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www.outreach.edu UGABeyondtheArch

publicserviceandoutreach

@uga_serves

UGA BEYOND THE ARCH THE YEAR IN REVIEW 2014-15 OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH

This is Public Service and Outreach

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach

UGA

BEYOND THE ARCH

T H E Y E A R I N R E V I E W 2 0 14 - 15


UGA BEYOND THE ARCH THE YEAR IN REVIEW 2014-15

INSIDE

1 2 3 4

Map of Georgia: Program Activity of Public Service and Outreach Letter from the President of the University of Georgia Letter from the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach FieldNotes: Highlights of 2014-15

9

NORTHEAST GEORGIA MOUNTAINS

10 12 14 15 17 18 20 21

Fire Sparks Revitalization Mind Games Connecting with Nature Hall of Wonders Building Stronger Schools More Than Meals Georgia Hospitality Environmental Education

23

SOUTHEAST COASTAL PLAIN

24 26 28 29 30 31 32 33

On the Half-Shell Revived and Thriving Appling Leads Tale of Two Cities Reaching a New Generation A Place in the Shade Young Philanthropists Engineering a Road+Wanted: More Nurses

35

MIDDLE GEORGIA I-75 CORRIDOR

36 38 39 40 41

Hoops for Life Tech Boom Think Regional Working with Nature All for One

43

SOUTHWEST FARM COUNTRY

44 46 47 48 49

SBDC Helps Breed Winners Teaching Teachers Growing a Culture of Health A Renaissance in Americus Educating a Workforce

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH

PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH UNITS

Jennifer Frum

■ THE ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP establishes long-term relationships with selected communities to identify the issues they face and then coordinates UGA faculty, staff and other resources to help them address their community and economic development needs. Eight counties in Georgia participate; three have already graduated from the program.

jfrum@uga.edu | 706-542-3352

Steve Dempsey dempsey@uga.edu | 706-542-6045

Paul Brooks pjbrooks@uga.edu | 706-542-6167

Gwen Moss gmoss@uga.edu | 706-542-7284

Kelly Simmons simmonsk@uga.edu | 706-542-2512

Cherie Duggan cduggan@uga.edu | 706-542-6654 UGA Atlanta Economic Development Office

Sean McMillan smcmilla@uga.edu | 706-340-9787

NORTHWEST METRO ATLANTA

52 54 55 56 57 58

Leading the Way Fishing for Fresh Seafood A Decade of Partners An Elf’s Success Fighting Blight Talking Hands

59

FURTHER BEYOND THE ARCH INTERNATIONAL

60 61

Into Africa A Partnership with Seoul+Reducing Risk

62 63 64 65

Four for the Future Awards PSO Faculty Fellows 2014-15 Student Scholars+PSO Faculty Fellows 2015-16 Honor Roll of Donors

■ THE CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT provides training and development, specialized assistance and data-driven studies to help governments throughout Georgia and the world become more efficient, more responsive and better managed. Laura Meadows | lmeadows@uga.edu | 706-542-6192 ■ THE GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION Conference Center and Hotel is a 300,000-square-foot, comprehensive public service educational unit that annually enrolls more than 100,000 adults in its on-site and distance-learning programs. Other activities for the campus, community and state serve an additional 100,000 people each year. Bill Crowe | william.crowe@georgiacenter.uga.edu | 706-542-3451

UGA BEYOND THE ARCH UGA Beyond the Arch: The Year in Review 2014-15 is published by the University of Georgia Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach through its communications unit. Vice President for Public Service and Outreach

■ THE J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT works with communities, nonprofit organizations, professional associations and youth to help develop knowledgeable, skilled and committed leadership that will enhance community and economic development in Georgia communities, the nation and beyond. Matt Bishop | mlbishop@fanning.uga.edu | 706-542-6201

Maegan Rudd Snyder

■ THE MARINE EXTENSION SERVICE (MAREX) works to increase the efficiency of existing marine industries, to identify new industries that do not harm the environment and to increase public awareness and understanding of coastal ecosystems. The programs delivered through locations in Athens and Atlanta and on the coast extend economic and cultural benefits throughout the state and region. Georgia Sea Grant sponsors research that addresses problems unique to Georgia as well as other research that has a national scope.

Public Relations Specialists

Mark Risse | mrisse@uga.edu | 706-542-5956

Jennifer Frum

Director of Communications

Kelly Simmons

51

Rob Gordon | gordon@uga.edu | 706-542-1098

Public Relations Coordinator

Christopher James Shannah Cahoe Montgomery Art Director

Rick Fiala Contributing writers, photographers and copy editors:

Jane Ellyn Aaron Brandon Camp Kathleen Cason Kinsey Lee Clark Carolyn Crist Denise Horton Michelle Johnson Lori Johnston Lisa Kesler Ryan Kor Roger Nielsen Angela Seal Dylan Wilson

■ THE OFFICE OF SERVICE-LEARNING supports UGA faculty members in creating and expanding service-learning opportunities for students in campus-based and study abroad courses. The unit also cultivates community-based partnerships that respond to expressed community needs. The Office of Service-Learning reports to the Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach and the Office of the Vice President for Instruction. Shannon Wilder | swilder@uga.edu | 706-542-0535 ■ THE SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER provides a wide range of educational opportunities to small business owners, potential entrepreneurs and community leadership organizations that support efforts to create, sustain or expand business ventures. Allan Adams | aadams@georgiasbdc.org | 706-542-2762 ■ THE STATE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF GEORGIA provides the public and UGA faculty and students opportunities for recreation, events, research and learning through its natural areas, display gardens and building spaces. Wilf Nicholls | wilfnich@uga.edu | 706-542-6131


◆ Hiawassee

DADE

TOWNS

FANNIN

CATOOSA WHITFIELD

RABUN

UNION

MURRAY

MAP OF

◆ Dalton

GILMER

WALKER

◆ Clarkesville

WHITE LUMPKIN

GORDON

CHATTOOGA

STEPHENS

PICKENS DAWSON

FLOYD

BANKS

HALL

Gainesville ◆

CHEROKEE

BARTOW

Rome ◆

GEORGIA

HABERSHAM

FORSYTH

MADISON

JACKSON

COBB

DEKALB

WALTON

✪ Atlanta

DOUGLAS

Archway Partnership OGLETHORPE

Bishop ◆

FULTON

Carl Vinson Institute of Government

LINCOLN

WILKES

Georgia Center for Continuing Education

ROCKDALE

CLAYTON

P U B L I C S E R V I C E A N D O U T R E A C H P R O G R A M S T H R O U G H O U T T H E S TAT E

ELBERT

◆ Athens

OCONEE

HARALSON

showing

CLARKE

BARROW

GWINNETT

PAULDING

CARROLL

FRANKLIN

NORTHEAST

NORTHWEST

POLK

HART

GREENE

MORGAN

NEWTON

COLUMBIA

TALIAFERRO

HENRY

FAYETTE

WARREN

Senoia ◆

SPALDING

Office of Service-Learning

GLASCOCK

BIBB

JENKINS

WILKINSON

◆ Columbus

◆ Dublin

HOUSTON

LAURENS

BLECKLEY

MARION MACON

CHATTAHOOCHEE

EMANUEL

PEACH

TAYLOR

◆ Statesboro

PULASKI

Metter ◆

TOOMBS

TELFAIR

CRISP

APPLING

BEN HILL

LEE

◆ Albany

IRWIN

WORTH

COFFEE

◆ Tifton

MITCHELL

CLINCH GRADY THOMAS

BROOKS

supporting more than 4,400 jobs

BRANTLEY

◆ Brunswick

WARE LANIER

Cairo ◆

annual statewide impact of

GLYNN

MIDDLE COOK

SEMINOLE DECATUR

programs have an estimated

directly and indirectly.

ATKINSON

COLQUITT

Moultrie ◆

McINTOSH

PIERCE BERRIEN

◆ Savannah

nearly $345 million,

WAYNE

BACON

TIFT BAKER

MILLER

LONG

TURNER

CLAY

EARLY

LIBERTY

◆ Baxley

JEFF DAVIS

TERRELL

DOUGHERTY

CHATHAM

WILCOX

SOUTHWEST

CALHOUN

BRYAN

TATTNALL

SUMTER

RANDOLPH

Public service and outreach

EVANS WHEELER

◆ Americus

WEBSTER

EFFINGHAM

MONTGOMERY

DODGE

DOOLY

BULLOCH

CANDLER

TREUTLEN

◆ Hawkinsville

SCHLEY

SCREVEN

SOUTHEAST

JOHNSON

CRAWFORD TWIGGS

QUITMAN

State Botanical Garden

WASHINGTON

◆ Macon

TALBOT

STEWART

Small Business Development Center

◆ Sandersville

JONES

UPSON

MUSCOGEE

BURKE

JEFFERSON BALDWIN

MONROE

TROUP

HARRIS

HANCOCK

LAMAR

PIKE

MERIWETHER

LaGrange ◆

PUTNAM

BUTTS

Griffin ◆

Marine Extension

RICHMOND

JASPER

COWETA HEARD

J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development

◆ Augusta

McDUFFIE

◆ Valdosta

LOWNDES

ECHOLS

CHARLTON

CAMDEN

Folkston ◆ This publication was produced without the use of taxpayer dollars.


LETTER

from JERE MOREHEAD

UGA

BEYOND THE ARCH

T H E Y E A R I N R E V I E W 2 0 1 4 - 15

We have an obligation to extend our vast intellectual resources to improve lives and to improve communities.

AS A LAND- AND SEA-GRANT INSTITUTION, the University of Georgia has a responsibility to use its vast resources and talents to help Georgia grow and prosper, creating jobs, developing leaders and helping communities address critical issues. In the Office of Public Service and Outreach

AS GEORGIA’S FLAGSHIP land- and sea-grant university, we at the University of Georgia are called to help train the state’s leaders, solve pressing challenges and boost the economy. Perhaps nowhere is this mission more evident than through the work of our eight public service and outreach units. When public officials across the state need resources to plan for a better Georgia, they turn to the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, which trained more than 22,000 elected officials and public employees last year alone.

we do that every day in every community throughout the state. Our 400When small businesses need financial guidance or support with strategic planning, they turn to the university’s Small Business Development Center. And when communities need assistance bringing in industry or revitalizing their downtowns, they turn to the Archway Partnership.

plus faculty and staff members in eight diverse units connect with all 17 UGA schools and colleges to find the expertise to tackle tough issues to help Georgians prosper. We train government officials. We build leaders. We grow strong communities. It is what we do. It is our mission. “The University of Georgia’s strategic plan calls on us to serve this great

With an estimated annual economic impact of $4 billion, it’s clear the work we do here at the University of Georgia matters—not only to our faculty, staff and students, but also to the residents of Georgia. This compelling figure symbolizes the strong relationship that exists between our great institution and the state we call home.

state by responding to our most pressing issues. There is none more important than creating knowledge, jobs, and prosperity. The governor has made this a priority, and we have directed resources toward having a greater role in the state’s economic development. We are bound by a compact to public service. Everyone at the university is committed

Over the past year, Public Service and Outreach has made tremendous contributions to the state through its various programs and projects, which you will read about in this report.

to that pursuit, whether in UGA’s research or outreach with government and community leaders, small business owners, the agricultural industry, coastal stakeholders, or our state’s youth. Together, we are making a

Now more than ever the university is being called upon to extend our resources to help improve lives and communities across Georgia and beyond. I have always admired the close relationship between our teaching, research and service activities and the needs of our state, nation and world, and it is my priority to continue finding new and innovative ways to meet these needs.

difference. What we do here matters. I take pride in that unique calling.” —Jere Morehead, President, University of Georgia

President, University of Georgia

Open to see PSO throughout the state of Georgia UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


LETTER

from JENNIFER FRUM

LOOKING BACK ON THE PAST YEAR, so many moments serve as vivid examples of the important work Public Service and Outreach (PSO) is doing around the state. Each story in this report reflects a program or project that has energized us and given proof that our work is making a real impact—most importantly by helping create jobs, develop leaders and addressing some of the state’s most pressing issues. Overall, this past year our eight PSO units had an estimated impact of $345 million on the state and supported more than 4,400 jobs. We also partnered with all 17 UGA schools and colleges on nearly 900 programs and projects, including the UGA Public Health Leadership Academy, a program developed by the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and UGA’s College of Public Health to help communities create and sustain a culture of health. The Carl Vinson Institute of Government expanded its school board governance training, increasing the potential for greater collaboration between the institute and local school boards and governments, which could lead to a better trained and skilled workforce around the state. On the coast, UGA Marine Extension’s Shellfish Research Laboratory on Skidaway Island launched the state’s first oyster seed hatchery—a major step in helping make Georgia’s oyster industry more durable and sustainable. In every corner of the state, the Small Business Development Center continued to provide assistance to business owners, serving more than 4,000 business owners and entrepreneurs and helping launch more than 300 new businesses. Through our service-learning programs, 7,300 UGA students helped provide an estimated 222,000 service hours to local and international communities. We also saw a 32 percent increase in support from our donors—a key difference in helping us achieve our goals.

The mission of Public Service and Outreach at the University of Georgia is to improve people’s lives by helping create jobs, developing leaders and addressing the state’s most critical issues.

