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Yolky at the Warhol M145eum

"Are you really fifty years old?" She smiled; three of her upper teeth were capped in silver. She reached the phone up to his ear with her right hand and with her left hand flipped her bra straps down. Part 9: Jenny

Jenny dropped her purse on the floor of her bedroom. Her roommate leaned in the doorway eating a raw hotdog. "So he shows up about two hours after we'd expected him. Apparently he'd gone to the movies." "You want one of these?" her roommate asked. She sat on the bed. "And I think he wanted to kiss me when he got there, but everyone was there so I backed off." "This one has no cheese. Or wait. Oh." "I pretended that I had a gift for him. It was some dumb pin my mom sent me." She flipped through her mail, pre-approved credit, student loan bills. "And there was this weird guy who showed up. No one knew who he was. He had this look on his face like he knew he terrified people but didn't know why. Like a dog that looks mean but isn't. My neighbors had a beagle that when you got close to it it would bark and growl and snap at you. One time my little brother-he was six years old-walked right over to the dog. I was watching from an upstairs window and yelling for my parents to run out and stop him, but they weren't home. I ran downstairs and out into the yard and over to the neighbor's. My brother was kneeling by the dog, rubbing its belly. The dog looked nervous and ready to pounce. He wasn't wagging his tail. He had this strained look in his eye, like he was unsure. I guess no one had ever pet him before. When I pulled my brother away, the dog reared up and pulled against the chain and started growling and barking again." "So what happened then?" her roommate said. "He died a while later." "Your brother or the dog?" Jenny looked at her. "Shit, Jen. That was supposed to be a joke. Sorry. Jesus. You even told me that before about your brother. Leukemia?" Jenny got her cell phone from her purse and plugged in the charger beside her bed. "There is something weird though about Lee. Can you have your friend run his number?" She lay on her bed in the dark with her clothes on. Another deception, she thought, having her roommate run Lee's social security and license plate numbers through the Secret Service; her roommate's ex-boyfriend worked as an agent. That deception in addition to the lies she'd been telling about publications, agents interested in her work, her contacts at Random House. Random house seemed about right to her. She was about to get up and tell her roommate not to bother; but she Summer - Fall 2006

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Profile for University of Idaho Library

Fugue 31 - Summer/Fall 2006 (No. 31)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho

Fugue 31 - Summer/Fall 2006 (No. 31)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho