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SELF-STUDY 2010

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2010 Self-Study

Table of Contents I. Executive Summary

1

A. About the College

1

B. Self-Study Process

2

C. Self-Study Committee

2

D. 2010 Major Recommendations

3

II. Program Documents

5

A. Mission & Strategic Plan

5

B. College Organizational Charts

III. Program Description

14 15

A. Enrollment & Demographics

15

B. Technology

16

C. Learning

19

D. Research

24

E. Resources

28

F. Diversity

34

G. Engagement

36

IV. Affected Constituents’ Input

45

V. Policy & Procedure Adherence

47

A. Educational Policies & Procedures

47

B. Faculty Personnel Actions

48

C. Budget Request Preparation

48

VI. Productivity & Quality Evaluation A. Productivity

51 51

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2010 Self-Study

B. Instruction

52

C. Student Learning Outcomes & Assessment

52

D. Student Services & Orientation

55

VII. Analysis & Recommendations A. College of Communications and Information Studies Strengths

57

B. Recommendations

58

Appendices

57

65

Appendix A

65

Appendix B

66

Appendix C

67

Appendix D

68

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2010 Self-Study

I. Executive Summary A. About the College The College of Communications and Information Studies is dedicated to improving people's lives through excellence in research, service, and education and training for undergraduate and graduate students in the multicultural, multiethnic global society of the information age. The College seeks to be a national leader at the undergraduate and graduate levels among public research universities in the fields of Communication, Journalism, Integrated Strategic Communication, Telecommunications, and

Awards

Library and Information Science. Our programs have been nationally recognized and compete for the best students in Kentucky and the nation. The Graduate Program in Communication ranked 7th (out of 83 programs nationally) in the National Research Council 2010 report on doctoral programs. The master’s program in Library and Information Science was

CJT Graduate Program ranked

7th

named one of America’s Best Graduate Schools by U.S. News and World Report in 2009. A National Communication Association survey identified the Department of Communication as the one of the most highly funded Communication programs in the nation. Across the College, faculty researchers have secured more than $42 million in extramural funding as principal investigators or co-investigators over the past 25 years. Our faculty members are recognized nationally and internationally for their teaching, publications, research, and community service. Faculty members have served as presidents of the National Communication Association, Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication, and

School of Library & Information Science named one of

America’s Best Department of Communication one of

Highest Funded

American Society for Information Science & Technology. In addition, the College boasts four former editors of prestigious scholarly journals. Members of our faculty are continuously recognized for outstanding teaching through the Provost Distinguished Service Professor Award, UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award, Interfraternity Council Great Teacher Award, and the student body vote for “favorite professor.” As a College, we value integrity, academic and scholarly excellence, mutual respect and human dignity, diversity and inclusion, academic freedom, shared governance, work-life sensitivity, civic and community engagement, social responsibility, freedom of expressions, and innovation and entrepreneurship. We seek to incorporate these ideals in everything we do. The College is part of Kentucky’s rich tradition in communication and information studies and has played a key role in training professionals in these fields since the 1890s, when the first courses in journalism were offered. The College and its units have enjoyed remarkable leadership, exemplified by visionaries such as Enoch Grehan (1869-1939), who was

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2010 Self-Study instrumental in establishing the university’s current daily newspaper and in fundraising for the construction of the Grehan Building. The College of Communications was created in 1976, when the Department of Human Communication and the School of Journalism joined together. The two units had previously been part of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1993, the College of Library and Information Science and the College of Communications merged, creating the present College of Communications and Information Studies. Since the 2005 Self-Study, the College has recruited new leadership, specifically a new Dean, and has played a key role in the rewriting of the University Studies Program (USP) requirements. The College has responded to developments in the marketplace that require more training for students in the use and delivery of Information Communication Technology (ICT) and has made technology, ICT in particular, a key part of its strategic plan. It is our hope that this report will provide a sense of who we are at the College of Communications and Information Studies, the important work we do, and the possibilities for our future.

B. Self-Study Process The College Dean, Dan O’Hair, formed the Self-Study Committee in September 2010, and the Self-Study Committee met regularly throughout the fall of 2010. The Committee solicited input from unit heads, divisions, centers, institutes, faculty, students, and staff from the College. In addition, the committee invited the entire College (faculty, staff, and students) to participate in a survey, which allowed them to anonymously rate College programs and initiatives and provide feedback. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications and the School of Library and Information Science were reviewed as part of their accrediting processes. The Department of Communication is not under review as part of this study, as it is on a different review schedule than the College. However, the Department’s role in the College is described in this document, as the Department is key to the College’s mission and activities. This Self-Study included a separate review of the Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program. The review of that program is incorporated into this document and a full copy of the report generated by the CJT Self-Study is included in Appendix B. The CJT Graduate Program review committee was comprised of representatives from the three primary areas of the program. Although the review process began in April 2010, the review committee held a forum during the Graduate Student Association’s November 2010 meeting in order to encourage graduate students to participate in the process.

C. Self-Study Committee The Committee included College Dean Dan O’Hair, School of Library and Information Science Professor Donald Case, School of Journalism and Telecommunications Professor Alyssa Eckman, Department of Communication Professor Derek Lane, College Communications Director Heather Saxon, and Graduate Student Sarah Vos. The CJT Graduate Program Self-Study included Associate Dean for Research and Chair of the Department of Communication Nancy Harrington, Department of Communication Professor Phil Palmgreen (Mass Communication), and Department of Communication Professor Seth Noar (Health Communication); Director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications Beth Barnes, and Journalism and Telecommunications Professor James Hertog (Media Studies);

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2010 Self-Study Department of Communication Professor Laura Stafford (Interpersonal Communication); and Graduate Student Sarah Vos.

D. 2010 Major Recommendations 2010 Recommendation No. 1 Create a Center for Excellence in Student Achievement to recruit more qualified students, retain current students, and help all students realize their full academic potential. 2010 Recommendation No. 2 Acquire the technological support from the University (UKIT) necessary to facilitate instruction and learning in a Mac-based environment. 2010 Recommendation No. 3 Increase office, classroom, and lab space to more appropriately serve the needs of the College. 2010 Recommendation No. 4 Increase funding to acquire the staff and technology to provide more online classes and leverage technology in both teaching and research. 2010 Recommendation No. 5 Create an undergraduate program in Information Studies, housed in the School of Library and Information Science. 2010 Recommendation No. 6 Increase funding for the CJT Graduate Program to (a) provide stipends for graduate students that are commensurate with our benchmarks, (b) increase the number funded graduate students, and (c) encourage graduate students to engage in research, publish their work, and present their work at conferences. 2010 Recommendation No. 7 Explore the possibility of the CJT Graduate Program including emphases in Risk Sciences and Instructional Communication. 2010 Recommendation No. 8 Create graduate-level certificates in Risk Sciences, Digital and Multimedia Journalism, and Integrated Strategic Communication to meet the needs of working professionals. 2010 Recommendation No. 9 Build a state-of-the-art multimedia, digital recording studio in order to remain competitive and keep up with technological advances. 2010 Recommendation No. 10

Ensure current faculty salaries, starting salaries, and start-up support are nationally competitive.

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II. Program Documents A. Mission & Strategic Plan i. College Mission Statement The College of Communications and Information Studies is dedicated to improving people's lives through excellence in research, service, and education and training for undergraduate and graduate students in the multicultural, multiethnic global society of the information age. Our primary mission is to teach students to communicate effectively; to obtain and evaluate information; to create, produce, and disseminate effective communication messages; to make strategic use of knowledge; and to undertake research programs that contribute to the advancement of the

“

The College is dedicated to improving people's lives through excellence in research, service, and education and training.

commonwealth and beyond. We seek to promote civic responsibility, service learning, and diversity.

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ii. 2010-2015 Strategic Plan Goal 1: Establish the College as a Leader in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Objective 1.1 Prepare students for leadership in the study and application of ICT.

Strategy 1.1.1 Ensure a flexible and responsive curriculum that educates students on

cutting edge ICT and their applications.

Strategy 1.1.2 Partner with organizations and corporations to provide real-world learning

and practice opportunities for students on the applications of ICTs to

current problems.

Strategy 1.1.3 Develop the various ICT-related literacies (including digital, information,

and media literacies) of students through the general education

curriculum.

Strategy 1.1.4 Maximize the creative use of existing instructional technologies to provide

Strategy 1.1.5 Increase research on best practices for the use of technology to deliver

Objective 1.2

Increase academic and scholarly productivity in ICT that contributes to economic and

societal well being.

exemplary distance learning for students.

distance learning.

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Strategy 1.2.1 Increase the level of research focused on ICT and the number of journal

Strategy 1.2.2 Increase external funding for research and development related to ICT.

Strategy 1.2.3 Recruit faculty with expertise and interest in ICT and the application of ICT.

Objective 1.3

Develop collaborative networks both within the University and with outside agencies and

organizations that advance our understanding and use of ICT.

Strategy 1.3.1 Identify commonalities among potential collaborators and create working

Strategy 1.3.1 Develop formal and informal channels for building relationships and

Strategy 1.3.2 Develop strategies and seek related funding for addressing knowledge

Objective 1.4

Expand ICT programs that empower individuals, groups, and communities to address

challenging problems through sustainable infrastructure.

Strategy 1.4.1 Address access issues through focus on new technologies and increasing

Strategy 1.4.2 Develop and study the use and effectiveness of digital media content

Objective 1.5

Implement new approaches to information technologies within the College to promote

awareness and understanding of the uses of ICT.

Strategy 1.5.1 Adopt a news mentality to delivering quick bits of information about the

Strategy 1.5.2 Develop and implement a search engine optimization (SEO) approach

to having information about the College appear first as stakeholders seek

information online about programs, or faculty or student success stories.

Strategy 1.5.3 Develop local and national partnerships to develop the College into a

articles published that address issues related to ICT.

partnerships among them that are aimed at mutual enrichment.

promoting information exchanges focused on ICT.

gaps in ICT.

the rates at which they are adopted.

aimed at empowerment.

College daily.

working laboratory for innovation in ICT.

Goal 2: Prepare Students for Leading Roles in an Information-driven Society

Objective 2.1

Recruit and graduate more high-ability communications and information science students

from all societal segments.

Strategy 2.1.1 Enhance marketing and communication efforts statewide and in strategic

Objective 2.2 Improve student retention and time-to-degree.

out-of-state and international target areas.

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Strategy 2.2.1 Increase faculty numbers to improve student/faculty ratio and academic

Strategy 2.2.2 Implement a rigorous and ongoing assessment of program effectiveness

Strategy 2.2.3 Expand efforts to monitor student progress toward degree completion and

Strategy 2.2.4 Implement research-based curricular enhancements to facilitate

Objective 2.3 Implement a new undergraduate General Education Curriculum that addresses

written, oral, and graphical communication theory and skills.

Strategy 2.3.1 Ensure that all students at the University graduate with appropriate

competency in oral and written communication including media literacy,

information literacy, visual literacy, and graphical literacy.

Objective 2.4 Implement an undergraduate program in Information Science.

Strategy 2.4.1

Focus first on involvement in General Education, then on instituting a

minor in Information Science, and then focus on developing a major in

Information Science.

Objective 2.5 Leverage information and communication technology (ICT) to improve student learning

experiences.

Strategy 2.5.1 Determine the appropriate mix of campus learning, e-learning, and

Strategy 2.5.2 Provide appropriate opportunities of professional development to

Strategy 2.5.3 Expand instructional development opportunities for innovative ICT-based

Objective 2.6 Increase the number and quality of graduates in all units to enhance the reputation of the

College while addressing the critical needs of the Commonwealth and the United States.

Strategy 2.6.1 Expand opportunities for interdisciplinary and inter-professional learning

Strategy 2.6.2 Provide training opportunities for graduate and professional students to

serve the needs of the Commonwealth and beyond through research,

teaching, and internship experiences.

Objective 2.7 Expand space available for academic pursuits through reallocation of existing space and

Objective 2.8

program quality.

across curricular and co-curricular programs.

implement a robust set of intervention and support strategies.

continuous improvement in student learning.

blended approaches for students and faculty.

encourage faculty engagement in technology-assisted instruction.

pedagogies that focus on active learning.

and training; create appropriate space and facilities.

construction of new academic buildings. Assess the success of graduates in relation to their field of professional preparation.

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Strategy 2.8.1

Track the employment of graduates.

Strategy 2.8.2

Establish social media connections to keep graduates in touch and

engaged.

Objective 2.9

Review and reconstitute graduate education in the College.

Strategy 2.9.1

Conduct a strategic planning process to determine ways to enhance

existing areas and develop new ones.

Strategy 2.9.2

Develop a model for staffing and resources of the graduate program.

Goal 3: Promote Research and Creative Activity that Deepens and Maximizes Social, Intellectual, and Economic Opportunities for all Citizens

Objective 3.1 Increase research and scholarly productivity.

Strategy 3.1.1 Reduce barriers to and facilitate interdisciplinary research and

collaborative scholarship, including scholarly projects that encompass

national and international partnerships.

Strategy 3.1.2 Target institutional investment to research areas of current strength and

emerging importance (such as health communication, risk and crisis

management, environmental sustainability, dissemination and

implementation processes, combating social ills, instructional

communication, biomedical informatics, and media studies).

Strategy 3.1.3 Grow traditional sources of extramural research support and identify and

Strategy 3.1.4 Increase the number and intellectual quality of graduate students in the

Strategy 3.1.5 Increase the number of research assistantships available to graduate

Strategy 3.1.6 Encourage and facilitate greater involvement of graduate faculty in

Strategy 3.1.7 Promote the creation of post-doctoral student positions.

Objective 3.2 Expand research capacity.

Strategy 3.2.1 Pursue private and non-profit funding for construction and renovation of

Strategy 3.2.2 Add faculty positions in targeted and emerging areas.

Strategy 3.2.3 Develop and implement effective College-wide policies for allocation of

cultivate new sources.

Graduate Program in Communication.

students.

mentoring graduate student research.

research space.

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2010 Self-Study

Strategy 3.2.4 Ensure that the level of administrative and support services are sufficient

to meet the needs of a growing research enterprise’s separate pre-award

and post-award requirements.

Objective 3.3 Enhance the impact and public awareness of the College’s research and scholarship on a

knowledge-based economy.

Strategy 3.3.1 Strengthen communications and public relations programming to

communicate more effectively the impact of research and scholarly

accomplishments.

Strategy 3.3.2 Integrate research and teaching more fully by increasing research

Strategy 3.3.3 Monitor, track, and publicize applied research efforts in our communities,

including well-being, safety, improved communication infrastructure,

technology transfer, commercialization efforts, and similar metrics.

Strategy 3.3.4

Leverage both traditional and new media forms for high-impact exposure

for the College.

Objective 3.4

Increase entrepreneurial opportunities and activity among faculty.

Strategy 3.4.1

Aggressively pursue College-supported research and entrepreneurial

centers, including a Center for Applied Communication Research.

Strategy 3.4.2

Provide incentives, including released time, for faculty for entrepreneurial

activity across the disciplines within the College, with other university

entities, and with outside agencies and businesses.

Strategy 3.4.3

Recruit staff professionally trained to handle, in an integrated way, the

business development, grant writing, and business management aspects

of entrepreneurial center activities.

Strategy 3.4.4

Develop ways to work collaboratively outside the structure of the College

in order to qualify for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants

from federal agencies and similar opportunities.

opportunities for students at all levels.

Goal 4: Develop the Human, Physical and Technological Resources of the College to Achieve the Institution’s Top 20 Goals

Objective 4.1

Recruit faculty and professional staff with high potential for success at a Top

20-level research university.

Strategy 4.1.1 Ensure starting salaries and start-up support are nationally competitive.

Strategy 4.1.2 Develop and leverage endowed chairs and professorships to recruit

leadership-level faculty and professional staff in targeted areas.

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Strategy 4.1.3

Recruit professionally diverse faculty to staff the General Education

requirements.

Objective 4.2

Enhance the success, retention, and advancement of faculty and professional staff engaged

in the varied missions of the University.

Strategy 4.2.1 Ensure that faculty and professional staff work allocation and

advancement policies and practices (including those pertaining to

compensation) are fair, transparent, and clearly communicated, and that

they reflect best practices among top public research universities.

Strategy 4.2.2 Support, recognize, reward, and celebrate faculty and professional staff

Strategy 4.2.3 Design and implement a research-based program to improve career

advancement support and opportunities for faculty and professional staff

at all stages of their careers.

Strategy 4.2.4 Identify and develop faculty and professional staff leaders.

Objective 4.3

Create a workplace culture that articulates values and initiatives to engage employees as

stakeholders.

Strategy 4.3.1 Reinforce values and practices necessary to foster a culture of respect,

learning, innovation, efficiency, and service to support students,

colleagues, and customers.