These are just a few ways our PSO units are making a difference in Georgia and beyond. I hope you will enjoy learning more about our work and the many ways we serve our state by reading the stories in the following report.

Vice President for Public Service and Outreach, University of Georgia

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

New Director

MARINE EXTENSION

Nature as an Ally to Stop Beach Erosion CONCRETE BULKHEADS and breakwaters are common attempts to halt beach erosion, but UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant are using oyster shells and native plants in a “living shoreline” program to protect Georgia’s coast. “The ‘living shoreline’ is still engineered,” says Thomas Bliss, director of the Marine Extension Shellfish Research laboratory on Skidaway Island, “but it’s designed to restore the shoreline. It has the added benefit of creating a natural habitat in which oysters, fish and other wildlife can thrive.” The project covers 200 square meters and

consists of two layers: one for stabilization and an upper layer for native plants, such as smooth cordgrass and sea oxeye daisies. Educating the public about the value of living shorelines is another element of the project. Learning and volunteer events are held throughout the year. Funded by a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, partners include the Burton 4-H, the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, the Chatham County-Savannah Metropolitan Planning Commission, the City of Tybee Island, One Hundred Miles, Coastal Civil Engineering and the Nature Conservancy.

ROBERT E. GORDON JR., a public finance lawyer and former faculty member of Public Service and Outreach was named director of the Archway Partnership in April. From 2010 to 2014, Gordon served as economic development and fiscal analysis unit manager for the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, a unit of the Office of Public Service and Outreach, which includes the Archway Partnership. He then joined the public finance team of a law firm in Atlanta, where he provided financial advisory services to local governments, utilities, and non-profits. As director, Gordon oversees partnerships in eight communities. Each is served by an Archway professional who acts as a direct liaison to UGA to address issues identified by community residents.

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

Big Supporters of Small Businesses

Ryan Hammock, Wells Fargo 4

WELLS FARGO AND GEORGIA POWER are the first recipients of the Golden Bulldawg, awarded by the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) for the companies’ long-term support of the center’s training programs. The two companies have donated more than $250,000 to the SBDC over the past several years. Wells Fargo has been the main sponsor of StartSmart, a program that has helped launch 858 new businesses, since 2008. Georgia Power’s focus has been on GrowSmart, which has helped more than 1,700 businesses operating for at least two years with their long-

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

Ken Compton and Glenda Stinson, Georgia Power

term growth goals. By supporting SmartStart and GrowSmart, Wells Fargo and Georgia Power have become key to the vitality of Georgia’s small businesses.


FIELDNOTES

It was a great year for UGA’s outreach programs. Here are some highlights.

J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

A Court of One’s Peers A PEER COURT developed by the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development faculty member Emily Boness for Athens-Clarke County has shown positive results, and is now underway in Forsyth County as well. The peer courts are juvenile court programs for first-time misdemeanor offenses. Trained teenagers from the community hear the cases and serve as advocates, judge, jurors and bailiff. The courts provide leadership opportunities for youth, while freeing judges’ time to focus on more serious cases. In Clarke County the results have been positive with cases heard sooner and a recidivism rate of only 17.5 percent, compared to 53 percent for the state juvenile court system. Forsyth County launched the program with a grant from the Governor’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council.

“We are continuing to grow. We are continuing to see new job opportunities... We have put Georgia on the international map.” —Gov. Nathan Deal, at the 2014 Biennial Institute

CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

The Event for Georgia Legislators MORE THAN 200 MEMBERS of the Georgia House of Representatives and Senate gathered in Athens in early December for the 29th Biennial Institute for Georgia Legislators to talk about critical issues in the upcoming session, foremost economic development. Gov. Nathan Deal closed out the three-day institute by describing how Georgia has established an international reputation as the Gov. Nathan Deal best U.S. state in which to locate new business. Since its inception in 1958, the Biennial Institute has been coordinated by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government and continues to be an anticipated event on the Georgia political calendar.

OFFICE OF SERVICE-LEARNING

Experience UGA Field Trips SOME 1,300 second-graders from Clarke County schools visited UGA’s campus in April during National Public Health Week for an Experience UGA program sponsored by Athens Regional Medical Center and organized by students in the College of Public Health. The children learned about nutrition, hand-washing and germ spread, physical activity and bullying prevention. They were among the 9,097 Clarke County students who went on field trips to UGA in the 2014-15 academic year. More than 700 UGA students and 26 departments and units participated in the Experience UGA field trips. The Experience UGA program was launched in 2014 by the Office of Service-Learning in partnership with the Clarke County School District and the College of Education’s Office of School Engagement.

The goal for 2015-16 is to extend the program to all 13,000 students in Clarke County public schools.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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FIELDNOTES 2 “We fulfill our mission as a land-grant university by taking the many resources of the university into communities throughout the state of Georgia.” —Jennifer Frum, Vice President for Public Service and Outreach

ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

Taking the Show on the Road

GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Summer Academy at UGA: Filling a Need and Growing WITH CLASSES on aviation and engineering to hands-on experience in creative writing and mock trials, the Summer Academy at UGA (SAUGA) at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education has been growing to meet an ever-increasing demand. The number of one- and two-week “camps” has doubled since the program’s start in 2010, and the number of participants has tripled (see chart below). One reason for the Academy’s popularity is that it’s geared to teens and “tweens”—groups not served by the traditional camps in the area, said Jen Schumann, the Georgia Center’s summer academy programming coordinator. The center maintains an online wait list—adding more sessions as needed—and has begun offering overnight options for out-of-town participants. “Our small class sizes give students real one-on-one contact with the specialists whose fields they’re interested in,” Schumann added.

GROWTH OF SUMMER ACADEMY AT UGA 201 5

Students • Camps

637 • 32

201 4

562 • 34

201 3

394 • 22

201 2

357 • 22

201 1 2010

6

284 • 23 210 • 15

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

UGA FACULTY and student musicians performed concerts and gave a master class for high school students during the inaugural season of “UGA Sounds Across Georgia” in Perry and Americus in February. Students of the Hodgson Wind Ensemble, directed by UGA band director Cynthia Johnston Turner, performed military marches, show tunes and original compositions. The concert included guest artist Phil Smith, former principal trumpet of the New York Philharmonic, and the Bulldog Brass Society, UGA’s graduate brass quintet. A master class was conducted by Turner and UGA

students at Perry High School for the community’s young musicians. This session was specifically designed for high school instrumentalists, allowing up-and-coming young artists to interact and perform alongside UGA’s band members. Facilitated by the Archway Partnership, “UGA Sounds Across Georgia” is a collaboration of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music (Office of Academic Programs), the Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach, the Performing Arts Center and the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost.


STATE BOTANICAL GARDEN

The Garden’s Art Contest Promotes the Talent of Young Georgia Artists CAITLIN LANDRESS, an undergraduate student in fine arts at Kennesaw State University, was the 2014 winner of the State Botanical Garden of Georgia’s annual art competition. Her painting, “The Beauty of Fall,” was

one of about 150 submissions from high school and college students from all over Georgia. The winner of the first prize receives $1,000; second and third place winners are awarded $500 and $250. The winning entries become the property of

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

Q&A: Eric Bonaparte ERIC BONAPARTE is a senior public service associate who has served the small business community for more than 22 years. He has worked with more than 1,000 small business owners and facilitated more than 250 training programs. He was a 2006 recipient of the Walter B. Hill Award for distinguished public service and in 2014 received the Public Service and Outreach “Fundraiser of the Year” award. In addition, he has received the Association of Small Business Development Center’s National “Star Performer” award for excellence in small business consulting. He is known for his work on minority business issues at the local, national and international levels. He plays a vital role in developing programs that help create new jobs and enhance business opportunities for minorities. How did you first become involved with the SBDC? I was an MBA student in New York in the mid 1980s and while there I found out about the program and worked on some projects between the SBDC and the business school at Long Island University. After moving to Georgia with my family, I saw an ad in the Atlanta Journal Constitution for a position in Decatur, interviewed and was hired as a business consultant back in 1991. There I worked with a large number of owners from different backgrounds and stages in their businesses. Your work centers on helping minority business owners. What specific challenges do they face? Minority businesses face a lot of the same challenges as non-mi-

the garden and are used to create items sold exclusively in its gift shop. Funded by the J.A. and H.G. Woodruff Jr. Charitable Trust, the contest was established by donor Tom Woodruff in 2005 to honor his parents.

nority businesses, however it is especially difficult for many minority firms to access funding in the form of venture capital, loans and various forms of alternative financing. Much of the difficulty can be addressed with adequate preparation early in the business startup including discussions about how to get owners and the company ready to attract opportunities. Have you seen increased opportunities for minority-owned small businesses in Georgia and, if so, to what do you credit that change? Georgia is ranked very high in terms of minority business growth in the United States, fueled mostly by strong numbers from the Atlanta metropolitan area. Major factors in that growth have been the availability of technical assistance through organizations like the SBDC, local colleges and a vibrant entrepreneurial community. In addition, the proximity to the airport, highways and labor has played a key role in that growth. What is the best advice you can offer a small business owner or entrepreneur? Operate in a way that makes you the most competitive, customer centric and progressive business in your space but with a strategy of conservative spending except for re-investing in the things that grow the business in a consistent and sustainable way.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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◆ Hiawassee TOWNS

RABUN

UNION

◆ Clarkesville

WHITE

HABERSHAM

LUMPKIN

DAWSON

STEPHENS

NORTHEAST HALL

FRANKLIN

BANKS

Gainesville ◆

HART

FORSYTH JACKSON

BARROW

MADISON

◆ Athens

CLARKE

OGLETHORPE OCONEE WALTON

◆ Bishop

MORGAN

Archway Partnership

NEWTON

Carl Vinson Institute of Government Georgia Center for Continuing Education GeorgiaLEADS

JASPER

J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development Office of Service-Learning Small Business Development Center State Botanical Garden

8

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

GREENE

ELBERT


NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST GEORGIA MOUNTAINS BORDERING both North and South Carolina, this region is made up of 26 counties and includes several of the state’s most popular tourist attractions—Lakes Lanier, Hartwell and Oconee, as well as Tallulah Falls, Rabun Gap and many local wineries. With a population of 119,648, the consolidated Athens-Clarke County is the largest city in the region. It is home to the University of Georgia, which includes more than 33,000 students and over 10,000 faculty and staff members, making it a primary economic generator for the northeast region of the state. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n 65 students and 19 faculty members from UGA were involved with projects in two Archway Partnership communities, Habersham and Hart counties; n 246 small business owners or entrepreneurs were served by Small Business Development Centers in Athens and Gainesville; the SBDC helped acquire 40 loans for a total of $24.4 million for businesses in this region, and more than 400 people attended 28 courses offered in the Athens and Gainesville offices. n Towns was one of 10 counties and two multi-county regions selected to participate in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce designed to help spur economic development throughout the state.

With assistance from Hart County leaders, Archway Partnership Professional Ilka McConnell and Dwayne Dye, economic development director for the Hart County Industrial Building Authority, the northeast Georgia county has laid the groundwork for bringing in new business, with an expanded industrial park and a College and Career Academy.

“By focusing on education and work force development, the Hart County community has positioned itself to attract attention from domestic and international companies looking to expand in Georgia.” —Sean McMillan, director of economic development, Atlanta office

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHEAST

CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

FIRE SPARKS REVITALIZATION A blaze that burned out a row of businesses in Clarkesville will lead to a downtown renaissance. By Roger Nielsen

New businesses, housing and better access to downtown merchants are the results of a revitalization strategy developed by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government.

10

WHEN A DEVASTATING FIRE struck Clarkesville’s central square, municipal leaders partnered with the University of Georgia and others to kindle a massive recovery effort that’s igniting an economic recovery in this picturesque mountain city. The day after a fire gutted four downtown buildings in March 2014, UGA’s Carl Vinson Institute of Government and a resource team assembled by the Georgia Department of Community Affairs met with Clarkesville government and commercial leaders to begin organizing the recovery effort. Emergency aid for seven displaced businesses quickly grew into a community project— engaging townspeople to decorate a barricade around the burned buildings in the immediate aftermath of the fire, then into a long-term revitalization plan targeting Clarkesville’s entire central business district. Within months, the city formally partnered with the Vinson Institute and the Georgia Municipal Association to develop a step-by-step revitalization through the innovative Renaissance Strategic Visioning and Planning process. The RSVP program is a collaboration with GMA, DCA, the Georgia Cities Foundation and others to prepare customized blueprints for Georgia cities’ economic development efforts. The Vinson Institute delivered Clarkesville’s awardwinning RSVP plan a little more than a year after the fire. Incorporating feedback from more than 800 citizens and community leaders, the plan lays out a series of achievable steps for rebuilding the fire-damaged buildings, making streetscape improvements and accomplishing short- and long-term economic development goals. Vinson Institute faculty and staff collaborated with citizens, city officials and organizations such as the Clarkesville Main Street program to develop the plan. Several RSVP projects were finished by mid-2015, including eliminating a two-hour parking limit to encourage people to visit downtown, said Mary Beth Horton, director of Clarkesville Main Street. “The fire gave us an opportunity to look at the downtown as a whole,” Horton said. “People were engaged and invested in the planning process, and now they are excited to see these projects getting done.” Contractors are rebuilding the burned structures and expect to have the first spaces ready by the end of 2015, Horton said, adding, “we’ve had a lot of interest from potential tenants.” The city aims to attract retailers and restaurants, develop a downtown hotel and convert vacant upper-story rooms into apartments or condominiums,

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


said Danny Bivins, a Vinson Institute faculty member who coordinates Renaissance planning projects. “The fire was a tragedy, but it gave the community a chance to think about how the buildings on the square and the surrounding blocks could be given a new look that will help drive economic growth in Clarkesville. This plan represents their vision of realistic ways to achieve that goal,” Bivins said. Clarkesville’s success at implementing components of the RSVP plan was recognized with a 2015 Four for the Future award, presented by Georgia Trend magazine and UGA’s Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach to honor effective public-private collaborations that strengthen a community’s vitality. n

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHEAST

OFFICE OF SERVICE-LEARNING

MIND GAMES A new servicelearning program connects students with families coping with dementia. By lori Johnston

Mellissa Pricher, left, and Marissa Jones engage Leo Jackson in activities while his wife, Artelia, works in her garden.

