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WHERE INSPIRATION LEADS TO CHANGE


TABLE OF CONTENTS


4 UH MĀNOA 12 HAWAI‘I 16 THE COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 25 PROGRAMS 25 Anthropology | ANTH

29 School of Communications | COM 33 Economics | ECON 37 Ethnic Studies | ES 41 Geography | GEOG 45 Political Science | POLS 49 Psychology | PSY 53 Public Administration | PUBA 57 Public Policy Center/Matsunaga Institute for Peace 61 Sociology | SOC 65 Urban and Regional Planning | PLAN 69 Women’s Studies | WS 73 Social Science Research Institute | SSRI

| PPC/MIP


YOUR JOURNEY OF A LIFETIME BEGINS HERE

THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA: MANOA: A DESTINATION OF CHOICE


1907 ESTABLISHED

320 ACRES

20

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE*

17

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

14:1

*As of Fall 2014

STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO* P5


LOCATED IN BEAUTIFUL MĀNOA VALLEY, IN HONOLULU, HAWAI‘I ON THE ISLAND OF O‘AHU As the flagship campus of the University of Hawai‘i System, UH Mānoa is consistently ranked “best value” among U.S. colleges and universities. Here, students and faculty gather from across the nation and world to take part in our unique research opportunities, multicultural experience, diverse community, nationally ranked Division I athletics program and so much more. With so much to be inspired by, there’s truly no place quite like this.

19,507 Enrolled* 14,126 UNDERGRADUATE

5,381 GRADUATE

STUDENT DIVERSITY *

P6

1.4%

0.3%

36.1%

23.2%

1.7%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKAN NATIVE

ASIAN

CAUCASIAN

HISPANIC

6.4%

13.6%

16.9%

0.4%

INTERNATIONAL

MULTIRACIAL

NATIVE HAWAIIAN OR PACIFIC ISLANDER

UNKNOWN

36.1% ASIAN » 9.2% Japanese » 8.3% Filipino » 8.3% Mixed Asian » 6% Chinese » 2.5% Korean » 1.8% Other Asian 16.9% NATIVE HAWAIIAN OR PACIFIC ISLANDER » 14.8% Native Hawaiian or Part Hawaiian » 2.1% Pacific Islander


STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS*

44%

28%

66%

OUT-OF-STATE/ U.S. NATIONAL

HAWAI‘I (IN-STATE)

100

BACHELOR’S DEGREES**

6%

56%

INTERNATIONAL

126 Countries and Regions Represented

85

MASTER’S DEGREES**

ENTERING FRESHMEN*

58

PROFESSIONAL AND DOCTORAL DEGREES**

1,841 TOTAL 59% FEMALE / 41% MALE

60%

63%

TOP 25% IN HIGH SCHOOL

HAWAI‘I RESIDENTS

3.5 AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL GPA

1608 50%

AVERAGE SAT SCORE

100%

1497 National Average Math / Reading / Writing

WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES ACCREDITATION *As of Fall 2014, **manoa.hawaii.edu/about/

85% FACULTY WITH PHD*

LSS

LAND, SEA & SPACE GRANT RESEARCH INSTITUTION** P7


A NETWORK OF POSSIBILITIES

YOUR TICKET TO CAMPUS LIFE

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As part of the UH Mānoa family, you’ll never be alone. There are a variety of departments, programs and services available to help make your transition to campus life as smooth as possible. » ACADEMIC ADVISING Assists in course selection and degree completion. » PUBLIC SAFETY Provides transportation or a walking escort, 24-hours a day. » CAREER AND EMPLOYMENT CENTER Helps with job search skills, employment information, and interview opportunities. » COUNSELING AND STUDENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER Offers a variety of services to promote wellness and personal success. » FINANCIAL AID Provides guidance in obtaining financial support while enrolled at the university. » WRITING CENTER Offers students one-to-one writing assistance.

» KŌKUA Serves students with disabilities and helps to facilitate equal access.

» LGBTI STUDENT SERVICES Works to maintain a safe, inclusive campus environment for all students.

» VETERANS SUPPORT SERVICES Assists veterans, active duty military and dependent students in transitioning from military life to life at the university.

» RAINBOW SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE Transports students throughout the campus and nearby areas, free-of-charge.

» KUA‘AINA NATIVE HAWAIIAN STUDENT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Offers academic support and services for students of Hawaiian ancestry.

» UH MĀNOA BOOKSTORE Serves as a one-stop shop for books, supplies and other necessities.

» INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES Provides support services for international students. » WOMEN’S CENTER Offers personal and academic support for women and LGBTI students.

» UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES Offers a wide range of services including general medical, women’s health, sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology, nutrition, pharmacy and clinical laboratory.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FOR NEW STUDENTS » HONORS PROGRAM The Honors Program provides, personalized educational experiences through small classes, dedicated advising and faculty-guided independent projects of research or creative expression. » LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN Take advantage of this opportunity to join small learning communities that allow you to take several courses together with a peer cohort and receive personalized attention from faculty and upperclassmen. » NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM Broaden your horizons through NSE. Through it, you can select from 180 colleges and universities throughout the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and study there for a year while paying either the UH Mānoa tuition or the resident tuition of the host school. » STUDENT SUCCESS AND LEARNING ASSISTANCE CENTERS Achieve academic success at the SSC and LAC. The centers offer services ranging from tutoring to writing project assistance and supplemental instruction groups for challenging courses – all designed to meet your individual learning needs. » STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM Gain a global perspective as you take a journey of a lifetime. Learn about the world from others’ viewpoints while living away from Hawai‘i in places like Argentina, Australia, Chile, China, Denmark, England, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan and Spain. Or create a self-designed study abroad program in countries where UH Mānoa does not have an existing one.

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FACILITIES LIBRARIES Nationally ranked libraries housing more than 3 million books and journals, a century of Hawaiian language newspapers, the world’s largest collection of Englishlanguage documentary videos from Asia, rare/historical documents, congressional papers, special collections and more.

CAMPUS CENTER Bank, cafeteria and various eating establishments, campus book store, meeting rooms, computer lab and lounge, and ticket office (discount movie passes, athletic tickets, bus pass, concert tickets).

ATHLETIC COMPLEX Includes arena, baseball stadium, basketball courts, tennis courts, playing field, track, weight rooms, swimming pool.

