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100 YEAR BOOK STAFF The College of Natural Resources 100 Year Book is published for alumni and friends of the college. For more information about the college visit www.uidaho.edu/cnr Kurt Pregitzer, dean Sara Zaske, editor/writer Steven Hacker, senior director, operations and outreach CNR ALUMNI NEWS University of Idaho 875 Perimeter Drive MS 1142 Moscow ID 83844-1142 Email: saraz@uidaho.edu Design: Beth Case, U of I Creative Services Photography: Most credits can be found next to their associated images. See back page for a listing of portraits, timeline photos, and U of I Special Collections photo numbers. Acknowledgment: We would like to thank research librarian Jeremy Kenyon and the Special Collections team at the U of I Library for their assistance in researching and locating historic photographs for this book. Cover image: Sunset in Lassen Forest, CA by Liang Wei, Ph.D. 2013


Dear CNR Colleagues and Friends: When Charles Shattuck first came to the University of Idaho in 1909, he arrived at a moment when forestry was considered “more or less of a fad — an untried experiment.” The idea that anyone working in forests needed to understand more than how to cut down a tree was almost radical. More than a hundred years later, we have seen that “untried experiment” expand from a course to department to a school and, finally, into the nationally top-ranked College of Natural Resources. This happened because of the hard work, perseverance and innovation of generations of faculty, students and friends of CNR. The college has been through tremendous growth and change — from a time when natural resources were viewed simply as something to exploit to today, when the careful management of our resources for multiple demands is paramount. Our field was also once dominated by white men, to the exclusion of many others. You will see that start to change in these pages, and I’m proud to say our college now has many women and people from diverse backgrounds as faculty and students. We need different ideas and perspectives to solve complex problems, and continuing to increase the college’s diversity will only strengthen our ability to solve the challenges facing our natural resources. Through the years, the college has remained committed to excellence and to best serving the people of Idaho and the wider world. That means we seek to not only identify problems but find practical solutions to manage natural resources in a productive and responsible way. In these pages, we have highlighted 100 leaders of the college: faculty, alumni and friends who have helped make this place great. This is only a small sample. We have thousands of great leaders associated with CNR. I have had the privilege to work with so many inspiring people and be at the helm of this college during its rise to national prominence. Now, as I take my leave into retirement, I look back with great pride at how far we have come. I know our natural resources face great challenges in the future, and there will always be those that dismiss good ideas as “a fad.” It is a conflict even older than our college. However, I have great confidence in solid science and good leadership, and I know our top faculty and graduates will continue to find the solutions we need to create an even better future. Best Wishes,

Dr. Kurt S. Pregitzer Thomas Reveley Professor and Dean


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TABLE OF CONTENTS COLLEGE TIMELINE................................................................................ 4 - 5 LIST OF DEANS......................................................................................... 6 - 7 100 LEADERS OF CNR......................................................................... 8 - 85 UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST............................ 17 MCCALL FIELD CAMPUS.......................................................................... 32 FRANKLIN H. PITKIN FOREST NURSERY.............................................38 TAYLOR WILDERNESS RESEARCH STATION.................................... 52 UNIVERITY OF IDAHO RANGELAND CENTER...................................62 A LOOK TO THE FUTURE...........................................................................86

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Kate Averett, CNR student

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1860 1870 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940

1910

1889

Charles Shattuck started planting 14-acre “arboretum hill” later named Shattuck Arboretum

University of Idaho established

1924

State Land Grant Board provided school with initial land for experimental forest

1910

Nursery started by Shattuck

1900

1870

American Fisheries Society founded

1890

1862

First Homestead Act passed

1862

Passage of the Morrill Act enables establishment of land-grant universities

1863

Idaho became a territory

Natural Resources

Idaho granted statehood

TIMELINE

Nez Perce manage natural resources in what is today’s Idaho Panhandle

1932

School received gift of 3,600 acres from Forest Development Company for experimental forest

Society of American Foresters (SAF) founded by Gifford Pinchot

1935

Wood utilization curriculum first instituted, ultimately renamed Renewable Materials

1935

1914

1908

Heyburn State Park created, oldest park in the Pacific Northwest

“Lumberman’s Forestry Course” added as an option in forestry degree

1914

Department of Forestry moved to College of Letters and Sciences; Shattuck promoted to Dean

1927

Grazing curriculum renamed Range Management

U of I forestry program accredited by SAF, one of first accredited programs in nation

1935

Botanist A.G. Tansley coined the word “ecosystem,” a concept that becomes integral to study of nature

1942

Range-Game Management program starts, eventually renamed Wildlife Management

1937

The Wildlife Society founded

1905

1917

U.S. Forest Service founded

First grazing course began

1909

Department of Forestry created in College of Agriculture

1917

Idaho Forester Magazine’s initial issue; published yearly until 1997

1939

Forestry summer camp started first on campus then moved to Payette Lake in 1940

1860 1870 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940


1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 1962

2012

McIntire-Stennis Act passed

UI Rangeland Center established

1980

1946

Master plan for “new” arboretum approved.

Bureau of Land Management established

1970

Environmental Protection Agency created

1948

Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit formed

1989

McCall Outdoor Science School (MOSS) started

1963

Cooperative Fishery Research Unit Program began

1981

1970

New Natural Resources building completed and “snag”installed

Society of Range Management founded

Wildlife and Fishery Units combined into Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

1990

2014

Northern Spotted Owl placed on endangered species list, dramatically reduced timber harvest on federal lands

Tom & Teita Reveley Building at the Pitkin Forest Nursery completed, using all Idaho wood products

2007

Fire Ecology & Management program initiated, first in the nation

1974

Wildland Recreation Management program began, currently called Natural Resource Conservation

1966

Rare and Endangered Species Act passed

2014

Environmental Science programs move into CNR

Intermountain Forest Tree Nutrition Cooperative established, now called Intermountain Forestry Cooperative

1984

1948

2001

Policy Analysis Group established by Idaho Legislature

1985

U of I range program accredited by Society of Range Management

1996

1952

Natural Resources and Ecology Program initiated, now called Ecology and Conservation Biology

Fishery Management and Wildlife Management programs started

1970

Taylor Wilderness Research Station established

1988

Aquaculture Research Institute established

2017

Kickoff of the U of I Arena Project, to be built as a showcase for mass timber construction

1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020


Kyrstan Hubbel, 2015

COLLEGE DEANS Charles H. Shattuck, Professor of Forestry 1909-1917

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Dean, College of Letters and Sciences

Francis Garner Miller

Richard E. McArdle

Dwight S. Jeffers

Ernest W. Wohletz

1914-1917

1917-1934

1934-1935

1935-1953

1953-1971

COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES


THE HISTORY OF THE NAME 1917-1953

School of Forestry 1954-1962

College of Forestry 1963-1999

College of Forestry, Wildlife and Range Sciences 2000 – PRESENT

College of Natural Resources

1917 - 2018 John C. Ehrenreich

John C. Hendee

Charles R. Hatch

Steven B. Daley-Laursen

Kurt S. Pregitzer

1971-1984

1985-1994

1995-2001

2002-2008

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CNR Archives

100 LEADERS

COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES FROM THE

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U of I Photo Services

Ben E. Bush, 1903 Ben E. Bush, 1903, earned his degree in mining engineering, but he was one of the first University of Idaho graduates to take a leading role in forestry. He worked as an agent with the state land department in charge of timber sales and went on to become the first state forester of Idaho in 1925. He served as the president of the National Association of State Foresters in 1932.

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U of I Special Collections (bottom and top right); U of I Photo Services (second row, first two photos); all other photos: Beth Case


Charles Shattuck Charles Shattuck started teaching forestry at the University of Idaho with just 11 students in 1909. His courses focused on real world experiences, taking students into forests, logging camps and mills. He had an enormous impact not only on the origins of the college, but also on the appearance of the entire university. He undertook the landscaping of the campus and was instrumental in creating the university arboretum, the first of its kind in the West. When the forestry department was transferred to the College of Letters and Sciences, Charles Shattuck became the dean of that college in 1914. The Charles Houston Shattuck Arboretum was named in his honor in 1933, two years after his death.

