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the peak district in autumn and winter Exclusive holidays in the best of the British countryside | 2015


DATES

2015 UK Countryside Tours offers an exclusive range of fully escorted holidays to the English Peak District at a magical time of year. Grand vistas that inspired Britain’s scientific, literary and musical giants, crystal clear rivers rich in wildlife, roaring fires and Christmas festivities in England’s best houses are just some of the sights that will charm you. This is one of Britain’s finest landscapes and a place whose industrial history changed the world. The tours are led by two expert guides. Jim Dixon was Chief Executive of the Peak District National Park for 12 years and today writes for The Times on nature and the countryside. Stuart Gillis was Director of Derby Museums and has extensive experience in Britain’s artistic and cultural renaissance and is an authority on the early Industrial Revolution in Derbyshire. Our tours will give you a special behind-the-scenes experience of the landscapes and heritage of the Peak District. This is a special time of year, when autumn mists swirl around the dales and moors, brilliant autumn sunshine illuminates the bones of an unspoilt landscape, and the great houses and market towns prepare for Christmas celebrations. Our tours include some very special experiences in some of the greatest country houses in Britain: Haddon Hall, described by Simon Jenkins as ‘the most perfectly preserved medieval house in England’ and the incomparable Chatsworth House, home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire.

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During your stay, you will have the exclusive use of the 5 Star Portland House. Built in 1870 as a grand townhouse, there are 11 beautifully appointed bedrooms and you will relax in the quality surroundings of this recently refurbished elegant house. We have fine views over the River Derwent in ‘Little Switzerland’ and a great location in the elegant spa town of Matlock Bath on the edge of the Peak District. Our private chef for your visit will delight you with a varied menu of local food prepared by a rare talent. We will visit some of the most exclusive shops in Derbyshire, including David Mellor’s ‘Round Building’ (their other shop is in Sloane Square in London) and John Smedleys, located in the world’s oldest continuously occupied factory, indeed it is part of the Derwent Valley World Heritage Site. We travel by luxury small coach and our group will be no more than 16 guests. All of your meals are included and you will experience a consistently high standard of service throughout. Please call on 01629 704759 or go to www.ukcountrysidetours.com to find out more or ask any questions. We look forward to welcoming you to one of the best places in the British countryside at a time of year that will charm and delight you as much as it does us.

Tour 1: Autumn in the Peak District

Monday 19 to Thursday October

Tour 2: Winter Landscapes and Chatsworth House at Christmas

Monday 16 to Thursday 19 November

Tour 3: Winter Landscapes, Chatsworth House and Haddon Hall at Christmas

Monday 7 to Thursday 10 December

Content Welcome to the Peak District

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Autumn in the Peak District

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Winter in the Peak District

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Christmas in the Peak District

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Your accommodation

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Tour 1 16 Tour 2 20 Tour 3 24 Practicalities 28 Booking form

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Our promise

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“ land where the crimson heather, the thyme and the bilberry grow together�


As a former Chief Executive of the Peak District National Park, an adviser to the Heritage Lottery Fund and a contributor to The Times Saturday Nature Notebook, I have an insider’s knowledge of a place that I am keen to welcome you to.

welcome to the peak district Jim Dixon has lived in the Peak District for 12 years and writes on its landscapes, people and wildlife. He has an expert eye having been an enthusiastic birdwatcher and countryman all his life. Here, he explains why the Peak District has caught his imagination.

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In 1658 Sir Aston Cokain wrote of Derbyshire that ‘Here’s Lead, whereof is made, Bullets for to invade, Them whose pride doth prevail, So far, as to assail Our British borders’. The Emperor Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 BC in part to impress his friends and enemies in Rome and in part to plunder the great mineral treasures he had heard were found in the rocks of the distant land. One of his target destinations was the upland limestone plateau of the Derbyshire Peak District. Lead mining has played a large part in the life of a county which itself has played a pivotal role in Britain’s early industrial revolution. Today, this most central of England’s shires, continues to be at the forefront of engineering globally and, were its people more inclined to do so, would boast many other innovations too. For centuries, lead mining has been pursued in the limestone hills by ‘adventurers’ who tunnelled into the ore-bearing veins deep within the limestone plateau. W H Auden described Pennine lead miners ‘With bags like pillows slung across their shoulders’ and toiling ‘to place a roof on noble Gothic minsters’. Regulated by the ancient ‘Barmote Courts’ whose origins stretch back over 1200 years and whose jurisdiction still lies within the Lord Chancellor’s Department, the miners toiled to bring ore to the surface whilst their families raised sheep and cattle on the poor soils of the limestone fields above. In the late 17th century, aristocratic landlords sought greater returns from the lead mines, introducing to this underground endeavour organisation of capital and labour. Drainage channels or ‘soughs’ were driven deep through the hills and early pumping engines were imported from Cornwall to drain the mines. In the deep, wooded valleys south of the white peak limestone plateau, Sir Richard Arkwright saw the potential of organised manufacturing and the strategic use of water power which ran evenly year-round from the limestone rivers, supplied deep in the limestone aquifers. Arkwright was driven by innovation, linking demand for cotton fabric, the power available in the rivers and his own commercial mind. In the deeply-wooded landlocked valley at Cromford he established Derbyshire’s, and the World’s,


first factory in 1771. His water-powered frame allowed unskilled workers in his factory to produce great volumes of material. He organised their labour on a scale previously unheard of. Today, Arkwright’s achievements are celebrated in the Derwent Valley World Heritage Site, which links a series of very early industrial mills in the broad wooded valley of the River Derwent. John Smedley’s Lea Mill remains today the world’s longest continuously occupied factory and its fine knitwear continues to be exported overseas. Under the limestone landscape of the Peak District are huge caves and voids. Writing as Dr James Hardcastle in The Terror of Blue John Gap in 1910, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle said of this landscape ‘Strike it with some gigantic hammer it would boom like a drum’. The caverns resulted from the action of water dissolving

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limestone to create vast voids within which are found one of Britain’s most elegant gemstones. Under the triangular hill of Treak Cliff, the rare mineral Blue John is mined today as it has been for millennia. The distinctive blue and yellow calcium fluoride crystallised in veins on the walls of the labyrinthine crevices 300 million years ago from hot saline originating in the earth’s mantle. Blue John, like other distinctive British gemstones such as Whitby Jet and Cairngorm, is mined in tiny quantities and is helping the British jewellery industry regain its place on the world stage. Chris Sellors’ Derbyshire family business has survived the globalisation of jewellery manufacture by making distinctive British gemstones using craft techniques. The gemstones are finished by Chris’ skilled team as quality jewellery much in demand in UK export markets.