» Simply Ono

» Campus Center Food Court (salad bar, grill, local favorites)

CAMPUS LIFE 200+ STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 20 PLACES TO EAT » Da Spot (vegetarian) » Domino’s Pizza Express » Honolulu Gourmet (salads, sandwiches) » India Café (South Indian and Malaysian) » L&L Hawaiian Barbecue (local and Asian-American fusion) » Le Crepe Café (traditional French crepes) » Panda Express (Chinese) » Serg’s (Mexican)

WARRIOR RECREATION CENTER (WRC) Approximately 66,000 square feet Features: Indoor running track, basketball and volleyball courts, fitness programs, locker and shower facilities, cardio machines, total body trainers, rock climbing simulators, plate loaded equipment, custom WRC UMAX dumbbells, Power Blocks, Kettle Blocks, half racks with Olympic platforms, nine station pulley system, and more.

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» Super Gyros (Greek, vegetarian, smoothies) » The Bean Counter (coffee bar) » The Curb (coffee bar) » Uahi Island Grill (contemporary local cuisine) » Verde Kaimuki (burritos) » Starbucks

» Pizza Hut » Ba-Le (pastries, sandwiches, salads, pho noodle soup, pad thai, other Asian favorites) » Stir Fresh (build-your-own stir fry, Asian cuisine). » The Market: Enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables from local growers at an affordable price.

» Simply to Go (sandwiches, pastries) » Jamba Juice

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES Whatever activities you enjoy, you’ll likely find a sport, club or organization that matches your interests. Classes: Ranges from surfing, stand-up paddling, body boarding, kayaking excursions to hiking, sailing, scuba and snorkeling. Sports: Basketball, volleyball, football, indoor soccer, badminton, flag football, tennis, and swimming, to name a few.

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES As one of Honolulu’s cultural centers, you’ll find a variety of ways to balance your studies with leisure activities that include campus concerts, theatrical performances, art galleries and more. Kennedy Theatre: 620-seat facility showcasing theater and dance Art Gallery: 4,200 square feet of exhibition space


ATHLETICS Home to the Rainbow Warriors, UH Mānoa offers a diverse NCAA Division I athletics program with approximately 450 student athletes competing on 20 men’s, women’s and co-ed varsity teams in affiliation with the Big West Conference, Mountain West Conference, Mountain Pacific Sports Federation and the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Association. MENS’ SPORTS Baseball, basketball, football, golf, swimming and diving, tennis and volleyball

WOMEN’S SPORTS Basketball, cross country, golf, sailing, sand volleyball, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, volleyball and water polo

CO-ED SPORTS Cheerleading and sailing

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STATE CAPITAL, HONOLULU RANKED IN THE TOP FIVE FOR SAFEST U.S. CITIES

by WalletHub, 2015

HAWAI‘I IS THE ONLY STATE IN THE U.S. THAT GROWS COFFEE BEANS

HAWAI‘I IS THE ONLY STATE IN THE U.S. WITH A TROPICAL RAINFOREST

Lyon Arboretum

HONOLULU RANKED #8 IN THE TOP 10 HEALTHIEST CITIES IN THE COUNTRY livability.com

by Mānoa Institutional Research Office Fast Facts

ISLAND OF HAWAI‘I CONTINUES TO GROW MORE THAN 42 ACRES EACH YEAR

by Mānoa Institutional Research Office Fast Facts

HOME TO ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST ACTIVE VOLCANOES, KĪLAUEA

by Hawai‘i Tourism Authority

SURROUNDED BY BEAUTY

EMBRACING LAND, OCEAN AND SKY


1.4M POPULATION 2013 Census

2

OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

Hawaiian + English

130 BEACHES

Surrounding O‘ahu

77.7°

AVERAGE YEAR-ROUND TEMPERATURE 25.4° C

Located at the crossroads of the Pacific where Asia and the western world embrace, Hawai‘i is a major metropolitan area that is home to more than 1.4 million individuals who come from all walks of life. Residents and visitors alike enjoy unique island experiences that aren’t found elsewhere, from an active nightlife to cultural activities and recreational opportunities that include hiking, surfing, snowboarding and more.

#1

GREENEST CITY IN THE US*

*Forbes America’s Greenest Cities 2015

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10 REASONS TO CALL HAWAI‘I HOME


EXPLORE

Yearning for the excitement of urban life in an international destination? Look no further than Hawai‘i. Here you’ll find the safety and friendliness of small-town living balanced with the diversity of a world city of people and cultures.

DYNAMICS

Chart a course for downtown Honolulu, the state’s capital. The heart of Hawai‘i’s financial district, this is where the islands’ movers and shakers do business and where Hawai‘i’s history is made. From restaurants, shopping and galleries to the theater and the harbor, you can find it all here.

HISTORY

Touch a piece of history at places like the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, ‘Iolani Palace – a living memorial to the Hawaiian monarchy, or Lahaina on Maui, where a historic whaling village awaits.

WATER

Whether you’re whale watching from the shores of Lahaina, enjoying the saltiness of sea spray as you take on the challenge of North Shore waves, or meditating as you float in the calm waters of world-famous Waikīkī Beach, you’ll find the sight and sounds of the warm Pacific Ocean a normal part of your life in Hawai‘i.

EARTH

Let Hawai‘i’s towering mountains, graced by cascading waterfalls, soothe your soul. From the stunning Napali Cliffs on Kaua‘i to the popular hiking destination of Diamond Head on Oah‘u, you’ll find a perfect complement to your ocean experiences.

FIRE

A visit to Kīlauea on Hawai‘i’s Big Island, the world’s most active volcano, is just your ticket to a fiery adventure. Continuously erupting since 1983, Kīlauea puts on a fire show that mesmerizes the senses.

SKY

Wondering what else is out there? Just look to the stars for your answer. From the top of Mauna Kea, with its world famous observatories, to the slopes of Haleakalā, known as the “House of the Sun”, your star-gazing will enter a whole new dimension as the stars come to life.

SOCIAL

Your adventures don’t have to stop when the sun sets. Waikīkī, with its offerings of restaurants, bars and nightclubs, let’s you explore life after dark and mix with locals as you enjoy great food and fabulous music and entertainment.

WIND

With sunny skies paired with warm tropical breezes, your senses will be awoken by an explosion of experiences in the islands for only in Hawai‘i can your adventures take you from ocean to mountain to sky.

TASTE

Tempt your palate with Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine. A culinary movement unique to the islands, you’ll find the freshest local ingredients blended with ethnic flavors from around the world.

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WHERE INSPIRATION LEADS TO CHANGE

THE COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (CSS) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA Here, it’s easy to be inspired. By our culture. Our diversity. Our surroundings. Our students and the potential of what they can do and who they will become. One of 17 colleges and schools at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, the College of Social Sciences (CSS) is among the largest of UH Mānoa’s units.