Strategy 4.3.2 Improve performance management to motivate and challenge employees

to excel in support of University and department goals; link achievement

to recognition, rewards, and compensation; and enhance communication

at all levels.

Strategy 4.3.3

Review and revise faculty/staff temporary disability policies to include

policies for dealing with faculty temporary disabilities and childbirth.

Objective 4.4

Continually enhance recruitment, selection, orientation, and retention of top talent.

Strategy 4.4.1 Sustain continuous progress in employment of women and minorities at all

Strategy 4.4.2 Strengthen market competitive compensation and benefits to attract,

Objective 4.5

Expand staff resources to support student success and faculty productivity in research and

teaching.

Objective 4.6

Objective 4.7 Develop a plan for a new or renovated building to consolidate all programs and activities of

achievement in all areas.

levels of the University.

retain, and reward top talent and high performers.

Support faculty in assuming leadership roles in professional and discipline-related activities.

the College.

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Objective 4.8

Increase building space available to College academic programs and for research and

support functions.

Objective 4.9

Improve the suitability, sustainability, efficiency, accessibility, and quality of existing facilities.

Strategy 4.9.1 Continue classroom and research facility renovations and upgrades.

Strategy 4.9.2 Implement a more collaborative process for building class and classroom

Strategy 4.9.3 Provide space for consolidation of undergraduate and pre-major advising.

Strategy 4.9.4 Provide consolidated space for planned entrepreneurial centers.

Objective 4.10 Strengthen the integration and utilization of innovative, cost-effective information technology

solutions to enhance the College.

Strategy 4.10.1 Establish and improve robust partnerships between Information

Strategy 4.10.2 Focus on the capture, aggregation, and delivery of information related to

Strategy 4.10.3 Ensure the best instructional technologies are available to faculty for

Objective 4.11 Determine College priorities for advancement efforts (including scholarships, endowment,

capital projects, major gifts, etc.) and aggressively pursue opportunities.

Strategy 4.11.1 Develop a compelling and succinct mission statement for the College that

Strategy 4.11.2 Determine areas of focus for development efforts (including annual

Strategy 4.11.3 Effectively utilize the Development Cycle (including identification,

schedules to improve classroom utilization.

Technology and the College.

communication and information studies.

distance learning delivery.

drives development efforts.

support, major gifts, planned gifts, and support for Centers of Excellence).

qualification, cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship) for all priorities.

Strategy 4.11.4 Utilize standardized and customized metrics to gauge success and

Objective 4.12 Cultivate and strengthen relationships with College alumni and donors.

Strategy 4.12.1 Develop a vision for our alumni and align with the vision of the University.

Strategy 4.12.2 Determine ways to use technology to reach alumni.

Strategy 4.12.3 Survey alumni to discover how many have included the College in their

Strategy 4.12.4 Develop a formal donor recognition program (i.e., Dean’s Society).

redirect efforts.

estate planning.

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Strategy 4.12.5 Increase collaboration with the UK Alumni Association.

Objective 4.13 Create a College Advisory Board.

Strategy 4.13.1 Cultivate board members who have the interests and resources to

Strategy 4.13.2 Provide the College Advisory Board with the necessary resources to fulfill

Objective 4.14 Increase resources for development efforts.

Strategy 4.14.1 Include ways to enlist faculty in assisting in the identification and cultivation

Strategy 4.14.2 Increase development staff.

Strategy 4.14.3 Develop budget for development materials and travel.

Strategy 4.14.4 Develop information/materials to help the UK Central Development Office

contribute successfully to College development efforts.

their responsibilities as development representatives of the College.

of donors.

build an understanding of the College and its development priorities.

Goal 5: Promote Excellence in Inclusion and Diversity Across the College

Objective 5.1. Establish and operate from a common understanding of diversity and inclusion that equips all

members of the College to navigate effectively in a diverse world.

Strategy 5.1.1

Adopt a College structure that makes explicit the shared responsibility of

the entire community for inclusive excellence.

Strategy 5.1.3

Develop an evaluation strategy for assessing the College’s progress in

achieving greater diversity and inclusion in all its endeavors.

Objective 5.2

Promote curricular and co-curricular transformation that recognizes the educational

advantages of diversity.

Strategy 5.2.1

Develop a coherent and focused College- and unit-level implementation

strategy for achieving greater diversity and inclusion in curricular and

co-curricular activities.

Strategy 5.2.2 Attract and retain talented and diverse faculty, students, and staff.

Strategy 5.2.3

Promote student, faculty, and staff understanding of, and respect for

diversity and inclusion.

Strategy 5.2.4 Establish clearly defined expectations, incentives, interventions, and

accountability measures as key components of the diversity and inclusion

strategy.

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Objective 5.3

Enhance College/campus/community collaborations in areas where opportunities exist to

build diversity and increase inclusion.

Strategy 5.3.1

Establish a plan for better internal and external communication with

respect to the College’s efforts at diversity and inclusion.

Strategy 5.3.2

Develop partnerships with local, regional, and statewide organizations that

promote excellence in diversity and inclusion.

Strategy 5.3.3

Encourage faculty, staff, and student participation in international

conferences and events, as well as national and local events that attract

diverse and inclusive audiences.

Strategy 5.3.4 Develop promotional materials and Web content in languages other than

Strategy 5.3.5 Actively recruit international undergraduate and graduate students via

three channels: direct contact with prospective students during

international travel by the College administration, faculty, and staff; Web-

delivered advertising; and interaction with the University’s International

Office.

English.

Goal 6: Improve the Quality of Life of Kentuckians through Engagement, Outreach, and Service

Objective 6.1

Enhance faculty and staff connection with the community through engagement,

outreach, and service.

Strategy 6.1.1 Develop a common understanding of engagement and its relationship to

Strategy 6.1.2 Evaluate and adopt in promotion and tenure regulations the best practices

Strategy 6.1.3 Promote faculty and staff involvement in engaged research, application,

Strategy 6.1.4 Provide incentives for, and recognitions of, significant faculty and staff

Strategy 6.1.5

Highlight and build on the history of the College in providing service to the

community.

Strategy 6.1.6

Highlight and build on the work of the Institute for Rural Journalism and

Community Issues and the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.

Objective 6.2 Enhance community access to University knowledge and expertise.

Strategy 6.2.1 Develop College, department, and unit mission statements that reflect

teaching, research, and outreach/service.

for assessing engaged scholarship.

outreach, and service.

outreach and engagement activity.

linkages with their natural community constituencies and counterparts.

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Strategy 6.2.2 Promote regional outreach and engagement partnerships.

Strategy 6.2.3 Pursue significant research and application that improve the lives of

Kentuckians, particularly when such research and application might have

broader implications.

Objective 6.3

Enhance external recognition and funding of University engagement, outreach, and service.

Strategy 6.3.1 Increase local, state, federal, and philanthropic support to expand

Strategy 6.3.2 Secure external recognition for engagement, outreach, and service

engagement activities.

initiatives.

iii. Strategic Plan for the Communications, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program The strategic plan for the CJT program can be found in the full Self-Study report for that program, which is located in Appendix B.

B. College Organizational Charts The administrative organization of the College is determined by its administrative needs and the teaching, research, and service functions of the College. Each administrative staff member is responsible to the Dean, directly or through his/her supervisor, for the effective operation of the organizational unit or functions for which he/she is responsible. The College organizational chart that outlines the roles of these individuals can be found in Appendix A. The faculty of the College of Communications and Information Studies consists of the Dean, any associate deans and all assistant professors, associate professors, and professors, who have primary assignment in the College. In addition, the faculty includes members of faculties of other colleges or departments who hold joint appointments in the College. Additional information can be found in the Governing Regulations of the University of Kentucky (http://www.uky.edu/ Regulations/).

C. Annual Reports The College creates an annual report that highlights each unit. In addition, the Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program creates its own annual report. The reports for the College can be found in Appendix A, and the annual reports for the Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program can be found in Appendix B. The College does not have an annual report for academic year 2009-2010 due to changes in leadership and administrative duties. The CJT Program does not have annual reports for academic years for 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. As part of the Self-Study, however, data was collected retroactively and summarized in the Self-Study report.

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III. Program Description The College of Communications and Information Studies is composed of five units: the Department of Communication; the School of Journalism and Telecommunications; the School of Library and Information Science; the Communication, Journalism and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program; and the Division of Instructional Communication.

A. Enrollment & Demographics Our students are recognized for their leadership roles on campus and in the classroom, their research achievements, and their creative pursuits. Journalism students attain top national rankings from the William Randolph Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Integrated Strategic Communication students have won numerous state and regional American Advertising Federation National Student Advertising competitions. Communication students continue their record of achievement through undergraduate research. The College awarded 348 Bachelor’s degrees in academic year 2009-2010, nearly 10% of the University’s undergraduate degrees for that academic year. The College has averaged 10% of all Bachelor’s degrees awarded at UK during the past seven academic years. The College awarded 94 Master’s degrees and 11 Doctorate degrees during academic year

Student Numbers

2009-2010; this represents 8% of all Master’s degrees and 4% of all

2009-2010

research and scholarship doctorates awarded by the University. Altogether, the College awarded 8% of all degrees awarded at UK in 2009-2010. The College had 1,086 students enrolled in Fall 2009 as undergraduate majors and 267 students enrolled in the College’s graduate programs. Undergraduate major programs include Communication, Integrated Strategic Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications. Graduate major programs include Communication and Library and Information Science. Of the 1,353 enrolled students, 69% were female, 11% were minorities (non-white), and 71.7% were in-state residents. Undergraduate majors were predominately full-time students (96%). The College’s distribution of undergraduate major enrollment by student classification in

Bachelors degrees

348

Master’s degrees

94

Doctorate degrees

11

Undergraduate Majors 1,086 Graduate Students Total Students

267 1,353

Fall 2009 includes increasing enrollments with each year: freshman 18.2% (198), sophomore 23.1% (251), junior 28% (304), and senior 30.7% (333). There are more than 12,900 living alumni of the academic units in the College; 6,700 live in Kentucky and 2,300 live in Fayette County. During the self-study period, the College had an average enrollment of 1,551 majors in the fall semester, with an average of 1,272 undergraduate majors and 279 graduate majors. However, the self-study period coincided with a steady decrease in major enrollments across College programs, from a high in 2005-2006 of 1,709 to a low in 2009-2010 of 1,355.

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2010 Self-Study During the same period, the number of credit hours taught by College faculty as part of the College’s broader mission remained steady, at approximately 29,000 hours (or 4.6% of the credit hours) taught at the University. The number of credit hours taught by College faculty and staff is expected to increase in coming years with the implementation of the new General Education Program courses, CIS 110 and CIS 111 (Composition and Communication I and II). The decrease in enrollment can be attributed to several factors. In 1977, the Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) graduate faculty decided to intentionally limit the number of graduate students to improve the quality of the students and the quality of the program. While this change took place before the study period, its effects can be seen over a 10-year period because the program had more part-time students prior to implementing this policy. In 2003, the Department of Communication and the School of Journalism and Telecommunications implemented a minimum GPA requirement of 3.0 in an effort to reduce the number of majors. At that time, the Department needed additional faculty to effectively meet the needs of its undergraduate majors, offer enough sections of the University Studies Program requirement for incoming freshman, and continue to conduct research. Because of lack of office space to house additional faculty and a lack of funding to support salaries, the Department chose instead to reduce the number of majors to a more manageable level. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications also faced challenges resulting from an insufficient number of faculty members to meet student demand.  As an ACEJMC-accredited program, the school must maintain enrollment restrictions in skills courses.  Faculty member advising loads were also very high, and faculty:student ratios in all three of the school’s majors greatly exceeded University guidelines. In addition, in 2004, the University suspended the University Studies Program requirement in oral communication because of insufficient resources. As a result, the College no longer had a course required of all undergraduate students that would bring students into the College who had not previously considered majoring in the programs offered by the College. These numbers were also influenced by events outside of the College, namely the downturn in the economy and the vast changes in the professional world of journalism and telecommunications. The Journalism and Telecommunications programs have also been affected by technological issues with the Mac labs that effect both students and faculty. It is the Self-Study Committee’s belief that these numbers point to a need for the College to do more to retain and attract high-quality students and to continue to adapt its programs to account for changes in the communication and information industries. The College’s Strategic Plan addresses these concerns.

B. Technology The College is committed to being a leader in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) (Goal 1 of the Strategic Plan). Since the 2005 College Self-Study, technology has continued to revolutionize the communication discipline in the academy and the professional world of newspapers and public relations firms. In our society, technological excellence is no longer just for the “IT” or “Tech” department. Every aspect of economic and social life is expanding its communication through technology. Nearly all commercial, governmental, education, and societal work within corporate entities, governments, media outlets, and non-profits is increasingly accomplished through interaction with digital Information Communication Technology. Communication and production through mobile, tablet, laptop, cloud, database, semantic Web, and archive environments is one entry-level skill in the ICT economy, whether a worker’s expertise is business, biology, French, nursing, or elementary education.

16


2010 Self-Study Indeed, businesses and organizations have undergone a revolution in ICT from entry levels to the strategic level, requiring more and better preparation in digital interpersonal, group health, instructional, mass media, social, and video-realtime communication. These communicative techniques represent a fundamental and fast-moving shift in the delivery of messages and data, pushing the oral past analog, to digital, nano, and biometric. While the delivery technologies transform everyone into a media producer and mass communicator, advances in the medium are intertwined with advances in the message. Rapidly changing technology affects all units of the College in multiple ways. First, as with any institution, changes in technology require new ways of doing the basic work of the College. Additionally, all College units prepare students for work that is progressively more dependent on new technologies, all of which are changing at an increasingly rapid pace, with the result that the nature of what students need to be prepared for is in constant flux. The College has a pivotal role within the University because it is responsible for educating students about ICT, providing the basis for learning ICT across all disciplines, and, as a result, impacting retention and graduation rates throughout the University. Finally, all units of the College have a role in understanding innovative technologies and in shaping the direction of technological change as it unfolds in the larger world. The College is uniquely poised to be a significant catalyst, educator, and information source for UK’s undergraduate population and the Commonwealth at large because of its longstanding leadership in the art and science of message creation, preparation, and impact analysis. i. ICT Leadership The College has a strong base as a leader in applications of ICT to its funded research. Its Digital Content Analysis lab system and the mobile survey possibilities are lauded as some of the best in the world, allowing it to excel in the field of Health Communication. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications is engaged in the ZAMCOM project in Africa, bringing media ICT knowledge and practices to media organizations and healthcare workers in Zambia and Botswana, while its team of digital media practitioners trains a significant percentage of Kentucky’s professional communicators on all platforms, including sound, video, Web, network, and data. Graduates from the School of Journalism and Telecommunications lead some of the world’s largest and most innovative communication conglomerates, as well. The College’s engagement in the new General Education Program’s Composition and Communication two-course sequence illustrates the centrality of ICT to our continuing role as educators to the UK community. The Division of Instructional Communication incorporates now-standard technologies of video-assisted oral communication, visual communication principles, and digital presentation excellence to the undergraduate experience. The School of Library and Information Science is one of the Commonwealth’s leading educators of digital archivists, librarians, and information scientists. Faculty in the School collaborate with the Biomedical Informatics program and the Center for Clinical and Translational Research. ii. New Course Offerings The College is exploring new ICT courses with UKIT, UK Libraries, the Department of Computer Science, and, most recently, the Analytics program within the Gatton College of Business. As a result of these efforts, the College will offer two new graduate and upper-level undergraduate courses in Spring 2010: a course on mobile application development and a course on content management systems. These two offerings will be followed by a course on enterprise IT management (Fall 2011). These new courses will strengthen our existing curriculum and the knowledge and capabilities of future majors, minors, and certificate holders.

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2010 Self-Study

iii. Technology Week 2010 In October 2010, the College and the ICT Co-Lab held a week-long series of events focused on technology (http:// cis.uky.edu/techweek). The events included a lecture by Drew Curtis, the founder of fark.com, a two-day mini conference on openness and transparency, and a two-day course on iPhone application development. The events were wellattended and well-received by the UK community, and we plan to make Technology Week an annual event. Technology Week 2011 will be held during the Homecoming Week at UK and will be co-sponsored by UKIT and other partners. The event will include a career services component and a student entrepreneurship component. In addition, the event will bring alumni to campus and connect working professionals with our students. iv. Hardware Investments At the beginning of 2010, we purchased a robust Web server to deploy college Web initiatives. We now have a flexible platform for hosting the College main site, and the sites for College research centers. We are also better prepared to meet future demands, whether that includes cataloging media, streaming video, or hosting online surveys. Having a local server allows us to respond to new needs with minimal delay. v. Content Management Initiatives Over the last 12 months, the College Website (http://cis.uky.edu) has been completely recast as a content management system (CMS), where each faculty and staff member has access to the site and can publish his/her content independently. The submissions are automatically organized and indexed for the ease of search and accessibility. Similar systems have been deployed for the research initiatives, such as Risk Sciences (http://risk.uky.edu). The new architecture makes sharing content very easy, so that College content can be automatically fed to research sites, and research information and news automatically appear on the College site. vi. Digital Signage The content management system (CMS) that drives the College Website also drives the digital signage that was installed in summer 2010 in both the Grehan and Little Library buildings. The signage system can be remotely managed, and it automatically retrieves new content from the College CMS, such as information about the upcoming events, to present on the signage screens. Since deployment, the system interface has gone through three upgrades to improve readability and ease of use. The system will continue to be developed alongside the Website and other content management initiatives. vii. Open Source CMS Support on Campus The College Website and the center sites run on open-source CMS (namely Drupal and WordPress). Since summer 2010, UKIT has been investigating the possibility of supporting Drupal as a University-wide CMS. Our College and the College of Agriculture have been early adopters of Drupal, and our representatives have played key roles in UKIT committees on future CMS support on campus. In December 2010, the College IT Coordinator provided several short training sessions on Drupal for the UK community. These sessions were sponsored by UKIT and are part of the effort to create a community of Drupal users on campus. The College IT Coordinator started a UK Drupal User Group in October 2010, and, by December, it had grown to 50 members. viii. Program for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (PIE) The College of Communications and Information Studies formed the Program for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (PIE) with the goal of enhancing the entrepreneurial ecosystem. The program collaborates with partners both on and off campus to deliver a series of initiatives, including business plan competitions, structured mentoring arrangements, and targeted course offerings. These initiatives all share the goal of encouraging entrepreneurial behavior. Ultimately, the

18


2010 Self-Study College is creating conditions that widen the window of entrepreneurial opportunity to help create a robust environment where entrepreneurial ideas regularly become commercialized innovations.

C. Learning The College is committed to preparing its students for leading roles in an information-driven society, whether those students are fulfilling the new General Education Program requirement in Composition and Communication; exploring communication and information studies through an elective; or seeking an undergraduate major or minor, or a graduate degree (Goal 2 of the Strategic Plan). Our programs prepare students to effectively communicate using multiple platforms and to

“

Graduates of the program comprise more than 80 percent of all master’s-level librarians in the state.

critically engage the messages they encounter in the world around them. i. School of Journalism and Telecommunications

�

The School of Journalism and Telecommunications (JAT) is the only academic unit within the university that brings together a faculty with strong professional and academic credentials devoted to exploring, teaching, and widely disseminating information about the crucial role that communication plays in a complex, self-governing society. The School seeks to (a) provide valuable, new knowledge in the areas of Journalism, Integrated Strategic Communication, and Telecommunication; (b) teach students the skills, both traditional and emerging, that will enable them to participate and lead in the communications industries; and (c) help students become knowledgeable consumers of all forms of mediated communications regardless of their career goals. Graduates of the School go on to careers in professional fields such as news broadcasting and reporting, advertising and public relations, and sound and video production. The School seeks to be a premier program known for its teaching, research, and public service in the fields of new and traditional media. The School educates and trains students for responsible positions in various communication and media professions; engages in critical, high-quality research aimed at both creating knowledge and critiquing the industry to improve professional practice; and serves the local, national, and global community by promoting democratic ideals and helping foster a public sphere in which free and open discourse can take place. The School is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC), and, as such, embraces and promotes the professional values and competencies identified by ACEJMC. More information on the ACEJMC can be found at http://www2.ku.edu/~acejmc/ or in Appendix D. The School offers undergraduate degree programs in Integrated Strategic Communication (with emphases on Account Management, Creative Advertising, Direct Response, and Public Relations), Journalism (Print and Broadcast), and Telecommunications (Electronic Media Industries; Policy and Regulation; Audio, Video, and Multimedia Production; and Social and Cultural Aspects of Media Influence). The program provides a practical mix of hands-on applications and the latest theoretical advances. Working closely with media firms and the local community, the School strives to maintain the high academic standards of its accrediting body, ACEJMC, while providing students with professional skills.

19


2010 Self-Study The School supports six student organizations, and students are visible nationally through wins in the Hearst Journalism Competition, work for ESPN/ESPNU, and participation in the National Student Advertising Competition, which is sponsored by the American Advertising Federation. The School has a strong public service tradition, as well. It houses the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues (see the Engagement section for more information). It is the home of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame and presents an annual Excellence in Public Relations award. The School also hosts a number of public events throughout the year, including the James C. Bowling Executive-In-Residence Program, the Joe Creason Lecture in Journalism, and alumni symposia in each of the three degree programs. ii. The School of Library and Information Science For the past 75 years, the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) has played an important role supporting the mission of the University of Kentucky. The School has been an integral part of the University by providing excellence in library and information science education, research, and service. Through both its on-campus and distance-learning efforts, the School has provided graduate-level professional training to students from a variety of backgrounds. The highcaliber faculty have a demonstrated record of quality research productivity, innovative teaching, and service to the Commonwealth. Moreover, faculty serve the profession nationally and internationally. The School continues to evolve to meet new challenges in information studies and librarianship, and it has been an important resource for individuals seeking to become contributing members of the information profession. New faculty hires have allowed for enhanced coverage of such areas as information technology and medical informatics. The School was ranked one of "America's Best Graduate Schools,” in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report and offers the only accredited program in library and information science in Kentucky. Graduates of the program comprise more than 80% of all master’s-level librarians in the state. The program is accredited by the American Library Association and is currently undergoing an expected re-accreditation in June 2011. The program was most recently accredited in June 2004. In addition to offering classes on campus, SLIS offers courses in distance learning formats, primarily using Blackboard course management software. The School began offering the online format in response to growing student demand. The School offers three forms of the master's degree: the Master of Science in Library Science (MSLS), the Master of Arts (MA) with a thesis option, and the MA with a final written exam option. Enrollment since 2004-2005 has averaged approximately 220 students. Since 2004, the School has graduated approximately 80-110 students per year. iii. Department of Communication The Department of Communication is not under review as part of this Self-Study. However, the Department’s role in the College is described in this document, as the Department is key to the College’s mission and activities. The Department of Communication generates new knowledge about communication practices in society, organizations, and the lives of individuals through its active research programs. The Department works with external constituencies to improve the quality of communication in everyday life, and its students acquire the knowledge and skills to perform effectively and ethically as citizens in a democratic society. The faculty includes nationally known scholars who specialize in Health Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Mass Media, and Risk Sciences. The Department offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees for undergraduate Communication majors, and faculty teach the majority of the graduate courses leading to a Master's or Doctoral degree in Communication through the College’s CJT Graduate Program. Undergraduate majors can choose to

20


2010 Self-Study specialize in health communication, corporate communication, interpersonal communication, or mass media, or they can select a general communication track. A recent National Communication Association survey revealed that, of programs responding to the survey, our Department is the most highly funded Communication program in the nation. Almost all of the funded research is focused on health communication and investigates ways to increase the effectiveness of media and classroom-based prevention programming. The Department has strong undergraduate associations. These associations host scholarly seminars, work with faculty to strengthen programs, and plan professional development workshops and social events. The Department also has a successful internship program that places between 20 and 35 students per semester in various positions in organizations in the Lexington area. Students have reported overwhelmingly positive experiences working as interns. Responses from employers (who provide evaluations of each intern at the end of the semester) have been equally positive. Several internships have directly resulted in full-time employment for the students immediately upon their graduation. iv. Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program The Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications (CJT) Graduate Program exhibits many strengths. The faculty and graduate students are generally pleased with the program, the National Research Council’s rankings are high, and the program compares favorably with other graduate programs at the University of Kentucky. The graduate faculty acquires a good deal of external research funding that, in turn, expands the quantity and quality of opportunities for graduate students. We aspire to be a premier program that is, at minimum, highly competitive with our peer institutions. The number of graduate faculty members has grown considerably in the past six years: graduate faculty from Journalism and Telecommunications has increased by six members; graduate faculty from the School of Library and Information Science has increased by two; and new General Education hires have increased the number of graduate faculty by an additional three members. The faculty is well published and many have ascended to leadership positions in their areas of study. The research facilities are exceptional (see Research, page 24). The CJT program faces three major challenges. First, the budget is meager. Stipends are not keeping pace with our peer institutions. Despite attracting numerous high-quality applicants, the program has not had the resources to fund more students as the size of the graduate faculty has increased. Second, teaching demands at the undergraduate level limit the amount of time available for graduate faculty to teach in the CJT program. Finally, despite the prominent standing of the CJT program in the communication discipline as a whole, our graduate students do not meet the graduate faculty’s expectations in publishing and placement at research institutions. The CJT Graduate Program offers Master’s and Doctoral degrees with emphasis in Health Communication, Media Studies, and Interpersonal Communication, and a graduate-level certificate in Health Communication. Considerable development has also occurred in two emerging areas, Risk Sciences and Instructional Communication. The program operates at the college level and is overseen by an associate dean for graduate studies. At any given time, approximately 50 master’s and doctoral students are active in the program. Typically, all students accepted into the program are fully funded. The National Research Council’s 2010 report ranks the University of Kentucky’s College of Communications and Information Studies Ph.D. program as high as seventh among the 83 Communication doctoral programs in the nation. The Communication program was one of only 28 programs at UK to rank in the top 50% nationally. The NRC report is in

21


2010 Self-Study addition to the 2004 report from the National Communication Association, which ranked the Health Communication graduate program sixth in the nation. There are currently 34 members of the CJT graduate faculty. Communication has 18 members, Journalism and Telecommunications has 12 members, and Library and Information Science (which oversees its own master’s degree separate from the CJT graduate program) has three. Three of the graduate faculty lines (two in Communication and one in Journalism and Telecommunications) are fully funded through the Division of Instructional Communication in the College. The program benefits from considerable collaboration among graduate faculty members. Current collaborative research projects include health communication and media studies projects, as well as an internal grant-funded research project focused on messages to, from, and about “home” that students receive during their first semester in college that might influence their decision to stay or leave (i.e., retention). Similar collaboration among the CJT graduate faculty and other programs throughout the campus continues to expand. In Health Communication, this collaboration includes research and teaching relationships with the College of Public Health, College of Nursing, College of Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, College of Medicine, College of Pharmacy, College of Education, and College of Arts and Sciences. Most recently, the Department of Communication, in collaboration with the Markey Cancer Center at the University of Kentucky, filled a joint position for a faculty member specializing in palliative care, end of life, and cancer communication. This position will expand the course offerings and research opportunities currently available to graduate students. An additional graduate faculty member holds a joint appointment in the Biomedical Informatics program in the College of Public Health. The Media Studies group is developing a collaborative political communications emphasis to enhance research and graduate teaching in this area at UK. This project is a collaboration with faculty from Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Community and Leadership Development program in the College of Agriculture. Interpersonal faculty members are involved in research projects with the Colleges of Arts and Sciences (Statistics and English), Education, Engineering (Civil, Chemical, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering), Family Medicine, and Nursing. In addition, interpersonal faculty members have worked with the Violence and Intervention Prevention Center, the UK Emerging Leader Institute, the UK IGERT Program on Engineered Bioactive Interfaces and Devices, the UK Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments, the Center on Drug Abuse and Research Translation, the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, and the UK BEST summer program. a. Health Communication

Over the past six years, the Health Communication faculty has led the college in external funding. Throughout

that period, including Risk Sciences, faculty members have been awarded $12 million as principal investigators

and another $1 million as co-investigators. As previously mentioned, the Health Communication program at the

University of Kentucky ranks in the top six nationally. The faculty are nationally recognized for their work (see

Productivity, page 51) Thus, remaining highly competitive in Health Communication is a priority for the program

and the College. The faculty recently launched a Health Communication Research Collaborative (HCRC) to help graduate students in health communication professionalize and match faculty and students with similar research interests.

22


2010 Self-Study In addition, the Health Communication faculty has hosted the biennial Kentucky Conference on Health Communication for more than two decades. This event draws top health communication researchers and an international audience to Lexington. b. Media Studies Media Studies has a number of nationally recognized graduate faculty. The number of graduate faculty whose home unit is Journalism and Telecommunications has more than doubled in the past six years. The director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications has achieved this growth through a combination of converting some special title lines to regular title lines that are commensurate with the expectations of graduate faculty and using new lines provided by the University to hire additional regular title faculty. A number of senior, mid-level, and newer faculty members are now available who can teach a wide spectrum of media studies courses. Major publications of the faculty are widely cited in major journals and used in graduate programs across the country. Senior faculty members in Media Studies, including some in Risk Sciences, have generated significant external funding. New initiatives in the study of new technologies and public policy, as well as the application of media interventions and risk and crisis communications, are actively seeking external support. c. Interpersonal Communication Interpersonal communication is one of the original areas of the CJT Graduate Program. Hiring internationally recognized senior scholar Dr. Laura Stafford in 2008 has provided the necessary leadership to keep pace with ongoing advancements in interpersonal communication scholarship. In addition, three assistant professors with extensive backgrounds in interpersonal communication were hired in 2010. This expansion of the faculty allows for further support of our nationally recognized Heath Communication area through the development of courses in interpersonal communication theory in health contexts. In addition to extending our already strong leadership in Health Communication, our new hires will move an instructional component of interpersonal communication forward with collaborative undergraduate and graduate level curricula. Faculty leadership across the discipline is evidenced in two faculty members serving as editors of National Communication Association journals. Additionally, interpersonal faculty members have held all offices of the Interpersonal Divisions of the National Communication Association and the International Communication Association since the last review. Interpersonal Communication historically has been one of the lesser-funded areas in the field of communication due to fewer funding opportunities. Increased collaborative efforts with areas within the Department and College (such as Health Communication and Risk Sciences) and across campus is needed. In addition, there is a need to find creative ways to fund more traditional areas of study within Interpersonal Communication. The role of social media and communication technologies is becoming increasingly important in the enactment of interpersonal relationships. There is a need for continued growth in studying the use of technology in Interpersonal Communication and using communication technologies to research Interpersonal Communication.

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2010 Self-Study

v. Division of Instructional Communication The Division of Instructional Communication was created in the College in 2010 to oversee the new General Education Program requirement in Composition and Communication. The requirement for an oral communication course as part of previous University Studies Program was suspended in Fall 2004 due to a lack of financial support needed to service the rapidly increasing number of incoming students (from 2,500 to 4,000 in 2004). The suspension was lifted in Fall 2010 when funds were made available to hire instructors to teach the new Composition and Communication I and II courses as part of the new general education curriculum beginning Fall 2011. Faculty in the Department of Communication elected not to offer the new general education courses in the Department, in part, because the influx of faculty lecturers would skew the nature of the unit. Hence, a new unit, the Division of Instructional Communication, was created in the College. The Division has already brought an additional $1 million to the College in the form of three new tenure-track faculty lines, eight full-time lecturer lines, two shared lecturer lines (one with nursing and one with collegiate debate), and five new graduate teaching assistant lines. The Division is currently working to move the debate/forensics program back into the College, which will provide the debate program with an appropriate academic “home” and perhaps leverage positive public relations and philanthropy for the College. The Division is working to create a Center for Communication across the Curriculum (CXC) and Communication in the Disciplines (CID) program as the University reconfigures the current graduation writing requirement (GWR) to align with the new Composition and Communication general education focus. These centers would be staffed with the experts needed to help faculty across the University develop lessons, assignments, evaluation rubrics, and assessment plans for what is likely to be referred to as a communication requirement in the major (CRM).

D. Research The College places a strong emphasis on research and creative activity that deepens and maximizes social, intellectual, and economic opportunities for all citizens (Goal 3 of the Strategic Plan). While the recent economic downturn and the loss of one key researcher have momentarily reduced the amount of outside funding obtained by the College, faculty are engaged in multiple funded research projects, and at no other time in the College’s history have we had more faculty funded as principal and co-investigators. In the last six years, College faculty published 29 books, over 300 journal articles, 90 book chapters, and presented hundreds of conference papers, photos, and other research presentations.  A recent National Communication Association survey ranked the Department of Communication as one of the most highly funded Communication programs in the nation. The Department has secured more than $42 million in extramural funding over the past 25 years. Almost all of this research is focused in the health communication area and investigates ways to increase the effectiveness of media or classroom-based prevention programming. Within the College’s six engagement and research centers, additional funded projects focus on the development and evaluation of theory-based interventions aimed at preventing the onset or reducing the frequency of risk-related behavior, community-based participatory research, and risk and crisis communication research. These projects include partnerships with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation, and the National Center for Food Protection and Defense, which is sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security and the Environmental Protection Agency.

