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FUGUE, Vol. 1, No.1

THE CANDY BAR Pamela J. Kuehne

ootsteps echo in the hall. It is the only sound. Darkness creeps further and further down the hall in a rhythmic motion. Henry's shiny black shoes are making the sound that bounces off the plain gray walls and back into his ears. He is alone. He starts to walk in a pattern down the shiny tile floor, trying to make a song with his steps: right... right, left-left, right-leftleft-left-right... left... left. He finally reaches the big steel doors and pushes them open with just enough strength so that he can slide through them without letting them touch h.im. Henry slowly nears the candy machine, the only source of light in the otherwise penetrating darkness of the room. His breath is heavy, the trip down the hall had taken a lot out of him. But to get a candy bar, it was worth it, he thought. He remembered his first days

there, when he wasn't allowed to make any trips by himself. And today, today was the first day he was allowed to, and knowing how candy was even more important to him than playing video games, it wouldn't be long before he'd be down there again. Henry revelled in this new found freedom. He was happy. The nearer and nearer he came, the more he could hear the buzz of the light of the machine, mixing with the sound of his footsteps. And as the light showing on his freckled cheeks reflected in the glass, he re alized that candy was not the only thing in the machine. Everything came rushing back to him. He had forgotten while he was walking down the hall. But now he remembered, he remembered it all. He stared at the machine, unblinking for almost two whole minutes. His eyes started to water, so he 4

Profile for University of Idaho Library

Fugue - Fall/Winter 1990 (Vol. 1, No. 1)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho

Fugue - Fall/Winter 1990 (Vol. 1, No. 1)  

The Literary Digest of the University of Idaho