GO BEYOND THE BOOKS

OUR MISSION 12 ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS

Marked by leadership, excellence and innovation, our student-centered environment is dedicated to providing students with a vibrant academic climate that affords exciting, intense interaction among students and faculty as they address fundamental questions about human behavior. Featuring outstanding scholarship through internships, active and service learning approaches to teaching, and an international focus particularly in the Asia Pacific region, we prepare students to become leaders in public and private enterprises throughout Hawai‘i and Asia.

To provide students with a culturally diverse experience that transforms them into bold, engaged global citizens who affect change, break down barriers, touch lives and succeed in a multi-cultural context.

» Anthropology » Communication/Journalism » Economics » Ethnic Studies » Geography » Political Science » Psychology

» Public Administration » Public Policy Center/ Matsunaga Institute for Peace » Sociology » Urban and Regional Planning » Women’s Studies


150 FACULTY MEMBERS

27K ALUMNI

50

STATES ALUMNI RESIDE IN

55

COUNTRIES ALUMNI RESIDE IN P 17


THE 8 STRENGTHS OF CSS 1 STUDENT CENTERED 2 CRITICAL THINKING 3 APPLIED DIMENSIONS

4 GEOGRAPHIC ADVANTAGE

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Learn to Lead the Way

CSS fosters an active environment that puts you among peers who share the same passions. You’ll be encouraged to participate and to ask probing questions, to think out loud, to be a part of spirited debates. Your voice will be sought and will bring fresh perspectives on issues.

Think What Others Don’t

Our courses expose students to a wide range of perspectives, enhance their spirit and skills of inquiry, and encourage their continual pursuit of truth. You’ll be asked to consider multiple perspectives and challenge your own biases, shine a new light on issues, and seek alternative solutions to the problems at hand.

Get Real World Experience

Through a blend of internships, service learning, networking, mentorships and more, CSS is your gateway to opportunities for integrative learning, collaborative assignments, and global and community-based learning that will deepen your academic experience, emphasize your relevance, and prepare you for success after college. You’ll be encouraged to take an active role in your education by applying what you learn in the classroom to real world experiences.

Be at the Center of it All

The college’s unique geographical location allows for substantial exposure to influences from the Asia and Pacific regions. You’ll find a rich combination of disciplines that meld culture with science and provides you with an in-depth understanding of the human dimension. We offer the perfect backdrop for a host of opportunities for cross-disciplinary studies that will allow you to immerse yourself in a community of scholars in an exciting, multicultural, urban setting.


5 RESEARCH ACTIVE

6 AWARD WINNING FACULTY 7 ALUMNI NETWORK 8 SHAPING THE WORLD

Do What Matters

Hawai‘i serves as a natural laboratory for social science research with its multicultural population and unique geographical setting. In this setting, college faculty conduct significant research and applied investigations that generate innovative solutions for critical social, behavioral, economic, and environmental issues challenging Hawai’i and the Asia Pacific region. This provides for lively interaction and engagement between faculty and students.

Be Mentored by Innovators

At CSS, you will find leading international faculty who are dedicated to the student experience. Hailing from countries such as Canada, China, Columbia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, Samoa, Turkey, the Ukraine and more, these dedicated individuals work to identify and connect you with opportunities to explore and succeed in your chosen field.

Connect with Market Leaders

With more than 27,100 alumni in 55 countries and all 50 states, you’ll find a strong network of CSS alumni and friends who are just like you – bold, engaged, global – and who are ready to help you navigate life’s journey.

Make An Impact

CSS faculty, students and staff are today’s unsung heroes. Together they take inspiration, blend it with ingenuity, and turn ideas into innovations that make a positive impact on our everyday lives including environmental policy, natural resource management, energy conservation, smart grid technologies, health care delivery systems, disaster science training, monetary policy implications, communication policy and planning, international trade policies, invasive species management, community-level food security, cultural revitalization initiatives, agricultural land use policy, family adaptation and promotion of positive development for children with developmental disabilities, foster-care system reform initiatives, research and active civic engagement, and more.

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ALUMNI FROM AROUND THE WORLD NORTH AMERICA Canada Mexico United States SOUTH AMERICA Argentina Brazil Peru Venezuela AFRICA Eritrea Senegal South Africa AUSTRALIA

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ASIA Bangladesh Bhutan Cambodia China Hong Kong India Iran Israel Japan Macao Malaysia Mongolia Nepal North Korea Pakistan Philippines Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand Vietnam

OCEANIA Cook Islands Fiji Indonesia New Zealand Papua New Guinea Solomon Islands Tonga TURKS AND CAICOS

EUROPE Belgium Czech Republic Estonia Finland France Germany Lithuania Netherlands Norway Russia Slovenia Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom


ACCESS

HOW WILL YOU SUCCEED AND THRIVE


FIND YOUR ANSWERS AT ACCESS

Life at the university can be challenging, but at CSS you are not alone. Here you’ll find a supportive network of faculty, staff and fellow students ready to help. Just visit ACCESS, short for Advising, Civic and Community Engagement in the Social Sciences, and you’ll find the people, resources and tools you need to succeed and thrive!

GET PREPARED From the moment you walk through the doors at CSS, ACCESS is here to guide you on your academic journey. Through one-on-one meetings with academic advisors, you’ll develop a customized educational plan that matches your interests, skills and abilities with your career and life goals, and sets you on the path to success. GET INVOLVED ACCESS also serves as your gateway to hands-on learning opportunities that help you integrate theoretical and classroom teaching with real world experiences. Through internships, mentorships, service learning and civic engagement, you’ll build your resume, network with professionals and get a head start in your chosen field. GET CONNECTED If you’re looking to enhance your global perspective through new experiences, ACCESS can also put you in touch with resources such as the National Student Exchange, Mānoa International Exchange or the Study Abroad Center. It’s a way to make friends from around the world and connect to life beyond the university. P 22


DISCOVER YOUR PASSIONS

YOUR POTENTIAL IS JUST THE BEGINNING

A degree from the College of Social Sciences reflects who you are. With it, you’ll join the ranks of those who have made a difference personally, locally and globally. You’ll become an idea maker, a leader, a catalyst. One day you will impact policies, change the way societies respond to social needs, influence the way communities are developed, uncover the next big story or speak for those who have no voice. The possibilities are endless. The impact you’ll make is immeasurable.

April Vogt, Undergraduate Student, Lolo Project, Inventor of Totable Weather Engagement & Enhancement Technology, T.W.E.E.T.