Clement L. Price Clement L. Price was the forest nurseryman for the University of Idaho for 25 years, beginning in 1910. Working with Charles Shattuck and student helpers, Clement planted more than 12,000 trees representing 130 species in the university arboretum. Also in collaboration with Charles Shattuck, he began the process of “growing and distributing trees at cost,� in effect creating a nursery program. The nursery received federal support in 1926 under the Clarke-McNary Act. In 1932, the university dedicated a special place within the arboretum in his honor: Price’s Green.

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Major Frank A. Fenn Major Frank A. Fenn was the supervisor of the Bitterroot National Forest from 1901 to 1927 and a great supporter of the university’s Department of Forestry in its earliest days. He not only influenced the founding of the department but also taught lectures and provided horses and equipment for field trips and studies. Charles Shattuck gave him “the greatest amount of credit” for helping to establish the new department.

Lloyd A. Fenn, 1911 Lloyd A. Fenn, 1911, was among the Department of Forestry’s first class of 11 students. The son of Major Frank A. Fenn, Lloyd went on to become a lawyer, but he never forgot what he learned at University of Idaho. He served several terms in the Idaho State Legislature and helped secure the passage of the Idaho Forestry Law in 1925. The law established the state forester office, outlined slash disposal methods and created a protective organization for all forestlands.

Clarence Favre, 1914, M.S. 1915 Clarence Favre, 1914, M.S. 1915, was the first student to receive a master’s degree in forestry from the University of Idaho. He was also a football star who played for the undefeated 1910 Vandals. Clarence went on to supervise three national forests. He also served as chief of the Intermountain Range and Wildlife Division for the U.S. Forest Service.

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U of I Photo Services

Harry E. Malmsten, 1917 Harry E. Malmsten, 1917, became the grazing examiner for the Forest Service and later an assistant professor at University of California, Berkeley in the 1920s and 1930s. He co-authored “Grazing Periods and Forage Production on the National Forests” in 1926 with Arthur Sampson, widely known as the “father” of range management. He also worked to devise better methods for full utilization of grazing resources in U.S., particularly in national forests in the Rocky Mountains.

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Rebecca Sheridan, 2016 Aaron Sparks, M.S. 2014, Ph.D. 2017

Charles Roy Stillinger, 1915 Charles Roy Stillinger, 1915, used his education at University of Idaho to become an associate pathologist for the U.S. Forest Service in the Office of White Pine Blister Rust Control. In 1957, he established a trust that helped the University of Idaho establish the Stillinger Herbarium, a regional resource specializing in the flora of Idaho and the Pacific Northwest.

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Photos: U of I Photo Services

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UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

EXPERIMENTAL FOREST Today the University of Idaho Experimental Forest (UIEF) is a network of eight properties totaling more than 10,300 acres. It includes actively managed, productive forest lands, designated natural areas and outdoor classrooms. UIEF serves multiple purposes: a research site for basic and applied research by faculty and students; a field-based education area with opportunities for hands-on learning and public outreach workshops; and an actively managed forestland that provides wood, clean water, recreation and wildlife habitat.

C.L. Billings C.L. Billings was a timber industry leader and longtime friend of the university. He was president of the Forest Development Company, a subsidiary of Weyerhaeuser. In 1932, the company gave the University of Idaho 3,600 acres on Moscow Mountain, helping to establish the university’s experimental forest.

Frances Garner Miller Frances Garner Miller was the first dean of the School of Forestry and helped build the newly established school through its formative years. During his tenure from 1917 to 1934, the school added range curriculum and acquired the experimental forest. He was active in a number of forestry associations, including the Society of American Foresters and the Idaho State Cooperative Board of Forestry. He was credited with bringing together the forestry interests of the state, industry and the U.S. Forest Service with remarkable success.

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Tom Gorman, CNR faculty

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Emera Wolford Renshaw, 1925 Emera Wolford Renshaw, 1925, was named deputy state forester of Idaho shortly after graduating from the University of Idaho School of Forestry. He served in that role for two years, then worked for many years for the U.S. Forest Service, including as a forest supervisor in 1938.

Arthur M. Sowder, 1925, M.S. 1927 Arthur M. Sowder, 1925, M.S. 1927, was named the first Extension forester when the University of Idaho first established its Extension forestry program in 1927. Among his duties, he handled the school’s tree sales. In 1930, he became an assistant professor, serving until 1936, when he joined the faculty at Michigan State University. Eventually, he moved to Washington, D.C., to become the nation’s chief Extension forester, a position he held until he retired in 1965.

Charles A. Connaughton, 1928 Charles A. Connaughton, 1928, served in the U.S. Forest Service for 43 years, rising to become regional forester of the southern region, the California region, and finally region six. He was a longtime director of the American Forestry Association. A scholarship in the College of Natural Resources is named in honor of his significant contributions to the field of forestry. In 1965, he received an honorary doctorate from the university.

George M. Jemison, 1931 George M. Jemison, 1931, was a fire research forester and part of the team that designed the first fire danger meter in the late 1930s. George started his career with the U.S. Forest Service as an assistant to Harry T. Gibson at the Priest River Research Station in Idaho before transferring to the Appalachian Station. He returned to the Northern Rocky Mountain Experiment Station in 1950 as director before rising to the position of deputy chief for research. He received an honorary doctorate from the university in 1967.

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Molly Kaweck, M.S. 2016

Vernon Young Vernon A. Young served on University of Idaho’s range management faculty in the 1930s and 1940s and was influential in creating the Society for Range Management in 1946. He mentored many successful students, including Harold Heady, 1938, who went on to become a leader in the Society for Range Management.

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CNR Archives

Harold F. Heady, 1938 Harold F. Heady, 1938, was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley from 1951 to 1984 and had an extraordinary impact on the field of range management ecology. He authored or coauthored more than 160 publications, including the 1975 textbook “Range Management.� He was an early officer of the Society for Range Management. He received many awards over his career, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and two Fulbright Fellowships. To ensure his legacy would continue, Harold, along his wife Ruth, established the Heady Professorship of Rangeland Ecology at the University of Idaho in 1994, now the Heady Chair of Rangeland Ecology.

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Miguel Vieira

Joshua Miller, 2013

Ernest E. Hubert Ernest E. Hubert served as the dean of the School of Forestry after the death of Francis Miller in 1925. A research pathologist, Ernest helped address the spread of the white pine blister rust fungus in trees and plants in Idaho from British Columbia. He was also a student of Native American history and the Nez Perce Tribe adopted him as an honorary member in 1935.

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Jeff Albright

Kenneth E. Hungerford, 1938 Kenneth E. Hungerford, 1938, graduated from University of Idaho and returned as an instructor in 1946, advancing to full professor and head of the wildlife management department. His research interests included pocket gophers, rough grouse and the radio tracking of deer. He also worked to develop new biometeorology and environmental law curricula.

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Courtesy of Clara Bleak

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R.H. Rutledge, 1938 R.H. Rutledge worked in the U.S. Forest Service for many years, including as the supervisor of two national forests in Idaho. He was appointed district and then regional forester serving Ogden, Utah, from 1920 to 1938. In 1939, he was selected to head the Grazing Service, one of the predecessor agencies of the Bureau of Land Management. He had a great love of what was then known as the Idaho Primitive Area, now known as the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, and he fought to preserve it. He was awarded an honorary master’s degree in 1938.

Morton R. Brigham, 1939 Morton R. Brigham, 1939, had a long career in wood products and was an active conservationist for more than 40 years. He worked for Potlatch Forests until 1952, and was a private consulting engineer for wood product manufacturing plants around the world until he retired in the 1980s. Morton was also instrumental in many grassroots environmental causes. He worked with the Montana Wilderness association to set aside the headwaters of the Selway River. He served on the River of No Return Wilderness Council and was a founding member of the Hells Canyon Preservation Society. He was named Conservationist of the Year in 1957 by the Idaho Wildlife Federation.

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Landon Goolsby, 2018

Charles Poulton, 1939, M.S. 1948 Charles Poulton, 1939, M.S. 1948, was a pioneer in remote sensing. He served 25 years on the faculty of Oregon State University, where he was the first head of the university’s range management department. With NASA funding, Charles led the Environmental Remote Sensing Laboratory. Later he left academia to provide international consulting on remote sensing, work which took him to 18 countries on five continents.

