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Aquaman

Of the various advantages drawn from the ability to extract breathable oxygen from seawater, we have concluded that the greatest might be ease of travel. But research shows signs of only two trips of any substantial duration. One was a honeymoon of sorts, though he seems to have explored little of either place. He noted one morning that the weather was sunnier than he'd expected, and that he felt by this betrayed. Local weather reports tend to confirm this impression, but he was in love so everything said or written at this time must be judged skeptically, or not at all. (I use the term 'ability' not 'power' because it seems, merely, an alternative used seldom to advantage, lacking the consciousness of successful manipulation or the power of production in non-normative amounts.) It's always been a numbers game. Therefore, we introduce error and we do it badly. We do this to account for a case of such unusual proclivities (read: unusual never means unique). I have yet to detect a pattern to his patterns. This troubles me. Invariably, proclivities open up possibilities, but years of fieldwork have shown that every one of us still dies alone.

[memo]

[document

a]

Summer • Fall 2006

Often, I suspect I mistake boredom for contentment. You please me, but I should indicate rather than just think that this is so. If I write, I should rely on figure, not rhetoric. If not metaphor, then simile. A good simile, after all, is easy, unlike metaphor, unlike argument, as any lover learns. You came upon me. You were a storm at sea. But you stayed, easy as simile. !25

Profile for University of Idaho Library

Fugue 31 - Summer/Fall 2006 (No. 31)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho

Fugue 31 - Summer/Fall 2006 (No. 31)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho