the students a chance to meet some of the young people they could volunteer to support. Karl, who ran the day in Bedfordshire, said that speed section dating was one of the highlights. ‘Each section had ten minutes to explain what they did’. The afternoon team-building activity, raft building, was ‘true February madness’ on

Network June/July 2009

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Student recruitment

mp into campus the frosty water. In Essex, recruits stacked crates, lit fires and toasted marshmallows, after meeting Beavers, Cubs and Scouts from local Groups. The legendary Post-it note game meant everyone got to know each other quickly. In Lancashire budding volunteers travelled to Great Tower campsite in the Lake District, where a host of activities were laid on, including high ropes and zip wires. After hanging about (literally) the students chomped their way through more free grub, and then sat down to hear from Network members why Scouting is making a difference. There was then the opportunity to fill in the forms to take up an appointment in a local Group or Unit, or get involved with a Scout Network. For event organiser Ian, it was the members’ stories that were crucial to the event’s success. ‘Telling potential members about our own experiences was a really powerful way to overcome any nerves about joining Scouting and make people see that we aren’t any different to them. We had to get across that it’s not short trousers, dyb dyb dyb, guitars and Kumbaya round the campfire. It’s about adventure, new experiences, friends, parties, international travel and just huge fun!’

Numbers game The events were all held during the last week of February and over the three universities over 900 students registered an interest. This is a great result, but interest needs to be converted into adults taking up a role in local Scouting. The Counties began the process of finding suitable roles for the recruits, using the appointment process. Those who had given their details were contacted by telephone, and a bulk texting service was used to contact those who couldn’t attend the taster day. The Scout Networks have used Facebook to spread the word about upcoming Network activities. Due to the success of these events, similar activities are being planned with other Counties in the future, so watch this space. more info Watch footage from the project in West Lancashire in the third episode of Everyday Adventure, on the Community Channel website. www.communitychannel.org/ everydayadventure

scouts.org.uk/pol

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Yankee Doodle The Programme Factory goes across the pond this issue, possibly in a home-made glider. More likely in an imaginary aeroplane. Will you take the challenge?

W

hen stuck for something to put in your programme, it’s always useful to use memorable dates as themes to base an activity around. An example for June/July could be Independence Day, observed in America on 4 July.

July

June 5 June

8 June

ent Day World Environm box) (Make a bird Day World Oceans ntic Ocean /Go tla (Go see the A scuba diving)

’s Day 21 June Father with your dad) (Go camping

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Why not hold a beach barbecue with a stars and stripes theme? Eat hotdogs and candyfloss; make fancy dress using American flags. It all adds up to a famous activity!

’s Day 15 July St Swithun mpaign Sc (Join the outs’ ca against rain tax. /water) ww w.scouts.org.uk val 18 July Start of Festi chaeology (Organise Ar h itis of Br a dig) nal Parks’ Week 22 July Start of Natio nal Park) (Go hiking in a Natio

Network June/July 2009

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Yankee Doodle The Programme Factory goes across the pond this issue, possibly in a home-made glider. More likely in an imaginary aeroplane. Will you take the challenge?

W

hen stuck for something to put in your programme, it’s always useful to use memorable dates as themes to base an activity around. An example for June/July could be Independence Day, observed in America on 4 July.

July

June 5 June

8 June

ent Day World Environm box) (Make a bird Day World Oceans ntic Ocean /Go tla (Go see the A scuba diving)

’s Day 21 June Father with your dad) (Go camping

6

Why not hold a beach barbecue with a stars and stripes theme? Eat hotdogs and candyfloss; make fancy dress using American flags. It all adds up to a famous activity!

’s Day 15 July St Swithun mpaign Sc (Join the outs’ ca against rain tax. /water) ww w.scouts.org.uk val of British 18 July Start of Festi ise a dig) Archaeology (Organ tional Parks’ Week 22 July Start of Na nal Park) (Go hiking in a Natio

Network June/July 2009

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Programme factory

Random programme challenge As the theme for this issue’s main magazine is ‘summer adventure’ we look at an activity from Programmes Online which you can run with your Network outdoors to enjoy the summer with. Why not team up with another Network to see whose glider glides best?