Grant A. Harris, M.S. 1941 Grant A. Harris, M.S. 1941, worked for the U.S. Forest Service for 10 years and served as the superintendent of the Vigilante Range Experiment Station. He earned his doctorate at Utah State in range ecology and returned to the Palouse, where he chaired Washington State University’s Department of Forestry and Range Management from 1967 until 1980. The Washington State Forestry Conference honored him with the Outstanding Service Award in 1980. In his retirement, he served as board chair for Decagon Devices, an ecological instrumentation firm now known as the METER Group. 26

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Glyn Lowe

Philip C. Habib, 1942 Philip C. Habib, 1942, has been called one of the “pre-eminent career diplomats in American post-war history.” While Philip started out as a forestry grad, his experiences in World War II changed the course of his career. He joined the U.S. Foreign Service and had a hand in halting the escalation of the Vietnam War. During President Jimmy Carter’s administration, he helped negotiate the Camp David accords. In 1980, he came out of retirement to serve as President Ronald Reagan’s Middle East envoy, helping negotiate peace in that region more than once. While his career took him far from forestry, Philip always had a fondness for his university days and maintained a strong connection to the college, often visiting campus, participating in events and leading fundraising efforts.

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U of I Photo Services

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Roger Guernsey, 1947 Roger Guernsey, 1947, knew he wanted to be a forester in the seventh grade. He fulfilled that dream at University of Idaho, graduating with a forestry degree and going on to become Idaho’s chief state forester, a position he held for nearly two decades. In 1987, Roger and his wife, Billie Lou, gave 47.5 acres of family-owned land near Princeton to the university to help students and tree farmers learn about forestry. The land is now known as the Roger Guernsey Outdoor Classroom.

Vernon Burlison, 1943, M.S. 1949 Vernon Burlison, 1943, M.S. 1949, was a University of Idaho Extension forester for 27 years. His career started in 1946 as an assistant instructor and assistant Extension forester, and in 1951 he became the Extension forester. Vernon worked extensively with the 4-H program and helped develop youth resource camp programs in Idaho. He wrote several books and pamphlets about trees in Idaho and helped promote the Idaho Christmas Tree Growers Association. He is pictured here passing out trees and tools for a high school project in 1953, when students planted 5,000 trees on the shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene.

Bruce E. Colwell, 1950 Bruce E. Colwell, 1950, was employed in the forest products industry for 44 years, holding a variety of positions from forester and logging superintendent up to division manager and group vice president. He was responsible for managing 1.7 million acres of corporation timberlands as well as manufacturing plants in several states including Idaho, Washington, Oregon and California. In 1975, he was elected into the University of Idaho Alumni Hall of Fame. He has also established a scholarship to benefit College of Natural Resources students. He received an honorary doctorate from the university in 1984.

Herald Nokes, 1950 Herald Nokes, 1950, became a physician after graduating from the College of Natural Resources, but natural resources always remained close to his heart. He managed the Nokes Tree Farm near McCall for many years, and in 2005 he and his wife Donna, also an alumna, donated 1,650 acres of undeveloped forestland to become part of the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The land is currently managed by the Nokes family but will eventually transition to the university to benefit research and generations of future students.

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Philip Higuera, former CNR faculty


Lee Sharp Lee Sharp served nearly 40 years as a University of Idaho range resources faculty member starting in 1949. He served as academic chair and department head. Lee also initiated grazing studies on a field station near Malta, Idaho. He led this collaborative, long-term research effort among the Bureau of Land Management, local ranchers and the university to test various methods and grazing intensities. In 1984, the station was renamed in his honor as the Lee A. Sharp Experimental Area.

Elwood Bizeau, M.S. 1951 Elwood Bizeau, M.S. 1951, is best known for his pioneering research on sandhill cranes and endangered whooping cranes. He worked for state wildlife agencies in Idaho and Wyoming for 18 years before becoming a University of Idaho professor of fish and wildlife resources. From 1976 to 1990, he worked closely with researchers in Idaho, Wyoming and Canada to increase the whooping crane population from 49 to more than 200. Elwood won numerous awards for his work, including the American Motors Conservation Award in 1977 and the Idaho Wildlife Society’s Professional Wildlife Biologist Award in 1987.

Stewart Brandborg, M.S. 1951 Stewart Brandborg, M.S. 1951, helped assure the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 as executive director of The Wilderness Society. He was devoted to the preservation of wilderness lands and was successful in helping preserve more than 100 million acres in Alaska as part of the national park, national forest, wildlife refuge and wilderness systems. Stewart is also known for leading a three-year fight in the 1970s against the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, resulting in a precedent-setting case in which a court found that the pipeline violated the 1969 National Environmental Policy Act.

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Photos: U of I Photo Services

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UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

McCALL FIELD CAMPUS Located on Payette Lake in Idaho, the McCall Field Campus is almost as old as the college itself. The university first gained access to the 14-acre site in 1938 and started running a rustic forestry summer camp in 1942 that lasted until the 1990s. In 2001, the campus was reinvented, after a key gift from Clara Bleak, as home to the McCall Outdoor Science School (MOSS), the only publically operated K-12 residential outdoor school in Idaho. Now, more than 2,500 children participate every year in the hands-on scientific experiences offered at MOSS. The campus also hosts a unique graduate program in environmental education and science communication, allowing graduate students to learn through field-based activities to teach youth and others about science and the environment. The ongoing goal for the McCall Field Campus is to create a year-round education and resource facility that offers a unique place for students of any learning style. The college is currently working to start an undergraduate forestry summer program with a focus on hands-on education and research.

Fred D. Johnson, M.S. 1952 Fred D. Johnson, M.S. 1952, was a professor of forest resources and managed the McCall Field Campus for nearly 30 years, overseeing generations of students at the forestry summer camp. He was passionate about teaching and won five College of Forestry Teacher of the Year awards. He wrote “Wild Trees of Idaho,� a primer for the identification and natural history of 88 species of native and naturalized Idaho trees. Fred also brought tropical dendrology and ecology to the College of Natural Resources. He received an honorary doctorate from the university in 2009.

Clara Bleak, 1946 Clara Bleak, 1946, earned her degree in art at the University of Idaho, but her strong interest in environmental education has made her a longtime friend of the College of Natural Resources. Clara helped jumpstart the McCall Outdoor Science School by creating the Clara Beak Endowment for Innovations in Environmental Education in 2000. She also established a fund honoring her late husband, the Ralph M. Bleak Memorial Endowment, which suports students training in field research and monitoring techniques at the Taylor Wilderness Research Station.

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Harold “Red” Thomas, 1951 Harold “Red” Thomas, 1951, and partner Art Troutner founded the Trus Joist company in the 1960s, which is credited with pioneering a type of engineered lumber that revolutionized the wood products industry. The company even developed the roof system for the University of Idaho’s Kibbe dome when it was built in 1971. Trus Joist’s success spanned four decades, and recently a company descended from Trus Joist, RedBuilt, named in honor of Red, was launched in Boise. Red is known for his philanthropy and his part in developing the Kodiak aircraft for use in humanitarian applications. For his many achievements, he was inducted into the University of Idaho Alumni Hall of Fame in 1989.

Benjamin A. Jayne, 1952 Benjamin A. Jayne, 1952, was an accomplished student and an outstanding football player who was once named to the All-American junior college football team. After graduating from the University of Idaho with a wood utilization degree, Benjamin went on to earn a doctorate from Yale University. He wrote numerous publications dealing with wood properties and taught at many top universities, including Yale, the University of Washington and Duke University, where he was the dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Prior to retirement, he held the Morris Goddard Chair of Forestry at Pennsylvania State University.

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Delmar Vail, 1953 Delmar Vail, 1953, had an exceptional 38-year career with the Bureau of Land Management. Among his achievements, Del managed BLM lands in the California Desert, where he played a role in establishing the Desert Ranger Force. He started his career as a range conservationist at the Burley District in Idaho. He held multiple leadership positions in Idaho, California, Utah and Wyoming before serving at the bureau’s Washington, D.C., headquarters as the assistant director and later deputy director for Lands and Renewable Resources. He served as the BLM Idaho state director from 1985 to 1994.

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U of I Photo Services

Minoru Hironaka, 1954 Minoru Hironaka, 1954, earned a worldwide reputation in plant ecology during his long career as a range ecologist in the College of Natural Resources from 1954 to 1992. Min is best known for his contributions to the ecology of sagebrush-grass vegetation, soil-vegetation relations, range weed and plant succession. His work had a great influence on rangeland management in the Intermountain Region. In 2000, he received the prestigious Renner Award from the Society for Range Management.