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MARISSA JONES HOLDS UP A FLASH CARD featuring a U.S. president. “Do you recognize him?” “Do you know his name?” she asks when he doesn’t respond. Leo Jackson, a senior citizen with dementia, sits on the couch in his Athens home and stares at the photo. “No.” She gently tells him that the man is President Obama. Jones, a master’s student in the School of Social Work, then spreads out several cards she made with photos of singers and their bios. Jones and classmate Mellissa Pricher ask Jackson to select a favorite singer. He chooses James Brown and Jones begins playing Brown’s songs from her iPhone, which triggers smiles and chuckles from Jackson. “If you’re creative with activities, it can bring back memories,” Jones says. Jones and Pricher are social work students in a new service-learning class that teaches students about the impacts of dementia on a family. Each week, the students visit with Jones, engaging him in activities and giving his family—his caregivers—some much needed time for themselves. Tiffany Washington, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work, created the course primarily for students majoring in social work or public health and have an interest in gerontology. She partnered with the Athens Community Council on Aging (ACCA) who provided the students’ training and identified the families who are enrolled in the program. “It’s so meaningful to me for so many reasons,” Washington said. “We’re helping families. We are addressing the issue of caregiver burden, caregiver stress and recognize that caregivers give around-the-clock care. I always talk about empathy as the most important skill we can have as practitioners. This is very much an empathy-building course.” The course is the first service-learning project for the council that has enabled UGA students to work unsupervised at clients’ homes, said Eve Anthony, ACCA chief operating officer. “We want to make sure that we are a good learning environment so that we’re creating a second generation of professionals who are interested in working with the aging population, or who at least understand issues related to the aging population,” Anthony said. “Service-learning is creating that.” Dementia is a syndrome in which there is a deterioration in memory, thinking behavior and the ability to perform everyday activities. Worldwide 47.5 million people suffer from dementia. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the total number of people with dementia will rise to 75.6 million by 2030. The students get ideas for activities from the people who are caring for the person with dementia. Suggestions have included listening to music or

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


setting the table for dinner, things that can help the person relate to an earlier time in their life. Caregivers use the 90-minute respite provided by the students to take naps or do activities such as cleaning or gardening. Jackson’s wife, Artelia, says listening to music and looking at pictures and words holds his attention and elicits responses. “What they’re doing with him is a new activity,” she says. “When they are here with him, he smiles.” Jackson connects a square puzzle piece showing a brown hat to the “hat” word piece. “You got it. You did it,” Pricher says. “Do you have any hats?” Jones says. “I have a bunch of them,” Jackson says, laughing. As the visit ends, Jackson takes a card of Ray Charles, folds it up neatly and puts it in his pocket. Pricher takes photos to document the moment, considered another break-through in their visits. “Having this opportunity to learn and possibly explore and see if we want to work with this population, for me, it’s great,” Jones says. “Had I not taken this class I don’t know if I would have come into contact with them. I’m able to learn first hand.” n

OFFICE OF SERVICE-LEARNING During the academic year 2014-15:

9,097

Clarke County School District students in grades Pre-K through 12 visited campus as part of Experience UGA.

700

UGA students participated in Experience UGA field trips through service-learning courses or as volunteers.

26

UGA departments/units helped host the Experience UGA field trips.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

13


NORTHEAST

STATE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF GEORGIA

CONNECTING WITH NATURE

The State Botanical Garden promotes the benefits of propagating plants native to Georgia. By Maegan Snyder

HIGH SHOALS Elementary School in Bishop, Ga., was among the sites in Georgia last year that the State Botanical Garden of Georgia introduced Connect to Protect (C2P), a program that encourages gardeners to use native shrubs and wildflowers in their landscaping. Launched in 2014, C2P educates the public about the native plants, which host birds and insects in order to create islands of natural habitats across urban communities. The container garden at High Shoals is maintained by third-grade teacher Laura Dailey’s class and used as a tool for teaching students about native habitats in Georgia and how plants and animals adapt to their environments to ensure survival. Students make observations of the garden to see which animals and insects visit the plants as well as take care of basic maintenance including watering the plants when there is not enough rain. “I think knowing how some of these plants actually benefit animals living in this area of Georgia makes the students more aware of living things in general,” said Dailey. “Most of all, I love that it gets the students outdoors and into nature. I want to instill a love within my students for our environment, and one way to do this is to help them make real connections with it in their learning.” The container garden includes nine different native plants, all propagated at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia’s Mimsie Lanier Center for Native Plant Studies. The program engaged the students in different activities, including planting the garden and a game where they learned about the life cycle and migration patterns of butterflies and honeybees. “With all our programs we want to make sure they are both fun and educational,” said the garden’s children’s program manager Andie Bisceglia. “We want to show students that science can be fun and interactive and that they can play an active part in caring for our native wildlife. I believe the earlier we expose children to outdoor education, the bigger impact we can have. The earlier they learn, the better environmental steward they will be.” Learn more at http://botgarden.uga.edu/conserve.php#Intro. n Above: The third-graders in Oconee County creating the container gardens of native plants will be responsible for taking care of them and will watch as the native wildlife appears.

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

NORTHEAST

HALL OF WONDERS JEFFERY YANG, a junior from Gwinnett County, was one of four students selected from the 67th annual Georgia Science and Engineering Fair to continue on to an international competition. Yang, who attends the Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science & Technology, also was presented with the Pinnacle Award, sponsored by The Kroger Co., Atlanta division, which is the highest award given at GSEF. Administered by the Georgia Center for Continuing Education, the 2015 fair drew more than 700 middle and high school students who competed for cash awards and prizes, as well as expense paid trips to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh in May. Green Power EMC, which sponsored the fair, selected the four ISEF trip winners. Green Power EMC is a nonprofit corporation that buys and markets electricity from green Georgia sources and generates awareness about environmental products and services. Entries this year included projects on sustainable energy, agriculture, meteorology, aeronautics, entomology and chemistry, among many other areas of science and engineering. For Yang’s project he developed a probe that would allow him to visualize receptor forces in living cells. This would allow researchers to map and compare the behavior of healthy cells and cancer cells to better understand how cells mutate and cancerous tumors develop. Green Power EMC ISEF trip winners included:

Georgia students display their scientific talents at the 67th Georgia Science and Engineering Fair. By Angela Seal

n Caroline Hendricks, a sophomore from Carrollton High School, Carroll County, Ga., for “Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Small Partridge Pea.” n Alexandra Melehan, a senior from Woodstock High School, Cherokee County, Ga., for “Transformation of Lemna minor for Nitrate Reduction–Year 3.” n Jake Wong, a junior from Chattahoochee High School, Fulton County, Ga., for “Influence of Gel Content on Produced Amylose Bio-Plastic Film.”

In addition to the four Green Power EMC ISEF trip winners, Chyna Mays, a sophomore from Rockdale Magnet School in Rockdale County, Ga., attended ISEF as an observer. This observer award is sponsored by Merial, an international animal health care company, and is intended to encourage ninth- or tenth-grade students to work toward ISEF selection in future years. n

Jeffery Yang, second from right, won an invitation to the international science and engineering competition and the highest award given at the GSEF. Middle and high school students qualify for the Georgia fair by winning regional competitions.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

15


Leaders from Barrow County Schools are working more effectively through a partnership with UGA’s Carl Vinson Institute of Government. The institute’s training and applied research helps leaders throughout Georgia better understand how school-government cooperation helps control costs in pursuits like siting new schools.

16

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

NORTHEAST

BUILDING STRONGER SCHOOLS The Vinson Institute improves schools through better board governance. By Roger Nielsen

A UGA INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE school governance is helping K-12 systems build the strong schools Georgia needs to ensure a skilled workforce and continued economic growth. The Carl Vinson Institute of Government is leading the outreach program. In less than a year, institute faculty members have established governance and leadership development partnerships with educators in Barrow County and several other Georgia school systems. In June, the Vinson Institute also published a ground-breaking examination of successful collaborations between school systems and local governments. And institute faculty have begun providing specialized training for educators in Georgia and at national conferences through a governance curriculum developed in association with the state Board of Education. “The Vinson Institute has abundant resources and expertise available to educators and administrators, and we’re striving to make Georgia schools more aware of it,” said Russ Cook, who joined the Vinson Institute faculty in January after a 40-year career as a Georgia educator, school superintendent and state-level administrator. In February, the institute led a two-day retreat for the Barrow County Board of Education to help better integrate members and explore effective governance techniques. “The workshop helped the three new board members and the existing members transform into a group that knows each other better and understands more clearly why we do what we do,” said Debi Krause, an incoming board member. At the request of Barrow Schools Superintendent Chris McMichael, institute faculty led an additional session for more than 30 principals and administrators in July. Cook is confident that the institute’s work in Barrow County will develop into a long-lasting relationship and that additional training partnerships will follow. In fact, organizations such as the Georgia School Superintendents Association and the Georgia Association of School Business Officials—as well as half a dozen large and small school systems—are already working with the institute on school governance projects. In addition, a team led by institute faculty member Paula Sanford published one of the first studies to examine collaborations between school systems and local governments. The study, sponsored by the Office of the Vice President of Public Service and Outreach, analyzed six successful collaborations in Georgia and illustrated the critical roles that leadership, trust, communication and mutual goals play in effective intergovernmental partnerships. n

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHEAST

OFFICE OF SERVICE-LEARNING

MORE THAN MEALS Service-learning makes a difference in the community and in the lives of students. By lori Johnston

18

STUDENTS WEARING HAIRNETS, baseball caps and gloves dice squash and zucchini and chop onion in the noisy kitchen at Talmage Terrace, an Athens retirement community. Through Campus Kitchen, a service-learning program at UGA, students prepare free healthy meals for Athens-area senior adults twice a week and have forged friendships and even found career direction. “The heart of service-learning is about relationships. That extends to what people do in their personal professions,” says Shannon O’Brien Wilder, director of the Office of Service-Learning. “It’s about building those relationships and solving problems together.” Campus Kitchen is one of the largest service-learning opportunities offered by the Office of Service-Learning, which turned 10 years old this year. During the academic year 2014-15, 208 service-learning courses, with 420 course sections were taught at UGA. Sarah Jackson, now outreach coordinator for UGA’s Office of Service-Learning, was a student in UGA’s Athens Urban Food Collective course that piloted Campus Kitchen in 2011 under the direction of graduate student Sarah Himmelheber. Jackson laughs as she remembers how little she knew about cooking for a crowd before she met Jane Anderson, Talmage Terrace’s director of dining service. Anderson shared advice about everything from cooking 100 meals for seniors to supervising student workers. She mentored Jackson as a volunteer leader, intern and in her full-time job overseeing Campus Kitchen. “I didn’t have any experience with food service whatsoever, so I was like this lost puppy,” Jackson says. “Jane just swooped in and trained me so I could go and help the students. She never hesitates to do what she can do to help the students. I think that shines through and has just made everything we do stronger.” Through Anderson and her staff at Talmage Terrace, which lets Campus Kitchen use their kitchen, Jackson saw how an interest in community and food issues can translate into a profession. “This gave me that confidence and made me realize that I do have these skills and am able to coordinate and manage volunteers,” says Jackson, who is finishing her master’s degree in public administration in 2015. UGA’s new experiential learning graduation requirement will lead to more opportunities created in partnership with faculty, and community organizations and agencies. On a summer evening, Ashley Owens, a Campus Kitchen dietetics major, shows students how much seasoning to add before she puts meals in the oven. Getting to know senior adults has helped Owens, who will graduate in

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


December 2015, decide to attend nursing school and work in geriatrics. “When I first started working here, I never, ever would have thought that it would turn into me wanting to work with elderly adults for the rest of my life,” she says. “You never know what you’re going to get out of a volunteer experience.” Owens and Pearl Wells, a member of Talmage’s dining services staff, have become friends sharing the same kitchen and even have delivered meals together. Using food donated by The Fresh Market and Trader Joe’s and harvested from UGArden, a student-run farm on South Milledge Avenue, students prepare and deliver around 1,200 prepared meals a month for clients of the Athens Community Council on Aging, in addition to providing 2,500 pounds of food to local agencies. “It’s a blessing to see young people doing something to help the community and to better themselves,” Wells says. “They talk about how it really makes them become better people by what they see and do for others.” n