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2010 Self-Study i. Organizational Changes Since the previous review, the College has made organizational changes to provide better support for research and has started several initiatives to promote a research culture. In January 2005, the College officially created the position of Associate Dean for Research (ADR), and, in March 2010, after eight years of working with a part-time grants officer, the College negotiated for a full-time grants officer. For several years before the creation of the ADR position, the Chair of the Department of Communication had been unofficially functioning in that capacity. The responsibilities of the ADR can be organized into two categories: research development and administration. In terms of administration, this position represents the College on appropriate committees, serves as a liaison to University of Kentucky Research Foundation and the Office of Research Integrity (ORI), supervises the College Grants Officer (CGO), reviews and approves IRB applications, disseminates research-related information from funding agencies, oversees scheduling of major research equipment in the College, promotes the College’s research reputation via promotional activities, and oversees the distribution of funds for the College Research Activities awards. In terms of research development, the ADR is responsible for promoting a research culture, building the research infrastructure of the College, securing space when needed, and stimulating the use of major research equipment and services in the College. Because the College has limited staff support, a staff assistant in the Department of Communication is paid overtime to assist the ADR with various administrative tasks. The CGO position has been in place since 2002. Initially, the College shared the position with two other colleges (Business and Economics and Fine Arts). Such sharing turned out to be untenable. When we hired our fourth CGO in January 2009, we negotiated to share with Fine Arts only; as of March, 2010, because the amount of work within our own College continued to increase, we negotiated to have a CGO assigned to our College alone. Of course, we still “share” our CGO with the Office of Sponsored Projects Administration (OSPA); we support 49% of her salary and OSPA retains controlling interest at 51%. This arrangement is still problematic because our CGO is “on call” with OSPA. Our CGO was recently assigned to assist with the College of Arts & Sciences while it searched for a new CGO; over an 8- to 9-week period, she worked with 27 different faculty members and three doctoral students to develop 14 budgets and review an additional 17 budgets. These added responsibilities detracted significantly form her ability to focus on College needs. ii. Research Initiatives Since 2005, the College has undertaken several initiatives to promote a research culture. Among them are research seminars, workshops, and periodic meetings focused on faculty promotion and tenure. Research seminars are held monthly, September-November and January-March; faculty members from the Department of Communication, School of Journalism and Telecommunications, and School of Library and Information Science present current research to an audience of fellow faculty members, graduate students, and staff. Topical research workshops are held once per semester; they have focused on publishing (with a panel of past and current journal editors from College faculty), research technology, grant writing, and software. Most recently, we have begun hosting what we call, “Speed Dating for Researchers.” College faculty and professional staff participate in the event, which involves each person spending 90 seconds talking to every other person in a “speed dating” format, so that everyone gains a better understanding of the research activities that are happening in the College. This event has been extremely well-received, and we are making it an annual event. In addition, the College Associate Dean of Research (ADR) is working with the ADR from Public Health to host an interdisciplinary “speed dating” event focusing on child and adolescent health, involving researchers from any college that wishes to participate; this event is slated for January 2010. To facilitate faculty promotion and tenure, the ADR meets once per semester with the College’s untenured faculty in an informal context to discuss research projects and publication, questions and concerns about process and policy, and

25


2010 Self-Study other topics. In Fall 2010, the ADR added yearly meetings with the College’s associate professors to discuss progress toward promotion to full professor status. iii. Extramural Grant Funding The College faculty members have been active in extramurally funded research projects since the mid-1980s. Over the past 25 years, we have brought in more than $42 million as principal investigators or co-investigators. Our faculty members are consistently approached by researchers from other UK colleges to participate in projects. Figure 1 depicts total grant funding, broken down by principal investigator (PI) and co-investigator (Co-I), for the past five fiscal years. During the self-study period, our faculty secured $13 million in extramural funding. Figure 1

The decline after FY08 can be attributed to the downturn in the economy, coupled with the departure of one of our most highly funded faculty members (who left to pursue greater opportunities outside academe). Our faculty continues to submit proposals at a strong rate, as shown in Figure 2. To help us increase the number of grant applications we submit, we recently hired a Research Assistant Professor. She currently is working at 75% allocation, but will be at 100% next year. Since her hire on September 1, 2010, she has been instrumental in the submission of two major applications, totaling $6,130,613.

Figure 2

Unlike faculty in colleges in the Medical Center, our faculty has not maintained records in the faculty database. However, our College is participating in a pilot reporting activity through Digital Measures, in particular through a customized report that will serve as our faculty performance review form. We look forward to the full implementation of the Digital Measures system so that we can efficiently track faculty productivity in terms of presentations, publications, and grant activity.

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2010 Self-Study

iv. Research Facilities The research infrastructure and technology available to the College is excellent. At present, we characterize our dedicated research space as “adequate,” however, we would welcome additional space for research assistants and project activity. We also would welcome revenue to maintain and enhance our research facilities, especially as equipment ages and demand for use increases (our research theater and focus group room, for example, are now in almost constant use). The Associate Dean of Research (ADR) and Director of Research and Instructional Technology for the Department of Communication are in discussions with UK’s Office for Commercialization and Economic Development to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities that could bring funding to the College to support our research infrastructure. The College houses a state-of-the-art research facility in the basement of the Grehan Building. This facility is available to faculty and graduate students interested in the production and testing of media-based messages. It has a 553-squarefoot, 20-seat Research Theater, with seats wired to collect heart rate to measure attention, electromyographic response (EMG) to measure cognitive processing and emotional reactions, and skin conductance response (SCR) to measure arousal. This physiological data acquisition equipment is very dated and, of all our equipment, is in most need of replacement. The 270-square-foot Focus Group Room has conference-style seating for up to 12 participants. This is a multi-purpose room, also equipped with 12 computers installed around the room's perimeter. Ceiling-mounted pan/tilt/ zoom video cameras and microphones allow for digital audio/video recording of focus groups and meetings. The focus group room contains an outside entrance to prevent interruption of Research Theater activities. This room is used for conducting focus groups during the preliminary phases of research studies. The research facility also has message production, editing, duplicating, and testing equipment. The 94-square-foot Digital Content Analysis (DCA) Lab, also housed in the basement of Grehan, consists of an array of 26 computers, each installed with multiple dual-TV Tuner input cards, S-Video Graphics output cards, and Gigabit Network cards. Features of this system include the following: 1) Permanent archive of video storage for each of the 26 channels being monitored, 2) 62TB of centralized RAID storage, allowing 600,000 hours of long-term video storage capacity, 3) automatic DVD storage and archiving, 4) full-text television transcript archive and search engine for efficient identification of specific subject-relevant footage, and 5) ability to search and view television via a Web interface from faculty offices. Output from the DCA Lab is also viewable in the Research Theater. The 224-square-foot Coding Room in 300 Funkhouser Building houses five modern workstations, each equipped with an LCD/TV viewing computer and a data entry computer. The Coding Room is used for viewing and coding television programming recorded by the DCA Lab. Coders record their observations into a centralized database. Research work space for graduate research assistants is available in 103 McVey. This 523-square-foot room currently serves four research projects and several graduate research assistants. Finally, the College benefits from a variety of research technologies to facilitate data collection, both on-site and off-site. The iBook Mobile Lab consists of 32 twelve-inch Apple iBook G4 Laptop computers and a server capable of quickly converting a classroom into a wireless computing lab. These 32 computers and server are housed on one cart with wheels for easy mobility and transport. Our 128-unit Portable PDA Survey Research System provides an efficient and compact method for conducting survey research in the field. PDA surveys not only allow for use of complex skip patterns and interactivity with audio/video, but also afford greater subject privacy, provide multilingual support, and reduce literacy concerns through audio narration. The Teleform system features powerful image recognition software used to create, scan, and process paper surveys to data. It is installed on a dedicated PC in Breckinridge Hall, which users can access directly or remotely. The Perception Analyzer System provides an interactive tool for gathering feedback by using wireless hand-held dials.

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2010 Self-Study

E. Resources The College is committed to developing its human, physical, and technological resources (Goal 4 of the Strategic Plan). i. Faculty and Staff In Fall 2010, the College had 30 tenured faculty members, 22 tenure-track faculty members, one research assistant professor, 13 lecturers, 9 part-time instructors, and 29 graduate teaching/research assistants. In addition, the units had 12 staff members, and the College and CJT Graduate Program had 8 staff members. These faculty and staff are the greatest resource of the College and key to our ability to meet our goals. a. Faculty Our faculty members are well-published, share a strong commitment to service, and are recognized for their excellent teaching (see Productivity for more details). The Self-Study Committee, however, was concerned to see that 31.7 % of the 41 faculty who responded to the 2010 Work-Life survey were either engaged in an active search for a new position or indicated that they had begun to explore options elsewhere. The primary reason (41.7%) respondents indicated for considering leaving UK was salary/wage. In addition, 54% of respondents indicated that they did not feel that they were fairly compensated in relation to colleagues of similar rank and experience at UK, and 76% indicated that they did not feel that they were fairly compensated in relation to colleagues of similar rank and experience at other benchmark institutions. In the Self-Study survey, respondents indicated that salary compression continues to be a major challenge for the College (see Self-Study Online Survey Evaluation Report, Appendix C). UK has had a history of lagging behind most benchmark institutions in terms of faculty salary. An economic downturn in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, starting in 2006, has meant three successive years without pay increases for faculty or staff. However, with tax revenues beginning to increase in 2010, there is hope for salary increases in 2011-2012. A large percentage of faculty respondents to the Work-Life Survey also indicated that there was too little internal funding for scholarship and creative activities (54%), too few staff resources for scholarship and creative activities (53%), and too few physical resources (space, equipment, materials) for scholarship and creative activity (51%). On a positive note, 81% of faculty responding to the Work-Life Survey thought that their colleagues respected individual and cultural differences, and 65% indicated that there was a high degree of trust within their unit. In addition, 59% felt valued by their unit for their scholarly/research contributions, 70% felt valued by their unit for their teaching contributions, 59% felt valued by their unit for their service contributions. A large percentage of the faculty also indicated that they felt respected by their colleagues (78%), respected by staff (80%), and respected by students (85%). b. Staff The College staff includes administrative assistants; the Development, Budget, and Grants officers; the Communications Director; the IT Coordinator; and Student Services staff. Like the Faculty, staff members cite wages as a key concern. While 73% of staff members responding to the Work-Life Survey agreed or strongly agreed with the statement, “I am satisfied with my job at the University of Kentucky,� 45% indicated that they had considered leaving UK in the last 12 months and 59% indicated they

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2010 Self-Study were not satisfied with their salary/wage. In addition, respondents indicated a lack of trust both within the University at-large and in their unit. On a positive note, 73% of those responding to the Work-Life Survey thought that their co-workers respected individual and cultural differences; 54% said they were respected by faculty; 63% said they were respected by their immediate supervisors; 72% said they were respected by co-workers; and 72% said they were respected by students. ii. Facilities The College has offices and classroom space in six buildings: the Grehan Building; the Little Library; the Engineering Annex; Breckinridge; McVey; and the King Library. In 2011, renovation of the College’s space in the Little Library (LCLI) will be complete. The renovation of the vacant third floor of LCLI began in 2004, and by 2006 three classrooms, 17 offices, two conference rooms, a student commons, and other facilities were constructed, primarily for the use of the School of Library Science. In the past year, portions of the commons and one conference room have been converted to office space, and the remainder of the floor has been renovated to house almost all of the College’s administration, several additional faculty offices, and two more classrooms available to the entire campus. The College uses all of the space available to it. It has 15,700 square feet of space in the Grehan building, which is dedicated to faculty offices, classrooms, and research facilities. In the Little Library, the College has 11,900 square feet of space, which is dedicated to faculty offices, classrooms, conference rooms, and the McConnell Center for Youth Literature. However, several faculty offices are inadequate, and research and meeting space is scarce. The medium term goal of the College is to consolidate all faculty and staff in no more than two buildings, and the longer term goal is to have all members of the College share one building. The self-study survey indicated some dissatisfaction with College facilities. Aggregate mean scores related to College physical resources for all participants across affiliations and roles (n = 30-126) who responded to the online survey reflected general satisfaction with the office space in the Little Library (n=30, M=4.40, SD=.62), the research facilities in the Grehan building (n=57, M=4.16, SD=.75), the classrooms in the Little Library (n=114, M=4.03, SD=.73), the technical support (n=106, M=4.00, SD=.94), and software and network services in offices (n=99, M=3.99, SD=.76). Lower mean scores (less than 3.99) were obtained from aggregate respondents regarding office computers, printers, and monitors (n=98, M=3.82, SD=.96), student computing labs (n=119, M=3.82, SD=.70), newsroom video and audio editing facilities in the Grehan building (n=47, M=3.64, SD=.90), bathrooms and lounges/social areas in the Little Library (n=126, M=3.60, SD=.93), and classrooms in the Grehan building (n=98, M=3.55, SD=.85). However, the lowest aggregate scores were related to bathrooms, lounges, and social areas in the Grehan building (n=109, M=2.92, SD=1.01) and office space in the Grehan building (n=69, M=2.80, SD=.99). For more detailed analysis of these results, see the Self-Study Online Survey Evaluation Report, in Appendix C. iii. Budget During the current 2010-2011 fiscal year, the College’s recurring general fund budget was $7,761,100. Of this budget, nearly 96% is budgeted for salaries and benefits for faculty, staff, part-time instructors, and graduate teaching assistants. The remaining 4% is budgeted for non-personnel operating expenses.

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2010 Self-Study

Figure 3:

FISCAL YEAR

RECURRING BUDGET

2010-2011

$7,761,100

2009-2010

$6,648,500

2008-2009

$6,560,900

2007-2008

$6,236,300

2006-2007

$5,455,400

2005-2006

$5,098,900

The recurring general fund budget for the College of Communications and Information Studies has increased 52% over the six fiscal years of this self-study period, from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the current fiscal year 2010-2011. The College’s growth in recurring funding is a direct result of the following: • The appointment of a new college dean • The appointment of a new academic director in the School of Library and Information Science • Additional funding for regular faculty, lecturers, and part-time instructors to meet the high student demand for academic courses offered in the College • Funding for a new general education unit within the College as part of the University’s revised general education curriculum — these new recurring funds provide funding for regular faculty, lecturers, and graduate teaching assistants, as well as non-personnel current operating expenses • Recurring funds for the College’s participation in distance learning and evening-weekend courses replacing an annual non-recurring funding model • Funding for faculty promotion increases • Additional recurring funds for salary merit increases during the first three years of this six-year self-study period The College also receives additional non-recurring funds every fiscal year for various initiatives and the return of prior year fund balances. During four of the past five fiscal years, non-recurring funds have exceeded $1 million. Some reduction of non-recurring funds is expected during the current 2010-2011 fiscal year and for future years because additional distance learning and evening weekend incentives, which had been funded non-recurring before 2010-2011, have been funded recurring beginning in fiscal year 2010-2011. The current annual recurring budget for the CJT Graduate Program is $324,865, with $265,524 (81.73%) dedicated for teaching assistantship stipends. This budget is dedicated to paying teaching assistantship stipends, a stipend for the Associate Dean, student travel to present research, recruiting expenses, and the annual graduate symposium. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications Director and the Department of Communication Chair provide additional funds if there is a need for more teaching assistants to cover open sections. During the six-year study period, the College experienced all of the recurring budget reductions in state appropriations experienced by the University. Despite some increase in recurring funds during this period, budget reductions have had an impact on the College’s operations:

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2010 Self-Study • Recurring funds have not been available for the past three fiscal years, including 2010-2011 for merit pools to fund salary increases. • Recurring funds to fill faculty vacancies have been reduced. • Recurring funds for lecturer and part-time instructor positions have been reduced. • Recurring funds for staff positions have been eliminated, and recurring state appropriated general funds for several staff positions have been replaced with income-supported funds. • Recurring funds for non-personnel operating expenses have been reduced. The College continues to look for new sources of recurring and non-recurring funding. The University’s new Teaching Innovation Incentive Funding (TIIF) program provides new funding opportunities for the College with its high-demand academic courses and its new academic certificate programs. In the future, the College expects to experience sustainable student credit hour (SCH) generation over the TIIF Program’s 2009-2010 SCH base, resulting in additional recurring funds to the College. iv. Equipment For information about the College’s research facilities and equipment, see page 27. In general, the College has an adequate amount of equipment. Moreover, the ever-changing technological advances in the professional world present a budgetary challenge because faculty and staff must continually update and upgrade computers, computer programs, and various electronic devices (cameras, video cameras, etc.) in order to adequately prepare students for the professional world. The College also depends on UKIT for support of the Mac computer labs. The labs are supposed to provide support to students who are learning to design and create multimedia projects that meet professional standards. The Mac platform is the platform utilized by media professionals. However, both professors and students have been frustrated by problems with the Mac labs. Significant teaching time has been lost due to ongoing problems, and significant improvements in the networks that support the Mac environment are needed to maintain a curriculum designed to meet professional standards. v. Communications The Communications position was established in March 2010 and reports directly to the Dean of the College. The position serves as the sole public relations (PR) manager for the College. This position provides PR support to the College's service and research activities. This position is also responsible for managing a number of public events held by the College, primarily during the academic year.   In the past year, the College has worked to improve its Internet presence, both through social media and by recreating its Web site. The College has been actively involved in social media with the development of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and iTunesU. The social media activity promotes College news and activities and encourages interaction among potential students, students, alumni, faculty/staff, and outside organizations. The Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/ ukcis) was developed on March 29, 2010, and currently has 298 friends. The Twitter account (@uk_cis) was developed on June 2, 2010, and currently has 72 followers and 5 listings. UK Parents Association is one of the current followers that list the College, so that all tweets are automatically re-tweeted to the UK Parents Association followers. The LinkedIn profile was developed June 1, 2010, and currently has 52 connections. The College is also in the process of launching an iTunesU site in coordination with UKIT. Over the last 12 months, the College Website (http://cis.uky.edu) has been completely redone as a content management system (CMS). The new site includes the following features: photo and logo gallery, calendar, RSS news feeds, and

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2010 Self-Study profiles. There are now dedicated pages for prospective students, students, alumni, and research efforts that allow for easier dissemination of relevant information. Between the site’s launch on October 22, 2010 and November 21, 2010, the site had 4,567 page views from 63 countries/territories. Furthermore, domains have been set up for Risk Sciences (http://risk.uky.edu), ICT Co-Lab (http://ict.uky.edu), and DISC (http://disl.uky.edu). The Risk Sciences site has been fully launched and, from November 12, 2010 to November 21, 2010, has received 48 visitors from 22 cities. Phase I of the College Website overhaul was completed in December 2010, and the College is continually updating information on the Website. vi. Support from Other University Units a. Alumni Affairs The College works closely with the UK Alumni Association (UKAA) leadership and staff. UKAA has provided financial support for events in the College (i.e., alumni receptions at the National Communication Association Convention, the College Recognition and Awards Dinner, the School of Library and Information Science Alumni Banquet), postage and printing for School of Journalism and Telecommunications’ ALUMNews, support for the College’s annual review publication, and support the McConnell Conference Lecture. In sum, over the last five years, UKAA has provided $22,000 for College programs and units. UKAA provides assistance with College event registration; publicity for events, alumni, and faculty in the Kentucky Alumni magazine and Alumni E-newsletter; and on the UK Alumni Website. The College uses the UKAA broadcast email system to publicize events and distribute electronic newsletters. Two staff members are directly involved with UKAA. The College Communications Director has been appointed to a two-year term as the College Alumni Affairs Representative on the UKAA Board of Directors. The College Development Director serves on the Affiliates Council and attends monthly meetings with Alumni Association management and staff. The College uses Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and an RSS feed to provide information about College events and activities and to connect to College alumni. In addition, the College has added an Alumni News page to our Website. The College actively seeks alumni participation in the classroom, to evaluate student writing portfolios, speak to student groups, participate in public programs and panels, and develop student internships. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications, the School of Library and Information Science, and the CJT Graduate Program use newsletters to communicate program news and alumni updates. The College has not had an alumni advisory board since 1995, but plans are underway to name a College National Advisory Board. The first board meeting will be held in April 2011. The board will be made up of alumni representing all units in the College and other business professionals who work in the communication or information industries. The group will be involved in advising the Dean, coordinating alumni activities, and helping secure gifts for scholarships, program endowments, and other needs. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications has an alumni advisory board that advises on student programs and assists with fund raising. Under their guidance, the Bids for Brains Silent Auction Fundraiser was established. Since being established, the event has raised close to $50,000 for existing and new scholarships.

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2010 Self-Study The College holds numerous events that are open to alumni and friends of the College. Those events include School of Library and Information Science Alumni Banquet; Joe Creason Lecture; Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony; James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence Program; College Awards and Recognition Dinner; Excellence in Public Relations Award luncheon; Richard G. Wilson Alumni Symposium; Gidel/Lombardo Lecture in Sports Journalism; School of Journalism and Telecommunications Bids for Brains Scholarship Silent Auction Fundraiser; McConnell Conference on Children’s Literature; Kentucky Conference on Health Communication; First Amendment Center Celebration and James Madison Award; and Citizen Kentucky public forums. The Awards and Recognition Dinner has been held for 11 consecutive years. Each year we honor a Friend of the College and an Outstanding Alumnus. The event functions as a way to connect College faculty, students, alumni, and donors. b. Development The College has a strong working relationship with the Office of Development. We use their services to identify potential donors, make alumni contacts throughout the country, conduct donor research, send annual giving mailings, and conduct two annual Phonathons. We participate in Development Office training programs available for deans and development officers. The College Phonathon is held every fall and spring. Over the past three years, the College has raised recordbreaking amounts during the event. In Fall 2010, the College had 625 pledges amounting to $36,761. This is the highest-ever fall pledge total. The College will have another 10-day Phonathon in Spring 2011. In 2009-2010, the College had 792 pledges and received $44,835. In 2008-2009, we had 786 pledges and received $43,916. From 2006 to 2010, the College and its units have awarded $333,441 in scholarships to our undergraduate and graduate students. These awards come from income generated from our scholarship and endowment accounts. This figure does not include outside awards. The College has also worked to increase the number of distinct private gifts and distinct donors. The Dean and Development Officer make personal visits with prospective donors. The Dean has also been active in making face-to-face contacts with alumni in New York, Chicago, Washington, and Kentucky. The Regional Gift Officers each year have had a minimum of 25 face-to-face contacts with our alumni. All donors to the College receive a either a handwritten thank-you note or letter from the Dean or a personal phone call from a unit head. The number of distinct private gifts to the College has grown from 1,145 in 2007-2008 to 1,850 in 2009-2010. From July 1 to October 31, 2010, the distinct gift count is 1,103 and the distinct donor count is 667. The distinct donor count, while steadily increasing, has not shown the same dramatic growth as the distinct gift count. The distinct donor counts from Fall 2007 to Spring 2010 are as follows: 982 in 2007-2008; 1,056 in 2008-2009; and 1,097 in 2009-2010. Between 2006 and 2010, the College has welcomed 20 new Fellows (individuals who commit to giving at least $10,000 to the College over a 10-year period). It is significant that several of the new Fellows are faculty, as well as alumni. All College Fellows are listed on College Web page. Since 2006, the College has established 17 new endowments, received a $250,000 gift from the Scripps Howard Foundation to support the First Amendment Center, received a $1.5 million match to establish the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, and secured funding to increase the level of support for

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2010 Self-Study several older endowments from $1,000 to $10,000. The College has three Research Challenge Trust Fund matched endowments—one in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, one in the Department of Communication, and one in the School of Library and Information Science. During the review period, the College completed the second phase of the capital campaign, which began in September 2003. The College goal was $1.65 million. The College raised $4,452,632 or 270% of our goal. The campaign ended in December 2007. The College is developing plans to create to a donor recognition program based on levels of giving. At the time of the last review, the College had one full-time employee devoted to development and alumni affairs, and no additional employees have been added to this role. c. University of Kentucky Public Relations The College uses UK Public Relations (UK PR) to disseminate information in the form of press releases to the media, newspapers, magazines, online outlets, radio and television – to encourage print and broadcast coverage. UK PR distributed 40 press releases on behalf of the College from January to November of 2010. UK PR also provides assistance in establishing researchers as knowledge experts in their various fields by promoting them and arranging interviews with various news outlets. In 2010, we had students and faculty appear in local and national news outlets, including the New York Times, CNN, and the Weather Channel. d. University of Kentucky Information Technology The College receives support from University of Kentucky Information Technology (UKIT), which maintains campus network systems for computing and communications. UKIT manages the Mac-based systems labs that are used as classrooms for students in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, as well as for student projects completed during open lab hours. UKIT provides lab consultants and managers to work with College faculty and students in the labs. As information technology resources continue to play key roles in the training and preparation for all students, the working relationship between UKIT and the College remains critical. UKIT also provides the infrastructure that supports the College research endeavors.

F. Diversity The College is dedicated to promoting excellence in inclusion and diversity (Goal 5 of the Strategic Plan) through the curriculum; through its recruitment of staff, faculty, and students; and by encouraging students to travel abroad. i. Committee on Diversity In 2010, the College established a Committee on Diversity to raise consciousness, comfort, and competency in dealing with diversity/inclusion issues within the College. The committee is tasked with developing an evaluation strategy to assess the College’s progress in achieving greater diversity and inclusion in all its endeavors. The Committee includes members from all units within the College. More specifically, the Committee will 1) establish a common understanding of diversity and inclusion that equips all members of the College to navigate effectively in a diverse world, 2) promote curricular and co-curricular transformation that recognizes the educational advantages of diversity, and 3) enhance collaborations where opportunities exist to build diversity and increase inclusion.

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2010 Self-Study As of November 2010, the Committee had discussed past and current efforts made within the three units. The Committee’s overall assessment is that much work must be accomplished to ensure that the College promotes diversity/ inclusivity as an essential part of its mission. All academic units made efforts to recruit diverse faculty, but expressed some frustration in finalizing recruitment and/or dealing with retention. The committee expressed general frustration in successfully recruiting a diverse student body. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications encourages inclusion of a statement on diversity within course syllabi. Additionally, the School regularly offers a “diversity” course, which is also required of all journalism majors. The Committee plans to work with the School of Journalism and Telecommunications in promoting a College-wide diversity themed event. The School has held such an event annually since the 2005-2006 academic year. The committee has conducted a baseline assessment of College faculty, students, and staff on diversity. Questions assessing the College’s educational environment, perceptions toward disparate treatment, and openness to diversity were included in a College self-study survey in November 2010 (see Appendix C for results). These survey items (and likely more extensive questions) will be re-administered periodically to track progress. The Committee plans to implement an “intervention” based on survey results to assess whether such a strategy will be helpful toward increasing diversity/ inclusivity awareness. Committee members have agreed to show more commitment and participation in diversity related activities/events and, further, actively promote and encourage faculty, staff, and student participation. Committee members have divided into groups to develop specific practices to address curriculum, recruitment, and outreach issues. The Committee will discuss ways to facilitate candid, open, and respectful discussions of diversity/ inclusivity. ii. International Affairs The College has worked to increase internationalization at the University, and its efforts can be seen in programs and engagement. The College also created a new position, the Associate Dean for Undergraduate and International Studies, to emphasize the importance of international studies to the College and to coordinate efforts to encourage students to study abroad and to increase internationalization within the College. The Associate Dean co-chaired the University’s Internationalization Task Force and serves as the College’s representative on the International Advisory Council. A Telecommunications faculty member serves on the steering committee for the Asia Center and has been deeply involved in the University’s collaboration with Shanghai University. Several faculty members are involved in international research. Dr. Doug Boyd (COM) is an expert on international broadcasting, particularly in the Middle East. Dr. Pam Cupp (COM) has worked extensively in health-related behavioral interventions in Africa and Asia. Dr. Seth Noar (COM) has conducted research related to HIV/AIDS prevention in Africa. Dr. Rebecca Miller (SLIS) studies intercultural knowledge transfer. A number of faculty members from the School of Journalism and Telecommunications are part of an ongoing partnership in Zambia and Botswana to use journalism to reduce the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS in those countries and, as a result, encourage treatment and prevention. To date, Dr. Chike Anyaegbunam, Dr. Beth Barnes, Prof. Mel Coffee, Prof. Al Cross, and Dr. Alyssa Eckman have all made at least one (and in most cases, multiple) trips to Africa for the project. Prof. Kakie Urch is scheduled to join the group in Spring 2011.

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2010 Self-Study Several international projects are in the development phase. College faculty collaborated on a grant proposal to USAID for a five-year training program on implementation of information and communication technologies in Zambia. The proposal is currently under review at USAID. Another project in development involves collaborating with Shanghai University to offer a Chinese version of the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication in Shanghai in June 2011. The program will include presentations by both U.S. and Chinese scholars. Several faculty are planning to attend. The College actively encourages students to study abroad. Faculty have offered several course through the Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA). While these courses are open to students from any of the CCSA member universities, the enrollment is usually weighted toward students from our college. Knowing the faculty member offering the course helps to reduce some of the perceived risk in studying abroad. This is an important consideration because many of our students have not traveled much and do not come from families where travel outside the United States is common. Courses offered by College faculty include a summer comparative media course, an advertising and public relations course in London during winter intersession, and a course on “Brits and Brands” in London and Dublin during winter intersession. Courses planned for the future include the advertising and public relations course in London, and a course on the Sport of Branding. In the summer of 2010, a journalism professor led a five-week program in Beirut. The Fares Foundation paid for the students’ costs. During summer 2011, the College plans to offer a two-week course on Advertising and Branding in Shanghai, China. In Fall 2010, the College held an information session for faculty on models for offering courses abroad. Information sessions are held for students in advance of each of the College faculty-led study abroad courses, and a general session on study abroad opportunities was held for students in Fall 2010. Study abroad opportunities relevant to the College’s majors offered by other universities or organizations are publicized to students through listserv postings, as well. The College also works with a liaison adviser in the UK Education Abroad office to help students find opportunities to study abroad. Faculty members have also taught non-UK students abroad. Their positions have included guest-lecturers at the Zambia Institute of Mass Communication (ZAMCOM), the School of Journalism and Telecommunications’ partner program in Zambia; the University of Botswana; Shanghai University; and Qingdao University. As part of the Transatlantic Media Fellows program, the School of Journalism and Telecommunications has hosted four visiting journalists for a week-long visit. Our guests have been from Germany, Greece, Great Britain, and Denmark. When guests are here during the academic year, they speak to relevant classes. Otherwise, the School coordinates visits with local media and other campus faculty members based on the journalist’s particular interests.

G. Engagement The College works to improve the quality of life of Kentuckians through engagement, outreach, and service (Goal 6 of the Strategic Plan). This engagement includes research centers, lecture series, outreach to current and former students, and promoting our work through newspapers, magazines, and other outlets.