BUILD A GLIDER

(POL ref: 27797)

Short description This activity uses everyday objects to build a working glider. It can be used as part of a team-building exercise or just to have a go at. Equipment • Assorted scrap paper • Cardboard • Clear sticky tape • Pencils • Pens • Ruler

• • • • • •

Scissors String White paper Drinking straws Glue Polythene bags.

Instructions • Gather all the materials you will need to build the glider • Download the PDF attachment from Programmes Online (www.scouts.org.uk/pol). • Discuss and design the glider making sure all measurements are the same • Split the different parts of the construction between the team members • Once the different parts of the glider have been constructed assemble them • Once you have tested the glider make any adjustments needed • Fly the gliders at the same time to see who can fly the furthest as well as who can stay in the air the longest.

Give it a go and have fun! Send in any pictures of your gliders to scouting.magazine@scout.org.uk with the subject ‘Network Supplement’ and we will publish the best.

scouts.org.uk/pol

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It’s a gir In the last issue, we focused on testicular cancer, so it’s only fair to shed light on some female cancers and point to places you can get help and information. By Lee Allwood and Elis Matthews

U

nless you were doing your DofE expedition on another planet, you will not have been able to avoid coverage of Jade Goody’s very public battle with cancer in the national media. All the way up to its tragic conclusion, the story of a young woman dealing with the diagnosis of cervical cancer, through the emotions of getting married and putting in place finances for two young boys, affected people across the UK. More women than ever have been inquiring about smear tests and performing the routine checks for lumps that perhaps get forgotten in the hustle and bustle of a busy life. Whatever you may have thought about Jade as a person, her legacy of raising awareness will undoubtedly save lives, as cancers are detected earlier, increasing the chances of successful treatment in hundreds, maybe thousands, of women.

The NHS website is easy to read and comprehensive in the detail of what happens when you have cancer. Visit www.nhs.uk

As with most cancers, the key to successful treatment is early diagnosis before the cancer has had the chance to spread to other organs. If you discover a lump, seek medical advice from your GP immediately

Breast cancer Thanks to several charities and appeals, much is known about breast cancer in the public domain. Events like the Race for Life, Moonwalk and Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October) mean that money is continually being raised to fund research and help women deal with the diagnosis of breast cancer.

What is it? There are several types of breast cancer, of which the most common arises from the ducts and is known as invasive ductal carcinoma. Cancers arising from the lobules (invasive lobular carcinomas) are less common.

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Network June/July 2009

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Female cancer

irl thing Know your breasts Get to know what’s normal for your breasts in look and texture, so you can spot any changes and get them checked. In particular look for: • lumps or thickening of the tissue • discharge from the nipple • ‘tethering’ of the skin, as if it’s being pulled from the inside • any unusual appearance, sensation or pain.

Remember, most lumps are harmless, especially if you’re young. But you should still get them checked by a doctor as soon as possible.

Cervical cancer Whereas breast cancer is more common in women aged over 50, cancer of the cervix occurs frequently in women under 35. Approximately 3,000 women are diagnosed each year in the UK.

What is it? The most common form, squamous cell carcinoma, develops from the flat cells that cover the outer surface of the cervix at the top of the vagina. Adenocarcinoma develops from the glandular cells that line the cervical canal and therefore can be more difficult to detect through screening.

What are the risk factors? The vast majority of cases develop from having the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), which is usually passed on during sex with an infected person. HPV can lay dormant for years before it starts damaging the cells around the cervix, leading to cancer. The reasons for this are not known. Other factors that increase the risk of contracting cervical cancer include smoking, a weakened immune system and having children at a young age.

>>

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It’s a girl thing

more info The number one piece of advice is to always seek medical advice if you think you may have a symptom of cancer. Early diagnosis greatly increases the probability of successful treatment. Helpful websites: www.breakthrough.org.uk www.cancerhelp.org.uk www.bbc.co.uk/health

>> What are the symptoms? The most common symptom is bleeding from the vagina. If you notice bleeding between periods, during or after sex, or experience pain during intercourse, it is worth consulting your doctor. Pre-cancerous cell changes don’t usually have symptoms, which is why you should have regular screenings.