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Derbyshire has some of the grandest houses of England at Kedleston, Hardwick and Haddon Hall and Chatsworth House, but also many lesser known but fine smaller houses. The Duke of Devonshire’s family seat at Chatsworth is one of the finest houses in England, with impressive gardens, a Lancelot Brown parkland and important collections of furniture, neo-classical sculptures, paintings and old master drawings. The 12th Duke Stoker and the Duchess Amanda have stamped their own characters on Chatsworth with their distinctive passion for contemporary art that has lifted Chatsworth from being a successful country house attraction to a stellar star in art circles. This is reflected in its status as one of the premier British tourist destinations, attracting over 800,000 visitors last year, including 126,000 from overseas. Just a stone’s throw from Chatsworth is Haddon Hall, one of the most perfectly preserved medieval houses in England, yet it is still home to the Manners family (watch out for the twin toddlers who may be playing in the hall). Haddon Hall was described by Simon Jenkins in ‘1000 Best Houses’ as ‘the most perfect house to survive from the middle ages’. Set in the heart of the beautiful Peak District National Park, parts of the house date from the 12th century, sitting like a jewel in its Elizabethan terraced gardens, and overlooking the River Wye. I organised a memorable visit to Haddon Hall for the Prince of Wales who, after seeing the parkland restoration and meeting gardeners, river-keepers and volunteer-guides, described Haddon as a ‘special place set in a magical landscape’. Look out for his signature on the mantelpiece, alongside all the other Royal visitors! Film-makers flock to Haddon Hall to use it as a location. The house and grounds have played host to three versions of ‘Jane Eyre’. Screen credits also include ‘Elizabeth’, ‘Pride & Prejudice’, ‘The Other Boleyn Girl’ and ‘The Princess Bride’, the cult classic movie in which Haddon Hall becomes Prince Humperdinck’s Castle and village.

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The attraction to visitors, and to the people who live in the fine cities, market towns and villages of the county, is obvious. Arthur Jewitt’s 19th century ballad ‘On the Peak of Derbyshire’ celebrates the ‘land, where the crimson heather, the thyme and the bilberry grow together’. The accessibility and intense diversity of the landscape Jewitt described are still unparalleled in Britain. The Peak District, designated the first British national park in 1951, is a paradise for walkers, cyclists and for country sports. The windswept moors at Bleaklow, Kinder and Stanage remain amongst the most important British upland landscapes. The limestone dales and plateau lands criss-crossed by more orderly enclosure-era dry stone walls, is a great contrast to the wildness of the moors. On a visit to North Lees Hall, at the foot of the Stanage Moors, in 1845, the young Charlotte Bronte was warned of the lunatic in the attic by her hosts, inspiring a plot that would endure in the minds of millions of readers of her novel ‘Jane Eyre’. The ‘Mass Trespass’ onto the 9th Duke of Devonshire’s grouse moors in 1932, not only gave rise to more public access to the countryside, but was an important moment in the great social changes that happened to Britain in the middle of the 20th century. Today, the once lifeless moors which hold back floodwaters, store carbon and protect wildlife and game birds are being painstakingly brought back to life. The county motto ‘Bene consulendo’ (By wise deliberation) reflects well, in my experience, the character of Derbyshire people. It describes the way the decadal long investments in technology are made by the aerospace engineers at Rolls Royce as much as it does the careful restoration of the landscapes of the Peak District moors and of the fabric and treasures of the great country houses. Derbyshire has inspired many to achieve great things. I hope you will be inspired to join me and my colleagues here for a few days where you can experience the best of the British countryside.


the peak district in autumn and winter


autumn in the peak district

October is the time of year when the trees and woodlands of the Peak District landscape become much more obvious, explains Jim Dixon. The autumn leaves become a talking point and for a few glorious weeks their colours dazzle, inspire and delight us. Albert Camus said that ‘Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower’. Throughout the summer, the engine room of a tree is its leaves. A mature, healthy tree may have 200,000 leaves. Each leaf is divided into 50 million cells. Within each cell the remarkable plant chemical chlorophyll works all summer, converting carbon dioxide and the sun’s energy into trees. These micro-factories make the all-important sugars and proteins that allow trees to grow and the fruits, nuts and seeds that reproduce the trees and give us and nature the bountiful autumn harvest of the woods. As the days draw shorter, the green chlorophyll pigments in our deciduous trees die back leaving the brown tannins and red and yellow anthocyanins, essentially the waste products of all that summer activity. John Burroughs says ‘How beautifully leaves grow old. How full of light and colour are their last days’. And in those last colourful days the leaves quickly shed, delighting or infuriating us with their beauty and profusion. The sessile oak and birch woods are important parts of the moorland environment, especially in the cloughs and valley sides. Prehistorically this would have been one of the most common habitats over much of the Peak District. Today it is largely confined to the Dark Peak with particular concentrations along the valley of the River Derwent. Our ash woods are some of the most beautiful and enthralling places in the Peak District National Park. In summer they are carpeted with wild garlic, bluebells and primroses. Many rare woodland flowers can be found too, such as the dark red helleborine, Jacob’s ladder, autumn crocus and whorled Solomon’s seal. The rare native trees, the large-leaved lime and whitebeams are found too. Out on the open landscapes of the farmed lands of the White Peak, the scattered woodlands, hedgerows, shelter-belts and individual trees are important in punctuating the landscape. The most prominent is the ring of beeches on the Neolithic burial chamber at Minning Low with its more recently planted and still establishing outer ring.

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We set off before dawn to walk the park at Chatsworth and witness the autumn fallow deer rut. The park was shaped by the 18th century grand designer Lancelot (Capability) Brown. We followed the contour of the western perimeter in the lee of the high stone boundary wall, glimpsing from several angles the great house, amidst its gardens and swirling mists. We had spooked several all-female fallow deer harems, their white and fawn coats brilliant in the early morning light.

John Constable said that ‘light, shade and perspective’, will always make an object beautiful. Autumn in the Peak District brings a natural event that illuminates the landscape in the showiest of dramatic light and shade displays. As autumn nights cool, they chill the moist upland air. The cold air falls and is trapped in the valleys. Temperature inversions, so–called because the air temperature increases with altitude instead of the normal decrease, create a phenomenon of great natural beauty.