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2010 Self-Study i. The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, housed in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, seeks to promote understanding of the First Amendment among citizens of Kentucky, to advocate for First Amendment rights in the Commonwealth, and to produce internationally recognized scholarship concerning the First Amendment and its related freedoms. The Center and its activities are overseen by a committee of faculty and staff. The Director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications appoints the Center’s director to a two-year term. Kentucky newspaper editors and other First Amendment advocates founded the Center in1998. In 2006, in recognition of the support of the Scripps Howard Foundation, the Center’s committee voted to change the name to the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. The Center’s activities include the following: • Inviting a noted First Amendment advocate to deliver “the State of the First Amendment Address” • In conjunction with the speech, holding a panel discussion on a First Amendment issue • Awarding the James Madison Award for service to the First Amendment. The winner must be a Kentuckian or someone who has made his/her contribution to freedom of speech and of the press in Kentucky • Funding Citizen Kentucky, a program that uses a freshman seminar to engage citizens in public issues through the power of the press • Co-sponsoring a statewide high school essay contest that includes a focus on freedom of expression • Supporting the School’s annual high school journalism workshop, which includes a class on freedom of expression and a First Amendment editorial contest • Writing op-ed pieces on current First Amendment issues In addition, the Center has an ongoing commitment to public discourse. The Center worked with the League of Women Voters to host a Lexington mayor forum in Fall 2010 and provided a digital forum during the primary. In 2007, the Center hosted public discussions about open government among the candidates for Kentucky Attorney General during the primary and general elections. The Center is in the process of producing a DVD for public officials that will outline their responsibilities under the state’s Open Records and Open Meetings Acts. The DVD is funded by a grant from the National Freedom of Information Coalition. A second DVDis planned, which will explain how citizens can use these laws to ensure government openness. ii. Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues The Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, housed in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, is an outreach program headed by an Extension Title professor in the tradition of UK’s status as a land-grant university. The Institute serves rural Kentucky and rural America by helping rural journalists define the public agenda in their communities through strong reporting and commentary, especially on broad issues that have a local impact but often lack authoritative local sources. From its inception in 2001 as a project funded by research grants, the Institute has focused on issues relating to education, the environment, economic development, and healthcare. With the hiring of its first director in 2004, through an initial grant from the Knight Foundation and a smaller grant from the Ford Foundation, it expanded its focus to include accountability journalism. When grant funds expired, the University began covering costs beyond the faculty line for the director. The Institute also receives income from its endowment, but that will decline if the Institute does not raise

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2010 Self-Study sufficient funds for the endowment by Spring 2011. At that time, unmatched money will revert to the state Research Challenge Trust Fund. As a result, raising funds is the Institute’s current priority. The Institute is primarily a public policy center for rural journalists and, secondarily, a journalism-craft center. Since 2008, the Institute has increased its attention to tools and techniques for journalists and their employers to help journalists counter the economic and technological pressures that are undercutting their abilities to cover issues and conduct accountability journalism. The Institute has received part of a grant from the McCormick Foundation to help Appalachian weekly newspapers adopt and embrace the Internet and multimedia. The Institute conducts workshops, seminars, and conferences, often in cooperation with other organizations, and conducts presentations at meetings of journalism groups and issue-oriented organizations. It has collaborated with the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the Kentucky Press Association on a series of open-government seminars, the Kentucky Open Government Blog, and original reporting on open-government issues in Kentucky. The Institute has also recently co-hosted a seminar on criminal justice issues in Kentucky with the Center on Media, Crime and Justice, part of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. The highest-profile effort of the Institute is The Rural Blog, a daily digest of events, trends, issues, ideas, and journalism about rural America. It maintains a separate Website, www.RuralJournalism.org, which highlights major topics, provides research references, and displays the Institute’s own reporting, such as its 2009 series on the economy of Eastern Kentucky, and its research. The Website and blog spotlight good rural journalism. The Institute also honors outstanding journalists with the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, integrity, and tenacity in rural journalism. The Institute conducts research on rural news outlets and their coverage of issues, such as healthcare and the environment and related topics. It produced the first report on training backgrounds and needs of rural U.S. newspapers and regularly presents research at the National Newspaper Association convention and conducts panels at conventions of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. A focus area for the Institute is healthcare. The Institute is currently working with Kentucky Youth Advocates on a grantfunded project to help rural journalists in Kentucky cover tobacco issues. Under a contract with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, the Institute is reporting on health issues in rural Kentucky and conducting research on how and why rural news outlets in the state address health issues. The Institute Director moderated the College’s Colloquia on Health Literacy, is a member of several internal and external groups dealing with Kentucky’s health issues, and has been part of several health-related grant proposals. The Institute has a national advisory board with 44 members, including an executive committee of five, and a steering committee comprised of academic partners from 28 universities in 18 states. The Director has traveled widely, taking the Institute’s mission to India, Africa, and most U.S. states. A proposal is in the works for a grant to start a program to train citizen journalists in rural India and conduct research in that country, as well. iii. Dissemination and Implementation Science Consortium The Dissemination and Implementation Science Consortium (DISC) was launched in 2009 by the Dean of the College in response to demands from Congress, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and citizens for increased knowledge application and accountability in healthcare and other practice settings. The ultimate goal of DISC is to understand how science is responsible to society. Its mission is to design and implement transdisciplinary research, both basic and applied; to improve understanding of dissemination and implementation

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2010 Self-Study processes; and to increase the effectiveness of such processes in various practice areas, including health, agriculture, business, education, environmental sustainability, and occupational safety and health. DISC conducts evidence-based research that accelerates the uptake of research findings into actionable practice. The Consortium partners with transdisciplinary teams of scientists and practitioners to develop and test models of dissemination and implementation applicable across diverse practice settings. The Consortium builds capacity to strengthen the innovation infrastructure of scientists and practitioners in diverse disciplines. DISC will contribute prominently to the building of research and organizational capacity for dissemination and implementation science at the University of Kentucky. DISC plays a prominent role in the Health Literacy Initiative (see page 42) and the Program for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (see page 18). iv. McConnell Center for the Study of Youth Literature The McConnell Center for the Study of Youth Literature, which is part of the School of Library and Information Science, supports teaching, learning, and research related to children’s and teen/young adult literature by serving as a resource for UK students and faculty, as well as researchers, librarians, teachers, and other adults who work with children. The Center was established in 1983 as The Center for the Study of Children's Literature by the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA) and the School of Library and Information Science. The Center was later renamed The McConnell Center for the Study of Youth Literature in honor of the late Professor Emerita Anne Y. McConnell. The Current Collection represents a record of what has been published for children and teens/young adults in the past 12 months and is primarily used to expand current knowledge of trends in children's and teen/young adult literature. The Current Collection is non-circulating and organized by genre: picture books, fiction, and non-fiction. Most of the books in the McConnell Center collection come from various publishers and KDLA. Those titles that are not retained in the Center's Permanent Collection are passed on to the 35 rural Kentucky libraries that KDLA regards as having the greatest need. The Permanent Collection is non-circulating and consists of those books published before to the current calendar year that have been retained due to their significance, including award-winning books (Caldecott, Newbery, Printz, and Orbis Awards, and the Sibert Medal) or other notable, historic, local, or regional books. Also featured is the Kentucky Collection, a growing selection of books containing Kentucky characters or settings and books for youth written and illustrated by current and former Kentucky residents. Reference materials and periodicals are also available to aid in retrospective collection development, professional development, or research in the field. The Center was recently relocated to a new space in Little Library with approximately 350 square feet. The McConnell Center hosts the annual McConnell Youth Literature Conference, which is held in Lexington. The McConnell Conference draws librarians, teachers, and other professionals who work with youth to share ideas, examine materials, and meet authors, illustrators, and other leaders in the field of Youth Literature. The New Book Exhibit and an accompanying free bibliography are made available for examination at the McConnell Youth Literature Conference. v. ICT Co-Lab The ICT Co-Lab is a new, dynamic, cross-disciplinary endeavor designed to develop partnerships with industry, commercial, non-profit, and governmental organizations to advance Information Communication Technologies (ICT) excellence and innovation in Kentucky. The ICT Collaborative is an intra-college and cross-disciplinary space that provides best practices to practitioners, researchers, and innovators with viable platforms for productive work that involves digital, visual, message, data, and archived and networked information. Its mission is to bring different publics and constituencies involved in these areas together to help advance excellence and economic growth through technology use and implementation.

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2010 Self-Study ICT Co-Lab engages researchers, professors, professionals, and the public working together to strengthen the innovation infrastructure for the good of the Commonwealth. The ICT Co-Lab seeks to align the significant energy and talent in Kentucky and at UK, with the College’s overarching goal in its new Strategic Plan: Technology. The ICT Co-Lab’s strength is bringing technology, the communication platform, and policy together in a collaborative space for success beyond outmoded disciplinary silos. This collaboration, by necessity and definition, creates an emphasis on diversity of participants, bringing traditionally “technology underserved” groups together with those with more experience to work toward a common goal. Areas of emphasis include the following: Broadband Access, including the wide-reaching 2010 National Broadband Plan; Telecommunications; Globalization of Healthcare; Media and Rural Policy; Mobile and GIS; Market and Policy Analysis; Product Testing and Measurement; and Multimedia Production for Education, Nonprofits, and Business. In Summer and Fall 2010, the ICT Co-Lab, the College Development Office, and the Office of the Dean conducted a listening tour involving Kentucky’s digital leaders in government, education, public policy, and social services to establish which projects are most needed to address the Commonwealth’s concerns. In its first year, ICT Co-Lab co-sponsored UK Technology week, helped bring Drew Curtis, the Kentucky-based founder and CEO of Fark.com (one of the top 20 visited Web sites in the world) to campus; sponsored a two-day mobile application programming workshop for faculty, staff, and students; and worked with state, local, and federal representatives to answer questions posed by the FCC National Broadband Plan. The ICT Co-Lab has also presented training forums for University of Kentucky departments including UK Healthcare Marketing, UK Alumni Affairs staff, and UKPR, helping these professionals increase the reach and effectiveness of the digital message of the University. In Summer 2010 the ICT Co-Lab deployed the first location-based service, large-scale activity in Lexington by creating Foursquare information locations for all 82 of the LexArts Horse Mania 2010 statues erected as part of the FEI Alltech World Equestrian Games. The ICT Co-Lab combined print, GIS, Web 2.0, and social media technologies to map 82 Horsemania sculptures and provide information about them, their artists, and their sponsors on a digital map available online and interactive smartphone users. Foursquare is the number one location-based service in the world. In addition to providing a service for Lexington and visitors to the World Equestrian Games, the project engaged undergraduate students in learning about the technology. During the World Equestrian Games (September-October 2010), the ICT Co-Lab also worked with the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Office of Public Safety to develop a social media monitoring system that was used by public officials at the FEMA/Public Safety Headquarters throughout the fortnight of the Games in order to monitor messages across the city and the world about the Games and any associated emergencies. The ICT Co-Lab also co-sponsored the first Drupal training sessions for UK students faculty and staff in December 2010, disseminating expertise on this crucial open source content management system that has been implemented as the U.S. government Web standard. The Lab has worked to develop course offerings within the College on Drupal, Content Management Systems, and Mobile Application Development to address continuing workplace needs on campus and in the information economy. vi. Risk Sciences Initiative The Risk Sciences Initiative, which is housed in the Little Library, was launched in 2010 to bring together researchers from across disciplines to provide broader, more systemic and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding how to

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2010 Self-Study manage risks and crises. The initiative supports collaborative research, graduate education, and engagement of the emergency management and response communities. The Risk Sciences Initiative works to coordinate proposals and projects that engage faculty in research to advance our understanding of Risk Sciences. Most recently, for example, the initiative began working on an IRB protocol for rapid response research that can be conducted in the wake of a crisis. An initial application has been drafted, and survey and interview questions are currently being compiled. Risk faculty will complete citizen emergency response team training in February and March 2011, so they will be able to help in a crisis, if needed, while collecting data. A change of protocol template for rapid response research will be developed and the base IRB protocol will be submitted in the spring. The initiative is working to identify possible funding agencies for research and has coordinated the submission of multiple proposals in the last 12 months. The Risk Sciences Initiative is also working to develop relationships with researchers in other disciplines on campus and around the world who study risk sciences for possible interdisciplinary collaboration. Several risk faculty members are on boards and committees across campus. In addition, the grant proposals submitted this fall included several collaborators, including communication scholars from Wayne State University, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, University of Southern Mississippi, and Harvard University, as well as food scientists from Cornell University, agricultural economists from Louisiana State University, and market research experts from the University of Minnesota. Proposals have been supported by such entities as the Department for Environmental Protection, National Institute for Hometown Security, Northern Kentucky Utility District, Kentucky TeleCare, Zambia Mass Communication Educational Trust, University of Zambia, and Media Institute of Southern Africa. The Risk Sciences Initiative is cultivating a relationship with its Scientific Advisory Board to ensure the Risk Sciences Initiative is on the leading edge of risk sciences research. The Scientific Advisory Board, which includes top scholars from across the country, was recently established to provide counsel on the development of research, education, and outreach initiatives. The first Scientific Advisory Board meeting was held in May 2010. This strategic plan and supporting documents for the Risk Sciences Initiative will be sent to the board for their review and advisement. Updates on the progress of the Risk Sciences Initiative will be reported via its Website, http://risk.uky.edu. In addition to encouraging research at the faculty level, the Risk Sciences Initiative has created a mentor program for graduate students to engage in research with faculty and develop a publication record. Through the Risk Sciences Fellowship program, Fellow candidates attend bi-monthly meetings that include discussions of research projects, opportunities, and expectations of graduate students, as well as “How-To� sessions on creating a vita, submitting to conferences and journals, finding a job, applying for funding, networking with scholars, and so on. Candidates complete a minimum of 40 volunteer research hours with one or more faculty members and submit a manuscript to both a conference and a regional, national, or international journal. The Risk Sciences Initiative is working to engage the emergency management and response community in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to improve the risk assessment, crisis preparedness, and response capacity of individuals and entities. Risk faculty are meeting with representatives from entities such as the Office of Homeland Security, Fayette County Urban Division of Emergency Management, Association of Counties, Institute for Hometown Security, United Way, and Public Health, among others, to better understand local emergency practices and programs. Risk faculty are now members of community groups like the Local Emergency Planning Committee. Several faculty members are taking part in community emergency response team training and Department of Homeland Security training workshops, as well. Key individuals in the emergency management and response community are being identified as potential Community Advisory Board members. This board will provide council on how Risk Sciences can best serve the emergency

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2010 Self-Study management and response community in improving the risk assessment, crisis preparedness, and response capacity of individuals and entities in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Potential members will be asked to join and the first board meeting will convene in the spring. The Community Advisory Board will then determine various opportunities for engaging the larger emergency management and response community network. vii. Health Literacy Initiative The College launched a new colloquium series in Fall 2010 as part of its Health Literacy Initiative to address the problem of low health literacy in Kentucky. Health literacy is a person's ability to obtain, process, understand, and communicate health information and to make informed health decisions. The Health Literacy Initiative focuses on four core areas: asset mapping, network development, engaged research, and capacity building. Graduate students involved in the Health Literacy Initiative are discovering what Kentucky is doing to improve health literacy and identifying what is working to maintain that improvement. They are also building a network of scholars to address health literacy issues and conducting research to find ways to raise health literacy in Kentucky. They are building on Kentucky’s assets has and creating new assets to fill in any gaps. As part of a graduate seminar course and two undergraduate communication courses, the College held six public forums throughout the fall semester with health literacy experts to have them collaborate on issues and possible ways to improve health literacy throughout the state. The colloquia were filmed for various uses, including the College's Website, podcasts, educational programming, and content analysis. The Health Literacy Colloquium series is a distinctive program with the goal of increasing knowledge of basic health issues among Kentuckians. Each panel expert plays a different role. Some conduct research on health literacy in rural areas, while others educate pharmacy or medical students on how to counsel patients with low health literacy. Others guide patients and families with health issues by translating medical jargon into plain English. Panelists included UK President Lee T. Todd Jr., State Senator Julie Denton, State Representative Tom Burch, UK College of Medicine Dean Emery A. Wilson, and many others who deal with different aspects of increasing health literacy in Kentucky. The panel is moderated by Al Cross, Director of the College's Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues. During the colloquia that have taken place, panelists have discussed a lack of information provided to caregivers and ways these caregivers can partner with patients. Other problems that have been recognized are patient self-care, taking medication correctly, and when to go to the emergency room. After each colloquia is posted online, undergraduate and graduate students involved with the Health Literacy Initiative blog about each forum. This way, they can recognize the best practices that they have seen from the series. The panels are featured on http://cis.uky.edu/Colloquium and UK TV Cable Channel 16. For more information about the Health Literacy Initiative, visit http://cis.uky.edu/healthliteracy. The College acknowledges that no single program will produce greater health literacy in Kentucky. However, the hope is that the colloquia will encourage students to create awareness among others. The College expects that the Health Literacy Initiative will create connections with other programs that will improve health literacy in Kentucky. Several collaborative research projects have already been developed as a result of the initiative.

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2010 Self-Study These projects include a “Worth the Wait”/March of Dimes grant with the Kentucky Department of Health, a patient waiting room study with the College of Medicine, a diabetes control project with the Fridell Committee (a statewide advisory group), and an asset-mapping project in Owensboro, KY with the Green River Development District. viii. Scientific Advisory Board May 20, 2010 marked the inaugural gathering of a trans-disciplinary team of scientists and practice stakeholders charged with advising University of Kentucky researchers on the development of a multi-unit Institute for Communication Research including the Center for Risk Sciences, the Dissemination and Implementation Science Lab, and the Information and Communications Technology Collaborative. The Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) provides feedback on the College research initiatives and offers suggestions for how to develop and promote Risk Sciences. It is composed of the following representatives from state and federal agencies, private industry, universities, and research centers: • Bill Burns, Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events • Kenneth F. Carey, Noblis, Inc. • Sharon Dunwoody, University of Wisconsin • Robert L. Heath, University of Houston • Jeffrey K. Lazo, National Center for Atmospheric Research • Tom Lester, University of Kentucky • Robert G. Ross (Bob), US Dept. of Homeland Security • Matthew W. Seeger, Wayne State University • Provost Kumble Subbaswamy, University of Kentucky • James Tracy, University of Kentucky • Marsha Vanderford, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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IV. Affected Constituents’ Input The College of Communications and Information Studies formed the Self-Study Committee in 2010. The Committee solicited input from unit heads, divisions, centers, institutes, faculty, students, and staff from the College. In addition, the committee invited the entire College (faculty, staff, and students) to participate in a survey that allowed them to anonymously rate College programs and initiatives and provide feedback. A complete copy of the survey results and supporting documents are available in Appendix C. For the CJT Self-Study, the Director of Graduate Studies met with graduate students at the November Graduate Student Association meeting to request student input. In general, the graduate students indicated they were pleased with the program. A copy of the notes from that meeting is available in Appendix B. Undergraduate students who responded to the online survey were generally satisfied with the student services in the College and most satisfied with the quality of their interaction with faculty, staff, and administrative personnel. There were no significant differences based on affiliation for either upper-division advising experiences or perceptions about the effectiveness of the College by outsiders. For more complete results, see Appendix C.