STUDENT EXPERIENCE*

EXPERIENCE LIFE*

» 92% of CSS students say that their professors care about their success and are available in and outside of the classroom* » 94% of students say that CSS programs challenge them intellectually*

» 44% of students have engaged in community service or volunteer work » 22% have participated in internships or other field experiences » 9% have studied abroad » 89% say that CSS programs prepare them to make a difference in the world

EXPERIENCE SUCCESS**

» 7 out of 10 graduates were employed within 6 months of graduation » 95% of graduates are employed, continuing their education, participating in internships or other field experiences, or participating in volunteer activities. » Graduates work with some of the world’s greatest companies and institutions such as the United Nations, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Asian Development Bank, Booz Allen Hamilton, Texas A&M University, Cedars-Sinai, Asian Broadcasting Network, Rutgers University, UNICEF, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Nielsen Company, and Harvard University. *Based on students surveyed in Fall 2014, **Based on alumni surveyed in Spring 2015

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AN TH RO PO LO GY

WHAT WILL YOU UNCOVER?

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EXPLORE HUMAN DIVERSITY Established in 1934, the Department of Anthropology (ANTH) is committed to the study of human social, cultural, and biological diversity. Students explore and develop a global understanding of human social, cultural, and biological change through comparative, holistic studies of communities and regions. Specializations include applied archaeology, ecological anthropology, and medical anthropology, with a particular focus in Asia and the Pacific. The department’s programs encourage the development of essential skills such as critical thinking, communication, self-direction, expression, creativity, global awareness and team dynamics.


FACTS

ANTH

98

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

48

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

SPECIALTIES

» Archaeology » Applied Archaeology » Biological Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology » Applied Cultural Anthropology

» Indigenous Anthropology » Ecological Anthropology » Medical Anthropology » Asia » Pacific Islands

» Applied Archaeology trains the next generation of professional non-academic archaeologists to be effective advocates for the study and preservation of historic sites. » Applied Cultural Anthropology trains students in the theories, methods, and analysis of cultural anthropology that can be utilized in careers requiring community-based fieldwork approaches to research.

GRAD MAJORS

» Ecological Anthropology focuses on human-environment inter- actions using approaches across the subfields of anthropology. » Medical Anthropology studies the sociocultural dimensions of health and illness.

16

FACULTY & STAFF

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Minor in Anthropology » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

23

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

1. Forrest Young, Rapa Nui

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Anthropology may be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Education - Teaching, research, administration. » Museums and Archives - Management and administration, curatorship, conservation, restoration, research, education, libraries, development. » Archaeology - Cultural resource management, research, excavation, fieldwork. » Government - Administration, cultural resource management, surveying, site management, excavation, research, museum conservation, legislative compliance review, program management and evaluation, impact assessment, policy analysis, urban planning, translation and interpretation. » Nonprofit - Administration, program management and development, policy analysis, fundraising and development, research, grant writing, counseling. » Business - Management, sales/marketing, human resources, public relations. » Communications - Documentary film production, photography, photojournalism, journalism, writing and editing, publishing.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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TOM MCDONOUGH “As an undergrad I was fortunate to work as an ‘Interpretation Ranger’ at the Thomas Edison National Historical Park in New Jersey. It was my job to help visitors understand the historical significance of the place, while also connecting it to their own lives. Each day I learned how its relationship to the present constantly changes and takes on new meanings. Although National Historical Parks are museums, they can be exciting centers for learning, thinking, and interacting with history. I have just accepted a position at the National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington, DC this summer and recommend anthropology and the National Park Service as ways to find opportunities for travel and work in interesting places.”


CO M M UN IC I AT O N S

WHAT WILL YOU DISCOVER?


MAKE YOUR MESSAGE MATTER The School of Communications (COM/JOUR) improves the ways in which people talk to each other – in Hawai‘i and beyond – through all mediated channels, from voice-to-voice conversations to dynamic interactions via emerging technologies. The school strives for excellence in all areas of teaching, research and practice while embracing the contemporary challenges of complex and multicultural contexts involving communication and journalism.


FACTS

COM

1

303

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

50 GRAD MAJORS

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

SPECIALTIES

» Strategic Communication » Intercultural Communication » Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) & Policy » Journalism » Broadcast Media » Media Arts

» Social Media » Online Media, including web-based » Mobile Media » Video/Digital Cinema » Emerging Media and Technologies » Media Literacy » Studio Production

» Media arts includes digital cinema and multimedia. » Communication in Communities focuses on intercultural and organizational communication. » Information and Communication Technologies & Policy focuses on how ICTs shape, and are shaped by, society. » Journalism trains aspiring storytellers to write news, report with a camera and work online, including through social and mobile media.

12

FACULTY & STAFF

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts, BA (COM & JOUR) » Master of Arts, MA (COM) » Interdisciplinary CIS Doctor of Philosophy, PhD (COM)

24

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

1. Professor Brett Oppegaard featuring “Old Faithful” developed app.

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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Graduates find employment in a wide variety of positions in organizational, community, and social programs, where communication specialists and journalists are needed. Examples include: » Public relations professionals. » Social media strategists. » Broadcast journalists. » Writers and editors. » Strategic planning professionals. » Public policy analysts. » Media relations specialists. » Communication technology specialists. » Film and multimedia production professionals. » Marketing directors. » Non-profit fundraisers and outreach strategists. » Grant writers. » Managers of communication companies. » Managers of telecommunication companies. » Intercultural specialists and trainers. » News media producers and on-air personalities. » Some graduates also elect to continue their graduate studies in MA, PhD or professional programs, such as law or business, before starting their careers.

BERNADETTE BARAQUIO “Communication is a necessary skill that, if used properly, can boost success in any career. As a proud UH alum, it is an honor to be an integral part of the School of Communications, where we provide hands-on training for creative and informative storytelling, and mass media video production.”


EC O N O M IC S

WHAT CHOICES WILL YOU MAKE?


IMPROVE EVERYDAY LIVING The mission of the Department of Economics (ECON) is to discover, refine, and disseminate economic knowledge, with emphasis on policy issues involving Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. Faculty members perform economic research, foster sound reasoning and decision-making through teaching, prepare students for careers, and provide service to the university, the state of Hawai‘i, the nation and the world. The department offers an undergraduate curriculum featuring student mentoring, free introductory course tutoring, a student-run club, internships, co-op work arrangements, study abroad programs, an Honors program, and research opportunities with faculty.


FACTS

ECON

208

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

49

SPECIALTIES

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

GRAD MAJORS

» Climate Change » Ocean Resources » Energy » Property Rights » Aging and Wealth Transfers » Experimental Economics » Foreign Investment

» Econometric Analysis » Labor Markets » Health Economics » Law and Economics » China and Japan Economies » Monetary Economics » Microeconomic Theory

» Resource and Environmental Economics addresses sustainability, climate change, ocean resources, and energy policies. » International Economics studies foreign investment, international monetary systems, trade policy, and immigration. » Human Resources analyses demographic issues, labor markets, and health economics. » Public Economics and Economic History studies how public policies and institutions affect behavior and welfare in historical and contemporary contexts.