CASE STUDY: HELEN MAYSTON, NETWORK COMMISSIONER FOR WALES. ‘I wasn’t in the habit of examining myself regularly as I was apprehensive of finding something. Ironic, really…’

W

hen I found a not very obvious lump on my breast, I didn’t really believe it and didn’t see my GP for two weeks. A friend, who was a nurse at the practice, practically forced me to go. Six weeks later I was in the breast clinic. Going alone was a mistake, but I had a mammogram and returned a week later for the results of the biopsy. It was inconclusive and they asked if I would have a frozen section (biopsy under anaesthetic where they continue with surgery if it is positive). The cancer was finally diagnosed the day after, ten weeks from when I found the lump. I went through the full spectrum of emotions: paralysing fear that I would die, that I wouldn’t see my children grow up; loneliness; sickness; a feeling that I wasn’t brave enough. During a scary wait for the histology results after my surgery, my father suddenly died, which made the whole thing extra traumatic. The cancer hadn’t spread, and I didn’t need chemotherapy. It was an indescribable relief. I had a four week course of radiotherapy and worked part-time, going for treatment in the afternoons. Family and friends were an

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invaluable support. My sister was amazing and my children were lovely. When I was close to losing it, a very good Scouting friend kept me going, sending me funny cards and phone messages. My advice Don’t think ‘It’ll never happen to me’. It happens to a lot of younger women (and some men) but it is one of the more treatable cancers. Get used to what your breasts feel like normally, at all times of the month, and examine them regularly. If you think you find something odd, have it checked out. Get screened early if you have a family history of breast cancer. What I learned • I am much stronger than I thought I was. • I am grateful for lots of things I previously took for granted. • Keeping busy helps and being positive is important. • Family and friends are what life is really all about.

Network June/July 2009

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Outdoor education

The adventure starts here bers in qualities such as Scouting has always aimed to develop its Mem oor environment. A university teamwork, self-reliance and respect for the outd that, writes Pete Varley course in the Scottish Highlands promises just Interested in an adventurous career?

Why UHI?

If you’re looking for a successful career in adventure tourism management and activities, Lochaber College offers a range of courses in outdoor adventure studies to suit you. You can study up to degree level in the outdoor capital of the UK, in the shadow of Ben Nevis.

Our Fort William base offers the opportunity to be instructed and gain experience in outstanding outdoor settings. The course will give you access to many world-class events that are hosted locally. The teaching team are highly qualified industry experts, ensuring you get the best from your studies. And of course there’s the range of modern equipment, kit and safety apparatus required for each pursuit. We also enjoy strong links with outdoor adventure providers, giving you the best of both worlds.

A degree in adventure Our BA in Adventure Tourism Management will open many doors for you in the growing global outdoor industry and on successful completion you will have the necessary qualifications and experience, including NGB awards, to start your career, either at home or abroad. You can apply for the degree now, find details of the course, entry requirements and view the facilities at www.uhi.ac.uk/adventure

The course A major element of this degree is to strengthen your practical skills in outdoor pursuits, activities and leadership, ensuring you’ll have the experience necessary to succeed in the global adventure tourism industry.

The course content includes: • Instruction, experience and work placements in a wide variety of outdoor pursuits, such as, skiing, snowboarding, canoeing, rock climbing and mountaineering. • Field trips to enhance skills and experience in adventure activities. • Classroom-based elements to build your knowledge of business and management and develop your leadership skills. • The chance to participate in (and organise) a variety of events and challenges that will build your confidence and look great on your CV.

Case study: Jenny McLernon ‘Studying Outdoor Education at uni gave me the knowledge I needed to get a foot in the industry. Scouting gave me leadership skills and the start in the outdoor industry. I’ve worked at Kandersteg and Gilwell Park, where I can actually make a difference and help to promote the future of Scouting. I’m the luckiest person in the world.’

scouts.org.uk/pol

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Joanne Carey introduces a County whose Network has an unhealthy obsession with witches, purple hoodies and social networking. It can only be East Lancashire

! m o o r b m o o r B E

ast Lancashire Scout Network formed in 2002. For the first few years we operated a one Network County structure, which in time proved ineffective for us. Following the National Network Review in 2006, we took the opportunity to look at our structure and how we could develop it, primarily to recruit new people. Having a local youth-centred point of contact in a geographic base seemed to be the answer and as such our new-look Network was born. Four Scout Network Leaders from the membership were appointed and the Networks were named after local legends, the Pendle Witches (see box on next page). As Network Commissioner, I took on the title of Demdyke, and this has become the County Network name. We also appointed a DofE Leader (Bulcock) and our local campsite has a Network Leader contact (Mouldheals). Internet issues are dealt with by Device. These ‘Local’ Networks are not District-based but geographical. All members are part of the County structure, allowing a mass crossover, transferable and flexible membership. An excellent tip was giving responsibility to our youth. Once in the leader roles, their involvement and

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commitment has been cemented, and to their credit they grabbed it with both hands.

Hoodie factor We set up ‘Netxec’, bringing together all the officers and leaders. Branding became important, adding to our visibility across the County. Thanks must go to Merseyside and the pink people ... we did nick a few ideas and our purple people started appearing. Neckers and hoodies quickly followed and our witch (the chick in a hat on a stick) is now our logo. This had a dramatic effect on East Lancs, encouraging new members (they all want a hoodie!). A clear identity is a must-have. When people see you, they get to know you and want to be part of what you do.

Explorer raid Next on the list of priorities was links with Explorer Scouts. Before, the truth was we didn’t have any. The localised structure now means that all young people have a Network Leader who acts as the point of contact. This has been well received, because it is far less daunting than approaching a Commissioner. New members are directed to the Leader nearest the area in which they live.

i.S ra pol ora sum ge

Network June/July 2009

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Network in focus

The next step was taking it to the Explorers: launch Operation NERAM (Network Explorer Raid A Month). This has gone down well with District Explorer Scout Commissioners and we continue to do it as a programme item each month. So far we’ve raided two units, meaning 30 new Network fans! It’s great fun getting seen, getting past any leader issues we may have between sections and meeting young people directly.

The Pendle Witches

In 1612, a group of women and men were tried, and subsequently hanged as witches in Lancaster and York. It is the most famous example of witch trials in English history. The Networks in East Lancashire take their names from the following witches:

Communication: the final frontier!

!

One of our biggest assets is Facebook. We are registered as a group and events are published here. Links can be created to other events across the County and beyond and our membership can see this at any time. This has proven more beneficial than our website, though we are currently developing this. Network is the most exciting section to be involved with and we’re extremely pleased with the changes to date. Our membership has doubled in the last year and looks set to grow.

N

S

SCOUT SHOPS

EQUIPPED FOR ADVENTURE

scouts.org.uk/shop 01903 766 921 i.SCOUT Polo Shirt and T-shirts

Demdyke: Elizabeth Southerns, the suspected ring leader, died in gaol. Nutter: Alice Nutter, hanged in Lancaster on 20 August 1612. Chattox: Anne Whittle, hanged in Lancaster. Redfern: Anne Redferne, daughter of Chattox, hanged. Robey: Isobel Robey, accused of causing sickness by witchcraft, hanged.

Scouts ‘Be Prepared’ Towel Item code: 1024948

£13

Karrimor Bobcat 65 Rucksack Item code: 1026594

RRP £65, Our price:

£58.50

Take the Scout towel with you to camp, and it might encourage you to have at least one wash while you’re there.

£11.74 (polo shirt) £7.83 (T-shirt)

Really Big Oball Item code: 1026847

£12.50 i.SCOUT is a theme running across a range of clothing and souvenirs. The polo shirts and T-shirts come in black, orange, kiwi and purple. Get ready for summer adventure with your i.SCOUT gear. Sizes: S-XXL. XXXL (black only)

The Network hair transplant experiment was deemed a great success

Kick it, stomp it, crush it, the Really Big Oball bounces right back to a perfectly formed sphere. Easy to grab or catch with vibrant colours. The Oball can be used indoors or out, anywhere your Network is doing its thing.

This 65 litre Karrimor Bobcat 65 rucksack has lots of great features that are perfect for day treks. • Supercool back system • Grab handle • Side compression straps • Two compartments • Removable sit mat • Key clip • Pocket in lid for additional storage • Front map pocket • Two mesh wand pockets • Lid shock cord carrying system • Ice axe/walking pole attachment Weight: 1480g, Colour: Cobalt/Cinder

All profits go back into Scouting. The Scout Association Registered Charity number 306101 (England and Wales) and SC0384837 (Scotland).

