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15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORS’ CUP BY THE YEAR 2015 JOE CRAFT CENTER • 338 LEXINGTON AVENUE • LEXINGTON, KY 40506-0604

15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORS’ CUP BY THE YEAR 2015 2009 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY ATHLETICS ANNUAL REPORT


CONTENTS

2008-09 UK BOARD OF TRUSTEES

> Realizing his Dreams...........................................2 > Embracing the Challenge....................................4 > 2008-09 Athletic Year in Review ..........................6 > Mastering Leadership..........................................8 > Creating Lasting Memories ...............................10 > Preparing for Future Success ...........................12 > Making History ...................................................14

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> Devoted to Serving ............................................16 > Marketing a Winning Brand...............................18 > Conquering Adversity........................................20 > Proudly Providing Support ...............................22 > Financial Integrity ..............................................24

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(as of June 30, 2009) Mira S. Ball, Chair Stephen P. Branscum, Vice Chair Pamela T. May, Secretary Edward Britt Brockman Penelope A. Brown Jo Hern Curris Dermontti F. Dawson Ann Brand Haney James F. Hardymon Everett McCorvey Billy Joe Miles Tyler Montell Sandy Bugie Patterson Phillip R. Patton Erwin Roberts Charles R. Sachatello C. Frank Shoop JoEtta Y. Wickliffe Ernest J. Yanarella

15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORS’ CUP

2008-09 UK ATHLETIC BOARD

CREDITS

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The 2008-09 University of Kentucky Athletics Annual Report is published by the UK Athletics Association, Mitch Barnhart, Director. This publication was written and edited by Eric Lindsey, Evan Crane, Craig Hornberger and the UK Athletics Media Relations Staff. Design by Craig Hornberger. Photography by David Coyle and Team Coyle, and Cheryl Treworgy/PrettySporty.com. Printing by Welch Printing. UK Athletics Association Joe Craft Center 338 Lexington Avenue Lexington, KY 40506-0604 UKathletics.com

(as of June 30, 2009) Bruno Agostinelli Charles W. Arnold Frank Butler Charles Cassis Dermontti F. Dawson Luther Deaton Alan DeSantis Victoria Dunlap C. M. Gatton Victor Hazard Scott Kelley Kathi Kern Frank Shoop William B. Sturgill Kumble Subbaswamy Lee T. Todd, Jr. Bruce Walcott Lionel Williamson Emeritus Member S. T. Roach

BY THE YEAR 2015


Dear Friend of UK Athletics,

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am pleased to send you a copy of our 2009 Annual Report. As an integral part of the Big Blue Nation, I trust you find it informative and inspiring.

In November of 2008, I presented our coaches and staff with a new challenge: to refuse to become satisfied with our many recent accomplishments and to move forward as a department with a new set of ambitious goals. As a tangible way to measure our progress, we unveiled a new 15 x 15 x 15 initiative. The stated goals of this initiative are to win 15 conference or national championships and finish in the top 15 of the national Directors’ Cup rankings by the year of 20115. At the same time, we made a renewed commitment to be innovative in all areas of our daily operation and to raise our social awareness within the Lexington community and the Commonwealth. Along with the special place UK Athletics holds in the hearts and minds of those who live in this great state, there comes a responsibility to help lift others up – especially in this unprecedented time of national economic crisis.

In the following pages, we’ll celebrate highlights from the 2008-09 athletic year and preview some of the exciting plans that are on the horizon for our department. We’ll also profile a few extraordinary individuals and areas of impact within UK Athletics that already exemplify what our department – as a whole – aspires to become over the next six years. With the continued unwavering efforts of UK administration, our athletes, coaches and staff, as well as the support of our loyal fans, I am confident we can fulfill the bold vision outlined in our 15 x 15 x 15 plan. Go Cats,

Our pursuit and ultimate attainment of the 15 x 15 x 15 goals will place UK Athletics among an elite group of schools, in terms of both athletic accomplishment and social involvement.

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“I know it sounds cheesy, but I want to serve my country and make a difference in the world.” — Tim Masthay

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t is often all too easy to forget the meaning, importance and hard work that goes into being a student-athlete. It’s more than just what an athlete does on the field. Equally, if not more important, is how they choose to spend their time away from the action of collegiate competition. To be a student-athlete is to balance games and practices with the full-time job of going to class, doing homework and even serving the community. There are hundreds of great examples at UK, but it would be tough to find a more complete student-athlete than Tim Masthay.

During his career at Kentucky, Masthay did it all. When he wasn’t on the field for the Kentucky football team, Masthay was excelling in the classroom and in the community. The Murray, Ky., native is a three-time Southeastern Conference Academic Honor Roll honoree and a two-time Academic AllAmerican, as chosen by the College Sports Information Directors of America and ESPN The Magazine.

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Masthay did all that while helping the UK football team win three straight bowl games for the first time in program history. The All-SEC honoree was an integral part of the Wildcats’ success, serving as the team’s punter and kickoff specialist the last four years. Given all the time Tim Masthay invests in football and academics, it is hard to imagine he would have time left to do anything else. But that’s what sets Masthay and other student-athletes at UK apart from others: the will to do more. Masthay is deeply committed to serving the community. While at UK, he volunteered at hospitals, contributed at the Salvation Army, participated in food drives and spent two weeks on an educational and service trip to Ghana. His outstanding record of volunteerism was no doubt a factor in his selection to UK’s prestigious Frank Ham Society of Character. So how does one find time to excel in the classroom, on the field and in the community?

“For me, it all came down to having a great support staff around me,” Masthay said. “My teammates are great, the administration is great, the coaches are great, and then, on an individual level, it just came down to prioritizing.” And nobody’s priorities are more in place than Masthay’s. He signed a free agent contract with the NFL Indianapolis Colts in the spring and plans to give professional football a try, but he says that won’t stop him from his ultimate goal of joining the Peace Corps in Africa within the next five years. “I know it sounds cheesy, but I want to serve my country and make a difference in the world.” > Among his many volunteer activities while a student-athlete at UK, punter Tim Masthay spent two weeks on an educational and service trip to the African country of Ghana in May 2008. While there, he participated in various service projects at a school and orphanage.

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“I know it sounds cheesy, but I want to serve my country and make a difference in the world.” — Tim Masthay

I

t is often all too easy to forget the meaning, importance and hard work that goes into being a student-athlete. It’s more than just what an athlete does on the field. Equally, if not more important, is how they choose to spend their time away from the action of collegiate competition. To be a student-athlete is to balance games and practices with the full-time job of going to class, doing homework and even serving the community. There are hundreds of great examples at UK, but it would be tough to find a more complete student-athlete than Tim Masthay.

During his career at Kentucky, Masthay did it all. When he wasn’t on the field for the Kentucky football team, Masthay was excelling in the classroom and in the community. The Murray, Ky., native is a three-time Southeastern Conference Academic Honor Roll honoree and a two-time Academic AllAmerican, as chosen by the College Sports Information Directors of America and ESPN The Magazine.