22

» Development Economics considers institutions, efficiency, and growth in developing countries.

FACULTY & STAFF

47

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE

» Experimental Economics and Game Theory deal with models of strategic interactions and testing their predictions in the laboratory.

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Minor in Economics » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

AY 2013–2015

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Economics can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Education - K–12 and college teaching, research, administration, evaluation. » Government - Administration; land and resource management; research on county, state, and national economies; program management and evaluation; impact assessment; policy analysis; statistical agencies; Honolulu Rail Transit Project; U.S. Congress, State Legislature. » Nonprofit - Administration, program management and development, policy analysis, fundraising and development, research. » Business - Management, sales and marketing, human resources, banking, insurance, real estate, finance, ‘big data’ consulting firms, airlines. » Communications - Economic and business journalism. » Advanced Degrees - Law, public policy, public administration, public health, economics, business, urban planning.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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DANIEL ANZAI Measuring the well being of U.S. communities - At UH, Daniel accumulated a toolbox of theoretical and empirical skills that he has used at the U.S. Census Bureau to help compile statistics on well being of individuals, families, and communities. Daniel is currently a graduate student in economics at the University of Oregon.


ET HN IC ST UD IE S

WHAT LEGACY WILL YOU LEAVE?

1


BROADEN YOUR PERSPECTIVES The Department of Ethnic Studies (ES) focuses on race and ethnicity in Hawai‘i, the United States, and the Pacific. Through engaged Oceanic learning and research, students develop theoretical, methodological, ethical, and participatory skills to analyze power relations and promote social justice in a globalized world. Established in 1970 to teach “Our History, Our Way”, the department maintains a research and teaching philosophy emphasizing praxis: the application of theory to complex problems in local communities, through service learning and civic engagement. Students develop the ability to think critically about society and popular culture, and work effectively within a global, multicultural community.

2


FACTS

ES

3

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

32

SPECIALTIES

» Ethnic Identity » Indigeneity » Migration » Representation » Economic Change » Social Movements

» Racism and Ethnicity » Critical Multiculturalism » Race and Gender » Ethnic Conflict » Land Tenure » Field Work

» Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Asian American histories of race, class, and gender. » Histories of Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Arab Americans, African Americans, and Native Americans.

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

» Ethnic and Race Relations in the United States and globally. » Political Economy in Hawai‘i, the Pacific, Asia, North America, and Middle East. » Service Learning and Civic Engagement emphasizing community-based research, praxis, and social justice.

8

FACULTY & STAFF

17

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Undergraduate Certificate in Ethnic Studies

1. Plasito Eseluquipi, son of the late master navigator, Pius Mau Pialug. April 2015. 2. Mālama I Nā Ahupua‘a service-learning program students, including students from Ethnic Studies 310 and guests, at Kapapa Lo‘i o Kānewai, July 2015. 3. Hawai‘i has a vibrant Chicano and Mexican community that has been growing steadily since the late 1980s. Several civic efforts are underway across the islands to make the community culturally and politically visible.

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Ethnic Studies can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Education - Teaching, research, administration, counseling, student affairs, library and information science. » Social Services - Administration, program management, grant writing, outreach, counseling. » Government - Administration, policy analyst, law making, legislating. » Business - Management, sales and marketing, human resources, public relations, communications. » Law - Legal representation, arbitration, judiciary, enforcement. » Cultural and Labor Organizations - Administration, outreach, programming, research, archiving and curating. » Communications - Documentary film production, photography, photojournalism, journalism, writing and editing, publishing. » Nonprofit - Administration, program management and development, policy analysis, fundraising and development, research, grant writing, counseling.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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TY SANGA Giving Voice to Community - Ty Sanga directed the 2014 Emmy-award winning food genealogy travel show Family Ingredients, the first Hawai‘i production to be picked up for a national series release by PBS. This followed his 2011 Hawaiian language short Stones, which was honored at the Sundance Film Festival. In an interview with Leslie Wilcox on Long Story Short, he recalled that Ethnic Studies “opened my eyes in regards to who we were as a culture, and as a society.” After viewing documentaries on the struggles of Native Hawaiians, Asian Americans, and African Americans, he realized that “we have a stronger voice that no one else has ever heard.”


GE O GR AP HY

HOW WILL YOU BRIDGE THE GAP?


GO BEYOND THE SURFACE Geography (GEOG) is about the human relationship with the environment and lends understanding to many critical issues that face modern society. The discipline spans natural science, social science, and the humanities, as well as technology, as it engages in questions such as environmental processes, socio-political dynamics, cultural change, and the use of modern geo-spatial technologies. The Department of Geography holds the answers to these challenging issues: globalization and its regional implications, climate change and its effects, resource use and sustainability, cultural change and environmental consequences, geopolitics with changing borders, and spatial digital technologies and the way people interact with the world. 1


FACTS

GEOG

42

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

45

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

SPECIALTIES

GRAD MAJORS

AY 2013-2015

» Environmental Geography engages in a systematic study of the Earth’s physical environment, natural resource management and global environmental change. Its focus is on global change and its impact on different parts of the world in the terrestrial and marine environments.

» Geographic Technology includes the study of cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and the use of these technologies in understanding spatial environmental issues. This is a fast-growing area in geography with many research and job opportunities.

FACULTY & STAFF

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE

» Eco-Hydrology » Environment » GIS » Pacific » Political Ecology » Remote Sensing

» Human Geography investigates the cultural, economic, and political processes that shape human activities on the Earth. It focuses on issues related to globalization, cultural and political changes and its relationship to the environment.

18

25

» Asia » Biogeography » Climate Change » Conservation and Policy » Culture » Development

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Minor in Geography » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

1. Close up of Professor Camilo Mora with evapotranspiration robot.

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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Geography provides an educational foundation for the development of an informed and conscientious global citizen, who, with critical appraisal of today’s connected world, is well placed to seek different kinds of employment opportunities. Geography graduates work in a variety of sectors, such as education, government, business or private, international agencies, and non-profits, where they are engaged in environmental planning, resource management, conservation, tourism, and social policy development. The fast growing field of Geographic Information Systems and digital mapping also offers job opportunities in a variety of areas.

DAVID STRAUCH David works with undergraduates to map historical trees in MÄ noa Valley, Honolulu Mapping technology can be effectively combined with knowledge of environmental history to understand human-environmental changes in a place. Students in Geography are trained to think holistically, integrating environmental, socio-economic and cultural-political processes that shape the dynamic of people and places, while using spatial technologies to study these complex dynamics.