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15/5/09 14:17:07


A place to call home This issue we look at a problem facing many Network members. With the global recession dramatically affecting house prices and interest rates, is buying better than renting? Lee Allwood and Adrian Wray find out how to get on the property ladder

B

uying a house is one of the biggest financial decisions that you will make in your life. It is a lengthy and complicated business, which while exciting is often fraught with stress and worry. Luckily, there’s lots of good advice kicking around, helping you make your home-buying experience as easy and problem-free as possible. The following tips are taken from the rightmove.co.uk guide Essential Info for First Time Buyers:

Work out what you can afford The most important step is working out how much you can afford. Use a budget calculator to get a realistic picture of your finances and identify where you might 14

have to cut back. Looking in detail at all your outgoings now will make taking on such a serious financial commitment far less stressful in the long run.

Agree a mortgage Ask several mortgage lenders what they are prepared to lend you and ask for an ‘agreement in principle’ where possible. This will lend weight to your case when buying. First time buyers are not subject to endless chains and therefore very attractive to sellers in a hurry to move. What you can borrow depends on what you are prepared to offer in terms of a deposit. One hundred per cent mortgages are fast becoming a thing of the

Network June/July 2009

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Problem page

Don’t go it alone Buying with a partner, sibling or friends can be a more economical way of getting on the ladder as there is someone else to share the financial burden with. Do: Discuss the finer details of who pays what before making any commitments. Don’t: Avoid thinking about what would happen if you split up, if buying with a partner. It’s unpleasant, but the alternative is far worse. Whoever you decide to invest with, make sure you have

the right agreement set up. Avoid disputes by taking simple measures, such as agreeing a rota for housework and how bills will be split. A local family property law specialist can help you draw up a co-habitation or joint ownership agreement.

Bank of mum and dad Parents can help in several ways, most pointedly by acting as guarantors for the mortgage or paying part or all of the deposit, reducing the cost of the mortgage over all (possibly even interest-free!). They can also help with the little things such as lending furniture and other essential items.

Renting vs buying The first thing to decide is whether you want to rent or buy your new home. There are pros and cons to both options and these vary depending on individual situations, but a few general issues are listed below.

Pros

>>

Cons

Renting 1) Your landlord is responsible for any repairs, maintenance and usually decorating. 2) It is easier to move if you are renting compared to when you own your own house. If you sign a tenancy contract be aware of how long you have committed yourself for. 3) You are protected under the Landlord and Tenant Act. 4) There is no chance of falling into the negative equity trap.

1) Some people see rent as money going down the drain because you get no return on it. 2) You can get caught in the trap of having to pay rent and bills and not being able to save a deposit to buy a house. 3) Check who you will be sharing with if you are renting a room. Are there communal rooms? 4) Check who is responsible for general repairs if you have found the property through an agency. They may be acting on behalf of a landlord so you need to know who to contact if there are any problems.

Buying 1) You are paying money towards owning your own property, which can be seen as an investment. 2) You will not risk having problems with a landlord (although this may not be the case where you are in leasehold property). 3) Your gaff, your rules.

1) The costs involved in buying a house are quite high – on top of having to pay the mortgage you have to consider the solicitors fee, surveyor’s fees etc 2) Interest rate changes will affect your monthly repayments so it is very important to consider what type mortgage is the best one for you. 3) You will generally be responsible for any repairs and maintenance of the property. 4) You may find yourself in a situation of negative equity where you owe more than your house is worth. scouts.org.uk/pol

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* Data from the Council of Mortgage Lenders, 14 April 2009

past. Typically you will need 10-15% of the purchase price as a deposit to get a mortgage in today’s climate (the typical deposit in February 2009 was a record 25%).* Special first time buyer mortgages are available, but standard mortgages could give you a better deal, especially if you have a large deposit. You could even consider taking out a longer term mortgage.

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A place to call home >>

Top tips for renting or buying • Make sure you visit the property at different times. Street lighting and parking can change throughout the day and may influence your choice of property. • If there is anything that needs to be repaired before you move in make sure it’s in the contract. Do not rely on verbal promises. • If you are renting, the Citizens Advice Bureau will check the contract for legalities and make sure everything is covered. • Check what is included in the price of the house: items such as carpets, curtains and light fittings should be specified if they are to be included.