Above: Working with Campus Kitchen has meant more than just serving the community to Sarah Jackson, who adopted Jane Anderson as a mentor over the months they prepared meals together. Opposite page: Students Aiden Holley and Ashley Owens work together to prepare meals at Talmage Terrace.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHEAST

GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

GEORGIA HOSPITALITY The Georgia Center raises money to provide scholarships to student workers. By Denise Horton

NEELY YOUNG, publisher and editor-in-chief of Georgia Trend magazine, has fond memories of working as a bellboy at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education in the early 1960s. “We wore little red jackets and bell hats and we mostly worked for tips,” he recalled. “If you worked a full day, you could make $8 or $9, which was pretty good money back then.” While the hourly pay for the more than 200 UGA students currently working at the Georgia Center comes close to what Young made on a daily basis, Center Director Bill Crowe would like to do even more. “Our student employees are hard working, great employees, and, obviously, they’re working here because they have a financial need,” Crowe said. “We would like to do a little something to ease their loan debt.” To that end, visitors might notice small signs throughout the Georgia Center announcing a new scholarship fund. Crowe said he hopes to provide each of the UGA student employees a $300-$500 scholarship each semester, on top of their raises. As was true in Young’s day, today’s student employees balance their Georgia Center jobs around their class schedules and while some may pursue careers in the hospitality industry, most see their careers following different trajectories. For example, Katie Scott, a server in the Savannah Room, is pursuing a degree in communications disorder in the College of Education. “My goal is to become a speech pathologist working with toddlers with special needs,” said the rising senior from Stockbridge. Through their jobs at the Georgia Center students build skills that will help them in their careers. Greeting guests, smiling and making customers feel appreciated are practices that will help in any field. And they are exposed to a variety of experiences and insight they might not get elsewhere. “You get to meet people with careers you never imagined,” said Gabe Hinton, who works in guest services—a position he describes as the modern equivalent of being a bellboy. “We might have a veterinary school conference one day and one for judges in cut-flower competitions on another.” Likewise, there are now generations of UGA alumni who have worked at the Georgia Center, Crowe said. “We have a lot of alums who have worked with us over the years who want to help current and future students,” he said. “This is an opportunity for them to help students who are somewhat following in their footsteps.” n

Students have been serving guests at the Georgia Center for decades. Alumnus Neely Young poses with a few at the reception desk. Photos of graduating student workers line a wall of the center under a banner reading, “Enriching the UGA Experience for Our Students for Over 60 Years.”

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

NORTHEAST

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION GEORGIA LAWMAKERS are strengthening their understanding of key environmental issues through the Legislative Environmental Policy Academy developed by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government. The academy provides members of the Georgia General Assembly with information about current and developing environmental issues that affect people across the state. Members of the House and Senate Natural Resources and Environment Committees travel to sites to learn more about topics such as living shorelines, flood protection and saltwater intrusion. “We provide objective information for lawmakers, away from the pressure of the annual legislative session so representatives and senators have the chance to reflect on Georgia’s environmental successes and concerns,” said Shana Jones, program manager with the institute’s unit of Planning and Environmental Services. The academy is supported by a $50,000 Dobbs Foundation grant. The program began in 2011, also through Dobbs Foundation funding. The curriculum helps legislators make informed decisions about complicated environmental issues, according to Dobbs Foundation President David D. Weitnauer. “We want to provide our legislators with unbiased, science-based information about Georgia’s natural resources and how to best care for them,” Weitnauer said. The academy helps legislators understand facts that are critical to informed decision-making, according to Rep. Lynn Smith, chair of the House Natural Resources and Environment Committee. “It helps to arm committee members with knowledge, so they feel confident when they cast their votes,” Smith said. “We need to make sure that what we’re deciding on and voting on is accurate.” n

A Vinson program helps Georgia legislators make informed policy decisions about the environment. By Roger Nielsen

Above: Shana Jones (in pink shirt) heads the program that helps lawmakers learn more about Georgia’s environmental concerns. Right: Rep. Buddy Harden of Cordele, Rep. Brooks Coleman of Duluth, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography Professor Mark Frischer, and Rep. Lynn Smith of Newman, chair of the House Natural Resources and Environment Committee, look for the black gill parasite in shrimp collected during a trawl on the RV Sea Dawg.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

21


WILKES

LINCOLN

WARREN

IE FF DU MC

TALIAFERRO

COLUMBIA

Augusta ◆ RICHMOND

K OC C AS GL

HANCOCK

BURKE

JEFFERSON WASHINGTON

◆ Sandersville

SOUTHEAST JENKINS SCREVEN

JOHNSON EMANUEL

◆ Statesboro

Dublin ◆ BLECKLEY

DODGE

TREUTLEN

WHEELER

MONTGOMERY

LAURENS

Metter ◆

BULLOCH

CANDLER

EFFINGHAM

EVANS TOOMBS

BRYAN TATTNALL

Savannah ◆ CHATHAM Skidaway Island

TELFAIR LIBERTY JEFF DAVIS

◆ Baxley APPLING

Archway Partnership

LONG

WAYNE

MCINTOSH

Carl Vinson Institute of Government GeorgiaLEADS

GLYNN

◆ Brunswick

Marine Extension Public Health Leadership Small Business Development Center

22

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

CAMDEN


SOUTHEAST

SOUTHEAST COASTAL PLAIN THIS VAST AND DIVERSE REGION includes 100 miles of coastline, including barrier islands. Savannah-Chatham County, with 272,000 residents, is the largest metropolitan area in the region, followed by Augusta-Richmond County, with a population of 196,741. Savannah and Brunswick are home to two of the four ports that make up Georgia Ports Authority, one of the state’s largest employers and a major economic engine. Tourism drives much of the economy along the coast, bringing in more than $3 billion a year in tax revenue generated by residents and visitors to the 100 miles of beaches and barrier islands from Tybee Island to St. Mary’s. Inland, Sandersville in Washington County is known as the Kaolin Capital of the world, for the white, alumina-silicate clay mined there and exported around the world to be used in paper, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and paint, among other things. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n 22 students and 22 faculty members from UGA helped with economic development projects in two Archway Partnership communities, Candler and Washington counties; n The Small Business Development Center offices in Augusta, Brunswick, Savannah and Statesboro assisted 646 small business owners or entrepreneurs, helping them acquire $14.3 million in loans. About 500 people attended 41 courses offered through the Augusta, Brunswick, Savannah and Statesboro offices. n Five counties—Appling, Bulloch, Laurens, Richmond and Washington—were chosen to participate in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce designed to help spur economic development throughout the state. In September 2014, UGA Marine Extension, supervised by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, released Ossabaw, a loggerhead turtle into the wild. Ossabaw hatched on Ossabaw Island in August 2011 but was unable to leave the nest. He was rescued by the Georgia Sea Turtle Cooperative network and lived at the UGA Aquarium on Skidaway Island until he was big enough to be released. About 70,000 people met Ossabaw during his stay at the aquarium.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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SOUTHEAST

MARINE EXTENSION

ON THE HALF-SHELL After an absence of more than 50 years, oysters return to the Georgia coast, thanks to a Marine Extension program. By Kelly Simmons

24

UGA MARINE EXTENSION is poised to launch the state’s first oyster hatchery, bringing the popular shellfish back to the Georgia coast after more than 50 years, and diversifying the state’s aquaculture industry. The shellfish research lab on Skidaway Island began piloting oyster growth last year, using funding from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to give wild spat—oyster seed—and advice to aquaculturists in the area who have DNR approval to farm and harvest in specific areas along the coastal rivers and tributaries. DNR funding also paid to outfit part of the shellfish laboratory to be used as a hatchery and to hire a hatchery manager. “We hope eventually to attract a commercial hatchery to supply large amounts of seed,” said Thomas Bliss, director of the Marine Extension Shellfish Research Laboratory on Skidaway Island. “We can focus here on research.” So far, 10 growers have cultivated the seedlings, protected in mesh bags on racks in shallow water. The first full size single shell oysters are expected to be ready for harvest this fall. By summer, some were already 1.75 inches long, about a quarter inch smaller than the legal size for commercial harvesting in Georgia, said Bliss. The survival rate was high—about 99 percent had survived so far. John Pelli, who owns the Savannah Clam Co., was among the local aquaculturists who agreed to try raising oysters. On a windy but sunny day in March, he was on his skiff, moving his mesh bags of shells from one location to another. He hopes to produce about 300,000 oysters a year to supply retailers locally and across the state. In the early 1900s, Georgia was the largest wild oyster producer in the country, harvesting more than eight million pounds of oyster meat in 1908. By the 1940s and 1950s, however, production declined significantly. In the 1960s, canneries built to process the native oysters had closed. In the 1980s, marine extension again began to explore opportunities in aquaculture. Clams, which are easier to grow, were first. In 2013, Georgia clammers harvested more than 105,000 tons of clams, up from 54,000 tons just five years earlier and 4.2 tons in 1993. Clams are much easier to grow because you can buy seed from other states. Georgia doesn’t allow oyster spat from outside the state because it could contain disease. To grow the spat, Bliss and hatchery manager Justin Manley have to recreate the natural spawning process of oysters inside tanks of water. Once the larvae is formed it attaches to a small piece of shell in the tank. The baby oysters, called spat, can be transplanted to other areas to grow into adults. They may be harvested when they are two inches wide.

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


During a low tide, UGA's Thomas Bliss, in red hat, and aquaculturist John Pelli secure the mesh bags holding the growing single-shell oysters. By law they must be at least two inches wide before they can be harvested and sold.

This year, Bliss says they’ll produce about 100,000 to 200,000 seeds, or spat. By 2020, he hopes that will increase to five to eight million. The payoff would be worth it. The 100,000-500,000 oysters grown in 2015 have an estimated dock value of $75,000. Five to eight million would bring in about $1.6 million. “Everybody’s crazy about single oysters,” Pelli said. “People are willing to pay good money for them.” n

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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SOUTHEAST

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

REVIVED AND THRIVING A coastal community is reborn with help from the Small Business Development Center. By Kelly Simmons

SBDC directors David Lewis from Brunswick, left, and Kyle Hensel from Savannah, provided assistance to Michael Hardy, middle, and investors began buying foreclosed property in Shellman Bluff.

26

A GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY in Shellman Bluff, Ga., has new life, thanks to local investors and the UGA Small Business Development Center (SBDC). When Michael and Marcia Hardy built a house in Sutherland Buff Plantation in 2006, they didn’t anticipate buying a golf course and adjoining properties. But the Sapelo Hammock Golf Club, surrounded by the elegant houses in Sutherland Bluff, the Sapelo River, marshes and mighty Live Oaks, was the gathering place for residents, including Martin NeSmith, owner of NeSmith Chevrolet, Buick, GMC in Jesup and Claxton; Martin Miller, president and CEO of Coastal Home Care, which provides health care workers to homebound people in southeast Georgia; and John Giles, a retired General Electric executive. Many, like the Hardys, had retired and lived there full-time; some maintained second homes there. When the course suddenly closed, Hardy knew he had to do something to keep the community intact. He reached out to potential investors to buy the course. “It’s the cornerstone of the community, whether you play golf or not,” Michael Hardy said. The housing crash could have been the end of Sutherland Bluff and the adjoining residential neighborhoods and businesses, said David Lewis, director of the SBDC Brunswick office. “When the golf course crashed, they realized their property value was going to nothing,” Lewis said. “It created a need for them to work together. The golf course is going to be viable. They’ve gotten to the point where it is sustainable.” Hardy created an LLC and began the process to buy the property, 171 acres near the coast with two miles of marsh front. In the past five years, 98 families have bought into the project, at levels ranging from $5,000 to $140,000. They have raised more than $2.4 million to buy the property and pay for continued improvements, without assistance from the county. But they didn’t just invest money. They put in sweat equity, coming together to bush hog the open land, landscape the grounds and paint the clubhouse. Kyle Hensel, director of the SBDC Savannah office, helped the group rebuild and optimize the web site for the golf course. “We bought into it 100 percent,” said Jordy Evans, a retired principle with Edward Jones Investments. “We’re cutting the grass, we’re writing the checks. We want to make it better.” Nearby, a condominium complex had gone into foreclosure. Hardy knew that could be a good investment, to provide visitors to Sapelo Hammock a place to stay overnight and take advantage of the natural resources in the area, such as fishing, boating and bird watching.

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


Hardy, Miller, NeSmith, Giles and local developer Leland Poppell bought 17 units and reached out to Lewis for guidance. Lewis helped them model that purchase—the condos, as well as a boat storage facility and a car wash— and plan for ongoing management costs. Hardy’s group sold 10 of the condominiums and maintain seven to rent to visitors. Hardy, Miller and NeSmith also bought storage units and a car wash that were in foreclosure and have them operational again. Through sheer diligence Hardy was able to convince Dollar General to build a store on the site, bringing a much-needed retail option to the area and jobs to local residents. When houses in the neighboring Coopers Point community went into foreclosure, Hardy, Miller and NeSmith stepped in and bought 76 foreclosed lots, as well as 11 others in Sutherland Bluff. Through a land liquidation company they were able to flip the lots, selling 85 of 86 on the day they went onto the market. Included in the sales were memberships to the golf course and reduced rates at the condominiums. Houses are once again occupied and new ones are underway. Former UGA basketball player David Dunn is building a home in Coopers Point. “We could not have had the success we have had without the skills of David (Lewis) and the SBDC,“ Hardy said. “David has made it easy for me to attract investors and people that want to make a difference in their community.” Many goals remain. The community needs a health clinic, a full-scale grocery store, a community center for older adults and a hardware store. Hardy and his partners have an architect working on how to best develop 65 acres near Coopers Point to serve the community. On a warm July morning, he was approached by local fire chief Mark Deverger as he waited for a breakfast biscuit at Clyde’s. “We need a new firehouse,” Deverger told Hardy. “Let’s work together on that,” Hardy responded. “I guarantee we can make that work.” n

Above, from left: Martin Miller, Martin NeSmith and Michael Hardy at the Sapelo Hammock Golf Club.

“SBDC should be utilized by all communities. We are so fortunate to have access to these resources throughout our great state.” —Michael Hardy

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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SOUTHEAST

J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

APPLING LEADS A partnership between UGA and state business leaders helps boost rural communities. By Kathleen Cason

Appling County leaders hope their natural resources, like the Altamaha River, will boost tourism and development in southeast Georgia.

28

APPLING COUNTY has a lot of things going for it—the Altamaha River, Moody Forest, which boasts one of the last stands of long leaf pines, and a united community. What it hasn’t had, until now, is a structured leadership program to ensure county growth for the future. It now is one of 10 counties and two multi-county regions selected as inaugural participants in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce, designed to build a pipeline of trained leaders throughout the state. “GeorgiaLEADS is an opportunity for us to reach out to the younger population, keep them engaged in community affairs, and get them to come back here after college,” said Keri Crosby, executive director of the Appling County Chamber of Commerce. The first step in the process is setting up a local stakeholder group to define a vision for the community and the leadership development needs to realize that vision. For Appling County, the stakeholders include representatives from business, education, government, a woman who has served as a community volunteer for more than 40 years and high school seniors. Their vision includes preparing young adults for leadership roles and equipping individuals in leadership positions to help the community grow and prosper. “What’s the draw to reside here?” asked Lee Lewis, Appling County manager. “We need to have a reason for young people to want to come back—the hometown feel, friendly atmosphere and our natural resources offer opportunities to build on.” The county already capitalizes on its natural resources, with four public landings along the Altamaha River and opportunities for outdoor activities, tourism and business on several lakes. The local board of tourism each year offers two 12-mile canoe trips that draw people from surrounding counties. “There’s a lot of energy in Appling County to create something new and different,” said Mary Beth Bass, the lead Fanning faculty member for GeorgiaLEADS. “Plus the community has a strong reputation for working well together.” With priorities set, the next step will be unrolling leadership development efforts over the next one or two years. “GeorgiaLEADS will help us identify the individuals who will be great assets to help us grow the community,” Crosby said. “There’s a lot for us to figure out so that’s why Fanning is at the table.” n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

SOUTHEAST

TALE OF TWO CITIES THE LEADERS of two central Georgia cities devised a novel solution to a mutual wastewater treatment issue—unite both municipalities into a single government. To help overcome the considerable logistical challenges, city officials tapped the Carl Vinson Institute of Government’s extensive expertise facilitating inter-government consolidations. The consolidated city of McRae-Helena debuted on Jan. 1, 2015, becoming Georgia’s first city-to-city merger since Graymont and Summit combined to become Twin City in 1921. McRae-Helena’s newly elected mayor and city council members celebrated the new year with a group swearing-in ceremony at 12:01 a.m. By consolidating the governments, municipal leaders cleared the way for Telfair State Prison to get the wastewater treatment service it needed for a planned expansion. The prison is a major employer in Helena, which couldn’t afford to enlarge its sewage treatment plant. Negotiations for using McRae’s treatment plant had stalled—until 2013 when Helena’s then-mayor Mike Young and June Bradfield, McRae’s mayor at the time, hit upon the idea of consolidating. In spring 2014, community leaders asked the Institute of Government to help them combine two cities’ operations and services. It was new territory for the institute, which has a long history of assisting city-county government consolidations including the newest, Macon-Bibb County, but had never facilitated the process of merging two contiguous cities. For much of 2014, institute faculty met regularly with members of a consolidation task force to answer questions and suggest solutions to knotty issues like how to reconcile conflicting provisions in city ordinances, zoning codes, tax rules—even liquor licensing regulations. “I’m very pleased that they asked us to help,” said Ted Baggett, head of the institute’s Strategic Operations and Planning Assistance division. “Either functional or full consolidation is an option that county or municipal governments can always consider, and the institute can provide assistance as local leaders explore the details of a merger. And when they choose the direction that’s best for them, we can be there to provide technical support.” Besides benefiting Telfair State Prison, the McRae-Helena consolidation is uncovering economies of scale that will help city leaders save tax money, said Bradfield, who chose not to run for mayor of the new unified government. Young, who did run and became the first mayor of McRae-Helena, said the larger population size also raises the community’s profile in the competition for grants and other economic development assistance. “I like the opportunity that our city has now. And the citizens didn’t see too drastic of a change in the way our operations work from day to day,” he said. n

CVIOG helped two Telfair County cities become one, the first city-city merger since 1921. By Roger Nielsen

Newly appointed/elected leaders of the City of McRae-Helena were sworn in at 12:01 a.m. on Jan. 1, 2015. From left: Martha Ann Mullis, Fred Crawford, Mildred Jones.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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SOUTHEAST

MARINE EXTENSION

REACHING A NEW GENERATION Fifty middle and high school students attended the first coastal conservation summit, organized by UGA. By Maegan Snyder

Students at the Youth Ocean Conservation Summit gain knowledge about environmental protection to take back to their home communities.

30

GEORGIA’S FIRST Youth Ocean Conservation Summit drew 50 middle and high school students—from 15 Georgia cities and five other states—to Skidaway Island in February. Sponsored by UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant, and organized by Georgia Sea Grant marine education student interns, activities focused on empowering youth participants with the knowledge, skills and resources needed to successfully launch ocean conservation projects in their own communities. “The summit provides a unique opportunity for students to come together with their peers, learn about ocean conservation issues in their local communities and start to develop solutions for those problems,” said intern Sean Russell, who earned his bachelor of science degree in biology in 2013 from the University of Florida, and founded the first Youth Ocean Conservation Summit OCS in 2011 at Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota, Fla. “When we look at the big picture, it’s overwhelming and many people simply don’t know where to start. I think the most important thing we want students to take away from the summit is to just start somewhere and take action.” Keynote speaker Cathy Sakas, chair of Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and co-founder of Ocean Exchange, a conservation advocacy group, helped students learn to effectively communicate messages regarding ocean conservation, as well as inspiring stories of ocean stewardship. Students also attended a panel discussion on environmental conservation with representatives from the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, Georgia coastal advocacy organization One Hundred Miles, Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary and Marine Extension. Later, they had the opportunity to work on action plans, ranging from organizing community cleanup efforts and rebuilding oyster reefs to raising awareness on preventing plastic pollution and marine debris. Sarah Katherine Bass, a sixth-grader from the Habersham School in Savannah, and two fellow students planned to create a series of YouTube videos and other social media accounts that show the causes of marine debris and what it can do to the various animals in the ocean. Their goal is to encourage people to not just help the environment, but also spread awareness of marine debris and its impact. “I came to the summit because I wanted to enhance my interest in marine biology and learn what I can do to take action and save the environment,” Bass said. “If this generation doesn’t take charge, then who will?” n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


MARINE EXTENSION

SOUTHEAST

A PLACE IN THE SHADE KINDERGARTEN TEACHER Katie Cowart has brought her students to the Marine Education Center and Aquarium for the past three years. The children enjoy handling the shelled invertebrates in the touch tanks and learning about marine life found along the Georgia coast. The only downside of the field trips is lunchtime—when it rains. “When the weather is nice, the classes can eat outside in the grassy area,” Cowart, a UGA alumnus, said. “But if it rains or the weather is bad, some classes have to eat their lunches on the bus. So some children have different experiences from others.” Thanks to a gift from Springer Mountain Farms and company president Gus Arrendale, a UGA alumnus, visitors to the Skidaway site will soon have a covered pavilion next to the aquarium where they can gather and eat on hot or rainy days. The $25,000 gift from Arrendale to Marine Extension will pay for materials to build the pavilion. Volunteers from the neighboring residential community, who call themselves the Barn Builders, are constructing the 1,000-squarefeet facility. In recent years the Barn Builders have built lean-to sheds, fences, picnic tables, information kiosks and more for the aquarium. “I am proud to be able to give back to my alma mater with this pavilion. I think it will help facilitate learning and the enjoyment of the unique outdoor environment in which only Georgia has to offer,” Arrendale said. “From the peak of Springer Mountain to the Georgia coast, protecting the environment is high on our list of priorities here at Springer Mountain Farms.” The pavilion, which will have lights, running water, ceiling fans and picnic tables to seat 50, will be near the head of the Jay Wolf Nature trail that runs along the Skidaway River. “Visitors, especially school groups, have been asking for a place to eat for years,” said Anne Lindsay, associate director for marine education. “We have never had a place where student groups could gather on their own out of rainy and windy weather. The pavilion will allow folks to stay on campus longer and adds to the convenience of the site as a field trip destination.” “Whatever project they come up with, we’ll try to tackle it,” said Lars Ljungdahl, a Barn Builders volunteer. “At our age, retired as we are, we have the time. We like to give back.” Cowart looks forward to her school trip this year, when the students will have a comfortable place to eat and relax. “We’ll be able to talk to the children under the pavilion after they finish their lunch,” Cowart said. “It will give us a place to recap all the things we learn at the aquarium, instead of waiting until the ride home.” n

A generous gift will provide a covered pavilion for outdoor education at the UGA Aquarium. By Michele Nicole Johnson

The covered pavilion is expected to be completed this fall, with running water and electricity.

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SOUTHEAST

MARINE EXTENSION

YOUNG PHILANTHROPISTS Fifth-graders raise money for the UGA Marine Extension Education Center and Aquarium. By Michele Nicole Johnson

32

THE FIFTH-GRADERS at St. Martin’s Episcopal School are proof that you don’t have to be grown up to make a huge impact. Since 2011, students at the Atlanta school have donated $4,473.75 to UGA Marine Education Center and Aquarium. A check for the school’s most recent donation of $1,000 was presented last spring during the annual fifth-grade trip to Skidaway Island. “You have given so much to us and our fifth-graders, that we really wanted to give back,” said Mary McPherson, elementary school principal at St. Martin’s. The students raised the money at a bake sale, part of St. Martin’s annual Cookie Company project, an interdisciplinary unit in which fifth-graders work in small teams to form cookie companies. The students learn about advertising, website development, budgets, and they sharpen their math skills through calculating for large-batch baking. All of this takes place over 10 days, culminating with a school-wide bake sale. “It lets our students see where their money is going,” McPherson said, “which is an important part of our service-learning development.” Over the years, the donations have been used to purchase a variety of items for the UGA Aquarium, including a 15-person life raft, life jackets, life rings, a marine-grade hot water heater and refrigerator for the R/V Sea Dawg, a VHF marine radio, a GPS chart plotter and several anchors. “The students are very generous and proud to be able to help UGA’s educational efforts,” said John “Crawfish” Crawford, a marine education specialist and boat captain at the aquarium. “They are appreciative, very interested, polite and a real pleasure to teach.” n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

SOUTHEAST

ENGINEERING A ROAD STUDENTS from the College of Engineering and the Terry College of Business Students get are working with the Candler Archway Partnership to map routes in Metter hands-on for a new road to relieve traffic congestion, and to identify potential businesses to recruit to locate along the corridor. experience with “Increasing traffic and frequent business turnover are both problems in the Candler Metter,” said Angel Jackson, an Archway operations coordinator. Last fall, engineering students began to work on the design for the selected County Archway route. Students from the Terry College MBA program looked at commercial Partnership. development options. With help from the UGA Small Business Development Center they made recommendations for commercial chains that could benefit By Michele Nicole Johnson the community. “We approached our work from a marketing perspective, looking at different metrics to find chains that would be interested in a town like Metter,” said Christopher Maher, an MBA student from Philadelphia. “The SBDC analysis helped by showing the number of different businesses in the area versus what the community should have based on the demographic data, identifying specific areas the community could address to grow economically.” “The fact that this is a real-life project for these students is College of Engineering students Adam Day and Katie priceless to us,” said Jamie Riggs, president and executive direcDean look over plans they helped develop for a new tor of the Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce. n thoroughfare in Candler County.