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CNR Archives

U of I Photo Services


UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

FRANKLIN H. PITKIN FOREST NURSERY Starting in 1910, the nursery facilities predate the college. Today, the Pitkin Forest Nursery produces nearly 400,000 seedlings annually while serving as a hands-on learning center for students. The mix of tree production and education was at the heart of the nursery from its inception, when the university’s first nurseryman Clement Price worked with Charles Shattuck and many students to plant 12,000 trees to establish the university’s arboretum. The Clark-McNary Act of 1926 helped expand the Forest Nursery. In 1939, Frank Pitkin was appointed nursery manager, and during his 40-year tenure, he expanded the nursery and helped educate generations of students. In 1956, the college bought Parker Farm along the Troy Highway and developed nursery beds and other buildings. In 1978, Pitkin started construction of two fiberglass greenhouses at Parker Farm. In 1981, that nursery site was dedicated in his memory. Building on this legacy, the 2000-square foot Tom and Teita Reveley Nursery Facility was constructed in 2014, with the support of many individual and industry donors. In the spirit of the nursery, the new facility is a teaching tool and showcase for best practices in the industry.

Franklin H. Pitkin, 1939 , M.F. 1958 Franklin H. Pitkin, 1939, M.F. 1958, known as “Pit” to generations of students, was a professor of forest management, leader of the University of Idaho Experimental Forest and head of the forest nursery, a position he held starting the year he graduated in 1939. Pit is also responsible for the famous whitebark pine snag that stands in the middle of the College of Natural Resources building. He helped select the snag, oversaw its harvest, delivery and installation in the new building in 1970. In 1989, the Parker Farm nursery site was dedicated in Pit’s memory, and in 2002, the production nursery was also renamed in his honor.

Thomas Reveley, 1959 Thomas Reveley, 1959, started his career in the wood products industry at Weyerhaeuser before he joined Merrill Lynch, where he rose to become the managing director of wealth management. Tom has remained deeply involved with his alma mater, serving on the Foundation board and the college advisory board. Tom and his wife, Teita, made key donations to the college, including establishing the Reveley Professorship, the first named professorship at the university, and the Reveley Geospatial Laboratory for Environmental Dynamics. Because of their strong support, the new classroom and nursery facility at the Pitkin Forest Nursery was also named in their honor. In 2014, Tom was presented with the University of Idaho President’s Medallion.

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Paul Dalke Paul Dalke was the first leader of the Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, a specially formed program that conducts research to better understand and preserve Idaho’s wildlife resources. Paul was a professor of wildlife management at the University of Idaho from 1948 to 1967 and conducted research related to elk, deer and sage grouse.

Rupert E. Andrews, 1956 Rupert E. Andrews, 1956, was the first graduate of the college’s fisheries management program. He went on to a 23-year career with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, serving 13 years as the director of the sport fish division. After retirement, Rupert served on the Alaska Board of Fisheries, the Board of Forestry, and the Trails and Recreation Commission.

Theodore C. Bjornn, M.S. 1957 Theodore C. Bjornn, M.S. 1957, earned international recognition as an expert on Pacific Northwest cutthroat trout, salmon and steelhead through his 35-year career at University of Idaho. Ted was on the college’s fish and wildlife faculty from 1966 to 2001 and served as the assistant leader of the Idaho Cooperative Fishery Unit. He had a profound impact on the management of the region’s fisheries and on the development of many natural resource professionals.

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42 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES U of I Photo Services

Kyrstan Hubbel, 2015

U of I Photo Services


Kendall L. Johnson, 1957 Kendall L. Johnson, 1957, studied and promoted the responsible use of rangelands on three continents. He was a range management faculty member and department head at the college from 1988 to 2002. He wrote the book “Rangeland Resources of Utah,” which became a standard reference in the profession, as well as “Rangeland through Time,” a classic publication documenting ecological change. He was also active in the Society for Range Management, serving as Utah and Wyoming president and as general president. He received SRM’s highest honor, the Frederic G. Renner award, in 2016.

Russell H. Hudson, M.F. 1957 Russell H. Hudson, M.F. 1957, has a gene archive in the University of Idaho Experimental Forest named after him. In the 1960s, he helped organize the Inland Empire Tree Improvement Cooperative, which helped private and public landowners work to identify, preserve and propagate genetically superior trees. Starting with ponderosa pine, the program expanded to include Western white pine, Western larch, Douglas fir and lodgepole pine. Russ led the group until 1985 when he was promoted to timberlands manager for Champion International.

John D. Hunt, 1959, M.F. 1961 John D. Hunt, 1959, M.F. 1961, is an emeritus professor and former head of University of Idaho’s Department of Resource Recreation and Tourism. He is best known for his research on the concepts of the image of tourist destinations, community tourism planning and the evaluation of tourism marketing. He served and advised many international organizations including the United Nations, the World Tourism Organization, Australian Tourism Commission, the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service to name just a few.

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44 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Michelle Benedum, CNR graduate student


Barbara Rupers, 1963 Barbara Rupers, 1963, was the first woman to graduate from the College of Natural Resources. Several women before her had studied forestry at University of Idaho, but none had achieved a diploma. However, even with her degree in hand, she found it difficult to find a job in forestry as a woman, so she became a high school science teacher in Oregon. Still, Barbara started a trend: the year she graduated, two more women enrolled who ultimately earned their degrees, and many more have followed since.

Leonard Marchand, M.S. 1965 Leonard Marchand, M.S. 1965, was ready for a career in forestry after graduating from the University of Idaho, but politics called him in another direction. A member of the Okanagan Nation, Leonard was appointed assistant to the minister of citizenship and immigration in Ottawa, Canada, the year he graduated. He was the first person from the First Nations to hold that position. In 1968, he was the first First Nations member elected to the Canadian House of Commons. From 1976 to 1979, Leonard served as minister of the environment where he drew upon his education to deal with issues such as the effect of acid rain on soil and forests, and the impact of a potential oil port on the British Columbian coast. In 1984, he was appointed to the Canadian Senate, serving more than a decade before retiring in 1998.

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Mckenna Sell, CNR student

U.S. Sen. James E. Risch, 1965, J.D. 1968 U.S. Sen. James E. Risch, 1965, J.D. 1968, R-Idaho, earned a bachelor’s in forest resources before attending the University of Idaho’s College of Law. He started his career as an Ada County prosecuting attorney and served 11 terms in the Idaho Senate. He was elected lieutenant governor twice, and served as the state’s 31st governor before being elected to the U.S. Senate in 2009.

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Dale H. Bosworth, 1966 Dale H. Bosworth, 1966, began his career as a forester in St. Joe National Forest and rose to become the regional forester for the Northern region. He served as the 15th chief of the U.S. Forest Service. In 2003, he received the U.S. President’s Distinguished Rank Award. Dale is also credited with bringing the U.S. Forest Service’s wildland fire suppression organization up to a high level of readiness, controlling 99 percent of all fires at small sizes.

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48 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES Aaron Murdock, 2018

Megan Riley, M.S. 2016


Gary R. Evans, 1964, M.S. 1967 Gary R. Evans, 1964, M.S. 1967, had a 36-year career in the USDA, serving for seven years as the chief scientist for global change issues for the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, as well as the director of the Natural Resources Institute of the Agricultural Research Service. Upon his retirement from the USDA in 1999, the Univeristy of Idaho Alumni Association honored Gary with its Silver and Gold Award.

Stephen McCool, 1965 Stephen McCool, 1965, is known for his work in sustainable tourism. He is an emeritus professor from the University of Montana, where he worked from 1977 to 2010. He has written numerous books, including “Tourism, Recreation and Sustainability,” and the textbook “Tourism in National Parks.” He is also the co-author of the IUCN Guidelines “Sustainable Tourism in Protected Areas.” In 2005, the U.S. Forest Service honored McCool with its Excellence in Wilderness Research award.

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CNR

Landon Goolsby, 2018

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J. Wayne Burkhardt, 1964, M.S. 1967, Ph.D. 1969 J. Wayne Burkhardt, 1964, M.S. 1967, Ph.D. 1969, is an internationally recognized authority on the Great Basin’s arid rangelands. A professor emeritus with the University of Nevada, Reno, he has been involved in many aspects of rangeland management for nearly four decades, including teaching, research, extension and public land policy. After retirement, he and his wife opened Ranges West, a private rangeland consulting firm in Idaho.