My son spotted the bucks first on their rutting ground, back-lit by a rich orange sun and mainly sat under a fine stand of oak trees. A few pairs, antlers locked, were jousting for superiority, playing out the ancient tussle for the favour of females tempted by all this male virility. While Capability Brown’s creation is as much art as it is nature, for me it plays the part of the primeval landscape well. Our prehistoric land would have included open glades amid dense stands of trees. Wild cattle and deer would have sustained top predators such as wolves in this land. The predators are no more, but the landscape here ‘feels’ like an ancient one and excites in me a sense of lost England. Times Nature Notebook 14 October 2014

The valleys are at first hidden in the mists, but the plateaus and moorland hills are lit by the crisp, clear pre-dawn light of red, gold, silver or blue. Sometimes, the mist sits only as high as hedges, trees and buildings. Sometimes it forms a deep sea of cloud high up into the valleys, filling them much as glaciers once did with ice sheets. As the sun rises, the first rays bathe the hills with rich golden light, little diffused by moisture and accentuating the autumn hues. The rising sun fires energy into the mists and quickly the moisture dissipates, at first creating a fantastic visual show of light and shade. In only a few minutes the spectacle is over as the mists burn away completely. Autumn is a wonderful time to visit this landscape. You don’t need to be up too early to experience some great sunrises and the landscape is a powerful mix of light, weather and land. I have written in The Times about the autumn fallow deer rut and the fantastic autumn mists that dazzle with their spectacular beauty. Do join me for a special few days in this wonderful landscape.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

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winter in the peak district

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On the Peak District moors, I have occasionally seen a magnificent great grey shrike, only ever one at a time because even in winter they are fiercely territorial, perched prominently on short trees and posts. This largest of European shrikes, is a predatory bird that feeds on larger insects and mammals, and has a distinctive ‘Dick-Turpin’ style mask and a long-tail. A few dozen Scandinavian birds turn up in Britain each winter and the Peak District moors are one of the best places to see them.

Snow arrives in the Peak District not with certainty, but with fond familiarity, writes Jim Dixon. I only recall one winter in the 11 I’ve lived here without it. Children growing up in these hills have an expectation of sledging, snowballs and snowmen that those from less favoured areas want for. Last winter, 6 inches fell on Boxing Day evening. In the village, the gritstone buildings take on a Disneylike gingerbread cottage look. The landscape around reverts to pre-colour TV monochrome. So long as it is not too deep or unexpected, people cope and normal life continues against the backdrop of the winter scene. John Ruskin said ‘there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather’. The impact of winter weather on wildlife depends on how deep snow lies and for how long, but it’s not the biggest threat. Sharp temperatures that are well below zero over a long period are more harmful to birds. With freezing rain or fog, ice on branches and frozen water will dramatically reduce food. The later the snow arrives – when body reserves may be depleted – the more harmful it is. Many birds are absent or fewer in numbers in the uplands during the winter, giving way to the winter specialists. The winter birds include finch, thrush and wader flocks feeding in the agricultural pastures. Small groups of bullfinch make their ‘creaky-gate’ call from thistles and teasels. Bramblings, a relative of the chaffinch but with a lightly orange (not pink) breast, winter in large flocks and are fans of beech mast, but may be tempted by garden feeders. Siskins, delicately striped, black and yellow finches are usually seen on riverside alders and visit our garden too. As temperatures drop, redwings and fieldfares, bold and assertive thrushes from Scandinavia, shift their feeding attention from probing for worms in pasture to stripping holly berries in the churchyard.

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Even in the depth of winter, I enjoy walks by the River Lathkill, one of the crystal clear rivers that drain Peak District limestone hills. The cause of my satisfaction is the dipper, a most engaging upland bird. They seem not to fear people and are one of nature’s great performers. This superbly elegant stream-living bird looks a little like a squat blackbird, but with a distinctive lustrous white throat and breast. It is a great swimmer and bobs in the shallows or dives in pools for river-bed living insects. Dippers breed early to take advantage of a build-up of insect food in the clear brooks during the winter. Dippers fly fast and low along the river, but in winter tend more to a low perch where their song brightens the otherwise dark and apparently lifeless winter dale. The scratchy but powerfully melodic notes carry over the babble of the winter river’s spate and makes finding the virtuoso an easy task. This effortless visibility means counting is accurate so studying dippers is popular with ornithologists. Populations appear to be stable on the mainly limestone Peak District rivers, but where water quality is poor, both the river insects and dippers decline. Dippers light up the darkest winter days turning a winter walk into a special occasion.

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christmas in the peak district

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Garrison Keillor said ’A lovely thing about Christmas is that it’s compulsory, like a thunderstorm, and we all go through it together.’ And where better to go through the festive season than in the Peak District, writes Jim Dixon. Whether it’s a brisk winter walk, some retail therapy or indulging yourself in traditional festive culture, there is something for everyone. The winter solstice, the time when the noon sun is at its lowest on the horizon, would have been important to the people of the new Stone Age who settled in the Peak District creating the great stone monuments at Minning and Arbor Low and Stanton Moor. The seasonal festival of ‘yule’ would have been celebrated by early pagans and ‘midwinter’ by Anglo-Saxons whose presence is seen in Bakewell with the largest and most important collections of stone crosses in England. Some of these pre-date the very first recorded celebration linked to Christ’s birth in the 11th century. Today’s Christmas festivities combine deeply-rooted traditions with those more recently imported from across the World. Whether you buy wholeheartedly into the notion that ‘Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart’ or whether you just enjoy the break from the mundane, there’s plenty to do in the Peak District at Christmas. Great houses have a tradition of sumptuous Christmas feasting and you can take part in this at Chatsworth which celebrates by dressing the house for the weeks before Christmas Eve. This year, you can rub shoulders with Mr Toad as Chatsworth features ‘The Wind in the Willows’. Chatsworth Christmas Markets are a firm favourite. I love Haddon Hall at Christmas with its 12 Days of Christmas theme with some fantastic quality events and candle-lit tours that start in front of the roaring Great Hall fire. The Peak District is a great place to stock up on essential and luxury foods. There are excellent butchers, such as New Close Farm in Bakewell

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and the Chatsworth Farm Shop has a huge range of the best food and drink from the English countryside. A great local tradition is to call in at the Cheese Shop in Hartington to stock up on Stilton. Hidden in the Peak District are some retail gems. David Mellor’s Hathersage factory produces knives of renowned quality and a visit allows you to see the knives being fashioned in the ‘Round Building’ factory. Their other shop is in Sloane Square, London. John Smedley’s knitwear is exported to 150 countries from their Derbyshire factory and the shop here is always popular. For traditional English and continental countrywear, John Brocklehursts in Bakewell is a must. The gift shops at Haddon and Chatsworth are amongst the best in England. Peak District pubs, village green Christmas trees, churches and schools host carol singing, indeed in some villages singing the unique carols written in those villages. And across the White Peak pubs in the weeks before Christmas, the Winster Guisers act out their traditional drama of the battle of St George against the Black Prince of Paradise. This 19th century tradition was revived in the 1980s and the players (in disguise) now raise thousands of pounds for charity. And after all of this spending, feasting and excess, the 555 square miles of open country, 1,600 miles of footpaths and 64 miles of accessible trails in the Peak District National Park are the best place to shake off those winter blues, get away from the dull winter TV schedules and remind ourselves of the glories of this special landscape. Merry Christmas!

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your accommodation

Portland House

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Set in one of Britain’s most important historical areas, the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site, and overlooking the steep wooded gorges cut though the Derbyshire limestone by the River Derwent, you will be staying in a house with a special history. The first warm springs were discovered in Matlock Bath in 1698. The educated and discerning gentry soon began to travel here to take the waters and admire the views. Erasmus Darwin, Charles’ grandfather and a leading figure in the Midlands enlightenment, was a fan of Matlock and encouraged Josiah Wedgwood to visit. The Wedgwoods fell in love with the gorges, the river and the sense that this was a valley where talented and creative people could think and plan for the future. Lord Byron nicknamed the area ‘Little Switzerland’ and the resort’s fashionable status was sealed after the young Princess Victoria came to stay in 1832. Portland is an elegant town house, set in its own enclosed garden and built for a Victorian entrepreneur called Wildgoose. Victorian ladies, constrained by their tight corsets and so unable to walk up the hill to view the cavern and take the waters, were charged a penny to ride up in a carriage. The springs still supply the garden’s fountain and it is said that Britain’s first soda water manufacturer lived here. In its Victorian heyday, guests would have strolled along the river, taken in the view and used Portland House as a base to explore the surrounding Peak District landscape. When Martin and Juliet Harrop first peered through the windows of this, then, neglected home, they were entranced by the potential of restoring it to the great house that it is today. Thanks to this chance visit, you too can stay in the Victorian elegance of this unique house for your visit. Portland House was saved from neglect and has now been tastefully restored, with many of the original features conserved, including the Downton-style bell pulls. It has the prestigious ‘Sense of Place’ Award, reflecting the use of local craftsmen and materials in its restoration and is unique in the details Martin and Juliet have lovingly and skilfully protected. Marble fireplaces and authentic period features combine with the modern quality and comfort you would expect of a 5 Star property. The house is fully heated and guests remark on how cosy the rooms are. Each room has a modern en-suite bathroom. Beds made by Royal Warrant-holder Hypnos ensure a comfortable night’s sleep and the soft furnishings are made by Abraham Moon & Sons of Yorkshire.

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Portland House is the ideal base to return to after a busy day walking or seeing the sights. Whether it is afternoon tea in the lounge, a drink in the bar or pre-dinner drinks on the terrace, you will feel relaxed here. This is not a hotel and so there are no staff on call or to disturb you. Our party will be the only guests and we have the exclusive use of Portland House. We want you to feel very much at home. You will be welcomed by afternoon tea and breakfast will be served each morning. Our private chef, Charlie, will make dining here a truly memorable experience. As a Masterchef of Great Britain, Charlie only uses locally-sourced and seasonal food. He has a close working relationship with suppliers and his blend of traditional English cooking with a modern edge has won him many fans. Charlie’s Chef’s Table will be a highlight. He will cook dinner for us and after each course join us to explain the source of his ingredients and how he has cooked them to maximise the distinctive flavours and experiences. His enthusiasm and artisan skill is matched only by his love of cooking. For our autumn tours, the best Derbyshire game and meat will combine with those earthy autumn vegetables to create meals with great flavour. For our Christmas tours, Charlie will give the traditional Christmas fayre a special touch to make our dinners here at Portland House very special.

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autumn in the 1 peak district

TOUR

Tour price

ÂŁ1498 per person*

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Monday 19 to Thursday 22 October 2015 •

REF AW2015/02

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com or complete booking form on page 29.

*10% discount for double occupancy.


3 night exclusive fully-escorted holiday, staying in 5 Star accommodation, with excellent food and the special insights of an expert into one of Britain’s favourite landscapes. In the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, the autumn landscapes of the Peak District are at their quietest and most beautiful. The glories of an autumn sunrise, the rut of the deer in Chatsworth Park and the crackle of an open fire in England’s best preserved medieval manor house await. Our tour takes us to the greatest country house in England, we walk in the footsteps of a literary giant and have the opportunity of some serious retail therapy in some of the north of England’s most exclusive shops. We will dine at Chatsworth House and in the Devonshire Dome in Buxton and our own private chef will use the finest of ingredients to ensure each meal at Portland House is memorable. Your host Jim Dixon has a lifetime’s experience of the British countryside and has worked for many of the country’s main conservation organisations. He was Chief Executive of the Peak District National Park for 12 years and led the UK National Parks for 4 years. Today he writes on nature and landscapes for The Times and works with a wide range of countryside and tourism organisations. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Derby and was appointed by the Prime Minister as a Trustee of the Heritage Lottery Fund.

your programme Day 1 Monday 19 October Arrival and Welcome Afternoon tea will be served in your accommodation, the elegant Portland House, set in the gorge of the River Derwent at Matlock Bath in ‘Little Switzerland’ on the edge of the Peak District National Park. You will have an informal opportunity to meet fellow guests and your host Jim Dixon. When everyone has arrived and settled Jim will give an introductory talk on the Peak District with the background to the landscape of Britain’s first National Park. He will introduce you to the splendours of autumn in the heart of England. Jim’s talks draw on his expertise and behind the scenes knowledge and are richly illustrated with exceptional wildlife and landscape photography. This evening, our Chef Charlie will prepare an elegant 3 course dinner of local produce from the Peak District. We will gather for drinks in the lounge before our dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Jim has a wealth of experience of the landscapes, wildlife and people of the Peak District and he looks forward to sharing with you his knowledge and insights into this very special place at a magical time of year when light, shade and history combine to make the landscape come alive in wonderful ways.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

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Day 2 Tuesday 20 October Sunrise Walk and Chatsworth House and Gardens We start the day with an optional early sunrise walk (leaving our accommodation at 7.00) in the glorious Capability Brown-landscaped parklands at Chatsworth House. Founded by Bess of Hardwick 400 years ago. England’s most glorious Palladian Mansion is surrounded by a landscaped garden that was laid out by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown and has many other influences. Home to herds of red and fallow deer, we will experience this ancient English deer park in the autumn rutting season. We will have breakfast at Chatsworth and then you will have some free time to explore Chatsworth House and Gardens. Those who choose not to have an early start will join us at Chatsworth. Chatsworth House is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Regarded as one of Britain’s best country houses, every visit is memorable. Its place in history, the extraordinary art treasures and the sumptuous décor are set in a glorious and unspoiled park and gardens. You will have the option of exploring the house and gardens or can join our exclusive tour of the house. During our visit, you will have the opportunity of visiting the ‘Beyond Limits’ sculpture exhibition in the gardens. Beyond Limits is now firmly established as one of the leading events in the artistic calendar with artists including Damien Hirst, Marc Quinn, Jaume Plensa, Manolo Valdés and Thomas Heatherwick (designer of London’s Olympic Cauldron), having exhibited in recent years. Spread out across the garden which is resplendent in autumn foliage, the diversity of these international artists’ works represents some of the most original monumental sculpture being made today. The exhibition is staged with Sotheby’s and much of the artwork is for sale. Your visit to Chatsworth will be made even more memorable with a special Curator’s Tour, where we will get the inside story from one of the curatorial team into the treasures of this wonderful home, known as ‘The Palace of the Peaks’. We will also visit the Chatsworth Farm Shop, consistently voted Britain’s Best Farm Shop. After your visit, we will return to Portland House for afternoon tea and a time when you can relax before an exciting evening back at Chatsworth. Our tour finishes in our private room in the Stables Restaurant where we will be met with a glass

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of champagne before an elegant three course dinner. Carriages will return us to Portland House where you can have a nightcap or head straight to bed.

Day 3 Wednesday 21 October After a leisurely start, we make our way to the most beautiful moorland landscapes of the Peak District National Park at Stanage Edge. This is one of the most dramatic rock escarpments in Britain with views to the romantically-named Hope Valley. We will walk for a short distance and hear about the special role that North Lees played in inspiring Charlotte Bronte to write Jane Eyre and hear about its starring role in Hollywood films today. We have the opportunity to visit the studio and workshop of iconic designer David Mellor who created many famous 20th century design icons. Today there is an excellent cooking and bakeware shop, a design museum and a chance to explore the ‘Round House’ factory where David Mellor knives are still made today. We then travel on to Buxton through the glorious landscapes of the Peak District that will be at its moodiest and beautiful with autumn tints and hues. Arriving in the glorious spa town of Buxton, we will be guests of The University of Derby’s Fine Dining Restaurant where classic meets contemporary. Set against the breath-taking backdrop of one of the grandest 18th century buildings in the UK – at 145ft in diameter the Devonshire Dome is larger than the Pantheon or St Peter’s in Rome, the Duomo in Florence or St Paul’s Cathedral in London. Built by the 5th Duke of Devonshire to house his riding stables, the Devonshire Dome is now home to the Dome Restaurant, a unique dining experience offering delicious, contemporary dishes prepared by talented students as part of their hospitality and culinary arts programmes.


The Dome Restaurant has a first-class reputation for outstanding food and exceptional service. Many trainees have gone on to work for some of the most prestigious hotels and restaurants around the world, including Claridges of London, Gleneagles and Skibo Castle. After lunch, we take a tour of the Georgian spa town and you will have some free time, perhaps to visit the museum, local exhibitions of art and photography or some of the more eclectic of Buxton’s shops. We leave Buxton for a drive through the Peak District arriving at Haddon Hall where we will be met for tea by Lady Edward Manners and an exclusive tour after the crowds have left. The Hall is one of the most perfectly preserved medieval houses in England, yet it is still home to the Manners family (watch out for the twin toddlers who may be playing in the hall). Haddon Hall was described by Simon Jenkins in his 1000 Best Houses as ‘the most perfect house to survive from the middle ages’. Set in the heart of the beautiful Peak District National Park, parts of the house date from the 12th century, sitting like a jewel in its Elizabethan terraced gardens, and overlooking the River Wye. Film-makers flock to Haddon Hall to use it as a location. The house and grounds have played host to three versions of ‘Jane Eyre’. Screen credits also include ‘Elizabeth’, ‘Pride & Prejudice’, ‘The Other Boleyn Girl’ and ‘The Princess Bride’, the cult classic movie in which Haddon Hall becomes Prince Humperdinck’s Castle and village.

Day 4 Thursday 22 October Our last morning is relaxed. Breakfast and coffee will be served and you can take care of last minute packing and catch up with any last questions of your host. You may like to visit nearby Bakewell to buy a ‘Bakewell Pudding’, call in on Matlock Bath’s Victorian Chocolatier, or head for the oldest factory shop in the world, to stock up on the elegant knitwear made here by John Smedley for over 200 years. After a light lunch we will take you to the railway station of your choice and, sadly, wish you goodbye. Please note that this tour will involve visiting some sites in the countryside where surfaces may be slightly rough and unstable. Most of your visits will, however, be easily accessible, although wet-weather clothing may be needed. We hope that you will have had a wonderful experience of the best of Britain’s landscapes at a magical time of year.

We return to Portland House for a well-earned rest. You will have the chance to settle before drinks, on the terrace if the weather allows, or in the lounge. Dinner tonight will be something special. Charlie will prepare a tasting menu with exceptional food sourced from the local area and he will join us to explain how he selects the best local ingredients and cooks them to a high standard. His focus will be on sourcing and cooking the best ingredients of autumn.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 19


winter landscapes and 2 chatsworth house at christmas

TOUR

Tour price

ÂŁ1498 per person*

20

Monday 16 to Thursday 19 November 2015 •

REF AW2015/03

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com or complete booking form on page 29.

*10% discount for double occupancy.


3 night exclusive fully-escorted holiday, staying in 5 Star accommodation, with excellent food and the special insights of an expert into one of Britain’s favourite landscapes as the great houses of England prepare for Christmas. At the turn of the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness to winter, the landscapes of the Peak District are at their quietest and most beautiful. The glories of an autumn sunrise, the running fallow and red deer at Chatsworth Park and the crackle of an open fire await. Our tour takes us to the greatest country house in England, Chatsworth, at the peak of its preparations for Christmas and we have the opportunity of shopping at the now well-established Christmas Markets. We have the opportunity of some serious retail therapy in some of the north of England’s most exclusive shops where you will be able to purchase unique, quality English gifts. We will dine at Chatsworth House and in the Devonshire Dome in Buxton and our own private chef will use the finest of ingredients to ensure each meal at Portland House is memorable.

