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Whatever one might expect, the success of the Social Empowerment Center has not quite gotten to Hutchinson’s head. She believes in helping others around her, just as a social worker should. She even lets employees see their own clients at her office, especially if they’re working towards licensure or private practice. “I’m not competitive like that,” she says. “I want to see my employees grow and achieve their goals. Not everybody wants to do that because their bottom line is the profit, but that’s not our bottom line.” Hutchinson got her start in 1993 as a food stamps case worker at Georgia’s Division of Family and Children Services, after graduating from Louisiana State University with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. She quickly transferred to child protective services, where she handled the midnight shift for a few years. “If you’re going to work in mental health, DFCS is a great place to start,” Hutchinson says. “It’s like a mental health boot camp where you get to experience all of your firsts, so by the time you establish clientele, you really have a wealth of experience. There is nothing patients can tell you that’s completely new.” Hutchinson says her training at UGA – along with the guidance of Robert Andoh of UGA’s Small Business Development Center, which specializes in educating small business owners – also prepared her well for her future success. She enrolled in the Master of Social Work program at the School of Social Work in 1997 and has been involved in the school ever since. In 2011, she received the Outstanding Field Instructor-Gwinnett Award for her role as field practicum supervisor for BSW and MSW student interns from UGA. In addition, Hutchinson now teaches at the University. She is in charge of a master’s class in cultural diversity that she hopes will continue. “Social work, compared to a mental health degree, opened me to so many avenues: teaching, administrative work, marketing,” she says. “I have done so much with a social work degree that I could not have done with a psychology-related degree.” Nominations for the 2014 Bulldog 100 were accepted between January and May 2013. To be considered for the list, each organization must have been in business for at least five years, experienced revenues in excess of $100,000 for the calendar year 2010, and be owned or operated by a former UGA student who owns at least 50 percent of the company or be the CEO, president or managing partner. The Bulldog 100 recognizes the fastest growing businesses regardless of size by focusing on a threeyear compounded annual growth rate. More than 800 nominations were received for the 2014 Bulldog 100. The class includes companies of all sizes, providing services and products in a variety of industries, including advertising, staffing, real estate, pest control and mixed martial arts. Companies as far west as Texas and Kansas, and as far northeast as New Jersey, made the list this year. The 2014 Bulldog 100 Celebration recognized the 100 businesses and 141 alumni who lead those companies on January 25 at the Marriott Marquis in downtown Atlanta. F A L L

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UGA School of Social Work Magazine Fall 2014  

University of Georgia School of Social Work

UGA School of Social Work Magazine Fall 2014  

University of Georgia School of Social Work