WANTED: MORE NURSES WHEN WASHINGTON COUNTY leaders began discussing one of their biggest concerns—a lack of accessible health care—they knew it would be difficult to attract qualified health professionals to the rural community. So they decided to grow their own. Through the Washington County Archway Partnership, they launched an iniNEW NURSES tiative that would generate more than 300 new registered nurses by 2010—27 graduated 2015, with another 100 expected 2011—29 graduated to be board certified in early 2016. 2012—61 graduated In 2009, the Washington Coun2013—71 graduated ty Archway Partnership facilitated 2014—74 graduated 2015—106 enrolled a series of meetings between offifor graduation in cials from Washington County ReDecember. An additional 76 enrolled in the gional Medical Center (WCRMC), course that begins Oconee Fall Line Technical Colin October. lege (OFTC), potential health care

employers and community leaders to discuss a community-based education program that would help licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) learn the skills they would need to become registered nurses (RNs). As a result, the OFTC and the medical center partnered to create an EMT/LPN to RN bridge programs. OFTC provides free instructional space at its Sandersville campus and Darton College in Albany provides the instruction. The University System of Georgia helped fund the program. Twenty-seven students from seven middle Georgia counties were in the first group. In recent years classes have enrolled an average of 75 students, with 306 graduating so far and passing their board certification exams. While some students have come from as far away as Atlanta and Savannah, many are from middle Georgia. n

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

33


PUTNAM

BALDWIN JONES

MONROE

◆ Macon

WILKINSON

BIBB CRAWFORD

M I D D L E TWIGGS PEACH HOUSTON

◆ Hawkinsville PULASKI

WILCOX

BEN HILL

TURNER

IRWIN

COFFEE

BACON

◆ Tifton TIFT

PIERCE BERRIEN

ATKINSON WARE

COOK LANIER

MIDDLE

Archway Partnership Carl Vinson Institute of Government GeorgiaLEADS

CLINCH BROOKS

Marine Extension Public Health Leadership Small Business Development Center

34

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

CHARLTON

Folkston ◆

◆ Valdosta LOWNDES

BRANTLEY

ECHOLS


MIDDLE

MIDDLEI-75 CORRIDOR INTERSTATE 75 runs from Tennessee to Florida, passing through Atlanta before cutting through the middle of the state past Macon, Tifton and Valdosta. With about 157,000 residents, the consolidated Macon-Bibb County is the region’s largest and is home to the Georgia Music Hall of Fame and the Ocmulgee Indian Mounds, built between 900 and 950 AD. The site is now a national park with a monument honoring the mounds. Just south of Macon in Houston County is Robins Air Force Base, home of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex, the 78th Air Base Wing and more than 60 other units. The base is the largest industrial complex in Georgia, with a workforce of more than 25,000 civilians, contractors and military members. Tifton is home to an extended campus of the University of Georgia, and a research facility—formerly the Coastal Plain Experiment Station—that dates back to 1918. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n 30 students and five faculty members from UGA helped the Pulaski County Archway Partnership with economic development projects. n The Small Business Development Offices in Macon and Valdosta assisted 402 small business owners or entrepreneurs, helping them acquire $8 million in loans. More than 300 people attended 23 courses offered through the Macon and Valdosta offices. n A 10-county region, including Turner, Ben Hill, Irwin, Tift, Berrien, Cook, Lanier, Brooks, Lowndes and Echols counties, were chosen to participate in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce designed to help spur economic development throughout the state. n Nine counties—Turner, Ben Hill, Irwin, Tift, Berrien, Cook, Coffee, Brooks and Lowndes—were selected to participate in the UGA Public Health Leadership Academy, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the College of Public Health designed to build a culture of health in communities throughout the state.

Native plants raised at the Mimsie Lanier Center for Native Plant Studies at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia will soon be headed to Macon, where they will be installed in three public areas around the city—Rose Hill Cemetery, Central City Park and the Dr. W.G. Lee Camellia Garden. “I hope we can expand native plant plantings throughout Macon-Bibb County,” said Stephen Reichert, a Macon native and chairman of the State Botanical Garden Advisory Board. “I want the State Botanical Garden of Georgia to be the STATEWIDE botanical garden. I love my hometown and the SBGG and want them both to grow together.”

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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MIDDLE

ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

HOOPS FOR LIFE A leadership program in Pulaski County brings youth together around basketball. By Denise Horton

36

THE BASKETBALL COURTS at the Ramsey Student Recreation Center turned into a championship arena in July when 50 teenagers from the Pulaski LIFE League came to the University of Georgia to play the final games of their season. But the trip—the second annual visit to UGA by the Pulaski LIFE Leaguers— was about more than a game. It was the capstone event for these elementary, middle and high school students, who spent five weeks this summer learning about good sportsmanship, appropriate behavior, making the right decisions, setting goals, managing money and dressing for success. Rising 10th-grader Ga’quan Watkins earned $500, which he will receive when he begins college in three years, by completing a series of tasks demonstrating the life lessons taught through LIFE League, which means Leading and Inspiring through Fellowship and Education. “I learned a lot about preparing myself for the ‘big’ world,” said Watkins, who is planning to major in animal science at Fort Valley State University. The Pulaski LIFE League began three years ago when Jeff Tarver, its founder and director, reached out to the Archway Partnership in Pulaski County. Through the Archway Partnership, a unit of the UGA Office of Public Service and Outreach, communities in Georgia are connected with university resources that can help them address their most pressing challenges. There are currently eight active Archway Partnership counties. Tarver, a former juvenile probation officer who now teaches criminal justice studies at Middle Georgia State, saw the need for a program that would engage students and help them build life skills for success. “Jeff, along with fellow Pulaski Tomorrow participants Tyler Jenkins and Nevin Shennett, wanted to reach young people before they get into trouble and LIFE League grew out of that idea,” said Michelle Elliott, the Archway professional from UGA in Pulaski County. What began as five Saturdays spent learning life lessons followed by lunch and basketball for Pulaski County youngsters has grown exponentially, morphing into summer camps that reach hundreds of children in Pulaski and neighboring counties. This summer, more than 200 children ages 5-18 from Pulaski, Bibb, Houston, Twiggs and Bleckley counties participated in camps. While basketball is still a major draw, programming has expanded to include an interpretative arts camp in Bibb County and a drumming group in Hawkinsville. Community support for the program has been strong. This year, instead of riding in an un-air conditioned school bus, the students traveled to and from Athens in a chartered bus paid for by Charles Johnson, a Hawkinsville native, UGA alumnus and current member of the Carolina Panthers NFL team. The Archway Partnership has been instrumental in bringing many of the

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


campers to UGA for a chance to experience life as a Bulldog. During the LIFE League visit in July, representatives of the president, admissions and the Office of Institutional Diversity met with the students. They ate lunch in a campus dining hall and toured the Ramsey Center. A highlight of the day was the arrival of UGA basketball players Yante Maten and Kenny Geno, who assisted in presenting awards following the games. They also shared their personal experiences. “When I was a kid, I was always picked last for basketball,” said Maten, a sophomore from Pontiac, Mich. “But then, I started making sure I was always in the gym more than anyone else and I became much better.” Geno, a junior from Booneville, Miss., noted that even as a college player he has had to re-focus. “I used to struggle, not just as a player, but as a person. I hadn’t worked hard enough for the past two years, but now I’m in the gym for an extra hour-and-a-half every day just shooting and improving so I can contribute better as a player.” While all of the campers received medals for their basketball prowess, Tarver had prizes for those who had met the other camp requirements. He also had a special award for Tyneshia Edwards, a former LIFE Leaguer who served as a coach this summer, for earning a 4.0 grade point average at Central Georgia Technical College. Throughout the day, Tarver made sure the focus didn’t drift from the true goal of LIFE League. “This organization is about more than basketball,” Tarver told the students. “It’s about life. I want you to think big. Don’t be mediocre. Think big.” n

Middle and high school students from Pulaski County cap off their basketball season with final games at the Ramsey Center. Helping present award ribbons were Yante Maten, above, and Kenny Geno, both members of the UGA basketball team. It was the second year the Pulaski LIFE League has visited UGA for its championship games and a tour of campus.

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MIDDLE

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

TECH BOOM An IT company in Macon is thriving, thanks to help from the Small Business Development Center. SBDC Last year SBDC worked with

4,705 small business owners and prospective entrepreneurs.

SBDC helped launch more than 330 new businesses and obtain $135 million in start-up capital. SBDC assistance led to the creation of more than 3,000 new jobs.

ROB BETZEL FIRST APPROACHED the UGA Small Business Development Center (SBDC) in 2010 looking for help with his rapidly growing IT business. Five years later, he’s still turning to SBDC professionals, with plans to double the size of his firm. “Our culture is driven around small business growth—both ours and the companies I address. The SBDC is a continuum of this conversation, helping us decide where we’re going next,” says Betzel, who owns Infinity Network Solutions. “I’ve gotten very good at surrounding myself with very smart people, like the Macon SBDC staff, to help make sure we succeed.” When Betzel first sought UGA assistance his company was growing by 1020 percent a year. The SBDC used Betzel’s data to build a model of how his business could run in the future. “They helped me better understand cash flow cycles, what they look like, how to manage them and how to use our credit line better,” he says. “Bottom line, they helped us better predict, manage and control our growth.” Since then, Infinity Network Solutions has grown from 15 full-time employees to 28, and has earned several small business awards. Three times the business has been on the Inc. 5000 list of America’s fastest-growing private businesses. “People can be taught to do technical things better,” Betzel says. “But if you build a system of management, knowledge and understanding of people, the culture you build is the difference between good and great results for your small business.” n

Brothers Rob and Brian Betzel are partners in Infinity Network Solutions.

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J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

MIDDLE

THINK REGIONAL ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE has provided economic stability to the middle Georgia region for many years. To further strengthen the area, middle Georgia is looking for ways to diversify its economy, and that will require some regional thinking. So the Middle Georgia Regional Commission partnered with the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development to design and implement a program that develops a pipeline of leaders with a regional focus. The Carl Vinson Institute of Government also provided technical assistance. Called the Middle Georgia Regional Champions, the program is funded by a grant from the Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment. For eight sessions starting in January, 40 leaders in the 11-county region— from business, industry, government, faith-based organizations, nonprofits, education and workforce development—uncovered the assets and challenges of middle Georgia, and sharpened their skills, learning about the regional economy, collaboration, and competencies that regional leaders need. In addition to discovering their personal leadership styles, the group piloted a new tool developed at the Fanning Institute that assesses risk-taking propensity and shows how a group’s willingness to take risks affects decision-making. In August, the Champions marked the end of training and the start of putting their regional values in action at a commissioning ceremony held at Museum of Aviation. Over the next year, these leaders will work with the Middle Georgia Regional Commission to strengthen the region’s economic vitality, education, and quality of life. n

Middle Georgia communities join forces to spur economic growth. By Kathleen Cason

MIDDLE OF

GEORGIA

Putnam

Jones

Monroe

Baldwin

Bibb

Wilkinson

Crawford

Twiggs

Peach Houston

Pulaski

At left are small cards, designed by a UGA student, to remind members of the Middle Georgia Regional Commission of the values they agreed to champion.

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MIDDLE

MARINE EXTENSION

WORKING WITH NATURE Folkston’s landscaping plan includes native plants and sustainable land use practices, thanks to Marine Extension. By Michele Nicole Johnson

MILES FROM THE COAST, UGA Marine Extension and the College of Environment and Design are helping beautify a Georgia community that a serves as a gateway to one of the state’s most popular natural attractions. Keren Giovengo, manager of the marine extension’s EcoScapes Sustainable Land Use Program, and Jon Calabria, an assistant professor in UGA’s College of Environment and Design, are helping the city of Folkston and Charlton County landscape the grounds around the renovated county courthouse and government campus. The landscaping project is important to the community for several reasons. The government campus includes historic buildings. Renovations have focused on using local labor and resources, like Georgia-grown pine. Also, Folkston is the eastern gateway to the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, which attracts thousands of visitors every year. “Charlton County understands and appreciates the role it plays as a gateway to the Okefenokee,” Giovengo said. “They sought our help in finding ways to integrate plants from that area that will help the community create a sense of place and promote the natural beauty of the region to its visitors.” EcoScapes promotes responsible stewardship of Georgia’s natural resources with sustainable land use development and landscaping practices, and engages Georgians through outreach, education and technical assistance. While the project is still in its conceptual stage, the proposed plan will incorporate native plants and best management practices to reduce stormwater runoff at the two-block site. The landscaping project also will serve as a demonstration garden, a teaching tool illustrating how plant choices and stormwater techniques can be duplicated on a residential or commercial scale. “Instead of fighting the native environment, we want to work with it,” said Will Lovett, then the Charlton County agent for UGA Extension. “It is a natural fit to get Keren and the EcoScapes program involved. We want to promote our natural environment.” n

DO IT YOURSELF Through EcoScapes, UGA Marine Extension has created a Native Plant Search Engine to help home gardeners, farmers and landscapers find plants that are appropriate for their gardens. Go to www.bugwood.org/ecoscapes. EcoScapes also assisted in the development of an app to help Georgians design rain gardens. Go to http://marex.uga.edu/rain-garden-app.