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Masthay did all that while helping the UK football team win three straight bowl games for the first time in program history. The All-SEC honoree was an integral part of the Wildcats’ success, serving as the team’s punter and kickoff specialist the last four years. Given all the time Tim Masthay invests in football and academics, it is hard to imagine he would have time left to do anything else. But that’s what sets Masthay and other student-athletes at UK apart from others: the will to do more. Masthay is deeply committed to serving the community. While at UK, he volunteered at hospitals, contributed at the Salvation Army, participated in food drives and spent two weeks on an educational and service trip to Ghana. His outstanding record of volunteerism was no doubt a factor in his selection to UK’s prestigious Frank Ham Society of Character. So how does one find time to excel in the classroom, on the field and in the community?

“For me, it all came down to having a great support staff around me,” Masthay said. “My teammates are great, the administration is great, the coaches are great, and then, on an individual level, it just came down to prioritizing.” And nobody’s priorities are more in place than Masthay’s. He signed a free agent contract with the NFL Indianapolis Colts in the spring and plans to give professional football a try, but he says that won’t stop him from his ultimate goal of joining the Peace Corps in Africa within the next five years. “I know it sounds cheesy, but I want to serve my country and make a difference in the world.” > Among his many volunteer activities while a student-athlete at UK, punter Tim Masthay spent two weeks on an educational and service trip to the African country of Ghana in May 2008. While there, he participated in various service projects at a school and orphanage.

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“For us to have the opportunity to contribute to Kentucky’s championships is a great honor.” — Harry Mullins, Head Rifle Coach

One of the most respected names in his sport, UK head rifle coach Harry Mullins led the 2009 Wildcats to conference regular season and tournament championships, and a second-place finish at the NCAA Championships.

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f a program is going to set a lofty goal like the 15 x 15 x 15 plan, it better have an ace in the hole to conquer the feat.

Kentucky has such an ace in Harry Mullins. Thanks to Mullins’ guidance and tutelage, the UK rifle team has become synonymous with championships. Mullins, who took over the rifle program in 1987 after a distinguished career as a student-athlete at UK, has transformed it into a perennial powerhouse. With Mullins’ decorated résumé and well-documented history of winning, there is no shortage of expectations for his team: win championships and win them often. “Our job is to win championships and the administration’s job is to count them,” Mullins said. The counting has already started. Behind the meticulous leadership of Mullins, Kentucky captured its first championships toward the 15 x 15 x 15 plan last fall. A 10-1 season, including a perfect

GARC regular-season championship. Mullins added to his shrine of trophies with a GARC tournament title weeks later. In all, his UK teams have captured eight championships – five GARC tournament titles and three GARC conference crowns. The only bare spot in Mullins’ trophy case has been reserved for a national championship trophy, a feat he’s come agonizingly close to several times. UK has posted eight top-three national finishes under Mullins, including a national runner-up finish this year. Although his time could become bogged down in polishing off countless championship trophies, Mullins dedicates most of his time shaping student-athletes. He has coached many great shooters, including 2000 Olympic Gold Medalist Nancy Napoliski, and his team is annually one of the most successful academic programs in the nation. “I enjoy the opportunity to coach at my alma mater,” Mullins said. “From a coach’s perspective, it is a dream come true. As a competitor, you establish a special bond and pride for the university. To have the opportunity to help instill that pride in studentathletes is an amazing responsibility.”

6-0 in the Great American Rifle Conference, helped UK to the

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“For us to have the opportunity to contribute to Kentucky’s championships is a great honor.” — Harry Mullins, Head Rifle Coach

One of the most respected names in his sport, UK head rifle coach Harry Mullins led the 2009 Wildcats to conference regular season and tournament championships, and a second-place finish at the NCAA Championships.

I

f a program is going to set a lofty goal like the 15 x 15 x 15 plan, it better have an ace in the hole to conquer the feat.

Kentucky has such an ace in Harry Mullins. Thanks to Mullins’ guidance and tutelage, the UK rifle team has become synonymous with championships. Mullins, who took over the rifle program in 1987 after a distinguished career as a student-athlete at UK, has transformed it into a perennial powerhouse. With Mullins’ decorated résumé and well-documented history of winning, there is no shortage of expectations for his team: win championships and win them often. “Our job is to win championships and the administration’s job is to count them,” Mullins said. The counting has already started. Behind the meticulous leadership of Mullins, Kentucky captured its first championships toward the 15 x 15 x 15 plan last fall. A 10-1 season, including a perfect

GARC regular-season championship. Mullins added to his shrine of trophies with a GARC tournament title weeks later. In all, his UK teams have captured eight championships – five GARC tournament titles and three GARC conference crowns. The only bare spot in Mullins’ trophy case has been reserved for a national championship trophy, a feat he’s come agonizingly close to several times. UK has posted eight top-three national finishes under Mullins, including a national runner-up finish this year. Although his time could become bogged down in polishing off countless championship trophies, Mullins dedicates most of his time shaping student-athletes. He has coached many great shooters, including 2000 Olympic Gold Medalist Nancy Napoliski, and his team is annually one of the most successful academic programs in the nation. “I enjoy the opportunity to coach at my alma mater,” Mullins said. “From a coach’s perspective, it is a dream come true. As a competitor, you establish a special bond and pride for the university. To have the opportunity to help instill that pride in studentathletes is an amazing responsibility.”

6-0 in the Great American Rifle Conference, helped UK to the

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“I’m very proud of this team and very proud of their run in postseason play. Prior to this season, I don’t think we understood how good we could be.” — Head Softball Coach Rachel Lawson, following team’s first NCAA appearance

hen Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart laid out the 15 x 15 x 15 plan, he called for championships, team success and individual accomplishments.

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The perennially strong swimming and diving teams had several relays finish in the top 10 at the NCAA Championships, while numerous school records were shattered throughout the season.

Women’s golf returned to postseason play for the first time since 2000, competing in the NCAA Championships in Columbus, Ohio. The men participated in the NCAA Tournament for the fifth time in the last six years.

During the 2008-09 athletic year, Kentucky embarked on the plan by capturing coveted titles and historic milestones. From football to rifle, Kentucky raised the bar and proved that it is well on its way to becoming a top-15 athletics program.

The basketball season was marked by outstanding individual accomplishments. All-American Jodie Meeks broke Dan Issel’s hallowed single-game scoring record with 54 points at Tennessee. The women’s team advanced to the National Invitation Tournament for the second year in a row, behind the play of All-SEC performers Eleia Roddy and Victoria Dunlap.

The tennis teams continued to meet and raise the bar as well. UK was selected as one of 16 host teams for the first and second rounds of the 2009 NCAA Men’s Tennis Tournament, while the women’s team made the championships for the 13th consecutive season. Bruno Agostinelli advanced to the quarterfinals of the NCAA men’s singles tournament, while the doubles team of Carolina Escamilla and Caroline Lilley made it to the Round of 16 in the NCAA women’s doubles tournament.

The football team – under the steady leadership of sixth-year head coach Rich Brooks – headed south for a third consecutive postseason, defeating East Carolina in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tenn. It marked the third consecutive season UK had won its bowl game — a first in program history. Likewise, the volleyball program continued to make huge strides toward becoming a perennial Southeastern Conference power. Led by fourth-year head coach Craig Skinner, the Wildcats enjoyed a 26-win season and advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the fourth consecutive season. Among UK’s school-record 17 conference victories was a dramatic come-from-behind five-set win over No. 12 Florida in front of the fifth-largest crowd in school history. By virtue of its outstanding regular season and other factors, Kentucky was chosen as a host site for the first and second rounds of the NCAA Volleyball Tournament. The men’s soccer team posted runner-up finishes in the Conference USA regular season and tournament championship en route to a No. 21 national ranking. The Wildcats engineered a school-record 10-match unbeaten streak during the season and ranked 25th nationally in home attendance. In women’s cross country, the Wildcats returned to the NCAA Championships for the first time in 19 years, placing 31st in the nation. Senior Jessica Ortman was the team’s top

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The softball team didn’t just make strides under second-year head coach Rachel Lawson – it made leaps. UK made the NCAA Tournament for the first time in school history, advancing to the regional finals. Molly Johnson became the program’s first All-American. She joined Megan Yocke on the All-SEC and Southeast All-Region teams. Barry Rice (above, left) was named Conference USA Defensive Player of the Year in men’s soccer for the second consecutive season, while Mallory Blackwelder helped power the women’s golf team and the softball team earned its first NCAA Tournament bid.

> The football team ended the 2008 season with a victory in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl to clinch a historic third consecutive bowl win.

finisher at NCAAs and at every meet during the 2009 season. On the men’s team, Adam Henken became the first male performer to run at the NCAA Championships since 2003. Harry Mullins and the rifle team captured the first of what will likely be multiple championships over the next few years. As his teams have done so often during his 21-year reign as head coach, the rifle team carried the banner for UK in 2008-09. The Wildcats won the Great American Rifle Conference regular season with an undefeated league mark and edged West Virginia to win the GARC tournament title. Kentucky nearly pulled off the trifecta at the NCAA Championships, finishing as the national runner-up.

Track and Field produced three individual SEC champions in 2009 (Ashley Trimble in the pentathlon and Rashaud Scott and Ashley Muffet in the discus) while Rondel Sorrillo finished second in the 200m dash at the outdoor NCAA Championships.

> Ashley Muffet (above, left) won an SEC title in the discus and was the top individual women’s point scorer at the outdoor league championships, while Bruno Agostinelli advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2009 NCAA men’s tennis singles tournament.

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“I’m very proud of this team and very proud of their run in postseason play. Prior to this season, I don’t think we understood how good we could be.” — Head Softball Coach Rachel Lawson, following team’s first NCAA appearance

hen Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart laid out the 15 x 15 x 15 plan, he called for championships, team success and individual accomplishments.

W

The perennially strong swimming and diving teams had several relays finish in the top 10 at the NCAA Championships, while numerous school records were shattered throughout the season.

Women’s golf returned to postseason play for the first time since 2000, competing in the NCAA Championships in Columbus, Ohio. The men participated in the NCAA Tournament for the fifth time in the last six years.

During the 2008-09 athletic year, Kentucky embarked on the plan by capturing coveted titles and historic milestones. From football to rifle, Kentucky raised the bar and proved that it is well on its way to becoming a top-15 athletics program.

The basketball season was marked by outstanding individual accomplishments. All-American Jodie Meeks broke Dan Issel’s hallowed single-game scoring record with 54 points at Tennessee. The women’s team advanced to the National Invitation Tournament for the second year in a row, behind the play of All-SEC performers Eleia Roddy and Victoria Dunlap.

The tennis teams continued to meet and raise the bar as well. UK was selected as one of 16 host teams for the first and second rounds of the 2009 NCAA Men’s Tennis Tournament, while the women’s team made the championships for the 13th consecutive season. Bruno Agostinelli advanced to the quarterfinals of the NCAA men’s singles tournament, while the doubles team of Carolina Escamilla and Caroline Lilley made it to the Round of 16 in the NCAA women’s doubles tournament.

The football team – under the steady leadership of sixth-year head coach Rich Brooks – headed south for a third consecutive postseason, defeating East Carolina in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tenn. It marked the third consecutive season UK had won its bowl game — a first in program history. Likewise, the volleyball program continued to make huge strides toward becoming a perennial Southeastern Conference power. Led by fourth-year head coach Craig Skinner, the Wildcats enjoyed a 26-win season and advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the fourth consecutive season. Among UK’s school-record 17 conference victories was a dramatic come-from-behind five-set win over No. 12 Florida in front of the fifth-largest crowd in school history. By virtue of its outstanding regular season and other factors, Kentucky was chosen as a host site for the first and second rounds of the NCAA Volleyball Tournament. The men’s soccer team posted runner-up finishes in the Conference USA regular season and tournament championship en route to a No. 21 national ranking. The Wildcats engineered a school-record 10-match unbeaten streak during the season and ranked 25th nationally in home attendance. In women’s cross country, the Wildcats returned to the NCAA Championships for the first time in 19 years, placing 31st in the nation. Senior Jessica Ortman was the team’s top

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The softball team didn’t just make strides under second-year head coach Rachel Lawson – it made leaps. UK made the NCAA Tournament for the first time in school history, advancing to the regional finals. Molly Johnson became the program’s first All-American. She joined Megan Yocke on the All-SEC and Southeast All-Region teams. Barry Rice (above, left) was named Conference USA Defensive Player of the Year in men’s soccer for the second consecutive season, while Mallory Blackwelder helped power the women’s golf team and the softball team earned its first NCAA Tournament bid.

> The football team ended the 2008 season with a victory in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl to clinch a historic third consecutive bowl win.

finisher at NCAAs and at every meet during the 2009 season. On the men’s team, Adam Henken became the first male performer to run at the NCAA Championships since 2003. Harry Mullins and the rifle team captured the first of what will likely be multiple championships over the next few years. As his teams have done so often during his 21-year reign as head coach, the rifle team carried the banner for UK in 2008-09. The Wildcats won the Great American Rifle Conference regular season with an undefeated league mark and edged West Virginia to win the GARC tournament title. Kentucky nearly pulled off the trifecta at the NCAA Championships, finishing as the national runner-up.

Track and Field produced three individual SEC champions in 2009 (Ashley Trimble in the pentathlon and Rashaud Scott and Ashley Muffet in the discus) while Rondel Sorrillo finished second in the 200m dash at the outdoor NCAA Championships.

> Ashley Muffet (above, left) won an SEC title in the discus and was the top individual women’s point scorer at the outdoor league championships, while Bruno Agostinelli advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2009 NCAA men’s tennis singles tournament.

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“All of the awards that Sarah has received throughout her career are earned. Nobody works harder or is more committed than her.” — Head Volleyball Coach Craig Skinner on Sarah Rumely

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ll great teams have a face – someone whom coaches, players and fans alike quickly attribute much of the program’s success, notoriety and persona.

Think Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls or Derek Jeter and the New York Yankees. For the Kentucky volleyball team, its face has a big bright smile, wavy red hair and a first-class personality. It’s the face of the program’s first Southeastern Conference Player of the Year, setter Sarah Rumely. “All of the awards that Sarah has received throughout her career are earned,” head volleyball coach Craig Skinner said. “Nobody works harder or is more committed than her.” The New Palestine, Ind., native knows how to win and that’s all she has done since putting on the Blue and White. In the past three seasons, Rumely has led UK to more wins (67) in a threeyear stretch since the team did it in the mid-1990s. Her freshman season she was named SEC Freshman of the Year, and she is only the third player in UK history to tally over 4,000 career assists. Rumely’s list of awards and accomplishments doesn’t stop there. She became just the seventh player in school history to be

named an American Volleyball Coaches Association All-American and earned first-team AVCA All-South Region honors. Probably the most rewarding accomplishment for Rumely to date, however, was doing something that no UK volleyball team has done in a long time: beat SEC powerhouse Florida. The Gators have long set the standard in SEC volleyball and no team in the conference has been able to stand up to Florida over the last decade-plus. On a perfect afternoon in November, however, Rumely and the Wildcats did just that – defeating Florida for the first time in 18 years. “We won this for the program, which has struggled to beat [Florida] in the past,” Rumely said. “This is one of those great moments that you will never forget.” Despite her many personal accolades and everything she has helped her team accomplish, the rising senior remains humble about being able to wear the Kentucky blue. “Playing in front of the outstanding fans we have here and having Kentucky written across your chest is a tremendous feeling,” Rumely said.

> Sarah Rumely excels on the volleyball court and in the classroom. Twice she has earned CoSIDA/ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District honors and is a three-time SEC Academic Honor Roll recipient. 8

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“All of the awards that Sarah has received throughout her career are earned. Nobody works harder or is more committed than her.” — Head Volleyball Coach Craig Skinner on Sarah Rumely

A

ll great teams have a face – someone whom coaches, players and fans alike quickly attribute much of the program’s success, notoriety and persona.

Think Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls or Derek Jeter and the New York Yankees. For the Kentucky volleyball team, its face has a big bright smile, wavy red hair and a first-class personality. It’s the face of the program’s first Southeastern Conference Player of the Year, setter Sarah Rumely. “All of the awards that Sarah has received throughout her career are earned,” head volleyball coach Craig Skinner said. “Nobody works harder or is more committed than her.” The New Palestine, Ind., native knows how to win and that’s all she has done since putting on the Blue and White. In the past three seasons, Rumely has led UK to more wins (67) in a threeyear stretch since the team did it in the mid-1990s. Her freshman season she was named SEC Freshman of the Year, and she is only the third player in UK history to tally over 4,000 career assists. Rumely’s list of awards and accomplishments doesn’t stop there. She became just the seventh player in school history to be

named an American Volleyball Coaches Association All-American and earned first-team AVCA All-South Region honors. Probably the most rewarding accomplishment for Rumely to date, however, was doing something that no UK volleyball team has done in a long time: beat SEC powerhouse Florida. The Gators have long set the standard in SEC volleyball and no team in the conference has been able to stand up to Florida over the last decade-plus. On a perfect afternoon in November, however, Rumely and the Wildcats did just that – defeating Florida for the first time in 18 years. “We won this for the program, which has struggled to beat [Florida] in the past,” Rumely said. “This is one of those great moments that you will never forget.” Despite her many personal accolades and everything she has helped her team accomplish, the rising senior remains humble about being able to wear the Kentucky blue. “Playing in front of the outstanding fans we have here and having Kentucky written across your chest is a tremendous feeling,” Rumely said.

> Sarah Rumely excels on the volleyball court and in the classroom. Twice she has earned CoSIDA/ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District honors and is a three-time SEC Academic Honor Roll recipient. 8

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“I just wanted to have memories. For me, when you look at a picture, it just brings back so many memories.” — Ashley Trimble

> Ashley Trimble was an AllAmerican and SEC Champion in the pentathlon in 2009.

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t is often said, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” One picture can describe a childhood experience, a family get-together or a moment of triumph in sports. More than anything, a picture can capture a thousand memories.

Growing up, Ashley Trimble didn’t have a lot of memories. There weren’t a lot of pictures and documents for Trimble to preserve her or her family’s past, so she started taking pictures of her family, friends and school. Since picking up a disposable camera in middle school, however, a camera has rarely left Trimble’s side. Trimble shot out of personal fun at first, but by the time she got into high school and her mother bought her a digital camera, it had become much more than a hobby. “From there, I shot away,” said Trimble, a senior art studio major. Her biggest passion is fashion photography. Trimble takes pictures for school, the track and field team, and her sorority, but she would like to end up in the fashion industry one day.

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She’s currently pursuing a photography internship in Paris, France, where she could potentially meet and network with some of the world’s most famous photographers. Years from now, Trimble won’t need a photo to remember her days on the track. A peek at her long and decorated list of shattered records and championships will be sufficient. The Columbus, Ohio, native owns the school records in the indoor pentathlon and outdoor heptathlon. She also ranks in the top seven all-time at UK in seven other events and is the freshman record holder in the 400-meter hurdles. But Trimble’s most unforgettable moment might have come this past season when she captured the 2009 Southeastern Conference Indoor title in the pentathlon. In addition to that accomplishment, she earned indoor All-SEC and AllAmerica honors. Trimble isn’t 100 percent sure what the future holds for her as both a budding photographer and talented track star. Whether it’s with her camera or on the track, Trimble has already made a portfolio worth of memories. No matter what she chooses to do, she’s sure to make a lot more.

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“I just wanted to have memories. For me, when you look at a picture, it just brings back so many memories.” — Ashley Trimble

> Ashley Trimble was an AllAmerican and SEC Champion in the pentathlon in 2009.

I

t is often said, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” One picture can describe a childhood experience, a family get-together or a moment of triumph in sports. More than anything, a picture can capture a thousand memories.

Growing up, Ashley Trimble didn’t have a lot of memories. There weren’t a lot of pictures and documents for Trimble to preserve her or her family’s past, so she started taking pictures of her family, friends and school. Since picking up a disposable camera in middle school, however, a camera has rarely left Trimble’s side. Trimble shot out of personal fun at first, but by the time she got into high school and her mother bought her a digital camera, it had become much more than a hobby. “From there, I shot away,” said Trimble, a senior art studio major. Her biggest passion is fashion photography. Trimble takes pictures for school, the track and field team, and her sorority, but she would like to end up in the fashion industry one day.

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She’s currently pursuing a photography internship in Paris, France, where she could potentially meet and network with some of the world’s most famous photographers. Years from now, Trimble won’t need a photo to remember her days on the track. A peek at her long and decorated list of shattered records and championships will be sufficient. The Columbus, Ohio, native owns the school records in the indoor pentathlon and outdoor heptathlon. She also ranks in the top seven all-time at UK in seven other events and is the freshman record holder in the 400-meter hurdles. But Trimble’s most unforgettable moment might have come this past season when she captured the 2009 Southeastern Conference Indoor title in the pentathlon. In addition to that accomplishment, she earned indoor All-SEC and AllAmerica honors. Trimble isn’t 100 percent sure what the future holds for her as both a budding photographer and talented track star. Whether it’s with her camera or on the track, Trimble has already made a portfolio worth of memories. No matter what she chooses to do, she’s sure to make a lot more.

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“Our goals will be to make the entire Commonwealth proud of its program and proud of its team by our work on the court and our integrity off the court.” — Head Men’s Basketball Coach John Calipari

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mplementing a vision for success cannot be achieved without planning for the future. Kentucky is already on its way to becoming one of the top athletics departments in the nation, but the blueprint for the future holds an unwavering foundation of prosperity. It would be virtually impossible to pinpoint which future initiative holds more promise and excitement for the future, but let’s start with the move that made shockwaves around the nation: the hiring of head men’s basketball coach John Calipari. When Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart set out to find the 22nd coach in program history, he sought a coach who could lead Kentucky back to its rightful position as the top basketball program in the country. In his drive to return UK to national prominence, Barnhart wanted a coach who would be an ambassador in the community, embrace the tradition and high expectations of the position, and reach out to the Big Blue fan base.