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V. Policy & Procedure Adherence The College of Communications and Information Studies Rules are intended to be consistent with the Governing Regulations, the Administrative Regulations and Senate Rules of the University of Kentucky, and the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The College policies and procedures are in the process of being updated. For current policies and procedures, see Appendix A. Results from the Self-Study survey report indicated that, in general, respondents felt that the College is doing a good job adhering to policies and procedures. Mean scores for all four questions related to policies and procedures were over 3.4 out of 5, including consistency in grading, adherence to budget request preparation, adherence to personnel actions, and consistency in grading. Other mean responses were over 3.0 for all diversity questions and consistency in applying policies related to probation and termination. For the complete results, see Appendix C.

A. Educational Policies & Procedures The College oversees the educational mission for each of its units. A brief description of the College governance committees is provided below. I. Strategic Plan Committee The College Strategic Planning Advisory Committee is charged with the responsibility of advising the Dean and faculty of the College on long-range planning and oversight and management of the strategic plan. The committee issues a strategic planning report to the Dean and faculty each year by April 15. The 2009-2010 Strategic Plan can be found in Appendix A. The committee consists of three members who are appointed by the Dean of the College. One member of the committee is from the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, one is from the Department of Communication, and one is from the School of Library and Information Science. Members serve for one year. II. College Assembly Although the faculty is empowered to determine educational policies and standards for the College, it delegates to the College Assembly the responsibility for considering academic programs and policies, such as course proposals, changes, and related matters. The Assembly consists of faculty, the Government Student Association student representative elected by the College, the Chairperson of the Communication Graduate Student Association or his/her designated delegate, and the President of the Library and Information Science Student Organization. III. Faculty Council The Faculty Council is the executive committee of the College Assembly. It develops and recommends policies and rules about academic requirements, curricula, and academic and professional teaching to the College Assembly. It reviews

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2010 Self-Study proposals for courses, curricula, and requirements, and recommends action to the University Senate. The Faculty Council also represents the College Assembly on other appropriate matters. The Faculty Council is composed of the Dean, two members elected from the faculty of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, two members elected from the faculty of the Department of Communication, and two members elected from the School of Library and Information Science.

B. Faculty Personnel Actions Faculty personnel actions follow procedures outlined by the University of Kentucky Administrative and Governing Regulations. The College works closely with individuals in the Provost Office to ensure adherence to University policies. The Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure Committee is currently being developed at the present time. In the meantime, the Dean appointed an ad hoc committee to ensure adherence. Each academic unit has its own policies and procedures governing promotion, tenure, and annual evaluations due to lack of consensus at the College level.

C. Budget Request Preparation The annual budgets for the College of Communications and Information Studies provide spending plans for each new fiscal year. The College follows the same fiscal year as the University, which is from July 1 through June 30. As a UK college reporting directly to the Provost, the College follows an annual budget process coordinated by the Provost Budget Office. Within the College, the annual budget process is coordinated and prepared through the Dean’s Office before being submitted to the Provost Budget Office. This annual budget process creates all of the College’s budgets, or spending plans, for the new fiscal year to fund all salaries, benefits, and operating expenses except those funded by sponsored projects. The College of Communications and Information Studies is funded primarily by general funds (state appropriations from the Commonwealth of Kentucky and tuition income). External income generated by special student fees and College programs, endowment income from the College’s endowed gifts, and restricted gifts given for the College’s immediate use are also estimated and budgeted for each new fiscal year. Preparation of the College’s general fund budget is guided by both the University’s and College’s strategic plans. The University provides guidelines for preparation of all parts of the annual budget. The University’s funding is guided by UK’s strategic plan. Every year during the budget development process, the College includes requests to the Provost for additional general funds, both recurring and non-recurring, in an effort to fully fund its strategic plan. The Provost’s approval of these requests is dependent on state appropriations and the University’s projected tuition revenue for the new fiscal year. Within the College, all academic units forward new general fund requests to the Dean to be considered in the general fund request to the Provost. In recent years, University-wide College and administrative budgets have been reduced due to a decline in state appropriations. Budget reductions to the College have generally been distributed with an equal percent across the board to all academic units and the Dean’s Office. In every year of reductions, each unit administrator has provided detailed plans on the allocation of their unit’s reduction. These unit plans are incorporated into the College’s overall reduction plans submitted to the Provost.

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2010 Self-Study In the 2010-2011 fiscal year, the School of Journalism and Telecommunications and the Department of Communication agreed to absorb the recurring budget cut to the CIS Graduate Programs in Communication, which is an interdisciplinary graduate program served by both of these academic units. These two academic units agreed to absorb $6,800 in recurring budget cuts to prevent the CIS Graduate Program from reducing the number of Teaching Assistant assignments in academic year 2010-2011. 

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VI. Productivity & Quality Evaluation A. Productivity The College of Communications and Information Studies strives to be one of the most productive units on the UK campus. The faculty members are distinguished along several dimensions, including international recognition for their research and expertise, service as editors of our discipline’s journals, and leadership as office holders in our national and regional organizations. i.

The School of Journalism and Telecommunications

In the past six years, the 22 faculty members in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications have published 13 books, 30 book chapters, 81 refereed journal articles, 116 articles and juried photos in the popular press, and 2 television productions. They have made 122 presentations of refereed papers at conferences and 115 invited presentations to academic and business groups. Faculty members have also participated in 7 funded research projects. Members of the faculty also play or have played leadership roles in the major national organizations for journalism and mass communication education and practice, including the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication, Broadcast Education Association, Journalism Education Association and Society for Professional Journalists. In the most recent six years, the School has graduated 818 students in Integrated Strategic Communication, 341 students in Journalism, and 221 students in Telecommunications, for a total of 1,380 graduates. ii. The School of Library and Information Science Faculty of the School of Library and Information Science have a strong record of scholarly achievement, quality teaching, and service to the community and the profession. In 2006, the American Library Association awarded Dr. Lois Chan the Beta Phi Mu Award. Senior faculty continue to play a major role in library and information science scholarship. For example, Dr. Donald Case served the 2008-2009 term as President of the American Society for Information Science and Technology and Dr. Chan’s continued high-profile involvement with the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). Also, faculty have developed strong interdisciplinary relationships with colleagues from other units in the College and across campus. Scholarly publications have grown out of collaborations with faculty in the Department of Communication, and several of our faculty are co-investigators on grants with Communication and the College of Medicine. Over the last six years, 11 faculty members of the School have published 8 books, over 60 refereed journal articles, 10 book chapters, 16 conference papers, and more than 20 other works. Six external and more than 20 internal grants have been received by faculty. They have also served professional and scholarly associations in more than 60 different roles during this review period. The School has graduated 570 Master’s degree candidates in the last six years, as well. iii. The Department of Communication Since 2006, the 19 tenured/tenure track faculty members and one research title faculty member of the Department of Communication have published 8 books and more than 175 refereed journal articles, 50 book chapters, 225 conference papers, and countless other works (for example, encyclopedia entries, book reviews, technical reports, and invited

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2010 Self-Study articles/chapters). During this time period, the Department has received 40 external and 11 internal grants. Faculty members have served in professional and scholarly associations in numerous roles during this review period, including serving as journal editors and chairs of divisions of the major professional associations. The Health Communication faculty is widely recognized as one of the most productive, innovative, and influential groups in this major sub-discipline. They continue to publish frequently in the premier health communication journals. For example, in a recent survey in the hundredth issue of Health Communication, the oldest and most prestigious journal in this area, one of our faculty was tied as the seventh most prolific author in this journal, and ranked third in the number of citations to these articles, according to the ISI Web of Knowledge service. A Ph.D. graduate of our program was tied for fifth in number of articles and was ninth in number of citations. In addition, graduate students have earned the Dissertation of the Year award sponsored by the International Communication Association. The Department has graduated 672 BA/BS degree candidates since May 2006. iv. The CJT Graduate Program Because the faculty of CJT are also members of the faculty of the other units, their research accomplishments will not be outlined here. In the past six years, CJT graduated 90 students. The 60 MA students took, on average, 1.8 years to complete the program, and six months after graduation, all had either decided to pursue a Ph.D. or obtained employment as a communications professional. The median completion time for the 30 Ph.D. students was three years to complete their dissertations following their comprehensive exams. Six months after graduation, all had obtained teaching or research positions. In the past six years, graduates have obtained jobs at universities and colleges such as University of Kentucky, Kentucky State University, St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO), Marshall University (Huntington, WV), Saint Francis University (Loretto, PA), Berea College (Berea, KY), Eastern Kentucky University (Richmond, KY), McDaniel College (Westminster, MD), Northern Kentucky University (Highland Heights, KY), Appalachian State University (Boone, NC), Coastal Carolina University (Conway, SC), Virginia Commonwealth (Richmond, VA), University of Houston (Houston, TX), Indiana State University (Terre Haute, IN), Georgia Highland College (Rome, GA), Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL), and Ohio University-Lancaster. v. Division of Instructional Communication Because the Division of Instructional Communication was formed in 2010, productivity measures are not available for the unit.

B. Instruction The College takes pride in the quality of its teaching. Faculty within the College have received University Great Teaching Awards and the Provost Distinguished Professor Award. The College encourages quality teaching by recognizing its best teachers annually with the Faculty Teaching Excellence and Graduate Teaching Excellence Awards. Overall, college faculty receive high ratings from students in their classes. Students of the 2010 graduating class rated professors 3.5 out of 4, on average, for the quality of instruction by faculty in their major.

C. Student Learning Outcomes & Assessment Each unit in the College has its own assessment plan with identified student learning outcomes. A committee composed of School of Journalism and Telecommunications Director Beth Barnes, Director of the Division of Instructional

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2010 Self-Study Communication and Department of Communication Director of Undergraduate Studies Deanna Sellnow, and Assistant Professor of Multimedia Kakie Urch provide oversight and support to the units in implementing and measuring student learning outcomes and assessment. The measures for each unit are described below. i.

The Department of Communication

The Department of Communication has identified four learning outcomes for its undergraduate students: 1. Students will demonstrate thorough knowledge of communication in multiple contexts. 2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in social science research skills. 3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in oral communication skills with the effective use of technology. 4. Students will demonstrate proficiency in written communication skills using proper APA style. The Department assesses its learning outcomes on a rotating basis, using such methods as pre-tests and post-tests and random sampling of student papers in upper-division courses, which are then assessed by trained evaluators. The Department of Communication has expanded the scope of its curriculum committee to embrace assessment as a regular function of the group. The Curriculum and Assessment Committee conducted a rigorous assessment of program learning outcome #4 (Students will demonstrate proficiency in written communication skills using proper APA style) based on the final research papers completed by students in all upper division (400- and 500-level) communication courses in spring 2010. On the basis of on coder results using a 10-item rubric, several deficiencies in student writing were discovered. The most significant problems occurred on the title and abstract pages, internal references, and reference list. As a result, the Department is now requiring the APA Style Guide in all COM 252 sections, cohort sections, and upper division courses; it also embeds instruction in using proper APA style throughout the courses. The assessment study will be replicated Spring 2011 to determine whether these changes result in improved achievement of learning outcome #4. The committee will assess one of four program learning outcomes each year. In addition, the Department assesses COM 181, COM 252, and cohort classes (COM 351 and COM 365) annually in the form of pre- and post-test exams (for cognitive learning), speech presentations (for behavioral learning), and teacher course evaluations (for affective learning). Assessment results have lead to the implementation of service-learning in the COM 181 program, a formal group theory presentation in COM 252, and a streamlining of theories covered in COM 351. The Curriculum and Assessment Committee has also developed a mastery exam that will be administered to students at three points during their studies (when they declare pre-COM, when they enter upper division, and when they complete the program) to assess learning over their course of study. The committee has also connected an assessment of benchmark institutions regarding requirements for the COM minor, pre-COM curriculum, and upper division curriculum. As a result, the Department is implementing program changes that will be more in line with the Top 20 institutions beginning fall 2011. v. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications The School of Journalism and Telecommunications has the following student learning outcomes, which are in line with its professional accrediting body’s professional values and competencies: • Understand and apply the principles and laws of freedom of speech and press, including the right to dissent, to monitor and criticize power, and to assemble and petition for redress of grievances. • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and role of professionals and institutions in shaping communications.

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2010 Self-Study • Demonstrate an understanding of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and, as appropriate, other forms of diversity in domestic society in relation to mass communications. • Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of peoples and cultures and of the significance and impact of mass communications in a global society. • Understand concepts and apply theories in the use and presentation of images and information. • Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical principles and work ethically in pursuit of truth, accuracy, fairness, and diversity. • Think critically, creatively, and independently. • Conduct research and evaluate information by methods appropriate to the communications professions in which they work. • Write correctly and clearly in forms and styles appropriate for the communications professions, audiences, and purposes they serve. • Critically evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy and fairness, clarity, appropriate style and grammatical correctness. • Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts. • Apply tools and technologies appropriate for the communications professions in which they work. To this list, the School has added two further student learning outcomes: • Teach students the skills, both traditional and emerging, that will enable them to participate and lead in the communications industries. • Help students to become knowledgeable consumers of all forms of mediated communications regardless of their career goals. The School uses a variety of direct and indirect measures to evaluate attainment of the student learning outcomes. The ISC and Journalism programs require a portfolio as a graduation requirement. Portfolios are assessed initially by the student’s faculty adviser; periodically, the School asks members of its professional advisory board and other media industry professionals to assess a sample of portfolios to determine progress in meeting many of the student learning outcomes. Furthermore, students in the Telecommunications major are required to complete an internship and are assessed by their internship site supervisor. vi. The School of Library and Information Science The School of Library and Information Science has identified the following student learning outcomes for its Master’s degree students: • Understand the processes associated with the production, distribution, organization, preservation, retrieval, and use of information in society. • Understand the general principles, values, and ethical standards underlying the provision of information services in a variety of settings. • Recognize the responsibilities of the library and information profession in a culturally diverse, technological, and global society. • Critically analyze and evaluate professional issues and problems in an appropriate operational or historical context. • Be familiar with information policies and information-related laws that influence the delivery of information resources throughout society.

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2010 Self-Study • Understand the nature of information, information needs, information seeking behavior, and information use in society. • Be able to develop, manage, and effectively use information systems, sources and services to serve clients; • Understand, and effectively use, information technology. • Understand the role of research in the profession, and be able to interpret and apply research results in practice. • Be familiar with the functions of management in organizations, and be able to apply management concepts and methods in effective problem solving and decision-making. • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication. The School uses a variety of assessment methods, including comprehensive exams, certificate exams, student portfolios, and internship supervisor reports. vii. The CJT Graduate Program The CJT Graduate Program offers both a Master’s degree and a Doctorate degree. The graduate faculty has identified four student learning outcomes for students in this program: • Demonstrate appropriate research skills in the communication discipline. • Communicate research findings orally and verbally within the communication discipline. • Explain the discipline, its research, and theoretical groundings to an academic audience. • Present a disciplinary issue, problem, or case from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives. The graduate program uses direct measures including comprehensive exams, major papers, research presentations and theses/dissertations as assessment measures. viii. The Division of Instructional Communication The new General Education Program courses, CIS 110 and CIS 111 (Composition and Communication I and II), are being assessed during piloting of the courses to determine the degree to which the courses are accomplishing outcomes. Data are being collected from both instructors and students.

D. Student Services & Orientation The Office of Student Services provides initial advising to all of the College’s admitted freshmen and plans the College’s freshman orientation session. The College’s Office of Student Services has two advisers who also meet with all transfer students and serve as the advisers for pre-major students in Integrated Strategic Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications. After they are admitted into upper division, these students are assigned a faculty adviser in their major. The Office also conducts senior checks for students in those three majors and the Communication major, maintains official records for all of the College’s undergraduates, and certifies undergraduate students for graduation. The Office also assists in ensuring that all School of Journalism and Telecommunications majors adhere to the curriculum requirements of the School’s accrediting body. The Office of Student Services selects the College’s student ambassadors and works with that group on recruitment activities and the COMMunity organization. The Office puts together the College’s Dean’s list each semester and administers the scholarships provided by the Dean’s office.