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• If it is a flat or maisonette, check about rights to parking/gardens etc. Who owns the freehold? • Does anything look like it might need immediate attention such as windows or plumbing? more info Whatever you choose to do, make sure you go through agents regulated by the relevant bodies, ie the National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA) or the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA). See www.naea.co.uk and www.arla.co.uk for further details

Network June/July 2009

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International Scouting

Moot point In August 2003, Jon Bell popped down to his local pub and inadvertently joined the UK Contingent for the 12th World Scout Moot. Within a year he was 10,000 miles away in Taiwan with 3,000 like minded souls from every corner of the globe. Isn’t it time you did likewise?

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t the Taiwan Moot, I shared in an adventure that seemed scarcely believable at the time. Five years on, I have just 300 words to tell you what all this meant, what it inspired and why, above all, you should take the plunge and join the next Moot adventure in Kenya. If I succeed, you owe me a drink – seriously, it’ll be worth it! When thinking about the Moot I’m left to wonder what aspect was most memorable. Perhaps it was the white water rafting, the hot springs or the fireworks. Maybe it was eating chicken feet and fisheyes under the world’s tallest building whilst singing the South African national anthem. All these things were amazing, but I know that more than anything it was living every day in my international patrol that made it an experience to

remember. We were a Norwegian, an Egyptian, a Mexican, four Taiwanese and myself. Learning about each other and sharing little pieces of our worlds still enriches mine. The Moot is the only World event for those of Network age. It’s a chance to experience international Scouting as an adult and taste the world beyond your doorstep. It’s also a lot of fun. Kenya promises to be a new and ground­breaking adventure for everyone involved. I was lucky enough to be there in Taiwan and count myself doubly lucky to join the Moot Contingent again. Registration opens on Monday 22 June on a first come first served basis, so don’t delay. If you only do one thing in Scouting, do this! more info The 13th World Scout Moot is a World Scouting Event for 18-25 year olds. It takes place in Kenya from 27 July-7 August 2010. It is the first World Scouting event for young people ever to take place in Africa and will be a pioneering global experience. Some 3,000 people are expected from one hundred countries and territories. The UK Contingent will number around 200. Registration opens on 22 June on a first come first served basis. For more information visit www.scouts.org.uk/wsm2010

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n u f f o l a Festiv There’s simply loads going on for Network members over the summer months. Check out our selection of jamborees, long walks and high jinks

June Coventry Scout Festival. Coventry. 5-7 June MADUK. Kingston Ridge Campsite. Essex. 26-28 June www.essexscouts.org.uk/maduk July Sun Run. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire Camp and overnight marathon walk 3-5 July www.sr-mc.org Three Nations Expedition. Russia, China and Mongolia. International expedition 15 July - 7 August www.threenations.org.uk

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August Wings 2009. International Jamboree. Windsor, Royal Berkshire. 1-8 August www.wings2009.org.uk Kent International Jamboree. International Jamboree. Sevenoaks, Kent 30 July - 6 August www.kij09.org.uk DofE Gold Open Expedition. Yr Hafod, Snowdonia, Wales 21-29 August www.scoutswales.org.uk

Get your event noticed If you are planning an event that is open to all Network members, let us know about it. You can get in touch at the usual address, or post on the wall of the Scout Network Supplement group on Facebook

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! e m i t It’s

27 July – 7 August 2010 www.scouts.org.uk/wsm2010 Registration opens Monday, 22 June 2009 First come, first served

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Adventure Beyond is a family run centre based in West Wales. We have venues and camping or bunk house accommodation in St Davids, Cardigan Bay, Brecon Beacons. Jethro Moore Adventure Beyond

G • CLIMBING • COASTEERING ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: CANOEIN RAFTING ING • CAVING • WHITE WATER RF SU • G KIN YA KA • ING LK WA GORGE ILLS URSE/ LOW ROPES • FIELD SK TEAM BUILDING • ASSAULT CO Nant Y Pobty Farm Coed Y Bryn, Llandysul Ceradigion, SA44 5LQ Phone: 07787123761 fun@adventurebeyond.co.uk www.adventurebeyond.co.uk

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