An equally impressive hire was the addition of head women’s soccer coach Jon Lipsitz. Lipsitz is renowned for his ability to breed a level of competitiveness matched by few programs. At Charlotte, Lipsitz’s teams were known for their mental toughness, explosive offense and stingy defense. Now embarking on the first year of what he calls his dream job, Lipsitz is hoping to do the same at Kentucky.

basketball on ESPN and ESPN2 each week, and expanded league championship coverage in a number of sports.

To get there, he’s outlined three basic principles that will define his team: family, legacy and finish, the last of which has been adopted by the entire athletics department. More good news for UK fans came in the announcement last August of a lucrative television deal between the Southeastern Conference, ESPN and CBS, beginning with the fall 2009 season. The 15-year contract is the biggest in the history of college athletics and will provide UK Athletics with more exposure than ever. With the new deal, ESPN’s various outlets will carry more than 5,500 SEC events over the 15-year period, including added football coverage, a second and third night of SEC

New head coach Jon Lipsitz vows to instill a new level of competitive spirit into the Kentucky women’s soccer program.

Financially, the contract with ESPN and CBS will generate more than $5 million annually in added revenues for Kentucky. But to build championship caliber teams in all sports, Kentucky must continue to provide championshipcaliber facilities. The program is currently conducting a feasibility study to determine if it can go ahead with building a new downtown basketball arena, a new campus baseball field and upgrading Commonwealth Stadium. The final results of that study are scheduled to be completed in the near future.

Not even three months on the job, Calipari has become an instant hit with the fans, embracing their passion and lofty expectations. He also has attracted immense media attention after hauling in what many experts claim is the No. 1 recruiting class in the nation. John Calipari was introduced as the new head coach of the men’s basketball program in April 2009.

The Southeastern Conference recently announced a historic television package with CBS and ESPN, which will provide unprecedented exposure for a collegiate athletics conference. The new deal includes SEC championship coverage of football, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, and track and field.

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“Our goals will be to make the entire Commonwealth proud of its program and proud of its team by our work on the court and our integrity off the court.” — Head Men’s Basketball Coach John Calipari

I

mplementing a vision for success cannot be achieved without planning for the future. Kentucky is already on its way to becoming one of the top athletics departments in the nation, but the blueprint for the future holds an unwavering foundation of prosperity. It would be virtually impossible to pinpoint which future initiative holds more promise and excitement for the future, but let’s start with the move that made shockwaves around the nation: the hiring of head men’s basketball coach John Calipari. When Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart set out to find the 22nd coach in program history, he sought a coach who could lead Kentucky back to its rightful position as the top basketball program in the country. In his drive to return UK to national prominence, Barnhart wanted a coach who would be an ambassador in the community, embrace the tradition and high expectations of the position, and reach out to the Big Blue fan base.

An equally impressive hire was the addition of head women’s soccer coach Jon Lipsitz. Lipsitz is renowned for his ability to breed a level of competitiveness matched by few programs. At Charlotte, Lipsitz’s teams were known for their mental toughness, explosive offense and stingy defense. Now embarking on the first year of what he calls his dream job, Lipsitz is hoping to do the same at Kentucky.

basketball on ESPN and ESPN2 each week, and expanded league championship coverage in a number of sports.

To get there, he’s outlined three basic principles that will define his team: family, legacy and finish, the last of which has been adopted by the entire athletics department. More good news for UK fans came in the announcement last August of a lucrative television deal between the Southeastern Conference, ESPN and CBS, beginning with the fall 2009 season. The 15-year contract is the biggest in the history of college athletics and will provide UK Athletics with more exposure than ever. With the new deal, ESPN’s various outlets will carry more than 5,500 SEC events over the 15-year period, including added football coverage, a second and third night of SEC

New head coach Jon Lipsitz vows to instill a new level of competitive spirit into the Kentucky women’s soccer program.

Financially, the contract with ESPN and CBS will generate more than $5 million annually in added revenues for Kentucky. But to build championship caliber teams in all sports, Kentucky must continue to provide championshipcaliber facilities. The program is currently conducting a feasibility study to determine if it can go ahead with building a new downtown basketball arena, a new campus baseball field and upgrading Commonwealth Stadium. The final results of that study are scheduled to be completed in the near future.

Not even three months on the job, Calipari has become an instant hit with the fans, embracing their passion and lofty expectations. He also has attracted immense media attention after hauling in what many experts claim is the No. 1 recruiting class in the nation. John Calipari was introduced as the new head coach of the men’s basketball program in April 2009.

The Southeastern Conference recently announced a historic television package with CBS and ESPN, which will provide unprecedented exposure for a collegiate athletics conference. The new deal includes SEC championship coverage of football, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, and track and field.

12

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“To be in the same sentence with guys like Dan Issel and the other Kentucky legends means a lot. It’s mind-boggling.” — Jodie Meeks

he messages and voice mails came in by the hundreds. Barely even a few hours after Jodie Meeks had finished torching Tennessee for a school-record 54 points, Meeks' inbox on his phone was nearly full with text messages and voice mails. Everybody wanted to congratulate Meeks on his historic game.

T

On a cold wintry night inside UT’s Thompson-Boling Arena, Meeks forever etched his name into UK basketball lore. With every shot No. 23 took – he only shot 22 times, making 15 – Meeks launched his name into the corridors of the all-time greats. Dan Issel. Ralph Beard, Cliff Hagan. Jamal Mashburn. Jodie Meeks.

But one message stood above the rest. It came from the man whose 39-year-old record Meeks had just broken. Dan Issel, Kentucky's all-time leading scorer, had called to offer Meeks his congratulations.

Just one season after battling nagging injuries, the 6-4 junior finished in the top 10 nationally in scoring with a 23.7 points per game average. In addition to his effort at Tennessee, he had two other games of 45 or more points and made the game-winning 3-pointer against Florida.

“He told me he was proud that I broke the record and that it could not have happened to a better kid,” Meeks said. Issel was more than happy to pass on one of the most hallowed records in the most storied and tradition-rich program in the country. For 30-plus years, children and grown men and women alike have ventured out to their driveways and hoisted up shots in hopes of emulating Issel. No one will ever replace the legendary Issel, but on Jan. 13, 2009, Meeks gave fans reason to “shoot it like Jodie.”

Meeks captured the school record for 3-pointers in a season (117) and led the Southeastern Conference in three statistical categories. He was tabbed a second-team All-American by several major publications, including The Associated Press and the United States Basketball Writers Association.

> All-time Wildcat basketball great Dan Issel (left) and newly minted legend Jodie Meeks share a mutual admiration for each other’s accomplishments at Kentucky. 14

15


“To be in the same sentence with guys like Dan Issel and the other Kentucky legends means a lot. It’s mind-boggling.” — Jodie Meeks

he messages and voice mails came in by the hundreds. Barely even a few hours after Jodie Meeks had finished torching Tennessee for a school-record 54 points, Meeks' inbox on his phone was nearly full with text messages and voice mails. Everybody wanted to congratulate Meeks on his historic game.

T

On a cold wintry night inside UT’s Thompson-Boling Arena, Meeks forever etched his name into UK basketball lore. With every shot No. 23 took – he only shot 22 times, making 15 – Meeks launched his name into the corridors of the all-time greats. Dan Issel. Ralph Beard, Cliff Hagan. Jamal Mashburn. Jodie Meeks.

But one message stood above the rest. It came from the man whose 39-year-old record Meeks had just broken. Dan Issel, Kentucky's all-time leading scorer, had called to offer Meeks his congratulations.

Just one season after battling nagging injuries, the 6-4 junior finished in the top 10 nationally in scoring with a 23.7 points per game average. In addition to his effort at Tennessee, he had two other games of 45 or more points and made the game-winning 3-pointer against Florida.

“He told me he was proud that I broke the record and that it could not have happened to a better kid,” Meeks said. Issel was more than happy to pass on one of the most hallowed records in the most storied and tradition-rich program in the country. For 30-plus years, children and grown men and women alike have ventured out to their driveways and hoisted up shots in hopes of emulating Issel. No one will ever replace the legendary Issel, but on Jan. 13, 2009, Meeks gave fans reason to “shoot it like Jodie.”

Meeks captured the school record for 3-pointers in a season (117) and led the Southeastern Conference in three statistical categories. He was tabbed a second-team All-American by several major publications, including The Associated Press and the United States Basketball Writers Association.

> All-time Wildcat basketball great Dan Issel (left) and newly minted legend Jodie Meeks share a mutual admiration for each other’s accomplishments at Kentucky. 14

15


“My crew is full of incredible people. I’m really blessed in the sense that they’re willing to represent the university and the athletics department the best they can.” — Donnie Mefford, Director of Sports Turf Management

> Donnie Mefford, UK’s Director of Sports Turf Management, and two members of his staff – Tommy Davis and Chuck Stivers – were honored for lifetime achievement at the 2009 CATSPY Awards.

T

hey’re the first ones there and the last ones to leave. Hours before the fans fill Commonwealth Stadium or the UK Softball Complex, Donnie Mefford and his staff are meticulously manicuring the nation’s best playing surfaces. Long after the dramatics of the game are gone and the roar of the fans has quieted, Mefford and his staff are still hard at work to make sure Kentucky’s fields are in optimum condition for the next day. The hours are long and odd, and the work isn’t glamorous. But Mefford and his 12-man crew in the sports turf management office wouldn’t have it any other way. In their eyes, it’s all worth it.

16

earned every bit of its nickname as “The hardest-working grounds crew” in the nation. Mefford, who is in his ninth year as the Sports Turf manager, oversees all grounds work at Kentucky. Behind the scenes, the crew is responsible for keeping UK’s surfaces in immaculate and safe shape. “It’s just mainly trying to go out and make the field as safe and as good as we can possibly make it,” Mefford said. “There are always things we’re faced with during the day or during the course of the season, and that’s what makes it fun. There is always something new on the horizon.”

“The most rewarding part of our job is when a student-athlete takes the time to say that they feel everything looks and plays good and that they appreciate what we’re doing,” Mefford said, “because in the end, that’s what we’re here for and who we’re here for.”

Whether it’s lining the field at Cliff Hagan Stadium for a baseball game later that evening or prepping the tennis courts for a regional tournament, the award-winning crew is on call sevendays-a-week, 24-hours-a-day.

It’s easy for outsiders to take what Mefford and his staff do for granted because Kentucky’s athletic fields and other playing surfaces always appear to be in pristine shape. But Mefford’s dedicated staff has

“My crew is full of incredible people,” Mefford said. “They care so much about what they do and I’m really blessed in the sense that they’re willing to do what it takes to represent the university and the athletics department the best they can.”

17


“My crew is full of incredible people. I’m really blessed in the sense that they’re willing to represent the university and the athletics department the best they can.” — Donnie Mefford, Director of Sports Turf Management

> Donnie Mefford, UK’s Director of Sports Turf Management, and two members of his staff – Tommy Davis and Chuck Stivers – were honored for lifetime achievement at the 2009 CATSPY Awards.

T

hey’re the first ones there and the last ones to leave. Hours before the fans fill Commonwealth Stadium or the UK Softball Complex, Donnie Mefford and his staff are meticulously manicuring the nation’s best playing surfaces. Long after the dramatics of the game are gone and the roar of the fans has quieted, Mefford and his staff are still hard at work to make sure Kentucky’s fields are in optimum condition for the next day. The hours are long and odd, and the work isn’t glamorous. But Mefford and his 12-man crew in the sports turf management office wouldn’t have it any other way. In their eyes, it’s all worth it.

16

earned every bit of its nickname as “The hardest-working grounds crew” in the nation. Mefford, who is in his ninth year as the Sports Turf manager, oversees all grounds work at Kentucky. Behind the scenes, the crew is responsible for keeping UK’s surfaces in immaculate and safe shape. “It’s just mainly trying to go out and make the field as safe and as good as we can possibly make it,” Mefford said. “There are always things we’re faced with during the day or during the course of the season, and that’s what makes it fun. There is always something new on the horizon.”

“The most rewarding part of our job is when a student-athlete takes the time to say that they feel everything looks and plays good and that they appreciate what we’re doing,” Mefford said, “because in the end, that’s what we’re here for and who we’re here for.”

Whether it’s lining the field at Cliff Hagan Stadium for a baseball game later that evening or prepping the tennis courts for a regional tournament, the award-winning crew is on call sevendays-a-week, 24-hours-a-day.

It’s easy for outsiders to take what Mefford and his staff do for granted because Kentucky’s athletic fields and other playing surfaces always appear to be in pristine shape. But Mefford’s dedicated staff has

“My crew is full of incredible people,” Mefford said. “They care so much about what they do and I’m really blessed in the sense that they’re willing to do what it takes to represent the university and the athletics department the best they can.”

17


“The KENTUCKY brand is fortunate to be represented by a stable of fantastic products. From its 22 team products to its licensed consumer products, KENTUCKY is an international and powerful brand. And, best of all, it’s getting stronger.” — Jason Schlafer, Assistant Athletics Director for Marketing and Licensing

> Kentucky’s new uniforms, custom designed by Nike Basketball’s Global Creative Director and Kentucky native Tracy Teague, were introduced at a special unveiling held at Keeneland Race Track’s Keene Barn. The blue and white checkerboard pattern that appears on the uniform was inspired by the winning colors worn by famed Triple Crown winner Secretariat. It also pays homage to Kentucky’s longstanding championship basketball tradition.

> Above, the exterior of UK’s new football team equipment truck was designed for the start of the 2008 season. At right, head coach Rich Brooks and the football program were recognized in Rupp Arena for posting a third-consecutive bowl victory.

F

ew, if any, Division I university athletic brands are more visible, popular and powerful in the public marketplace than that of Kentucky Athletics. Among the factors contributing to UK’s outstanding brand recognition are its across-the-board success in each of its 22 varsity sports as well as the unmatched loyalty and devotion of its Big Blue fan base – long the envy of other Division I programs around the nation.

> Women’s basketball coach Matthew Mitchell came to last year’s Big Blue Madness in style, riding in a circa 1949 Seagrave fire engine. Over 23,000 fans packed Rupp Arena for the first official practice of the 2008-09 men’s and women’s basketball seasons. 18

> UK Athletics honored its more than 500 student-athletes at the seventh-annual CATSPY Awards, held in April at Memorial Coliseum. Among the winners was Bingy Lara (right) from the men’s soccer team.

> Above, UK Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart presents the Keightley family with a jersey worn by the team on Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the life and career of beloved equipment manager “Mr. Wildcat,” Bill Keightley.