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

MIDDLE

ALL FOR ONE THE CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT helped Macon and Bibb County consolidate their governments two years ago, then worked with the unified government to pave the way for reduced spending and infrastructure improvements to spur economic development. “The consolidation created a renewed sense of confidence and enthusiasm in the community. It has been very productive, and the institute has been instrumental in helping us through the process,” said Robert Reichert, who was elected the first mayor of Macon-Bibb County after serving two terms as Macon city mayor. Anticipated economic development projects include an airport expansion to better accommodate cargo planes and a highway project to better connect the airport to the area’s two interstate highways. In addition, the consolidated government has reduced spending by 15 percent in the past two years. State and local government leaders in the middle Georgia community worked with the institute to provide technical assistance and practical knowledge before, during and after the consolidation process. “Our collaboration was a very in-depth, handson process dealing with the nuts and bolts of consolidation,” said Ted Baggett, head of the Strategic Operations and Planning Assistance with the institute. “An entire community came together to make this succeed. It represented a huge effort to include everybody and do it right.” Voters in Macon and Bibb County overwhelmingly approved a government consolidation in July 2012. Afterward, the institute helped a consolidation task force reconcile differences between city and county ordinances, prepare a financial policy, and draft a budget, a capital improvement plan and revenue projections for the new government. Reichert and the first Macon-Bibb County Commission members took office Jan. 1, 2014. The institute then facilitated a series of workshops for the newly installed leaders to help them establish management priorities and develop a strategic plan. The plan provided a blueprint that city leaders used to draft the current fiscal-year budget adopted June 16. “Consolidation didn’t just pop up overnight,” said Jeffery Monroe, an attorney who chaired two consolidation task force committees. “The groundwork was being laid years in advance in cooperation with the Institute of Government, and the entire community was encouraged to participate in the process.” n

UGA guidance helps Bibb County and the city of Macon consolidate and save money. By Roger Nielsen

Macon-Bibb County leaders embrace a vision of economic growth as the unified government launches initiatives such as the Second Street Corridor beautification project.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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HARRIS

TALBOT

TAYLOR

Columbus ◆

MUSCOGEE

CHATTAHOOCHEE

MARION

MACON

SCHLEY DOOLY STEWART

WEBSTER

◆ Americus SUMTER CRISP

QUITMAN

SOUTHWEST TERRELL

RANDOLPH

LEE

◆ Albany

CLAY

DOUGHERTY

CALHOUN

EARLY

WORTH

BAKER

MITCHELL

MILLER

COLQUITT

Moultrie ◆

Archway Partnership Carl Vinson Institute of Government SEMINOLE Georgia Center for Continuing Education

DECATUR

GeorgiaLEADS Public Health Leadership Small Business Development Center

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

GRADY

Cairo ◆

THOMAS


SOUTHWEST

SOUTHWEST FARM COUNTRY WITH MORE THAN 194,000 RESIDENTS, Columbus-Muscogee County, the first consolidated city-county in Georgia, is the most populous in the southwest region. It also includes Fort Benning, the home of the U.S. Army Infantry since 1918, and has been the U.S. Army Home of the Armor, which trains critical maneuver forces, since 2005. Plains, Ga., in Sumter County, is home to Jimmy Carter, the 39th president of the United States. Visitors can tour President Carter’s boyhood home, now a national historic site, or on certain Sundays hear President Carter lead a Sunday school class at Maranatha Baptist Church. Colquitt County/Moultrie was the first Archway Partnership community, launching as a pilot program in 2005. Agriculture still reigns supreme in the southwest corner of the state, with acres of pecans and peanuts—two of Georgia’s top crops—throughout the region. At the Southwest Georgia Research and Education Center near Plains UGA and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers study ways to help farmers diversify and increase their crop yields. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n 26 students and 10 faculty members from UGA helped the Sumter and Grady County Archway Partnerships with economic development projects. n The Small Business Development Center in Albany assisted 174 small business owners or entrepreneurs, helping them acquire almost $3 million in loans. n Sumter and Colquitt counties were chosen to participate in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce designed to help spur economic development throughout the state.

In Sumter County, priorities defined by the community for the Archway Partnership include renovating playgrounds at three schools, training leaders, completing a community health assessment and addressing the issues and challenges it identifies, and looking at opportunities to increase economic development.

n Twelve counties—Sumter, Crisp, Randolph, Terrell, Lee, Dougherty, Worth, Mitchell, Colquitt, Decatur, Grady and Thomas—were selected to participate in the UGA Public Health Leadership Academy, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the College of Public Health designed to build a culture of health in communities throughout the state.

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SOUTHWEST

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

SBDC HELPS BREED WINNERS Many of the fastest growing businesses owned by UGA alumni have been helped by the Small Business Development Center.

Alumnus Will Harris credits his growth to help from the SBDC’s Albany office.

44

WHEN WILL HARRIS DECIDED to convert his father’s beef cattle operation in Bluffton, Ga., into one that would adopt more humane practices for raising cattle, he turned to the Small Business Development Center (SBDC). Staff at the SBDC office in Albany helped him develop a business plan for a new processing plant at White Oak Pastures, and connected him to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development to help determine the feasibility of a new facility. “We knew this method was better for animal welfare, more sustainable, produced an artisan product, and that it cost more. The question was, were there enough sophisticated consumers who would pay the premium needed to cover the added costs of providing these benefits?” Harris said. “‘Build it, and they will come’ does not always work.” His new plant opened in 2008, soon processing 75 cows a week with 28 employees. Now White Oak Pastures employs over 100 people and produces grassfed beef and lamb, pastured poultry, pastured eggs and Certified Organic vegetables. White Oak is one of 21 companies on this year’s UGA Alumni Association’s list of the 100 fastest-growing businesses that has received assistance from the SBDC. The 2015 Bulldog 100 ranks the annual growth of businesses owned by UGA alumni. This is the sixth year that the alumni association has sponsored the recognition program. “Business owners like those in the Bulldog 100 think strategically and plan for growth,” said SBDC Director Allan Adams. “The SBDC provides ongoing educational resources to help business owners like these enhance their chances for success.” Liberty Technology in Griffin, owned by Ben Johnson, has been recognized as part of the Bulldog 100 since 2013. Johnson initially came to the SBDC in 2010 to attend a FastTrac—now GrowSmart—class, and has worked with the organization since. Since then, Liberty Technology has grown from 9 employees to 24 and provides a full spectrum of IT outsourcing services to more than 70 clients around the world. Pawtropolis, a pet training and boarding facility located in Athens, Ga., and a client of the SBDC since 2002, was also recognized on this year’s list.

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


More than 12 years ago, the SBDC helped Pawtropolis owner Amanda Crook develop an initial business plan. “I thought I was doing great…but it was a joke,” said Crook. “I knew what I wanted, but they helped me get to the concrete numbers that would make my dreams a reality. We put the plan down on paper and showed the bank that this was going to be a reliable business.” n The UGA SBDC has 17 locations throughout the state to assist small businesses and entrepreneurs. For more information visit www.georgiasbdc.org.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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SOUTHWEST

GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

TEACHING TEACHERS High School Advanced Placement teachers hone their skills through Georgia Center courses. By Denise Horton

Tommy Skrak, middle, a high school teacher in Macon County, takes advantage of Georgia Center training to prepare to teach an AP class.

46

ABOUT 20 HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS in an entomology lab on the UGA campus intently take notes as instructors Richard Patterson and Pat Mote discuss the intricacies of teaching Advanced Placement biology. “Determine your goals for the course,” Patterson tells them. “Setting high standards is reasonable, desirable and appropriate.” However, he adds, be realistic. “Fall is a better time to concentrate on difficult topics than spring, with the exception of reproductive biology, have them read that over spring break.” Nearly 400 teachers from across Georgia and several surrounding states gathered this summer for the week-long Advanced Placement Summer Institutes for Teachers at the UGA Center for Continuing Education. This year, AP institute courses covered 20 different topics, ranging from U.S. history to physics and macroeconomics, according to Jen Schumann, program coordinator for the Georgia Center. “Teachers who attend range from those who are brand new to those with years of experience,” Schumann said. “In some schools, there may be only one teacher with an AP course, so the institute provides a place for networking with others in the same boat.” For Tommy Skrak, a 25-year veteran teacher who is leading his first AP course this fall, the training helped him get up to speed quickly. “(The instructors) experience was invaluable,” said Skrak, a science teacher at Macon County High School in Montezuma, Ga. “The instruction and labs were insightful, many of them very practical.” AP institutes have been held at UGA for the past 30 years. The institutes and consultants who teach them are approved by the College Board, which creates the curriculum, content and tests for AP courses. Consultants like Patterson and Mote have a deep understanding of what it means to teach an AP course. Patterson has been a high school biology teacher for more than 40 years at Athens Academy and has taught AP biology for nearly as long. Mote has more than 30 years of experience as a high school teacher, mostly in Athens, but is currently on the faculty of Georgia Perimeter College, where she teaches biology for both majors and non-majors. Both have been College Board consultants for more than 30 years. “An AP course is supposed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course so teachers have to make difficult decisions regarding the depth and breadth of each topic they cover,” Patterson said. “For the students, there’s a lot riding on one day’s performance. For example, they have to answer eight essay questions in 80 minutes. That would be a challenge for anyone.” n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

SOUTHWEST

GROWING A CULTURE OF HEALTH AS A BANKER, Ross Dekle may seem an odd fit for a leadership program designed to address public health issues. However, his strong ties to the Colquitt County community have helped build a network of people to tackle some tough issues, like obesity, infant mortality and teenage pregnancy. Dekle is part of a team from Colquitt County that is participating in UGA’s Public Health Leadership Academy. The nine-month program, co-designed by UGA’s College of Public Health and the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development, is helping five teams of community leaders throughout the state learn ways to create and sustain a culture of health. “The most surprising take away so far has been how much I have to contribute,” said Dekle, Moultrie region president of Southwest Georgia Bank. “Building networks and identifying key people in the community, that’s something I can do well.” Having a diverse team, representing all sectors of the community is key to the success of the program. The program, which also includes teams from Sumter and Washington counties, as well as multi-county LaGrange and a South Georgia region, is a departure from individual leadership development, said Louise Hill, senior public service associate at the Fanning Institute and co-leader of the program. “Teams from different sectors of a community—such as health, education, business and policy—are training together to learn how they can build a culture of health locally,” Hill said. Added Marsha Davis, associate dean for outreach and engagement in the College of Public Health and director of UGA’s Public Health Training Center, “Solutions involve multiple strategies and different sectors within communities.” The teams are learning how to lead using a collective impact model to address a public health issue specific to their community—obesity, for example. The collective impact approach will allow teams to unify existing efforts and identify gaps, resulting in a sustainable way to address adult obesity, said Whitney Costin, Archway Partnership public health professional and Team Colquitt member. “This program has encouraged me to think differently,” said Angela Castellow, executive director of United Way Colquitt County and Moultrie city councilwoman. “I tend to decide this is what we’ll do and take action. But I see that stepping back and bringing everybody to the table gets more buy in and a broader picture of what the real issues are.” n

Fanning partners with the College of Public Health to create a model of sustainable health practices. By Kathleen Cason

Members of Team Colquitt hold a training session to discuss health concerns in southwest Georgia.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

47


SOUTHWEST

ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

A RENAISSANCE IN AMERICUS Archway Partnership works with the Institute of Government to revitalize downtown.

COTTON AVENUE, Rylander Park, the Jackson Street Depot and the McGarrah Street Corridor are among the sites in Americus that will see improvement through a visionary downtown redevelopment plan facilitated by the Americus-Sumter County Archway Partnership. Local leaders participating in the Sumter County Archway Partnership requested higher education resources to both capitalize on prior revitalization projects and to explore new downtown design, infrastructure, and sense of place opportunities. Working with local Americus stakeholders, a team of experts from the Carl Vinson Institute of Government’s Downtown Renaissance Partnership identified improvements designed to help generate new development. The plan was completed in May and work is already underway in some areas. Among the improvements in the plan: n Restore Cotton Avenue to the original brick street. n Expand Rylander Park by redesigning the rear of adja-

cent Cotton Street businesses to make them more accessible so that people can take advantage of usable green space. n Clean up derelict buildings and vacant land on Jackson

Street by building row houses or condominiums on the property; a new depot could be a catalyst for downtown, and access points for pedestrians to the SAM Shortline railroad. n Narrow McGarrah Street and add sidewalks and land-

scaping to make the entry corridor to the city more appealing. Restoring streets to their original brick is one way the city hopes to make downtown more attractive.