Alma H. Winward, Ph.D. 1970 Alma H. Winward, Ph.D. 1970, was a national leader in range management and earned the nickname “Mr. Sagebrush.” He worked as a regional ecologist for the Intermountain Region of the U.S. Forest Service for 23 years, beginning in 1980. His work helped increase understanding and management of riparian zone ecology as well as the role of sagebrush, which covers about 100 million acres in the West.

Albert W. Franzmann, Ph.D. 1971 Albert W. Franzmann, Ph.D. 1971, conducted research on big horn sheep at the University of Idaho before becoming a wildlife research biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. He was named director of the Kenai Moose Research Center and was a professor of wildlife management at the University of Alaska. He was also a founding member of the North American Moose Foundation. In 2001, he received the Lifetime Conservationist Award from the Kenai Peninsula Chapter of the Safari Club International. In 2004, he was elected to the university’s Alumni Hall of Fame.

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Photo courtesy of Clara Bleak

CNR Archives Photo courtesy of Clara Bleak

Janet DeVlieg Pope, 2011 Janet DeVlieg Pope has made many contributions to the college, and in particular to Taylor Wilderness Research Station, which would not be what it is today without her support and hard work. Janet first visited the station in the 1990s with her future husband, Jim Pope, Sr. who had been flying helicopter missions in and out of Taylor since 1975. In 2004, Janet and Jim worked to complete the DeVlieg Cabin, airlifting in materials and volunteering hundreds of hours of time to create a meeting place and home for researchers and students working in the middle of the wilderness. In addition, through the DeVlieg Foundation, Janet has helped fund numerous research and field experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students at Taylor. She received an honorary doctorate from the university in 2011.

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Photo courtesy of Clara Bleak

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

TAYLOR WILDERNESS RESEARCH STATION No other university has a research facility quite like the Taylor Wilderness Research Station in central Idaho, which is surrounded by 4 million acres of wilderness. To reach the station, located in the heart of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, researchers, students and visitors must fly in or hike for three days, but it is exactly this remote location which makes Taylor such an outstanding place for education and research. Maurice Hornocker famously started mountain lion studies in the region and helped bring the 65-acre property to the University of Idaho. Following his work, faculty and students have engaged in numerous studies at Taylor, including plant identification, wildlife surveys, stream ecology and the impact of wildfire. A host of environmental monitoring activities are also underway at the station. The station provides research sites not only for university faculty but also for researchers from NOAA, Idaho Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, among many others. Dozens of students from high school up to graduate school visit the station every year to participate in hands-on research and education.

Maurice Hornocker Maurice Hornocker is well known for his research on big cats. He was also instrumental in establishing the Taylor Wilderness Research Station. A professor of wildlife resources and leader of the Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit from 1968 to 1985, Maurice often flew out to a remote ranch to conduct mountain lion research and became friends with the ranch’s owner, Jess Taylor. In 1969, Jess agreed to sell the ranch to the university for $100,000, and the college gained 65-acres in the middle of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness for research and education. Maurice conducted pioneering research on big cats in North America and around the world, including leopards, jaguars and tigers, often photographing his subjects for National Geographic and other publications. In 1985, he established the Hornocker Wildlife Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to wildlife research and education.

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Derrick Brutel Tom Koerner

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John C. Seidensticker, Ph.D. 1973 John C. Seidensticker, Ph.D. 1973, is considered one of the world’s most prominent tiger conservationists. He is an emeritus scientist with the Smithsonian National Zoological Park and Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Throughout his career, he has studied and worked to protect wild tigers, leopards, giant pandas, sloth bears and other carnivores. He pioneered the use of radio telemetry to study large, wide-ranging species, and was the first to use it to study wild tigers and leopards in Asia. He has also served as chair of the Save the Tiger Fund Council and as an independent advisor to the Global Tiger Initiative, helping guide the strategy to double the number of wild tigers.

John W. Connelly, 1974 John W. Connelly, 1974, has studied sage grouse and sagebrush ecosystems for more than 40 years, primarily as a wildlife research biologist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. He is a certified wildlife biologist and has worked on grouse conservation issues at national and international scales. He is an active member in The Wildlife Society, including serving as president of the Northwest Chapter. In addition to his bachelor’s in wildlife resources from University of Idaho, he holds a master’s and doctorate from Washington State University.

Steven Amstrup, M.S. 1975 Steven Amstrup, M.S. 1975, is an internationally renowned polar bear researcher. He is currently the chief scientist for Polar Bears International. Prior to joining PBI, he served as a research wildlife biologist with the USGS at the Alaska Science Center in Anchorage, where he led polar bear research for more than 30 years. In addition to his master’s in wildlife management from the University of Idaho, Steven holds a bachelor’s in forestry from University of Washington and a doctorate in wildlife management from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

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Aaron Sparks, M.S. 2014, Ph.D. 2017

Seth Chaffee, 2018

Leon Neuenschwander Leon Neuenschwander helped start the college’s fire program and taught many leaders in the fire profession. He joined University of Idaho’s faculty in 1976 and served as the college’s associate dean for research from 1986 to 1994. As a noted fire ecologist, Leon often served as a national spokesperson for the restoration of fire’s role in forest ecosystems. He was honored in 2007 by the Association for Fire Ecology with the Harold Biswell Lifetime Achievement Award in Fire Ecology and Management.

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U of I Photo Services

John H. Ehrenreich John H. Ehrenreich served as dean from 1971 to 1984, helping the college expand and navigate a time of great social and technological change. He oversaw the establishment of departments within the college in 1979. During his tenure, the college added the Clark Fork Field Campus near Lake Pend Oreille and the Taylor Wilderness Research Station. John was instrumental in hiring women faculty members. He also broadened the college’s reach by establishing a relationship with China’s Ministry of Forestry, which became the foundation for a scholarly exchange program that benefited the entire university. He established the college’s international program, which helps faculty participate in overseas development projects.

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Doug Smith, NPS

Mongo

Paul R. Krausman, Ph.D. 1976 Paul R. Krausman, Ph.D. 1976, is an emeritus professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. He also held the Boone and Crocket professorship at the University of Montana. His research focused on the ecology and management of large mammals, and Paul contributed greatly to wildlife management and conservation in the Southwest. He was inducted into the University of Idaho’s Hall of Fame in 2003. A former president of The Wildlife Society, Paul received the Aldo Leopold Memorial Award in 2006. He is the editor-in-chief of the Society’s Journal of Wildlife Management.

Evelyn Merrill, M.S. 1978 Evelyn Merrill, M.S. 1978, was the first woman enrolled in the college’s wildlife master’s degree program, and she is now a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta, Canada. She has conducted research on cervid foraging and habitat ecology for 35 years in a diversity of ecosystems across North America, including the Mount St. Helens blast zone. Her research has included trophic dynamics of wolf-elk-grassland systems in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta; industrial development on elk habitat effectiveness; ungulate foraging and habitat ecology; predator-prey relationships; and the spread of chronic wasting disease in heterogeneous landscapes. She is the past president of the Canadian section of The Wildlife Society and the former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Wildlife Management.

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Amanda Holmes, 2015

Victor Bullen, 1978 Victor Bullen, 1978, joined the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in 1993 and rose to the position of agency environmental coordinator, providing leadership in the development and implementation of the agency’s environmental policies with a focus on staff training. Victor served on White House and interagency commissions and boards, such as the Coral Reef Task Force and the National Invasive Species Council, and acted as USAID’s liaison with the President’s Council on Environmental Quality. Prior to USAID, Victor was a program officer at World Wildlife Fund-U.S.

Winifred Kessler Winifred Kessler is a certified wildlife biologist and former president of The Wildlife Society who began her impressive 40-year career as a member of the University of Idaho’s wildlife faculty from 1976 to 1984. She went on to work at Utah State University and the University of Northern British Columbia. She served 21 years with the U.S. Forest Service in several positions, rising to become Alaska regional director for wildlife fisheries ecology, watershed and subsistence management, before retiring from the service in 2010. The Wildlife Society honored Wini Kessler in 2017 with the Aldo Leopold Memorial Award.