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2010 Self-Study The current system recognizes staffing realities can be confusing for students, particularly early in their academic careers when students might not have definitely decided on their major. The College is looking into expanding its student services area to allow all pre-major advising to be handled by Student Services. The Office of Student Services is also involved in recruiting efforts for the College. The advisers arrange coverage for the Preview Nights held by the Admissions Office and the “Come See For Yourself” recruitment events. The advisers meet with prospective students and their parents in sessions arranged through the Visitors Center. They also represent the College at other special recruitment events held by Admissions, including Transfer Days at various community colleges and events for special populations, (for example, Governor’s School for the Arts participants). The College also wants to add a staff position in the new student services area to provide assistance in recruitment activities, but in the meantime this is a very time-consuming aspect of the advisers’ responsibilities. The Office of Student Services has long provided strong support for the College’s undergraduates, and our students routinely praise the advising staff for their knowledge and the concern they exhibit for students. Our College’s freshmento-sophomore retention figures are not as strong as we would like, but in many cases the students who are not being retained never took a course in our College and never met with our advisers after their initial registration session.

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VII. Analysis & Recommendations A. College of Communications and Information Studies Strengths Dedicated Faculty and Staff The College’s faculty and staff are dedicated to the College and promote its goals and values. Our faculty members are nationally recognized for their research and appreciated by students for their knowledge and teaching skills. Our staff works hard to accommodate the needs of students and faculty.

Faculty have served as presidents of the National Communication Association, Association of Schools of

Journalism and Mass Communication, and American Society for Information Science & Technology. In addition,

the College boasts four former editors of prestigious scholarly journals. Faculty are continuously recognized for

outstanding teaching through the Provost Distinguished Service Professor Award, UK Alumni Association Great

Teacher Award, Interfraternity Council Great Teacher Award, and the student body vote for “favorite professor.” Productivity The College is one of the most productive on the UK campus. With the new General Education Program requirement, the College will become even more productive in generating revenue for the University. In addition, our faculty are widely-recognized for their research. They continue to publish in prestigious journals and obtain grants to conduct research. Integration among units within the College The units of the College work collaboratively to conduct research, obtain grants, and offer classes that meet the needs of our undergraduate and graduate students. Teaching Our faculty are recognized for their teaching by students in their evaluations and by the University at-large. In addition, with the newly formed Division of Instructional Communication, the College is positioning itself to be a leader in disseminating best practices in instruction and conducting the research to establish best practices. Partnerships with other units at the University The College is engaged in many collaborative partnerships across campus. These include teaching and research relationships with the College of Public Health, College of Nursing, College of Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, the College of Medicine, the College of Pharmacy, the College of Education, the Markey Cancer Center, the College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, the Violence and Intervention Prevention Center, the UK Emerging Leader Institute, the UK IGERT Program on Engineered Bioactive Interfaces and Devices, the UK Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments, the Center on Drug Abuse and Research Translation, the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, and the UK BEST summer program.

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B. Recommendations

i. 2004-2005 Self-Study External Review Committee Recommendations 2004-2005 Recommendation No. 1: Space 1) Immediate completion of Phases II and III for SLIS (which is currently #45 on the list of priorities of UK 2004-2006 Capital Request); and 2) A space needs assessment of all units and programs in the College. 2010 Update Phase II of the SLIS portion of the renovations was completed by 2006. The plan for Phase III was changed to accommodate more pressing needs College-wide for faculty, research, and administrative space. The space now houses the McConnell Center for the Study of Youth Literature, Graduate Program in Communication, Division of Instructional Communication, Division of Risk Sciences, Information and Communications Technology Collaborative, Dissemination and Implementation Sciences Consortium, and two classrooms.

2004-2005 Recommendation No. 2: Faculty 1) Two additional faculty in the Department of Communication: one to teach in the mass communication track and one to teach in the interpersonal communication track; and 2) One faculty position in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications to teach photojournalism. 2010 Update: Two additional faculty members in the Department of Communication were hired: one to teach in the mass communication track and one to teach in the interpersonal communication track. The School of Journalism and Telecommunications was able to add three faculty positions due to funding from the Provost: two positions in Integrated Strategic Communication and one in visual communication that also teaches photojournalism. 

2004-2005 Recommendation No. 3: Staff 1) One additional Student Affairs staff member for undergraduate advising and other staff needs; 2) Substantial increase in the allocation of time of the Grants Officer position to the College; and 3) Additional support personnel for technology on a recurring fund basis. 2010 Update: Student Affairs was not able to increase staff. In March 2010, after eight years of working with a part-time Grants Officer, the College negotiated for a full-time Grants Officer. The Office of Sponsored Projects Administration pays 51% of the Grants Officer salary. In 2010, the College hired an IT Coordinator.

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2010 Self-Study 2004-2005 Recommendation No. 4: Resources 1) Immediate restoration of an adequate operating budget for the Department of Communication; 2) Regarding the University Studies Program (USP) program requirement in Oral Communication Skills, the Committee recommends immediate appointment of a University-wide task force to investigate possible options and to report back to the appropriate body with its recommendations within the 2005-2006 academic year; 3) The Committee also recommends strongly that the University take steps to assure that all students are able to enroll in courses outside their own major without unnecessary roadblocks being erected to “manage enrollment.” 4) The Committee recommends that the College address the issue of salary compression as soon as possible; and 5) The Committee encourages greater participation of faculty across all three units served by the CJT program. 2010 Update: The operating budget for the Department of Communication has been restored. The Department of Communication’s current operating expense budget is $121,693 recurring. The College’s total general fund recurring current expense (non-personnel) operating budget has increased 48% from fiscal year 2004-2005 to fiscal year 2010-2011. The issue of salary compression has worsened since the last review because new Assistant Professors are brought in at competitive salaries, and most others have not received any salary increases for several years due to budget cuts. The General Education Committee replaced the governance for the USP. The Division of Instructional Communication will provide funding, administration, staffing, and logistics for the new two-course sequence in Composition and Communication. Joint activities among the faculty have generally increased, including participation of faculty across all the units served by the Communication, Journalism, and Telecommunications graduate program.

ii. 2010 Recommendations for Quality Enhancement 2010 Recommendation No. 1 Create a Center for Excellence in Student Achievement to recruit more qualified students, retain current students, and help all students realize their full academic potential. 2010 Recommendation No. 2 Acquire the technological support from the University (UKIT) necessary to facilitate instruction and learning in a Mac-based environment. 2010 Recommendation No. 3 Increase office, classroom, and lab space to more appropriately serve the needs of the College. 2010 Recommendation No. 4

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2010 Self-Study Increase funding to acquire the staff and technology to provide more online classes and leverage technology in both teaching and research. 2010 Recommendation No. 5 Create an undergraduate program in Information Studies, housed in the School of Library and Information Science. 2010 Recommendation No. 6 Increase funding for the CJT Graduate Program to (a) provide stipends for graduate students that are commensurate with our benchmarks; (b) increase the number funded graduate students; and (c) encourage graduate students to engage in research, publish their work, and present their work at conferences. 2010 Recommendation No. 7 Explore the possibility of the CJT Graduate Program including emphases in Risk Sciences and Instructional Communication. 2010 Recommendation No. 8 Create graduate-level certificates in Risk Sciences, Digital and Multimedia Journalism, and Integrated Strategic Communication to meet the needs of working professionals. 2010 Recommendation No. 9 Build a state-of-the-art multimedia, digital recording studio in order to remain competitive and keep up with technological advances. 2010 Recommendation No. 10

Ensure current faculty salaries, starting salaries, and start-up support are nationally competitive.

iii. Explanation of Recommendations & Alignment with Strategic Plan 2010 Recommendation No. 1 Create a Center for Undergraduate Excellence in Student Achievement to recruit more qualified students, retain current students, and help all students realize their full potential. This position would help the College recruit more qualified students and assist students as they progress toward graduation. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 2 (Learning), No. 4 (Resources), and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 2 Acquire the technological support from the University (UKIT) necessary to facilitate instruction and learning in a Mac-based environment, which is the standard platform utilized by media professionals. IT professionals who specialize in the Mac platform are needed to coordinate communication and services to ensure that the technological infrastructure relied upon by professors and students remains fully operational. In addition, the Self-Study committee is concerned that upcoming changes in the University’s general education curriculum that require all students to produce multimedia-based artifacts will over-tax a system that is already failing to meet the College’s needs related to networking infrastructure. Significant teaching time has been lost due to ongoing problems in the operation of the campus Mac labs. Significant improvements to the networks that support the

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2010 Self-Study Mac environment are needed to maintain curriculum designed to meet professional standards. This includes the need for real-time, immediate dissemination of information to a mass audience, which is reliant upon a stable, reliable network with adequate bandwidth. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 1 (Technology), No. 2 (Learning), No. 3 (Research), and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 3 Increase office, classroom, and other facility space available to the College. The College uses all of the space available to it. It has 15,700 square feet in the Grehan building, which is dedicated to faculty offices, classrooms, and a research facility. In the Little Library, the College has 11,900 square feet of space, which is dedicated to faculty offices, classrooms, conference rooms, and the McConnell Center for Youth Literature. However, several faculty offices are inadequate, and research and meeting space is scarce. The medium term goal of the College is to consolidate all faculty and staff to no more than two buildings, and the longer term goal is to have all members of the College share one building. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 2 (Learning), No. 3 (Research), and No. 4 (Resources). 2010 Recommendation No. 4 Increase funding to acquire the technology to provide more online classes and leverage technology in both teaching and research.

The School of Library and Information Science began offering the online classes in response to growing student

demand. Additional courses across all units are being evaluated to follow a similar model in response to to this

growing student needs and to increase recurring funds for the College’s participation in distance learning.

The College has a strong need to develop new research labs, update research equipment in existing labs and in

the Media Research Theater, and add a mobile collection data lab that would be used for community outreach

and in the collection of data in many unrepresented areas on health and other issues that face the

Commonwealth and the nation. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 1 (Technology), No. 2 (Learning), No. 3 (Research), No. 4 (Resources) and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 5 Create an undergraduate program in Information Studies, housed in the School of Library and Information Science. The program would fulfill a need for information technologists and analysts in Kentucky organizations and would help the College meet its goal of becoming a leader in technology. The impact of information technology, digital initiatives, and changes in information-seeking behavior have been shifting the teaching and research agendas of schools of information studies, and the introduction of undergraduate programs in schools that traditionally offered only graduate programs. Unlike students in

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2010 Self-Study graduate programs who seek jobs in libraries, students attracted to undergraduate Information Studies programs seek careers in corporations. Aspects of information studies include the creation, organization, and preservation of digital materials, including standards development and metadata creation; information architecture and knowledge management; Web design; information literacy; studies of information seeking behavior, particularly related to health; and increasing importance of medical informatics. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 1 (Technology), No. 2 (Learning), No. 5 (Diversity), and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 6 Increase funding for the CJT Graduate Program to provide stipends for graduate students that are commensurate with benchmark universities, increase the number funded graduate students, and, through funding, encourage graduate students to participate in research, publish, and present their work at conferences. The availability of faculty to teach and advise graduate students outpaces the limited number of teaching and research assistantships. In addition, the teaching assistantship stipends ($13,000 for Doctoral students and $9,500 for Master’s students) are low in comparison to competing institutions. These primary competitors include the University of Pennsylvania, Michigan State University, Penn State University, University of Georgia. University of Indiana, University of Wisconsin, University of Texas, University of Illinois, and University of North Carolina. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 2 (Learning) and No. 3 (Research). 2010 Recommendation No. 7 Explore the possibility of the CJT Graduate Program to include emphases in Risk Sciences and Instructional Communication. Risk Sciences is a rapidly growing area, both in the College of Communications and Information Studies and nationally. Risk Sciences, in the communication discipline, refers to the study of risk and crisis messages and their influence on planning and responding to high risk and crisis situations. At UK, the Risk Sciences Initiative was launched in 2010 to bring together researchers from across disciplines to provide broader, more systemic and interdisciplinary approaches for understanding how to manage risks and crises. In the College, two faculty members were hired on lines dedicated to developing Risk Sciences. The faculty members whose research interests are closely aligned to Risk Sciences have been meeting regularly since June 2010. The current team of 12 faculty members developed a vision for Risk Sciences to advance the University of Kentucky in becoming the premier institution for risk and crisis communication research and education. Currently, the College has curriculum, faculty, and student interest to support an emphasis in Instructional Communication; existing instructional courses are already in place within the graduate curriculum; students have been completing theses and dissertations that focus on advanced research in instructional communication for the past 10 years; instructional communication scholarship has resulted in over $5 million dollars in federal funding, multiple instructional communication publications by University of Kentucky faculty, and conference papers that have been presented at international, national, regional, state, and local conferences; and the

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2010 Self-Study College has a critical mass of instructional communication faculty (eight graduate faculty, eight affiliated faculty with doctoral degrees, five doctoral students, and three master’s students). This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 2 (Learning) and No. 3 (Research). 2010 Recommendation No. 8 Create graduate-level certificates in Risk Sciences, Digital and Multimedia Journalism, and Integrated Strategic Communication to meet the needs of working professionals. The graduate certificate in Risk Sciences would incorporate the three new graduate courses–risk communication, crisis communication, and risk and crisis management–however, the classes will be offered primarily online and through weekend seminars for this target audience. Professionals can complete the requirements for the certificate without pursuing a graduate degree. Traditional graduate students pursuing a graduate degree can attain the graduate certificate as well, regardless of the format through which they take the core courses. The Certificate Program in Digital and Multimedia Journalism would be designed for working journalists who completed undergraduate degrees three or more years ago. The industry has changed tremendously during that time. Journalists who received their training in 2007 or earlier are feeling left behind, whatever the quality of their undergraduate preparation. In particular, community journalists, a robust group in Kentucky, have just started to address the challenges of moving their media entity online. People working in other fields who are interested in a career change might also pursue this Program. Through the Program, students will gain understanding of the new technologies in the field, learn how and where they are appropriately used, and learn to use them to produce stories across media platforms. The Certificate Program in Integrated Strategic Communication would be designed to appeal to several audiences: professionals working in persuasive communication (for example, ad agencies, PR agencies, non profits, corporate communication) who completed undergraduate degrees three or more years ago, people working in other fields who are interested in a career change, and entrepreneurs who need the knowledge provided by this program to promote their own businesses. Through this program, students will learn about the range of strategic communication disciplines and develop a comprehensive strategic communication plan for a brand or other business entity. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 1 (Technology), No. 2 (Learning), and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 9 Build a state-of-the-art multimedia, digital recording studio in order to remain competitive and keep up with technological advances. Graduates of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications go on to careers in professional fields, such as news broadcasting and reporting, advertising and public relations, and sound and video production. All of our programs emphasize a hands-on learning experience. Students currently anchor and produce a live newscast aired four days a week (Monday-Thursday) on a local cable channel in an inadequate studio space that is located across campus in a former gym of the Education

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2010 Self-Study Building. In order to remain a premier program in the fields of new and traditional media, the College must make the necessary investments to relocate the studio to a proper space. The Health Literacy Colloquia are also hosted in the studio, with a panel of experts from the community. The studio cannot currently accommodate a studio audience that would be recommended for such a program. This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 1 (Technology), No. 2 (Learning), No. 4 (Resources), and No. 6 (Engagement). 2010 Recommendation No. 10

Ensure current and starting salaries for faculty and staff are nationally competitive. Recurring funds have not been available for the past three fiscal years, including 2010-2011, for merit pools to fund salary increases.

The Faculty section on page 28 outlines responses from the 2010 Work-Life Survey. Of the 41 faculty that

responded to the survey, 31.7 % were either engaged in an active search for a new position or indicated that

they had begun to explore options elsewhere. The primary reason (41.7%) respondents indicated for

considering leaving UK was salary/wage. In addition, 54% indicated that they did not feel that they were fairly compensated in relation to colleagues of similar rank and experience at UK, and 76% indicated that they did not feel that they were fairly compensated in relation to colleagues of similar rank and experience at benchmark institutions. In the Self-Study survey, respondents indicated that salary compression continues to be a major challenge for the College (see SelfStudy Online Survey Evaluation Report, Appendix C). This Recommendation would help the College meet Strategic Plan Goals No. 2 (Learning), No. 3 (Research), No. 4 (Resources), and No. 6 (Engagement).

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Appendices Appendix A College Strategic Plan 2009-2014 College Organizational Chart College Policies and Procedures College Annual Report 2005 College Annual Report 2006 College Annual Report 2007 College Annual Report 2008 College Annual Report 2009

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Appendix B CJT Graduate Program Self-Study CJT Graduate Program Annual Report 2004-2005 CJT Graduate Program Annual Report 2005-2006 CJT Graduate Program Annual Report 2006-2007

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Appendix C Self-Study Online Survey Evaluation Report Self-Study Online Survey Self-Study Online Survey: Undergraduate Student Resources Statistics Self-Study Online Survey: 2005 Self-Study Recommendations Statistics Self-Study Online Survey: Quality and Productivity Qualitative Responses

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Appendix D ACEJMC Principles of Accreditation ACEJMC Accrediting Standards

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UK College of Communications & Information Studies Self-Study