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ALISA STANISLAW PORTFOLIO

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SELECTED WORK I. II. III.

IV.

GRADUATE PROJECT REGIONAL/ECOLOGICAL DESIGN CONSTRUCTION II PLANTING IN THE LANDSCAPE

Alisa Stanislaw MLA 2013, Rutgers University alisa.stanislaw@gmail.com 908.627.6314

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GRADUATE PROJECT ASSEMBLY DESIGN: DEVISING A PLANTING STRATEGY FOR LIBERY HILLS AT LIBERTY STATE PARK

EXPLODED AXON OF LIBERTY HILLS

Redevelopment and restoration of derelict landscapes into green space has become a pressing issue in urbanized areas, due to the exponential rise in population. Providing spaces for people to enjoy, as well as offering ecological benefits in urban areas has become a concern within landscape architecture. This design project examines these issues through an analysis of topography, hydrology, vegetation and circulation on the site of Liberty Hills within Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey that will accommodate 67,000 cubic yards of soil from future construction projects, and a much larger quantity in the future calling for an interim strategy. A historical inquiry of how the site has changed over time from an oyster bed, the industrial revolution and into the present day interior and park helps to design the manufactured site. An investigation of the concept of novel plant assemblages informs a planting design on the 24-acre site of Liberty Hills, as well as creating a meaningful human experience. TOPOGRAPHY

CIRCULATION

TREE & SHRUB PLANTINGS

PERENNIAL PLANTINGS

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ANALYSIS: GRADUATE PROJECT The creation and transportation history of Liberty State Park was analyzed through diagrams, as well as visualizing where the historic fill was coming from and the amount being brought to Liberty Hills. TRANSPORTATION HISTORY

LAND CHANGE: LIBERTY HILLS

CREATION OF LAND ON THE HUDSON

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TOPOGRAPHY

XERIC.MESIC.HYDRIC DIAGRAM

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PLANTING PLAN The planting design consists of mostly perennials and a few woody species chosen for their hardiness, seasonal interest,and plant survival strategies. The majority of the species already exist within the park and its interior.

SEASONAL COLOR DIAGRAMS SPRING

SUMMER

FALL

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WINTER


PLANTING PALETTE Species are broken down by plant survival strategies such as ruderals, stress tolerators and competitors in addition to their preferred soil condition and seasonal color.

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SECTIONS: 10 years after planting showing the relationship between the people, plant species and pathway materials.

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ECOLOGICAL DESIGN FOR THE REGION CREATING BACKYARD HABITAT IN THE LAWRENCE BROOK WATERSHED The regional and ecological design studio focused on the Lawrence Brook Watershed in Middlsex County, New Jersey. Split into groups, my studio partner and I developed a habitat expansion area, that capitalized on an area within the watershed with the most area of open space, wetlands and forest to conserve and expand on habitat. My focus was creating backyard habitat within a highly suburbanized area (in yellow on the plan) by planting species that offer food and shelter to wildlife, while also managing stormwater and alleviating flooding for residences up against bodies of water. COMMUNITY OUTREACH

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IMPLEMENTING CONSERVATION VEGETATION TO CREATE BACKYARD HABITAT FOR PEOPLE, WILDLIFE AND TO MANAGE STORMWATER

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CONSTRUCTION II COLLECTION, INFILTRATION AND INTERACTION This design along the entrance of Rutgers Gardens celebrates water on site through structure and plants. In order to manage stormwater, there are different zones that collect and infiltrate, while offering two platforms for visitors to access and observe the process. The structure is sculptural and welcoming along the entrance, where pieces vary in height thickness and elevation. During rain, water will drip from these pieces and be directed into the existing swale that is planted with wet site tolerant grasses, and as the area slopes up, there will be a mix of mesic meadow species. Reclaimed curb pieces are placed throughout the designed area on the ground, so that water can flow through and infiltrate.

DESIGN PROCESS

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PLANTING AND MATERIALS PLAN

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PLANTS IN THE LANDSCAPE A CURE FOR WHAT AILS YOU: MEDICINAL PLANTING DESIGN The botanical lesson within this garden creates a space showcasing medicinal plants that thrive within a shaded woodland. People in the past took advantage of the medicinal qualities that plants offered for a range of ailments, and are now considered endangered within the wild since many roots have medicinal properties. This garden promotes the cultivation of medicinal plants, since Bloodroot (Sanguinaria Canadensis), Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense) are harvested for their root while the stem Jewelweed (Impatiens spp.) and bark of Sweet Birch (Betula lenta) are utilized for healing ailments ranging from nausea to cancer. To prevent overharvesting of the roots, the understory plants will be cultivated and replaced, or through selective harvesting, in order to allow them to colonize within their spaces. This garden creates a shady space for people to enjoy while admiring the many botanical elements and medicinal uses of the featured plants.

PLANT SCHEDULE

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PLANT SECTIONS

SECTION B-B1

SECTION A-A1

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Alisa Stanislaw, Portfolio.