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U of I Photo Services

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Curt Berklund, 1977 Curt Berklund, the national director of the Bureau of Land Management from 1973 to 1977, had deep ties to Idaho. Curt grew up in a family of loggers in the upper peninsula of Michigan, and in 1952 the family moved to Cottonwood, Idaho, to log big pine timber. He also owned and operated sawmills in Elk City and St. Maries, Idaho, before serving in the Department of the Interior and ultimately becoming the BLM national director. After retiring, he moved back to the Spokane area and established research funding at the University of Idaho benefitting College of Natural Resources students. He received an honorary doctorate from the university in 1977.

Leonard N. “Bud” Purdy, 1978 Leonard N. “Bud” Purdy, the owner of Picabo Livestock Ranch, was a longtime friend of the university. Bud was instrumental in establishing the Cattle Association and served on a number of industry-related councils including the Idaho Rangeland Committee and the National BLM Advisory Council. Education was also very important to him, and he served as the president of the University of Idaho Foundation. He received an honorary doctorate from the university in 1978 and was inducted into the University of Idaho Alumni Hall of Fame in 2013.

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62 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES Timothy Link, CNR faculty

Amanda Gearhart, M.S. 2005

Amanda Holmes, 2015


UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

RANGELAND CENTER Established in 2012, the Uinversity of Idaho Rangeland Center is not so much a place as an idea: the idea collaboration will help create the best solutions to address the complex challenges of our rangelands. And we have a lot of rangeland: Half of the entire Earth’s land surface, including half of Idaho, is rangeland. The center brings together researchers from multiple disciplines, educators, students and land managers to tackle these challenges by discovering new knowledge and finding science-based solutions as well as offering information and learning opportunities.

Jeff Foss, 1980 Jeff Foss, 1980, is the former deputy state director of resources for the Bureau of Land Management. He had a distinguished 35-year federal career, marked by his ability to foster coalitions among diverse stakeholders. Before joining BLM, Jeff worked for the U.S. Forest Service in a variety of positions in Utah, Idaho and Alaska. He also worked as a director for the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Office responsible for conservation of plants, wildlife and fish listed under the Endangered Species Act. In 2015, he was honored with the Department of the Interior Meritorious Service Award. Jeff continues to serve his alma mater and the state as an advisory board member to the University of Idaho Rangeland Center.

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Andrew Nelson, CNR faculty

Vincent Corrao, 1981 Vincent Corrao, 1981 is the CEO, founder and president of Northwest Management, a forest and environmental management firm. Vincent, who earned his degree in forest resources management, leads emerging market development and works with Native American clientele as well as developing business operations. With more than 35 years of forestry experience, he continues to give back to his alma mater by serving on the College of Natural Resources Advisory Board.

William Miller, 1977, M.S. 1981 William Miller, 1977, M.S. 1981, co-founded the Environmental News Network (ENN.com) in 1993 and as CEO helped it grow to become a leading source of environmental information on the internet. Under Will’s leadership, the network produced many media products for National Geographic, NOAA, Turner Broadcasting and others. Following ENN, Will opened up his own consulting business, providing design, planning and regulatory services for environmental restoration and conservation projects.

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Isaac Cook, CNR student

Russell T. Graham, M.S. 1977, Ph.D. 1981 Russell T. Graham, M.S. 1977, Ph.D. 1981, is a leader in silviculture with more than 40 years of experience in research with the Rocky Mountain Research Station. He started his career with the U.S. Forest Service in 1966, working summers in the Black Hills National Forest in Wyoming, ultimately becoming a research forester with the Intermountain Research Station in Moscow. His work has included topics such as wildfire behavior, land management and polices, and wildlife. He has a long history of educational outreach and has mentored more than 40 graduate students. He received University of Idaho’s Distinguished Alumni Service Award in 1987 and the Natural Resources Education Award in 2002.

William E. J. “WEJ” Paradice, Ph.D. 1981 William E. J. “WEJ” Paradice, Ph.D. 1981, first joined the Hunter Valley Research Center in 1982 when there was just one computer and a small staff. WEJ rose from that first position as a research officer to become CEO of the nonprofit for nearly 30 years and helped transform the regional center in Maryville, Australia, into a research powerhouse, providing assistance to business, government, community groups and other organizations.

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Matt Fisk, M.S. 2016

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John Y. Takekawa, M.S. 1983 John Y. Takekawa, M.S. 1983, is a research ecologist who has conducted studies on a wide range of issues, including avian influenza transmission, coastal ecosystem response to climate change, salt pond ecology and wetland restoration. John also served as the director of bird conservation in the National Audubon Society’s science division. He is a USGS scientist emeritus and founded the USGS Western Ecological Research Center field station on the San Francisco Bay, developing it from a one-person office to more than 30 full-time staff.

Michael D. Samuel, M.S. 1985, Ph.D. 1984 Michael D. Samuel, M.S. 1985, Ph.D. 1984, is a wildlife ecology professor at the University of Wisconsin and specializes in wildlife disease ecology. He earned a master’s in applied statistics at University of Idaho at the same time he completed his doctorate in wildlife management. His research projects focus on questions related to disease transmission, disease reservoirs, host ecology, the impacts of disease on wildlife populations and epidemiological modeling. He has also served as the assistant unit leader of the Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit.

Ed Bowles, M.S. 1986 Ed Bowles, M.S. 1986, has led the fish division of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for more than 17 years. In this role, he developed and implemented key policies directing native fish conservation and hatchery management, federal recovery planning and marine resources conservation. Before moving to Oregon, Ed directed the salmon and steelhead recovery program for Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Murray D. Feldman, M.S. 1986 Murray D. Feldman, M.S. 1986, is recognized as one of the nation’s leading attorneys in the environmental field. A partner at Holland & Hart, Murray advises clients on the major laws affecting natural resources and environmental matters, including the Endangered Species Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Clean Air and Clean Water acts. He has worked on client projects and federal court cases throughout the Pacific Northwest and eight other states. He is also the author of the book “Idaho Wilderness Considered,” and more than 20 seminal articles on the application and implication of the ESA and NEPA, legal consequences of climate change, landownership and land use conflict, mining, and river and water laws.

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David Iliff

[p.70-71 two bios could use more panda pictures in scenic/panda and/or generic scenic of a national park scenic/Yosemite…]

Gary E. Machlis Gary E. Machlis is the former science advisor to the director of the National Park Service and was a faculty member in the College of Natural Resources from 1979 to 2013. Gary has conducted studies in over 130 U.S. National Parks and been active in international conservation. In the 1980s, he worked on the Giant Panda Project in China for the World Wildlife Fund. He has also conducted research in the Galápagos Islands, Kenya and Eastern Europe. He has written numerous publications on conservation issues, including “The State of the World’s Parks” and “The Future of Conservation in America.” In 2010, Gary was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Chi King Chensiyuan

Hemin Zhang, M.S. 1986 Hemin Zhang, M.S. 1986, is known as the “Father of Pandas.� He is the director of the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda, which oversees three panda bases in China. His research focuses on reintroduction of captive giant pandas to the wild and the control of panda epidemic diseases, as well as other issues having to do with the environmental impact of human and wildlife interaction. Hemin also oversaw the reconstruction of the Woolong Nature Reserve in Sichuan, China, after the devastating 2008 earthquake.

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Phil DiPofi, 2018 Jim Ekins, U of I Extension

[p.72-73 three bios; use fire photo suggest scenic/contestphot 01_DiPofiPhil_Tiger_Creek Burn for assoc with Rego; for both Reiman Radcliff could use scenic/contest photo “Jim Ekins submission” (canoes on a river)]

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Francisco Rego, Ph.D. 1986 Francisco Rego, Ph.D. 1986, is an internationally recognized fire scientist with expertise in fire behavior, fire ecology and landscape ecology. At the University of Idaho, Francisco taught the first fire behavior courses to undergraduates, as part of the first bachelor’s degree in fire in the U.S. He is a professor at the Instituto Superior de Agronomia in Lisbon, Portugal, where he was president of the Directive Council for three years. He has been coordinator of the Center of Applied Ecology Baeta Neves since 1995. He has also served as the national coordinator of the Portuguese Commission for Forest Fires; as vice chair and chair of the European Forest Institute; and national director of the Portuguese Forest Service.

Bruce Rieman, M.S. 1976, Ph.D. 1987 Bruce Rieman, M.S. 1976, Ph.D. 1987, is an emeritus fisheries scientist with the U.S. Forest Service at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Boise. He has more than 40 years of experience in research, management and program administration related to fishes, fisheries and conservation biology. His work has extended throughout much of the Interior Columbia River Basin and influenced aquatic natural resource management in the interior west.

Bob Ratcliffe, 1989 Bob Ratcliffe, 1989, is the Division Chief for the National Park Service’s Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Programs. Bob oversees a portfolio that includes the widely recognized National Trails and National Rivers programs. He has more than 40 years of experience working in outdoor recreation and public lands management and previously served for the Bureau of Land Management in a variety of field and national leadership roles, including division chief for the National Recreation and Visitor Services program.

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72 COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES Courtney Conway, CNR faculty

Janelle Nelson, CNR student


J. Michael Scott J. Michael Scott, a distinguished professor emeritus of fish and wildlife sciences at University of Idaho, is renowned for his work to study and conserve some of the world’s rarest species. He served as a faculty member from 1986 to 2011, as well as the leader of the Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and as a senior scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Together with students and colleagues, Mike pioneered new techniques including the variable circular plot method for estimating population sizes of birds and use of Gap Analysis as a tool in wildlife conservation to map the distribution of natural resources — a method now being used worldwide to inform management and policy decisions around the creation of new natural area reserves. Mike has won multiple awards, including the U.S. Department of Interior’s Distinguished Service Award, the highest award given to a career employee for a lifetime of service. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Donald Sampson, 1990 Donald Sampson, 1990, is the executive director of the Institute for Tribal Government at Portland State University. He also leads the institute’s nonprofit arm: the Tribal Leadership Forum. He is the CEO of Warm Springs Ventures, the economic development wing of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs in central Oregon. Donald is the climate change project director of the Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians. He has held numerous advisory and elected board positions including the Earth Conservation - Salmon Corps Board, Spirit of the Salmon Fund and president of the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society. In 2002, Donald received the Ford Foundation’s Leadership for a Changing World award.

Brian T. Kelly, M.S. 1991 Brian T. Kelly, M.S. 1991, studies canine predator-prey relationships, ecology and management. He served as U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s field supervisor in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for more than seven years and took a leading role in collaborative efforts to conserve greater sage grouse in 11 states. Later, he helped address wolf recovery and management as the USFWS’ Mexican wolf recovery coordinator in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and red wolf recovery field coordinator in North Carolina. He served as Idaho’s state supervisor for the USFWS from 2010 until his retirement in 2014.

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P. Zion Klos, Ph.D. 2016

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Leanne Marten, M.S. 1993 Leanne Marten, M.S. 1993, is the regional forester for the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Region. She manages 25 million acres across five states, including 12 national forests. Leanne began her career as a seasonal employee in the Clearwater National Forest. She later worked on the Canoe Gulch Ranger District of the Kootenai before serving as district ranger in the Ottawa National Forest. Prior to becoming regional forester, she was the national director for Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers in Washington, D.C.

Jim Unsworth, 1982, Ph.D. 1994 Jim Unsworth, 1982, Ph.D. 1994, is the former director of the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, where he worked from 2015 until retiring in 2018. Prior to WDFW, Jim worked for 30 years with Idaho Department of Fish and Game, serving as state big game manager and wildlife bureau chief before becoming deputy director in 2008.

Richard A. Fischer, Ph.D. 1994 Richard A. Fischer, Ph.D. 1994, is a research wildlife biologist with the U.S. Army Research and Development Center. He has developed a coordinated bird monitoring plan for the Department of Defense military lands, investigated migratory stopover hotspots on military installations and conducted research into the beneficial uses of dredged material for avian habitat creation along the Lake Erie shoreline and tributaries, among other projects.

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Paul Mannix

Sumit Pamnani

Moses Makonjio Okello, M.S. 1993 Moses Makonjio Okello, M.S. 1993, is a professor of wildlife management and tourism at Moi University in Kenya. He has done extensive research in wildlife ecology, wildlife conservation and ecotourism, with a particular focus on Kenya and Northern Tanzania. Prior to Moi University, Moses joined the School for Field Studies in 1999 as a lecturer and rose to professor in 2006. He was appointed as the school’s Center for Wildlife Management Studies director in Kenya in 2009, founded the Tanzania chapter in 2010 and oversaw both programs as senior director for East Africa from 2011 to 2015. He has influenced many conservation initiatives mainly in the Amboseli Ecosystem. His work in that area also led to the establishment of community and private wildlife sanctuaries.

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Esculapio

Tim Tear, M.S. 1993, Ph.D. 1995 Tim Tear, M.S. 1993, Ph.D. 1995, has worked in conservation for more than 30 years and is the executive director for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Africa region. In the 1980s and 1990s, he worked in national park management in Kenya, Southern Sudan and Tanzania. Starting in 1998, Tim worked for The Nature Conservancy for 15 years, leading an effort to establish conservation measures across the organization, and later serving as the science director for the agency’s Africa program. His scientific publications include evaluating the impacts of air pollution on biological diversity in the eastern U.S.; improving resource management in the face of climate change; and setting objectives in conservation.

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Claudia Charpentier, Ph.D. 1995 Claudia Charpentier, Ph.D. 1995, has served on nearly every national natural resource or environmental task force in Costa Rica. She has held leading academic positions, including assistant dean for academics in the College of Exact and Natural Sciences, as well as vice president for academics at the National University of Costa Rica. She also was instrumental in creating an exchange between the University of Idaho and the University of Costa Rica. In addition to her doctorate in resource recreation and tourism from U of I, she has a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Costa Rica and a master’s degree in botany from the University of New Hampshire.

Lisel Alamilla, M.S. 1996 Lisel Alamilla, M.S. 1996, is a conservationist and politician in Belize. Lisel worked as the executive director of the Ya’axche Conservation Trust before she was appointed in 2012 as a senator and cabinet member in charge of forestry, fisheries and sustainable development, a position she held until 2015. She is now the chair of the Toledo Maya Land Rights Commission. In 2012, Lisel won the Whitley Award for Inspirational Leadership.

Aaron D. Miles, Sr., 1996 Aaron D. Miles, Sr., 1996, is the natural resources department manager for the Nez Perce Tribe and deals with many challenging issues, such as wolf recovery in Idaho, the Snake River Basin adjudication and water quality concerns. Aaron has worked in forestry and fisheries professions for the Bureau of Land Management, as well as for the Nez Perce Tribe. In 1996, he worked for Washington State University as a recruiter and tribal liaison for the provost’s and president’s offices, and facilitated a Memorandum of Understanding among the WSU president and a number of tribal chairs.

Ramaz Gokhelashvili, M.S. 2000 Ramaz Gokhelashvili, M.S. 2000, is a biodiversity conservation specialist. He has started and managed multiple nature conservation projects, assessments and studies in Georgia and other places in the Caucasus. He worked as the Southern Caucasus director for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) eight years after graduating from the College of Natural Resources with a master’s in wildlife ecology. He has written six books and more than 100 papers and articles on natural resources management. He now works as the chief technical advisor for the GFA consulting group.

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Joshua Miller, 2013

Jay Gruenfeld Jay Gruenfeld is a retired forestry executive who always recognized the importance of communication, leadership and emotion, qualities he felt were important to pass on to the future leaders at the College of Natural Resources. In 2003, Jay and his wife, Janet, established an endowment to help promote those values for students in CNR and the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences. Jay spent more than 18 years with Weyerhauser, working as a logging superintendent, Skynomish Tree Farm manager in Washington and corporate manager of timber and log sales. He was also a resource manager for BrooksScanlon and a corporate vice president with Potlatch Corp in Idaho.

Steve N. Edwards, M.S. 2000 Steve N. Edwards, M.S. 2000, works with government and business to develop ways to compensate for the impacts of development on biodiversity as part of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Business and Biodiversity Programme and the Sustainable Use Initiative. Steve has over 20 years of applied experience and leadership in conservation and international development, including sustainable tourism and environmental policy development; community involvement and public participation in natural resource and protected area management; conservation enterprise project design and management; and biodiversity offsets and the mitigation hierarchy. Prior to his work with IUCN, Steve worked for Conservation International.

