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ASUI-Kibbie Dome to watc h and ch eer for their favorite graduate. Approximate ly 6,500 pa r e nts, friends, spouses, a nd relatives flocked to th e bleachers on the south side of the dome. T hey were there to c heer. They were there to c ry. They we re there to revel in the spirit of the tim e. Yet as important as these well-wishers were to the graduates, perhaps t h e greatest sen se of loss was s hared among the graduates themselves. These were not m erely nameless. faceless people, passing from before one's eyes. these were students, classmates. friends. These were the

sam e p eople wh o s truggled through Math 160, squeak ed by in English 104, held on tight at the Latah County Fair carnival, waltzed until dawn at a frate rnity dance or bought the rounds at Tuesd ay two-fers. The same people who had played together. studied together and lived together, now took the final step as one - they graduated together. If it was uttered once. graduates uttered it a thousand times. "Have a good life. " That one fourword phrase signified the end of life as it was known. It signaled a parting. It represented the en d of a college career. It ushered in the funeral procession. o

Traditional toast. Jus t as traditional as the ceremony ls the unsanctloned graduation toast. James Zimmer, the ninth In hls famiJy to graduate from Idaho, toasts his parents In the stands.

Graduation

45

1986 Gem of the Mountains, Volume 84 - University of Idaho Yearbook  

1986 Gem of the Mountains, Volume 84 - University of Idaho Yearbook

1986 Gem of the Mountains, Volume 84 - University of Idaho Yearbook  

1986 Gem of the Mountains, Volume 84 - University of Idaho Yearbook