19


“The KENTUCKY brand is fortunate to be represented by a stable of fantastic products. From its 22 team products to its licensed consumer products, KENTUCKY is an international and powerful brand. And, best of all, it’s getting stronger.” — Jason Schlafer, Assistant Athletics Director for Marketing and Licensing

> Kentucky’s new uniforms, custom designed by Nike Basketball’s Global Creative Director and Kentucky native Tracy Teague, were introduced at a special unveiling held at Keeneland Race Track’s Keene Barn. The blue and white checkerboard pattern that appears on the uniform was inspired by the winning colors worn by famed Triple Crown winner Secretariat. It also pays homage to Kentucky’s longstanding championship basketball tradition.

> Above, the exterior of UK’s new football team equipment truck was designed for the start of the 2008 season. At right, head coach Rich Brooks and the football program were recognized in Rupp Arena for posting a third-consecutive bowl victory.

F

ew, if any, Division I university athletic brands are more visible, popular and powerful in the public marketplace than that of Kentucky Athletics. Among the factors contributing to UK’s outstanding brand recognition are its across-the-board success in each of its 22 varsity sports as well as the unmatched loyalty and devotion of its Big Blue fan base – long the envy of other Division I programs around the nation.

> Women’s basketball coach Matthew Mitchell came to last year’s Big Blue Madness in style, riding in a circa 1949 Seagrave fire engine. Over 23,000 fans packed Rupp Arena for the first official practice of the 2008-09 men’s and women’s basketball seasons. 18

> UK Athletics honored its more than 500 student-athletes at the seventh-annual CATSPY Awards, held in April at Memorial Coliseum. Among the winners was Bingy Lara (right) from the men’s soccer team.

> Above, UK Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart presents the Keightley family with a jersey worn by the team on Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the life and career of beloved equipment manager “Mr. Wildcat,” Bill Keightley.

19


“They understand this is a special opportunity to play at Kentucky. They get that and that is why I love coaching them.” — Matthew Mitchell, Head Women’s Basketball Coach

C

all it a coincidence or a string of fate, but it couldn’t have been more fitting for Carly Ormerod and Eleia Roddy to walk off the basketball court for the final time together.

That last game – a second-round Women’s National Invitation Tournament game – may seem insignificant, but to leave the hardwood healthy in their final game was a victory in itself. Roddy had four knee surgeries during her career, missing significant time her freshman and redshirt junior years, and the entire 2006-07 season. Sesamoiditis and turf toe in Ormerod’s left foot caused her to miss a combined 24 games her final two seasons. But the injuries won’t define their careers. Overcoming adversity and going on to successful careers at UK will. Roddy rebounded her senior year to become one of the most dominating players in the Southeastern Conference. The second-team All-SEC selection finished 13th in the conference in scoring (12.1 ppg) and fourth in rebounding (8.2 rpg).

Ormerod didn’t put up the numbers Roddy did, but Kentucky’s 2005 Miss Basketball provided leadership and dedication during her four years. What’s even more remarkable is the two never put school aside to get back on the court. Despite hundreds of hours in the physical therapy room, the duo still achieved success off the court. Roddy was a three-time SEC Academic Honor Roll selection and a member of the SEC Community Service Team in 2007. She gave countless hours to the Hope Center, her local church and read as a volunteer to elementary school children. Ormerod was a four-time SEC Academic Honor Roll selection, a member of the 2009 SEC Community Service team and was inducted into UK’s Frank Ham Society of Character in 2008. Among her many community service ventures, she helped organize a food drive to benefit God’s Pantry, was a frequent visitor at local hospitals and coordinated a canned food drive for UK Athletics – all while graduating an entire year early.

> In addition to overcoming injuries during their UK Hoops careers, teammates Carly Ormerod (left) and Eleia Roddy earned SEC Academic Honor Roll distinction and were members of the SEC Community Service Team. 20

21


“They understand this is a special opportunity to play at Kentucky. They get that and that is why I love coaching them.” — Matthew Mitchell, Head Women’s Basketball Coach

C

all it a coincidence or a string of fate, but it couldn’t have been more fitting for Carly Ormerod and Eleia Roddy to walk off the basketball court for the final time together.

That last game – a second-round Women’s National Invitation Tournament game – may seem insignificant, but to leave the hardwood healthy in their final game was a victory in itself. Roddy had four knee surgeries during her career, missing significant time her freshman and redshirt junior years, and the entire 2006-07 season. Sesamoiditis and turf toe in Ormerod’s left foot caused her to miss a combined 24 games her final two seasons. But the injuries won’t define their careers. Overcoming adversity and going on to successful careers at UK will. Roddy rebounded her senior year to become one of the most dominating players in the Southeastern Conference. The second-team All-SEC selection finished 13th in the conference in scoring (12.1 ppg) and fourth in rebounding (8.2 rpg).

Ormerod didn’t put up the numbers Roddy did, but Kentucky’s 2005 Miss Basketball provided leadership and dedication during her four years. What’s even more remarkable is the two never put school aside to get back on the court. Despite hundreds of hours in the physical therapy room, the duo still achieved success off the court. Roddy was a three-time SEC Academic Honor Roll selection and a member of the SEC Community Service Team in 2007. She gave countless hours to the Hope Center, her local church and read as a volunteer to elementary school children. Ormerod was a four-time SEC Academic Honor Roll selection, a member of the 2009 SEC Community Service team and was inducted into UK’s Frank Ham Society of Character in 2008. Among her many community service ventures, she helped organize a food drive to benefit God’s Pantry, was a frequent visitor at local hospitals and coordinated a canned food drive for UK Athletics – all while graduating an entire year early.

> In addition to overcoming injuries during their UK Hoops careers, teammates Carly Ormerod (left) and Eleia Roddy earned SEC Academic Honor Roll distinction and were members of the SEC Community Service Team. 20

21


“We want a competitive, broad-based athletics program. Brett and Billie Jo embrace this philosophy and truly support all 22 programs.” — Mark Coyle, Senior Associate Athletics Director for External Affairs

B

ecoming a top-15 athletics program and hanging 15 championship banners can’t happen without the support of the K Fund. The student-athletes are the backbone of Kentucky’s athletics program, but nothing is possible without the generosity and charity of people like Brett and Billie Jo Setzer – loyal K Fund members since 2002.

The Setzers have been longtime supporters of the Wildcat program. Brett, a former UK student, and Billie Jo, who received her master’s degree from UK, have been to hundreds of Wildcat sporting events over the years, ranging from gymnastics meets to volleyball matches and baseball games. Their devotion to UK sports increased in 2002 when, upon the hiring of Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart, the Setzers became K Fund donors and started to financially support a number of Kentucky’s athletic programs, including men’s golf, women’s basketball and football. Brett’s love for the Wildcat football program spans back to 1972 when he developed a friendship with former coach Fran Curci. Now, the Setzers are neighbors with current head coach Rich Brooks and his wife Karen, whom the Setzers consider close and dear friends.