PO LI TI CA LS CI EN CE

WHAT EFFECT WILL YOU HAVE?


EMPOWER COMMUNITIES The Department of Political Science (POLS) stands out in the fields of international relations, political theory, comparative politics, Asian politics, futures studies, indigenous politics, and public policy. Across these fields, there is a shared preoccupation with the critique of dominant historical forces and centers of power. Student-centered classes are focused on broad yet comprehensive discussions that catalyze critical thinking and promote effective communication in a range of contexts.


FACTS

POLS

227

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS SPECIALTIES

83

» Alternative Futures » Comparative Politics » Indigenous Politics » International Relations

» Law and Politics » Political Theory » Public Policy

» Indigenous Politics offers comparative study of indigenous histories, cultures and politics, starting from the cultural and geographical specificity of Hawai‘i. It encourages the study and practice of indigenous political concepts, ethics and systems. It also engages in scholarship that matters to Indigenous communities.

GRAD MAJORS

DEGREES OFFERED

23

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Minor in Political Science » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

FACULTY & STAFF

18

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

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1

PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Political Science can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Government and Law - Public policy, research, regional planning, foreign service, law enforcement, legislation. » Politics - Elected or appointed leadership, campaign management, public advocacy. » Nonprofit - Administration, management, public relations, fundraising. » Business - Sales, human resources, management, advertising, public relations. » Journalism - Editing, reporting, circulation, sales, broadcasting. » Academia - Research, teaching at all levels of education.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

ASHLEY LUKENS, PHD For her PhD, Ashley wrote a dissertation titled, Theorizing Food Justice: Critical Positionality and the Political Economy of Community Food Systems. Her study examines the economic and political strategies of community-based food justice organizations and included interviews with food activists across the US. Having developed the concept of tactical activism, Ashley is now able to put those ideas into practice through her work as the Program Director of the Center for Food Safety’s (CFS) Hawai‘i office. CFS a national non-profit public interest and environmental advocacy organization. Ashley is a founding member and Vice President of the Hawai‘i Food Policy Council.

1. Close up of Professor with published book.

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PS H YC O LO GY

WHAT WILL YOU UNLOCK?


UNDERSTAND THE UNKNOWN The Department of Psychology (PSY) fosters a broad understanding of psychological knowledge, methods, and concepts that enhance productivity in virtually every area of human endeavor. The undergraduate curriculum promotes interpersonal skills and sensitivities, and critical thinking skills in specialized courses including Behavioral Neuroscience, Clinical, Cognition, Community, Cultural, Developmental, and Social Psychology. Coursework integrates the study of human and animal behavior from an evolutionary and biological perspective in relation to human social behavior. Exposed to scientific methods that contribute to an understanding of behavior in diverse social and environmental situations, students acquire a better self-understanding and appreciation of the diversity of experience.


FACTS

PSY

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

336

SPECIALTIES

» Biological Psychology » Clinical/Community » Experimental

» Developmental » Social/Personality

» Behavioral Neuroscience analyzes the biological determinants of behavior through a research intensive, multi-disciplinary approach. » Clinical Psychology develops clinical psychologists who are well versed in empirically based assessment methods and treatment.

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

» Cognitive Psychology utilizes a variety of approaches to study cognition ranging from behavioral studies with neurotypical and atypical populations to computational models and developmental research approaches.

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» Community and Cultural Psychology emphasizes understanding individuals within their social and cultural context. » Developmental Psychology studies changes in social behavior, cognition, language and emotions from childhood through early adulthood.

GRAD MAJORS

» Experimental Psychopathology focuses on understanding problems in living to better inform prevention and treatment programming. » Social Psychology explores the human experience in the social context.

19

FACULTY & STAFF

29

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Bachelor of Sciences (BS) » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Psychology majors with interests in specific areas of Psychology may also conduct research with department faculty, enroll in the Psychology Honors Program, and join Psi Chi, which is the National Honor Society of Psychology. Majors, who wish to obtain an advanced degree, may seek admission to graduate or professional programs for training in psychology, human services, law, medicine, and counseling. P 51


PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

A degree in Psychology provides a basic liberal arts education applicable to a broad range of occupations including: » Sales Representatives - The psychology major can help students acquire a range of interpersonal skills, which can be applied in a number of different sales and marketing positions. » Advertising Agents - Careers in this field involve researching the target audience for a product, and developing a message and advertising materials based on this research. » Psychiatric Technicians - Job titles in this area include psychiatric technicians, mental health technicians, and social work assistants. These individuals usually work directly under the supervision and guidance of a licensed professional. » Market Researchers - People working in the field of market research perform a variety of tasks, including conducting interviews, performing opinion polls, collecting data, and interpreting results. » Laboratory Assistants - Some settings that might employ psychology lab assistants include university psychology programs, government agencies, and businesses that study human behavior.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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MICHELLE TAGORDA Ms. Tagorda graduated with a BS degree in Psychology in spring 2013. She is now a graduate student in Public Health where she also serves as the undergraduate program adviser. She was recently appointed the student member of the Board of Regents. She is also part of the Health Behavior Change Research Workgroup, working on the Waipahu Health Action Research Training project, where she works with high school seniors on activities to prevent teen obesity.


PU BL IC AD M IN IS TR I AT O N

WHAT IMPACT WILL YOU MAKE?


BE A LEADER OF CHANGE Public Administration (PUBA) is a graduate-level MPA program dedicated to energizing public institutions and organizations, enriching civic culture, and increasing leadership capacity through teaching, research, and service in Hawai‘i, the U.S. and Asia Pacific. It is committed to building organizational and community collaborations for creative problem-solving, and fostering connections between participants and change agents. Hawai‘i’s diversity and mixture of cultural traditions establish a rich setting for developing a leadership style. The program brings together participants from a variety of backgrounds to share experiences, uses collaborative teaching to view issues from different perspectives, emphasizes active engagement in classes, and continuously applies theory to practice.


FACTS

PUBA

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS SPECIALTIES

54

» Public Administration focuses on building a deeper understanding of public organizations and an individual’s role within those organizations so that our graduates can be more effective public service leaders. » Non-Profit Management takes an interdisciplinary perspective to help graduates develop tools and skills to effectively tackle the challenges facing the non-profit sector.