your programme Day 1 Monday 16 November Arrival and Welcome Afternoon tea will be served in your accommodation, the elegant Portland House, set in the gorge of the River Derwent at Matlock Bath in ‘Little Switzerland’ on the edge of the Peak District National Park. You will have an informal opportunity to meet fellow guests and your host Jim Dixon. When everyone has arrived and settled Jim will give an introductory talk on the Peak District with the background to the landscape of Britain’s first National Park. He will introduce you to the splendours of autumn in the heart of England. Jim’s talks draw on his expertise and behind the scenes knowledge and are richly illustrated with exceptional wildlife and landscape photography. This evening, our Chef Charlie will prepare an elegant dinner of local produce from the Peak District. We will gather for drinks in the lounge before our dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Your host Jim Dixon has a lifetime’s experience of the British countryside and has worked for many of the country’s main conservation organisations. He was Chief Executive of the Peak District National Park for 12 years and led the UK National Parks for 4 years. Today he writes on nature and landscapes for The Times and works with a wide range of countryside and tourism organisations. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Derby and was appointed by the Prime Minister as a Trustee of the Heritage Lottery Fund. Jim has a wealth of experience of the landscapes, wildlife and people of the Peak District and he looks forward to sharing with you his knowledge and insights into this very special place at a magical time of year when they combine to make the landscape come alive in wonderful ways.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 21


Day 2 Tuesday 17 November Chatsworth House and Christmas Markets Christmas at Chatsworth today has rekindled the spirit, and the scale, of the grandest Christmas celebrations that this Ducal seat will have experienced. We start our day with a visit to Chatsworth’s now well-established Christmas Markets where there is live seasonal musical entertainment from brass bands to string quartets, you can enjoy mulled cider and German beers in Chatsworth’s Bavarian beer tent and find the perfect presents for all the family from the wide range of stalls including toiletries, clothes and things for your home. There is a wide range of food available from gourmet burgers, hotdogs, pancakes, fudge and chocolate. Chatsworth House is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Regarded as one of Britain’s best country houses, every visit is memorable. Its place in history, the extraordinary art treasures and the sumptuous décor are set in a glorious and unspoiled park and gardens. We will then travel the short distance to Chatsworth Farm Shop, consistently voted Britain’s Best Farm Shop. After your visit, we will return to Portland House for afternoon tea and a time when you can relax before an exciting evening of music and the arts at Chatsworth. The Dukes of Devonshire were great patrons of the arts and your speaker will explain the contribution that Chatsworth has, and continues to make to the arts. Our evening starts with drinks and entertainment followed by dinner in our own private dining room in the Stables Restaurant where we will be met with a glass of champagne before an elegant three course dinner. Carriages will return us to Portland House where you can have a night cap or head straight to bed.

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Day 3 Wednesday 18 November Winter Landscapes and Christmas in Saxon and Georgian Towns After a leisurely start, we make our way to the most beautiful moorland landscapes of the Peak District National Park at Stanage Edge. This is one of the most dramatic rock escarpments in Britain with views to the romantically-named Hope Valley. We will walk for a short distance and hear about the special role that North Lees played in inspiring Charlotte Bronte to write ‘Jane Eyre’ and hear about its starring role in Hollywood films today. We have the opportunity to visit the studio and workshop of iconic designer David Mellor who designed many famous 20th century icons. Today there is an excellent cooking and bakeware shop, a design museum and a chance to explore the ‘Round House’ factory where David Mellor knives are still made today. We then travel on to Buxton through the glorious landscapes of the Peak District that will be at its most beautiful with the end of the autumn tints and hues and the start of winter. Arriving in the glorious spa town of Buxton, we will be guests of The University of Derby’s Fine Dining Restaurant where classic meets contemporary. Set against the breath-taking backdrop of one of the grandest 18th century buildings in the UK – at 145ft in diameter the Devonshire Dome is larger than the Pantheon or St Peter’s in Rome, the Duomo in Florence or St Paul’s Cathedral in London. Built by the 5th Duke of Devonshire to house his riding stables, the Devonshire Dome is now home to the Dome Restaurant, a unique dining experience offering delicious, contemporary dishes prepared by talented students as part of their hospitality and culinary arts programmes. The Dome Restaurant has a first-class reputation for outstanding food and exceptional service. Many trainees have gone on to work


for some of the most prestigious hotels and restaurants around the world, including Claridges of London, Gleneagles and Skibo Castle. After lunch, we take a tour of the Georgian spa town and you will have some free time, perhaps to visit the museum, local exhibitions of art and photography or some of the more eclectic of Buxton’s shops. We cross the Peak District at dusk, perhaps catching the sunset if we are lucky, before arriving for a short visit to Bakewell. This ancient market town has some of the best preserved saxon church statuary and some great traditional English shops. Our favourites are John Brocklehurst’s traditional country outfitters, the Bakewell Pudding Shop and the Wee Dram, which stocks hundreds of excellent malt whiskies. You will have a short guided tour of Bakewell and have a chance to walk through the town after dusk as the town begins to close for the evening. We return to Portland House for a well-earned rest. You will have the chance to settle before drinks in the lounge. Dinner tonight will be something special. Charlie will prepare a tasting menu with exceptional food sourced from the local area and he will join us to explain how he selects the best local ingredients and cooks them to a high standard. His focus will be on sourcing and cooking the best ingredients of Christmas and he will offer you tips and insights into great Christmas cooking.

Day 4 Thursday 19 November Our last morning is relaxed. Breakfast and coffee will be served and you can take care of last minute packing and catch up with any last questions of your host. You can call in on Matlock Bath’s Victorian Chocolatier, or head for the oldest factory shop in the world, to stock up on the elegant knitwear made here by John Smedley for over 200 years. After a light lunch we will take you to the railway station of your choice and, sadly, wish you goodbye. Please note that this tour will involve visiting some sites in the countryside where surfaces may be slightly rough and unstable. Most of your visits will, however, be easily accessible, although wet-weather clothing may be needed. We hope that you will have had a wonderful experience of the best of Britain’s landscapes at a magical time of year.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 23


winter landscapes, chatsworth 3 house and haddon hall at christmas

TOUR

Tour price

ÂŁ1498 per person*

24

Monday 7 to Thursday 10 December 2015 •

REF AW2015/04

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com or complete booking form on page 29.

*10% discount for double occupancy.