Just weeks after the hiring of Brooks, Brett Setzer ran into Brooks in the Dallas airport and decided to introduce himself to his new neighbor. “I walked up and said, ‘Hey, don’t be messing up my fishing pond,’” Brett recalls. “He kind of gave me this look like, ‘who is this crazy fan?’” That crazy fan and his wife turned out to be two of Brooks’ most loyal supporters during a rough first few years when Brooks inherited a team burdened by the effects of a severe NCAA probation. Like all Wildcat football fans, they have since delighted in the program’s historic turnaround – including three consecutive bowl victories in the last three years. From that initial meeting in the airport, a special relationship blossomed. Brett and Brooks talk on the phone nearly every day, and the Setzers’ company, Brett Construction, hires some of the players in the summer as a part of an NCAA-approved offseason work program. It’s just one of the many ways the Setzers support the UK Athletics program they love so much.

< Avid supporters of UK Athletics, Brett and Billie Jo Setzer have been K Fund members since 2002. 22

23


“We want a competitive, broad-based athletics program. Brett and Billie Jo embrace this philosophy and truly support all 22 programs.” — Mark Coyle, Senior Associate Athletics Director for External Affairs

B

ecoming a top-15 athletics program and hanging 15 championship banners can’t happen without the support of the K Fund. The student-athletes are the backbone of Kentucky’s athletics program, but nothing is possible without the generosity and charity of people like Brett and Billie Jo Setzer – loyal K Fund members since 2002.

The Setzers have been longtime supporters of the Wildcat program. Brett, a former UK student, and Billie Jo, who received her master’s degree from UK, have been to hundreds of Wildcat sporting events over the years, ranging from gymnastics meets to volleyball matches and baseball games. Their devotion to UK sports increased in 2002 when, upon the hiring of Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart, the Setzers became K Fund donors and started to financially support a number of Kentucky’s athletic programs, including men’s golf, women’s basketball and football. Brett’s love for the Wildcat football program spans back to 1972 when he developed a friendship with former coach Fran Curci. Now, the Setzers are neighbors with current head coach Rich Brooks and his wife Karen, whom the Setzers consider close and dear friends.

Just weeks after the hiring of Brooks, Brett Setzer ran into Brooks in the Dallas airport and decided to introduce himself to his new neighbor. “I walked up and said, ‘Hey, don’t be messing up my fishing pond,’” Brett recalls. “He kind of gave me this look like, ‘who is this crazy fan?’” That crazy fan and his wife turned out to be two of Brooks’ most loyal supporters during a rough first few years when Brooks inherited a team burdened by the effects of a severe NCAA probation. Like all Wildcat football fans, they have since delighted in the program’s historic turnaround – including three consecutive bowl victories in the last three years. From that initial meeting in the airport, a special relationship blossomed. Brett and Brooks talk on the phone nearly every day, and the Setzers’ company, Brett Construction, hires some of the players in the summer as a part of an NCAA-approved offseason work program. It’s just one of the many ways the Setzers support the UK Athletics program they love so much.

< Avid supporters of UK Athletics, Brett and Billie Jo Setzer have been K Fund members since 2002. 22

23


I

n May 2009, the University of Kentucky Athletic Association Board of Directors approved an operating budget of $72.65 million for the fiscal year of 2009-10.

Balanced Budget $72.65 M

UKAA, which is 100 percent self-supporting and receives no state or university funds, supports the broadest program in the Southeastern Conference – 22 varsity sports – with an athletics budget that places UK in the mid-range of SEC schools. During the upcoming fiscal year, UK Athletics will donate an additional $500,000 to campus academic scholarship programs. This is on top of the $1.2 million annually that the UKAA has contributed toward the university’s general scholarship fund and in support of UK’s Singletary Scholars program, bringing the total to $1.7 million in the coming academic year. “I continue to be pleased with the financial commitment that UK Athletics makes toward our academic programs,” said UK President Lee T. Todd, Jr. “This is especially impressive and welcome given the economic environment we currently face.” Rob Mullens, deputy director of UK Athletics, reported to the board that increased revenues from the Southeastern Conference’s new television rights contract with ESPN and CBS Sports will help the department offset increased expenses in the coming year. These expenses include the

> UK Athletics boasts the broadest program in the Southeastern Conference (22 sports), yet its budget ranks as average among all 12 league schools. UK Athletics also prides itself on operating with a balanced budget ($72.65m). increased costs of athletic scholarships, which the department directly pays to the university, as well as increases in the costs of team travel, utilities and health insurance, among others. “We spend approximately 25 percent ($18 million) of our self-supporting budget back on campus and we are happy to be able to do so,” said Mullens. “UK Athletics appreciates the support of our great fan base, which enables us not only to grow the competitiveness of our teams and provide great opportunities for our student-athletes, but also gives us the chance to make very real and significant contributions toward the overall success and betterment of this great university.”

“We spend approximately 25 percent ($18 million) of our selfsupporting budget back on campus and we are happy to be able to do so.” — Rob Mullens, Deputy Director of UK Athletics 24


CONTENTS

2008-09 UK BOARD OF TRUSTEES

> Realizing his Dreams...........................................2 > Embracing the Challenge....................................4 > 2008-09 Athletic Year in Review ..........................6 > Mastering Leadership..........................................8 > Creating Lasting Memories ...............................10 > Preparing for Future Success ...........................12 > Making History ...................................................14

2

4

> Devoted to Serving ............................................16 > Marketing a Winning Brand...............................18 > Conquering Adversity........................................20 > Proudly Providing Support ...............................22 > Financial Integrity ..............................................24

8

10

(as of June 30, 2009) Mira S. Ball, Chair Stephen P. Branscum, Vice Chair Pamela T. May, Secretary Edward Britt Brockman Penelope A. Brown Jo Hern Curris Dermontti F. Dawson Ann Brand Haney James F. Hardymon Everett McCorvey Billy Joe Miles Tyler Montell Sandy Bugie Patterson Phillip R. Patton Erwin Roberts Charles R. Sachatello C. Frank Shoop JoEtta Y. Wickliffe Ernest J. Yanarella

15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CUP

2008-09 UK ATHLETIC BOARD

CREDITS

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The 2008-09 University of Kentucky Athletics Annual Report is published by the UK Athletics Association, Mitch Barnhart, Director. This publication was written and edited by Eric Lindsey, Evan Crane, Craig Hornberger and the UK Athletics Media Relations Staff. Design by Craig Hornberger. Photography by David Coyle and Team Coyle, and Cheryl Treworgy/PrettySporty.com. Printing by Welch Printing. UK Athletics Association Joe Craft Center 338 Lexington Avenue Lexington, KY 40506-0604 UKathletics.com

(as of June 30, 2009) Bruno Agostinelli Charles W. Arnold Frank Butler Charles Cassis Dermontti F. Dawson Luther Deaton Alan DeSantis Victoria Dunlap C. M. Gatton Victor Hazard Scott Kelley Kathi Kern Frank Shoop William B. Sturgill Kumble Subbaswamy Lee T. Todd, Jr. Bruce Walcott Lionel Williamson Emeritus Member S. T. Roach

BY THE YEAR 2015


15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORS’ CUP BY THE YEAR 2015 JOE CRAFT CENTER • 338 LEXINGTON AVENUE • LEXINGTON, KY 40506-0604

15 CHAMPIONSHIPS RANK IN TOP 15 OF THE DIRECTORS’ CUP BY THE YEAR 2015 2009 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY ATHLETICS ANNUAL REPORT

2009-10 UK Athletics Annual Report  
2009-10 UK Athletics Annual Report  

Annual report for the University of Kentucky Athletics Association, covering the 2009-10 seasons.

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