GRAD MAJORS

7

» Public Sector Leadership » Public Policy » Human Resources Management » Nonprofit Management

DEGREES OFFERED

» Master of Public Administration (MPA) » Graduate Certificate in Public Administration with focus on Public Service Leadership or Nonprofit Management

FACULTY & STAFF

7

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013-2015

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Public Administration can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Local Government - City management, financial administration, budget analysis, general services, community affairs. » State Government – Legislative, Executive, Judicial branches, state agencies and programs. » Federal Government - Legislative, Executive, Judicial branches, or independent agencies. » Non-profit - Management, advocacy, program management and evaluation, policy analysis, development. » Political Support and Lobbying - Advocacy, political action committees, political parties, community engagement. » Business - Human resources, budget analysis, management, sales and marketing, management consulting. » International Affairs - Governance, policy making and analysis, public sector reform, poverty reduction, environmental protection, ethics.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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ESBEN BORSTING “Public Administration provides the knowledge and skills to professionals in the government, community, and not-for-profit sectors to lead their organizations into the future. From planning and policy to strategic implementation, PUBA sets a foundation for public leaders to improve the quality of our lives through all levels of government and social programs.”


R O TE F N TE CE ITU CY ST LI IN PO GA IC A BL UN PU ATS M

R

PE

AC

E

WHAT WILL YOU FIGHT FOR?


BE THE CHAMPION FOR CHANGE Established in 2006, the Public Policy Center (PPC), which includes the Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution (MIPCR), is committed to enhancing the quality of community life throughout Hawai‘i, the United States, and the Asia-Pacific region. Through an interdisciplinary, multi-cultural approach to teaching, research, service, and application, future leaders and professionals learn and practice public policy-making, dispute resolution, and peacemaking. With an emphasis on critical thinking development and collaborative problem solving, students learn theory and skills in research, analysis, evaluation, and advocacy; leadership and governance; peacemaking, including human rights, conflict management and dispute resolution; and policy analysis and evaluation.


FACTS

PPC/MIP

20+

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS SPECIALTIES

35

FACULTY & STAFF

» Peace Studies broadens students’ perspectives and strengthens critical thinking on issues of war, justice, human rights and governance. » Conflict Resolution (facilitation, mediation and negotiation) focuses on community and civic relations, and developing leadership skills to successfully navigate professional and interpersonal life.

GRAD MAJORS

6

» Peace Studies » Human Rights » Conflict Resolution » Public Policy

» Public Policy emphasizes the analyses, design and evaluation of policy choices to solve public problems.

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Interdisciplinary Studies (major in Peace and Conflict Resolution or Public Affairs and Policy Studies) » Minor in Peace Studies » Graduate Certificate in Conflict Resolution

17

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013-2015

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

Students have furthered their education and employment in the following areas: » Government - Administrative, Legislative, and Judicial branches of government at local, state, federal, and international levels. » Education - Administration, teaching, student affairs, counseling, advising. » Nonprofit Organizations - Administration, program management and development. » Law - Public interest, family and juvenile, human rights, politics. » Conflict Resolution – Negotiation, facilitation, community and civic relations, policy analysis.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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KERRIE UROSEVICH Kerrie Urosevich, PhD, is currently the Action Strategy Coordinator for the Executive Office on Early Learning, which is part of the Office of the Governor in the state of Hawai‘i. She has worked previously in the areas of local and international community mobilization and peace building.


SO CI O LO GY

WHAT NEW PERSPECTIVES WILL YOU BRING?


SEE THE WORLD IN A NEW LIGHT The Department of Sociology (SOC) studies society, social interaction, social organization, and the consequences of these processes by combining scientific and humanistic perspectives to examine a range of topics, including marriage and family patterns, race and ethnic relations, demography, social change, class structure, value systems, conflict, deviant behavior, and the people and institutions of societies. The department prepares students to succeed as academics, researchers, service providers, leaders and good citizens in their own societies. Using Hawai‘i’s natural resources of location, people, and relationships, Sociology generates new knowledge about the island lifestyle and its true multi-ethnic mix of people.


FACTS

SOC

191

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

44 GRAD MAJORS

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

SPECIALTIES

» Technology and Society » Sports and Society » Sociology of Japan, China, and Korea » Popular Culture » Sociological Theories » Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods

With a view of the world that is both local and global, the department provides students with a broad foundation in theory and methods of sociological research. It also focuses on the following four areas in which it offers exceptional expertise and opportunities for research and training: » Sociology of Asia and the Pacific, with emphasis on comparative sociology of Asia.

16

» Crime, law, and deviance. » Ethnic and race relations.

FACULTY & STAFF

23

» Race and Ethnicity » Criminology and Juvenile Delinquency » Social Problems » Sociology of the Family » Inequality and Social Stratification » Medical Sociology » Gender and Domestic Violence

» Health, aging, and medical sociology.

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Minor in Sociology » Master of Arts (MA) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013-2015

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1

PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Sociology can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Business - Human resources, management, sales, marketing, public relations, office administration. » Criminal Justice - Corrections, rehabilitation, law enforcement, judiciary. » Education - Teaching, research. » Government - Social statistics, demography, public administration, policy analysis, research, program development, human services, city planning, law enforcement. » Human Services - Counseling, case management, advocacy, mental health services, programming, administration. » Social Science Research - Research, data analysis, demography, market research, information sourcing.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

JOY LACANIENTA Joy is currently pursuing her PhD in Sociology, as well as an Advanced Certification in Women’s Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She has over 20 years experience in community organizing and advocacy. Joy’s research focuses on the dynamics and complexities of mobilizing communities around social issues and public policies, and how these factors intersect with culture, socio-economic status, and gender violence. Joy is particularly interested in working closely with the issues affecting immigrant/ migrant communities.

1. Dorothy Goldsborough, Department of Sociology

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D AN N AL BA O N N G UR GI NI RE AN PL

WHOSE LIVES WILL YOU TOUCH?


BUILD COMMUNITIES FROM THE GROUND UP The Department of Urban and Regional Planning (DURP) brings together a diverse faculty and student body from across the world for innovative research and a unique learning environment in the Asia Pacific Region that fosters practical solutions for critical global and local issues through planning, public policy and social collaboration. Responding to the global need for cooperative responses to environmental crises, resource scarcities, and socio-political conflicts, DURP takes a visionary “whole society� approach to planning and works with various partners to deepen social and human understanding with the aim of increasing resilience, sustainability and quality of life for all.


FACTS

PLAN

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS

SPECIALTIES

GRAD MAJORS

» International Development emphasizes understanding of the wide array of planning issues from rapid urbanization to the provision of shelter and services in cities around the world, particularly in the Asia Pacific region. » Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance – DURP is also home to the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center, which develops and delivers training and educational programs related to homeland security and disaster management, with specific focus on natural hazards, coastal communities and the special needs of island societies.

FACULTY & STAFF

AY 2013–2015

» Environmental Planning and Sustainability fosters understanding of the phenomena of globalization, climate change, and environmental degradation along with strategies to improve ecological health and sustainability.