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U of I Photo Services

U of I Photo Services

Theresa Jain, 1983, M.S. 1994, Ph.D. 2001 Theresa Jain, 1983, M.S. 1994, Ph.D. 2001, is a research forester with the U.S. Forest Service. She not only conducts research into natural phenomena but also works to integrate discoveries into silvicultural methods and systems, testing them across multiple spatial scales and within different forest structures and compositions. She has held a variety of positions in the Forest Service since starting as a trainee in 1979 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. She works for the Rocky Mountain Research Station at the Moscow Forestry Sciences Laboratory. She has won several awards, including Forester of the Year in 2005 and the National Award for Outstanding Contributions in Silviculture in 2007.

Christine Moffit Christine Moffit led a research and outreach program at the University of Idaho from 2002 to 2017, focused on aquatic biology, aquatic invasive species, fish disease and aquaculture. A trailblazer in a male-dominated profession, she worked to increase diversity and inclusion in fisheries science, training and mentoring graduate, undergraduate and high school students. Christine has been a leader in the American Fisheries Society and served as the National Society president from 1999 to 2000. She has won numerous awards, such as the Idaho Chapter American Fisheries Society Excellence in Aquaculture Award, USGS Performance Award, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Idaho Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the USGS Diversity Award.

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Eli Duke

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Peter Kolb, M.S. 1987, Ph.D. 1995 Peter Kolb, M.S. 1987, Ph.D. 1995, has worked on the faculty of Montana State Extension and the University of Montana since 1997, studying tree physiology, and forest ecosystem function and dynamics across Idaho and Montana, with a specific interest in disturbance processes. He has not only worked with regional private landowners, timber businesses and foresters, but also in Bavaria, Germany, where he studied and conducted outreach about the impacts of long term intensive forest management on forest productivity, insects, diseases and soils.

Mary Taber, M.S. 2005 Mary Taber, M.S. 2005, worked for the National Park Service in Yellowstone for 25 years and six years for the Bureau of Indian Affairs at the National Interagency Fire Center. Her master’s project in the College of Natural Resources focused on the use of a fire effects planning framework to evaluate the use of wildfire in whitebark pine stands in Yellowstone National Park. She has also led planning teams for complex, long-duration wildfire incidents using the Wildland Fire Decision Support System.

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Tyler Drzewucki, 2015

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Joe Oatman, 2001, M.S. 2006 Joe Oatman, 2001, M.S. 2006, a Nez Perce tribal member, has become a leader in fisheries management, helping improve salmon and steelhead runs. He has contributed greatly to the Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries Department, first as a harvest biologist and now as the deputy program manager. He has served on a number of professional committees: United States v. Oregon Technical Advisory Committee; Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission; as the tribal designate to Pacific Fishery Management Council; U.S. Southern Panel of Pacific Salmon Commission; and member representing Indian Tribes on the Governance Coordinating Committee to the National Ocean Council.

Zachary Penney, Ph.D. 2013 Zachary Penney, Ph.D. 2013, is the first Nez Perce Tribal member to receive a doctorate in fisheries. Zach studied under Christine Moffit and immediately after graduating became a John Knauss Fellow. Serving as a one-year fellow for U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-California), Zach provided guidance on natural resource issues and tribal legislation. In 2014, he became the Fishery Science Department manager at the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, where he supervises more than 40 professionals representing the four Columbia Basin Treaty tribes.

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A LOOK TO THE FUTURE

H

ow we manage our natural resources is perhaps the most pressing issue facing our world today. We now understand that our ecosystems provide so many services — from wood, food and jobs to essential wildlife habitat, clean air and water, as well as recreation. Balancing these demands is not a simple task, but we cannot let the complexity of the problem lead us to adopting incomplete or ill-conceived solutions, or worse, inaction. More than ever, we need solid science and innovative experts to help us build a sustainable future, and the University of Idaho’s College of Natural Resources is ready to provide them. The College of Natural Resources has a tradition of producing leaders, and we are growing to meet the challenges of the future. Our enrollment is increasing as we draw students from across Idaho, around the nation and from far points of the globe. They recognize that CNR offers the best education and opportunity for their tuition dollars. Our graduates are in demand by industry and natural resource agencies. Our faculty are some of the best in their fields, and our research expenditures have risen in recent years. We also have changed our research and education programs to better address today’s problems, including adding the Department of Natural Resources and Society and bringing the environmental science program under the college’s umbrella. The College of Natural Resources is unique in providing hands-on research experiences for our students at the UI Experimental Forest and Taylor Wilderness Research Station. We are now working to add an undergraduate program at McCall Field Campus, a revival of the summer camp of the past but with an educational focus to meet the challenges of today. The need for talented natural resource professionals is growing as humans demand more and more from an integrated earth system. As these pages show, the college is steeped in a tradition of hard work and excellence. We are building on the achievements of the previous generations to foster the research and educate the young people who will help solve some of the most complex and pressing issues facing our world.

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CNR Archives

U of I Photo Services

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Lance Johnson, 2015

PHOTO CREDITS The following portraits are courtesy of Special Collections, U of I Library (Subject followed by sources and ID numbers) p. 8-9 Richard E. McArdle, 3-0108a; Dwight S. Jeffers,3- 0086c; John C. Ehrenreich, 1539a; John Hendee, U of I Personnel Vertical File; Charles R. Hatch, 1435a

p. 22 Professor V.H. Young in lab, 215-04 p. 24-25 Ernest Hubert, 3-0251a; Kenneth Hungerford, 218-043 p. 26-27 R.H. Rutledge honorary degree, 2-109-018; Morton Brigham 2-109-010 p. 29 Philip Habib, 40 SIL 11

p. 11 Ben E. Bush, 13-305

p. 31 Vernon Burlison, Harrison School Project, 1-218-026

p. 13 C.L. Price, nurseryman, 218-008

p. 33 Lee Sharp, 3-1759a; Stewart Brandborg from *Savage, G. “an Album,” 64

p. 15 Major Frank Fenn and Lloyd Fenn in Savage, G. “an Album” 14, 17; Clarence Favre, The Gem yearbook, 1915. p. 16-17: Harry Malmsten, Idaho Forester, 1952, 2179; C. R. Stillinger, 215-08 p. 18 C.L. Billings 13-79 p. 21 Emera Renshaw, Idaho Forester, 1925, 418; Arthur M. Sowder, 3-0274a; Charles Connaughton, 101-3097; George M. Jemison, 3-1278a

p. 41 Frank Pitkin, 1-218-034 p. 47 Barbara Rupers, 101-2064 p. 51 Gary R. Evans, 101-1334 p. 55 Maurice Hornocker, 1-255-04 p. 58-59 Leon Neuenschwander, U of I Personnel Vertical File

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OTHER PORTRAIT CREDITS:

1935: Roger Surry

p. 28 Charles Poulton, the Robert W. Henderson Photographic Collection, OSU Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center

1939: *Savage, G., “an Album,” 79

p. 47 Leonard Marchand, Senate of Canada p. 61 Winifred Kessler, Ducks Unlimited Canada All other portraits were either taken by U of I Photo Services or were courtesy photos provided to the College of Natural Resources.

1966: USDA 1990: Spotted owl, USFWS 2007: Lance Johnson, 2015 U of I Photo Services 1870, 1924, 1948, 1980, 1988, 2001 and 2014 CNR: 1914, 1917, 1970, 2017

No year; top left: Nez Perce Indian Village, Special Collections 024-6a

* Savage, George., and University of Idaho. College of Forestry, Wildlife, Range Sciences. The University of Idaho College of Forestry, Wildlife and Range Sciences, 1909-1984—an Album. Moscow: College of Forestry, Wildlife and Range Sciences, University of Idaho, 1985.

1862: Justin Morrill, Library of Congress

Back cover: CNR Archives

TIMELINE PHOTOS P. 10-11

1900: Gifford Pinchot, by Pirie MacDonald, Library of Congress 1910: Evergreen seedlings, Special Collections 218-016

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Years of Natural Resources

Profile for University of Idaho College of Natural Resources

Celebrating 100 years of Natural Resources  

University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources has been educating leaders for more than 100 years. This book celebrates that legacy and...

Celebrating 100 years of Natural Resources  

University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources has been educating leaders for more than 100 years. This book celebrates that legacy and...

Profile for uidahocnr
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