3 night exclusive fully-escorted holiday, staying in 5 Star accommodation, with excellent food and the special insights of an expert into one of Britain’s favourite landscapes as the great houses of England prepare for Christmas. With the low winter sun, short days and the promise of Christmas, and maybe some snow, this is a magical time to be in the Peak District. The great houses that we’ll visit are dressed for Christmas. From the crackle of an open fire at Haddon Hall, England’s best preserved medieval manor house, to Chatsworth’s connection with our best-loved Christmas music, you will have a special start to the festive season. We have the opportunity of some serious retail therapy in some of England’s most exclusive shops where you will be able to purchase unique, quality English gifts. We will dine at Chatsworth House and in the Devonshire Dome in Buxton and our own private chef will use the finest of ingredients to ensure each meal at Portland House is memorable.

your programme Day 1 Monday 7 December Arrival and Welcome Afternoon tea will be served in your accommodation, the elegant Portland House, set in the gorge of the River Derwent at Matlock Bath in ‘Little Switzerland’ on the edge of the Peak District National Park. You will have an informal opportunity to meet fellow guests and your host Jim Dixon. When everyone has arrived and settled Jim will give an introductory talk on the Peak District with the background to the landscape of Britain’s first National Park. He will introduce you to the splendours of autumn in the heart of England. Jim’s talks draw on his expertise and behind the scenes knowledge and are richly illustrated with exceptional wildlife and landscape photography. This evening, our Chef Charlie will prepare an elegant dinner of local produce from the Peak District. We will gather for drinks in the lounge before our dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Your host Jim Dixon has a lifetime’s experience of the British countryside and has worked for many of the country’s main conservation organisations. He was Chief Executive of the Peak District National Park for 12 years and led the UK National Parks for 4 years. Today he writes on nature and landscapes for The Times and works with a wide range of countryside and tourism organisations. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Derby and was appointed by the Prime Minister as a Trustee of the Heritage Lottery Fund. Jim has a wealth of experience of the landscapes, wildlife and people of the Peak District. He looks forward to sharing with you his insights into this very special place, at a magical time of year when they combine to make the landscape come alive in wonderful ways.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 25


Day 2 Tuesday 8 December

Day 3 Wednesday 9 December

Chatsworth House at Christmas

Winter Landscapes and Christmas in Buxton and Haddon Hall

Christmas at Chatsworth today has rekindled the spirit, and the scale, of the grandest Christmas celebrations that this Ducal seat will have experienced. We start our day with a visit to Chatsworth House where we will tour the House in its most splendid Christmas dressing. Drawing on traditional festive themes and a more contemporary popular feel, Chatsworth House at Christmas is not to be missed.

After a leisurely start, we make our way to the most beautiful moorland landscapes of the Peak District National Park at Stanage Edge. This is one of the most dramatic rock escarpments in Britain with views to the romantically-named Hope Valley. We will walk for a short distance and hear about the special role that North Lees played in inspiring Charlotte Bronte to write ‘Jane Eyre’ and hear about its starring role in Hollywood films today. We have the opportunity to visit the studio and workshop of iconic designer David Mellor who designed many famous 20th century icons. Today there is an excellent cooking and bakeware shop, a design museum and a chance to explore the ‘Round House’ factory where David Mellor knives are still made today.

Chatsworth House is home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Regarded as one of Britain’s best country houses, every visit is memorable. Its place in history, the extraordinary art treasures and the sumptuous décor are set in a glorious and unspoiled park and gardens. We will then travel the short distance to Chatsworth Farm Shop, consistently voted Britain’s Best Farm Shop which is a must visit experience before Christmas. After your visit, we will return to Portland House for afternoon tea and a time when you can relax before an exclusive evening of music and the arts at Chatsworth. The Dukes of Devonshire were great patrons of the arts and your speaker will explain the contribution that Chatsworth has, and continues to make to the arts. Our evening starts with drinks and entertainment followed by dinner in our own private dining room in the Stables Restaurant where we will be met with a glass of champagne before an elegant three course dinner. Carriages will return us to Portland House where you can have a night cap or head straight to bed.

26

We then travel on to Buxton through the glorious landscapes of the Peak District that will be at its most starkly beautiful near to mid winter. Arriving in the glorious spa town of Buxton, we will be guests of The University of Derby’s Fine Dining Restaurant where classic meets contemporary. Set against the breath-taking backdrop of one of the grandest 18th century buildings in the UK – at 145ft in diameter the Devonshire Dome is larger than the Pantheon or St Peter’s in Rome, the Duomo in Florence or St Paul’s Cathedral in London. Built by the 5th Duke of Devonshire to house his riding stables, the Devonshire Dome is now home to the Dome Restaurant, a unique dining experience offering delicious, contemporary dishes prepared by talented students as part of their hospitality and culinary arts programmes.


The Dome Restaurant has a first-class reputation for outstanding food and exceptional service. Many trainees have gone on to work for some of the most prestigious hotels and restaurants around the world, including Claridges of London, Gleneagles and Skibo Castle. After lunch, we take a tour of the Georgian spa town and you will have some free time, perhaps to visit the museum, local exhibitions of art and photography or some of the more eclectic of Buxton’s shops. We travel back over the Peak District arriving at Haddon Hall at dusk. After a short introduction and tea with Lady Edward Manners, we will take a candle-lit tour of Haddon Hall that will be dressed for Christmas. This most enchanting visit will include taking part in one of the ’12 Days of Christmas’ themed events. We return to Portland House for a well-earned rest. You will have the chance to settle before drinks in the lounge. Dinner tonight will be something special. Charlie will prepare a tasting menu with exceptional food sourced from the local area and he will join us to explain how he selects the best local ingredients and cooks them to a high standard. His focus will be on sourcing and cooking the best ingredients of Christmas and he will offer you tips and insights into great Christmas cooking.

Day 4 Thursday 10 December Our last morning is relaxed. Breakfast and coffee will be served and you can take care of last minute packing and catch up with any last questions of your host. You can call in on Matlock Bath’s Victorian Chocolatier, or head for the oldest factory shop in the world, to stock up on the elegant knitwear made here by John Smedley for over 200 years. After a light lunch we will take you to the railway station of your choice and, sadly, wish you goodbye. Please note that this tour will involve visiting some sites in the countryside where surfaces may be slightly rough and unstable. Most of your visits will, however, be easily accessible, although wet-weather clothing may be needed. We hope that you will have had a wonderful experience of the best of Britain’s landscapes at a magical time of year.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 27


practicalities Arrivals and Departures

Costs and Booking

We will meet you at the railway station suited to you. Good stations for the Peak District are Chesterfield, Matlock Bath and Buxton and stations on the Hope Valley Line between Sheffield and Manchester. Your accommodation is a short walk from Matlock Bath Station which is just over 2 hours from London St Pancras Station via Derby. We can arrange airport pick-ups at Manchester and East Midlands and, at a supplement, London and other UK airports. The address is Portland House, New Bath Rd, Matlock Bath, Derbyshire DE4 3PX. Matlock Bath is approximately 2.5 hours (140 miles) from the junction of the M1 and M25.

This is a bespoke tour of premium quality and you will be staying at and dining in some of the best accommodation and country houses in the Peak District. Your guides are experienced experts and you will have access to special behind the scenes tours. You will be travelling with like-minded people with a unique experience. The costs of your tour reflect this high quality experience. All rooms and dining experiences will be of a similar quality.

Holiday and Travel Insurance We’d be grateful if you could arrange your own holiday insurance and if you are visiting the UK please ensure that you have access to UK and EU medical services.

Special Needs Please advise us in advance when you book of any special needs that may affect your ability to enjoy this tour to the full, including medical, dietary or accessibility issues.

What to Wear We will be walking in the English countryside in autumn and winter. We could be in brilliant sunshine and 30°C temperatures or in misty dawn weather at just above freezing. Please ensure you have comfortable outdoor shoes, waterproofs, and layers of clothes. We will have some formal dinners that you may wish to dress for but we will not be wearing black tie.

What to Bring You will be staying in a good quality accommodation and your trips will be to places that are used to visitors, so other than your own essential personal items you do not need any special equipment.

Shopping and Souvenirs We will visit some of Derbyshire’s best shops, including the excellent gift shops at Haddon and Chatsworth and exclusive gift shops. You will also have the opportunity to shop for gifts and local specialities in Bakewell, Buxton and Hathersage. Many of the gifts can be posted home or to friends, including Bakewell’s famous pudding!

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Prices are based on single occupancy rooms, although there is a 10% discount for joint occupancy. Prices are inclusive of VAT and are not subject to any surcharges once booking has been confirmed. All of your meals are included. The cost of the tour is £1498 per person. For overseas visitors, we can arrange for a similar quality of accommodation and tours in London at the start and finish of your holiday, making this a 7 night stay complete with London Heathrow pickup and drop off. Please ask for details and a price. Please complete the attached booking form. You can download another copy of this form from www.ukcountrysidetours.com/booking-form.pdf. Please note that this is an exclusive tour with limited places and may sell out quickly once booking opens. The tour should be booked with a 20% deposit payable by cheque, credit card or by bank transfer (please ask for details), which is payable to a Protected Bonded Scheme. Full payment should be made no later than 4 weeks before the start of your tour. Please note that it is not possible to be firm about all booking details at this stage, and some details of the itinerary may also change for practical reasons beyond our control. We will endeavour to ensure the whole experience is a complete one that meets your overall expectations of a premium holiday in the English countryside.

Contact Jim Dixon or Stuart Gillis Please call or e-mail us if you have any questions. Tel : 01629 704759 Email : info@ukcountrysidetours.com booking@ukcountrysidetours.com UK Countryside Tours Richfield, West Bank, Winster, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 2DQ www.ukcountrysidetours.com


booking form Your details

Payment

Please complete a separate booking form for each guest. You can download another copy of this form from: www.ukcountrysidetours.com/booking-form.pdf

Please pay a deposit on booking of 20% of the full fee. Ensure that you pay the remainder in full, no later than noon 4 weeks before the start of your tour (Tour 1: 21st September, Tour 2: 19th October; Tour 3: 9th December).

Your name .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. How you wish to be addressed on the tour ......................................................................................................  Your age ........................... (Please note that we do not accept guests under the age of 18) I would like to book: Tour 1

Tour 2

Tour 3

Please tick which tour you would like to book. Please use a separate form for each tour, you can download another copy of this form from www.ukcountrysidetours.com/booking-form.pdf

Single occupancy

Double occupancy (complete an additional booking form)

Full time home address

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................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Telephone number Email address

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.................................................................................................................................................................................................

In case of emergency (someone not coming on this tour to contact in case of emergency) Name .............................................................................................................................. Tel

...............................................................................

Please tell us about any special needs that may affect your enjoyment of the holiday, e.g. medical, dietary, accessibility or anything we need to be aware of whilst we and our partners are looking after you.

Single occupancy tour price £1498.00 per person. Deposit required = £299.60 per person (20% of the tour price). Outstanding amount to pay: £1198.40 per person. Double occupancy tour price £1348.20 per person (which includes a 10% discount). Deposit required = £269.64 per person (20% of the tour price) Outstanding amount to pay: £1078.56 per person.

I enclose a deposit of: £299.60 (single occupancy)

£269.64 (double occupancy)

Cheques payable to ‘Trustees of Protected Travel Services Air Travel‘, and posted ‘C/O UK Countryside Tours, Richfield, West Bank, Winster, Matlock, Derbyshire, DE42DQ’. Please telephone for bank account or online payment details if you wish to pay electronically. All payments will be receipted.

Your understanding of the tour Please sign below to confirm that you understand that this tour is to the Peak District in the autumn and winter 2015. It will include walks in the open countryside and guided visits to stately homes, small market towns and the English countryside. You agree that you are reasonably able to take part in all activities and that should you have any special needs that you will notify them at the time of booking or if appropriate on joining the tour. By signing below, you also agree to abide by all reasonable guidance and requests of the tour leader and that you understand that this is a small tour group where the needs of all of the guests collectively need to be met.

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You also confirm that you understand that we are a very small, specialist tour business offering special tours and so we are unable to offer the full package of customer care options that a larger tour company would be able to.

...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Signed

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

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Date

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the peak district in autumn and winter - 29


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our promise We are well connected, well-respected and welcoming. We will work hard to ensure you have a memorable, fulfilling and enjoyable stay. We have selected the accommodation, itinerary and catering to ensure that you have a quality, relaxed and exclusive experience that will enlighten and entertain you. If we do not feel that the tour can go ahead to the standard we would want for reasons outside our control we will cancel, giving you a full refund of any money already paid to us.

Call to book 01629 704759 or visit www.ukcountrysidetours.com

credits Many of the best landscape photographs in this brochure are by Peak District wildlife and landscape photographer Alex Hyde. Alex’s work can be seen at www.alexhyde.photoshelter.com

the peak district in autumn and winter - 31


UK Countryside Tours Richfield, West Bank, Winster, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 2DQ Tel : 01629 704759 Email : info@ukcountrysidetours.com www.ukcountrysidetours.com Jim Dixon Associates trading as UK Countryside Tours. Registered in England and Wales No. 9181757

We ensure our customers are protected with all booking fees being paid directly into a bonded account. This is managed independently through Protected Travel Services. This protection lasts from the point that you book your holiday through to the point when you return. You can enjoy every holiday booked through a PTS client knowing that you have 100% financial protection and full peace of mind at all times. For more information on how your money is protected please visit www.protectedtravelservices.com

The Peak District in Autumn and Winter  

UK Countryside Tours offers an exclusive range of independent and escorted short breaks to the Derbyshire Peak District.