» Community Planning and Social Policy involves designing and facilitating inclusive planning processes for community development and social policies in areas such as housing, education, criminal justice, and health.

16

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE

» Planning in Asia and the Pacific Islands » Urban design » Historic preservation » Conflict mediation and negotiation » Transportation and urban infrastructure

» Land Use and Transportation focuses on planning for the development and sustenance of land and people through the wise use of land and natural resources, as well as the provision of transportation and other types of infrastructure such as water, wastewater, utilities, and communications systems.

80

10

» Climate change, energy, and food security » Natural disasters and resilience » Social justice and policy » Community and economic development » Globalization, urban economics and politics

DEGREES OFFERED

» Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) » Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) » Certificate in Planning Studies » Professional Certificate in Urban and Regional Planning » Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Certificate P 67


PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

The skills learned in Urban and Regional Planning can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Business – Real estate (construction management, development, sales, leasing), management, human resources, sales. » Education – Teaching, research. » Human Services – Counseling, case management, advocacy, rehabilitation counseling, mental health services, programming, administration. » Government – Demography, social statistics, public administration, policy analysis, research, program development, human services, city planning, law enforcement, politics. » Urban and Regional Planning – Transportation, demography, housing, historic preservation, urban design, urban renewal, disaster risk reduction science, environmental and regulatory issues, economic development, land use, research design, program development. » Social Science Research – Data analysis, demography, disaster resilience, market research, information sourcing.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

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ADAM AYERS Adam is a PhD candidate in the area of community-based natural resource management and coastal planning. “Centered in Honolulu, Hawai‘i where East meets West, the DURP master’s and PhD programs offer students the opportunity to study and immerse themselves in a wide variety of unique and intriguing issues.”


W O M EN ’S ST UD IE S

WHO WILL YOU INSPIRE?


BECOME AN AGENT OF EQUALITY The Department of Women’s Studies (WS) is committed to providing a rigorous and integrated academic experience for students interested in feminist scholarship and gender studies. The department investigates how gender intersects with race, class, and other vectors of power in shaping history, psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, political science, philosophy, literature, language, art, drama, education, law, medicine, and biology. The Department of Women’s Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, gender, and sexuality. The department is especially attentive to the ways that gender functions transnationally (i.e., in the jostling of different states, societies and cultures of today’s global world).


FACTS

WS

27

UNDERGRAD MAJORS

MAJOR ACADEMIC AREAS SPECIALTIES

» Feminist Methods of Inquiry and Theoretical Analysis explores sex and gender as analytical categories. » Feminist Knowledge studies the pervasive impact of gender relations on thoughts, actions and prevailing constructions of reality.

17

» Sex and Gender, and Social-Political Categories of Power and Privilege examines the interaction of sex and gender with race/ ethnicity, class, sexuality and other primary vectors of power and privilege as relevant to the human experience.

GRAD MAJORS

» Sex and Gender Differences analyzes the empirical and philosophical debates concerning sameness and difference as it relates to gender.

9

FACULTY & STAFF

» Gender in Asia and the Pacific; » Law, Sexuality, and Violence; » Global Feminism

DEGREES OFFERED

» Bachelor of Arts (BA) » Undergraduate Certificate in Women’s Studies » Graduate Certificate in Advanced Women’s Studies

30

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE AY 2013–2015

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PUT YOUR DEGREE TO USE

Skills learned in Women’s Studies can be transferred to a number of different employment opportunities such as: » Art and Media - Writer, director, producer, filmmaker, journalist, curator and artist, editor. » Business - Management, sales and marketing, human resources, public relations. » Education - Professor, researcher, administrator, counselor, teacher. » Human Services - Child welfare worker, domestic violence victims advocate, substance abuse prevention advocate, clinical social worker, human rights advocate. » Law or Politics - Lawyer, politician, legislative aide, union representative organizer. » Non-profit - Administration, program management and development, policy analysis, fundraising and development, research, grant writing, counseling.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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REPRESENTATIVE CYNTHIA THIELEN Among the first majors to graduate with a BA in Women’s Studies in 1975. She has served the 50th District in the Hawai‘i State Legislature since 1990 and is the Assistant Minority Leader. Representative Thielen is a tireless advocate and Co-Chair of the House Women’s Caucus and a member of the Keiki and Kupuna Caucuses.


SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

IGNITE THE SPARK TO INGENUITY The College of Social Sciences is committed to innovative research initiatives that build upon the college’s strengths and provide unique social science perspectives in areas that play essential roles in the university’s research efforts. Historically, the college and its Social Science Research Institute (SSRI) have been leaders in the areas of environmental change, health informatics, behavioral health, economics, and social innovation.


MAJOR PROGRAMS INCLUDE

CENTER FOR ORAL HISTORY Established in 1976 by the Hawai’i State Legislature. COH preserves the recollections of Hawai’i’s people through oral interviews and disseminates oral history transcripts to researchers, students, and the general community. THE OFFICE FOR EVALUATION AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT SERVICES Conducts program evaluation and needs assessment research primarily for public and private non-profit programs. The Office provides continuing education and training, technical assistance and consultation, and opportunities to work with a multi-disciplinary team on complex public policy issues and programs. TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND SOCIAL INFORMATICS (TASI) RESEARCH PROGRAM / PEACESAT PROGRAM The overarching mission of the TASI / PEACESAT Program of the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI) is to facilitate and conduct interdisciplinary and applied research in issues relating to health care disparities, including health care cost and value; health information technology; health care informatics; Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and telecommunication services in underserved and rural locations. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I ECONOMIC RESEARCH ORGANIZATION (UHERO) UHERO conducts rigorous, independent economic research on issues that are both central to Hawai‘i and globally relevant. We distribute our analysis widely to promote research driven dialogue and inform public- and private-sector decision making in Hawaii. HAZARDS, CLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM The Hazards, Climate & Environment Program (HCEP) works with local and regional stakeholders and experts in physical and biological science, engineering, and social and cultural knowledge to assess risk and vulnerability from hazards, climate change, and environmental degradation, and to develop risk reduction methods to build resilient communities. HAWAI‘I CORAL REEF INITIATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM The purpose of the Hawai‘i Coral Reef Initiative Research Program is to support research and monitoring to more effectively manage coral reef ecosystems in Hawai‘i.

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2500 Campus Road, Hawai‘i Hall 310 Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96822 P 808.956.6570 F 808.956.2340 www.socialsciences.hawaii.edu www.facebook.com/socialsciences.uhm www.twitter.com/CSS_UHManoa Information in this brochure, including cost, programs, policies, etc., is subject to change without notice. The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.

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