48

The Georgia Downtown Renaissance Partnership helps cities realize their potential, using input from the community and resources from the Georgia Municipal Association, the Georgia Cities Foundation, the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, the Archway Partnership and the Carl Vinson Institute of Government. n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

SOUTHWEST

EDUCATING A WORKFORCE MORE THAN 1,200 STUDENTS have access to job training programs and the opportunity for dual high school/college enrollment through the state’s first College and Career Academy established at a public high school converted into a charter school. The Grady County Archway Partnership brought together K-12, higher education, business and industry, media, local government, hospital/health care providers and citizens to identify and address critical needs in southwest Georgia, including local education and work force development issues. Once work force development was identified as a priority, resources from UGA—with assistance from the Georgia Department of Education and Technical College System of Georgia—helped the community transform Cairo High School into a specialized charter school. The College and Career Academy received a $3.15 million state grant in December 2013 and began operating in January 2014. Construction on a new building is expected to begin in March 2016. “The Archway Partnership has brought us together so that we’re all moving in the same direction,” says Mesha Wind, chair of the Grady Archway Partnership executive committee and advertising director for The Cairo Messenger newspaper. “We all wanted progress for our community but were working individually and separately. Now we’re working together.” Through 18 curriculum pathways, such as mechatronics, sports medicine, and health care science occupations, students earn high school and college credit and get on-the-job training. Additional pathways are being developed. “Magic happens when educators and business industry leaders talk together about the skills that will be needed in three to five years and the programs that can be offered,” Wind says. “That collaboration is really what catapulted the high school into becoming the College and Career Academy.” n

Spearheaded by the Grady County Archway Partnership, the college and career academy will better equip students for local jobs. By Carolyn Crist

A rendering of the College and Career Academy in Cairo.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

49


FANNIN

CATOOSA

DADE

MURRAY WHITFIELD

◆ Dalton GILMER

WALKER

CHATTOOGA

GORDON

FLOYD

PICKENS

CHEROKEE

BARTOW

◆ Rome

NORTHWEST POLK GWINNETT

COBB

PAULDING HARALSON

DEKALB

DA RO

CK

FULTON

LE

✪ Atlanta

DOUGLAS

CLAYTON

CARROLL

HENRY

FAYETTE COWETA

Senoia ◆

HEARD

SPALDING

◆ Griffin

MERIWETHER

Archway Partnership

LAMAR

◆ LaGrange

TROUP

Carl Vinson Institute of Government Georgia Center for Continuing Education GeorgiaLEADS Public Health Leadership Small Business Development Center

50

PIKE

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

UPSON

BUTTS


NORTHWEST

NORTHWEST METRO ATLANTA NORTHWEST GEORGIA is the most populous of the five regions, including much of metro Atlanta. More than 4.3 million people—roughly 43 percent of the total state population—now live in the 10-county metropolitan area, as defined by the Atlanta Regional Commission. Between 2014 and 2015, the population increased by 60,300 people, the largest single-year growth since the Great Recession. With attractions like the High Museum of Art, the Georgia Aquarium, the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial site and a host of other venues, Atlanta is a top destination for conventioneers and tourists. According to the Georgia Department of Economic Development, tourists spend more than $13 billion in the metro region, supporting about 136,000 jobs. The film industry has made its mark on northwest Georgia. Home to the AMC television show “The Walking Dead,” Senoia, in Coweta County, has been the setting for more than 25 movies and television shows. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n The Archway Partnership launched its twelfth community program since 2005, this time in Griffin-Spalding County, which is home to the UGA Griffin campus. Archway’s work in Whitfield County will end later this year, with programs continuing under the guidance of community residents. Clayton County was an Archway partnership community from 2008-2013.

Participants on the 2015 New Faculty Tour visit the town of Senoia and tour some of the sites used for filming “The Walking Dead,” as well as other television and movie productions.

n The Small Business Development Center offices in Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett, Cobb, Clayton, Floyd and Carroll counties assisted 1,862 small business owners or entrepreneurs, helping them acquire a total of $60.2 million in loans. More than 2,000 people attended 136 courses offered through seven locations. n Floyd, Carroll and Troup counties, as well as a region that includes Dade, Walker, Catoosa, Whitfield, Murray, Gordon, Chattooga, Floyd and Bartow were among the 10 counties and two multi-county regions statewide selected to participate in GeorgiaLEADS, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute of Leadership and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce designed to help spur economic development throughout the state. n A region including Carroll, Heard, Troup, Coweta, Meriwether, Fayette, Henry, Butts, Spalding, Pike, Lamar and Upson counties was selected to participate in the UGA Public Health Leadership Academy, a partnership between the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and the College of Public Health designed to build a culture of health in communities throughout the state.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHWEST

J.W. FANNING INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

LEADING THE WAY Siblings Claudia and Rafael Caycho credit the Fanning Institute’s program for Latino youth with helping them succeed. By Kinsey Lee Clark

Now successful adults in metro Atlanta, the Caychos earned confidence and leadership skills through a specialized program at UGA.

52

RAFAEL CAYCHO looked up to his older sister. When she attended a weeklong summer camp at UGA for high school students, he saw her return confident in her leadership abilities. The program, by the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development, offered a safe place to talk about issues in the Latino community and activities, such as a ropes course, that showed students how to work toward a common goal. He knew he had to attend the next year. Like his sister, Claudia, he developed trust with peers, and gained confidence and valuable communication and delegation skills. Since 2004, nearly 500 youth have attended Fanning’s residential summer camps, which include discussion groups and team-building activities. “It teaches you how to become a better professional, a better leader, but it helps you to become a better person,” says Rafael, now 26. “Plus, you have fun all the time.” The camp also motivated both siblings to attend UGA. “When I saw the faculty and some of the UGA students, I was amazed,” he says. “Everybody was so good to me and so professional, so I decided to apply to UGA.” Earning a bachelor’s degree in biology from UGA in 2011 put Rafael on the path to a medical career. He is dual enrolled in a M.D. program at Caribbean Medical University in Curacao and Walden University in Minneapolis, Minn., for a master’s and a doctorate in healthcare administration. “The program told me that I was able to do everything I wanted to do,” he says. “Even if there are some obstacles in your life, you can always overcome.” Claudia double majored at UGA, earning applied bachelor’s degrees in international affairs and Latin American & Caribbean Studies in 2009, and a law degree from Samford University in Birmingham, Ala.. She is an associate attorney at Castan & Lecca in Atlanta. Claudia remembers how isolated she felt from Latino classmates prior to the camp. Her family moved from Peru to suburban Atlanta when she was 13. She learned English quickly and was one of the few Latinos in AP courses. After attending the camp, she emerged as a leader among Latino youth. “It left me with a message that not only was I going to go to college, but I had to pave the way for other people,” says Claudia, now 27. Through team-building exercises, the students realize their strengths and leadership skills, says Carolina Darbisi, Fanning’s public service associate and lead faculty for the programs. Leadership ¡Sin Limites! is a weeklong program for high school students seeking to solve issues facing Latinos. Lead-

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


ership Without Limits is a two-week program for students whose parents are migrant workers. “It shows them what teamwork is like in action without having to give them a lecture,” she says. Past participants are among UGA student mentors, and those relationships extend past the summer. Some mentors provide guidance about college decisions and scholarships. “It’s an amazing program to take advantage of when you’re in high school, especially if you’re a first-generation high school graduate or if you’re about to be a first-generation college student,” Claudia says. Rafael credits the program for boosting his confidence and providing professional tools he uses today. “I don’t think I would be the type of person that I am now if it wasn’t for the program,” he says. “It didn’t only affect my life as a high school student, but also my adult life and my professional life.” n

Latino students from across the state participate in Leadership Without Limits at the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHWEST

MARINE EXTENSION

FISHING FOR FRESH SEAFOOD The Georgia Seafood Directory, produced by UGA Marine Extension, helps consumers find fresh, local fish. By Michele Nicole Johnson

Tori Stivers oversees the directory and helps Georgia retailers and wholesalers learn how to identify fresh seafood.

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HUNGERING FOR GEORGIA CLAMS in Atlanta? Shrimp in Columbus? Catfish in Macon? Look no further than the Georgia Seafood Directory produced by UGA Marine Extension/Georgia Sea Grant in partnership with the Consumer Protection Division of the Georgia Department of Agriculture. The directory is a way to promote seafood retailers and wholesalers who can’t afford promotional materials. “Unfortunately, smaller operations don’t have the resources to develop and maintain a website and social media accounts to promote their companies,” said Tori Stivers, a Marine Extension seafood specialist, who manages the online directory from her base in metro Atlanta. “This is the void filled by the online Georgia Seafood Directory.” The online directory has been around since 2000, targeted to restaurants, grocery stores, caterers and other food service companies looking for local seafood. The redesigned directory is now geared to consumers. While the “eat local” food movement has inspired an emergence of farmers markets and restaurants featuring locally grown ingredients, commercial seafood harvesters have struggled to tap into the market without an online presence. The seafood directory features businesses selling seven types of seafood that are economically important to Georgia: shrimp, fish, oysters, whelk, blue crabs and clams. The directory also features Georgia-based companies offering specialty seafood products such as cannonball jellyfish at Golden Island International in Darien, alligator meat at Prehistoric Ponds Inc. in Homerville, and even python at Allied Food Service Inc. in Rome. “From time to time we have had people come in and say they found out about us on the Georgia Seafood Directory,” said Elaine Knight, who owns Knight’s Seafood, a 40-year-old family-owned business in Brunswick. The Knight’s Seafood page in the directory includes a picture of the business and the hours. More than 850 users have tapped into the directory since it launched in May. “Now that the directory is up and running, our next step is to promote it and tell companies and consumers about it,” Stivers said. “It’s a free service, and we want to encourage companies to get listed.” You can find the Georgia Seafood Directory at http://marex.uga.edu/seafood-directory. n

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ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP

NORTHWEST

A DECADE OF PARTNERS AS DALTON-WHITFIELD COUNTY completed its sixth year as an Archway Partnership community, Griffin-Spalding County came on board as the twelfth partnership since the program began 10 years ago. In 2009, Dalton-Whitfield County was named the eighth Archway Partnership community. In June 2015, it was the fourth to graduate from the partnership, which brings the resources of the University of Georgia into communities across Georgia to address critical, locally-identified issues. Over the past six years, UGA has assisted Dalton-Whitfield in three main areas: economy, education and the environment (quality of life issues). Locally, this effort and vision for the community became known as Communit-E3. Through the partnership, residents of Whitfield have achieved numerous successes—a few include the formation of a networking group called Young Professionals of Northwest Georgia (YPONG), a new trail system behind Dalton State College, the establishment of a local library Learning and Technology Training Center and the creation of two education-focused initiatives, Readers-to-Leaders and First Five. These and other successful programs have helped Whitfield County (and the region at large) earn designation as an Early Education Empowerment Zone. Perhaps the most meaningful impact has been the creation of a foundation for collaboration that will stay in the community for years to come. “Archway has provided the framework for community members to discuss critical issues and begin to formulate ideas to resolve these issues,” said Lynn Laughter, co-chair of the executive committee. “We have all benefited greatly from Archway’s efforts to address the critical development needs across the community. ” “When a community graduates, our goal is to help it develop a way to sustain the collaboration on its own,” said Archway Partnership Director Rob Gordon. “Although we will not be physically present on a day-to-day basis, we will certainly continue to be a resource for community leaders for years to come.” In July, Griffin-Spalding County became the newest member of the Archway Partnership. So far, the community has identified five priority areas to be addressed through its initial work plan: community health and wellness; workforce education; community development; community image and communication; and intergovernmental collaboration. n

As Dalton-Whitfield “graduates,” Griffin-Spalding becomes the newest Archway Partnership community. By Maegan Snyder

One success of the Whitfield program is Readers-to-Leaders (R2L), which focuses on literacy.

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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NORTHWEST

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

AN ELF’S SUCCESS UGA’s Small Business Development Center helped catapult “Elf on the Shelf” to stardom. By Lori Johnston

Carol Aebersold, middle, and twin daughters Christa Pitts and Chanda Bell, created the bestselling holiday book.

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“THE ELF ON THE SHELF” story is told in homes every holiday season. An elf is sent to children’s homes to monitor who is naughty or nice. The elf hides in various spots each night and may get into some mischief, depending on the home. Ten years after helping Carol Aebersold and her twins, Christa Pitts and Chanda Bell launch the best-selling holiday book, the UGA Small Business Development Center is still providing support and guidance to the Kennesaw-based company. A family member told Aebersold and her daughters about the SBDC’s free, confidential consulting. When they contacted the SBDC office located at Kennesaw State University—one of 17 UGA SBDC offices across the state—they met area director Drew Tonsmeire. “It was very encouraging and motivating for us to hear from someone other than family and friends that our product had great potential. Drew asked us challenging questions and really helped us take a good, hard look at what it was going to take to make this business succeed,” said Pitts, now CEO. The family needed money to produce their part-book/part-toy product, but several lenders had turned them down. The SBDC connected the company, CCA and B (formed by their initials and standing for Creatively Classic Activities and Books), with an alternative lender. Although it was an expensive option, requiring them to cash in retirement accounts and sell one of their homes, it was the only resource that helped them get started. “Without that one connection to that loan source, they recognized it would have never happened,” Tonsmeire said. “It was that one pivotal move.” The company now is a multi-million dollar business with national recognition on numerous levels, such as making the Inc. magazine’s list of fast-growing companies three times, having a balloon in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and an animated TV special. Over the years, Tonsmeire has served as an unbiased adviser for “The Elf on the Shelf” creators, providing knowledge and a look at the pros and cons related to expanding staff, facilities and product lines. The SBDC offers knowledge and resources that business owners can’t find on their own, as well as doses of encouragement in successes and dark hours, said Tonsmeire, whose office won the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Excellence and Innovation Award for the Southeast in 2014. “Their only goal is to help you be successful,” Pitts said. n

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CARL VINSON INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT

NORTHWEST

FIGHTING BLIGHT THREE NEIGHBORING metropolitan cities are joining forces to vanquish inThe Vinson vading blight, utilizing an array of economic revitalization weapons supplied Institute helps cities by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government and the Georgia Department of Community Affairs. partner in economic The Clayton County communities of Forest Park, Lake City and Morrow development. formed the precedent-setting alliance. Municipal leaders are working in concert to recruit commercial redevelopment along the main street that connects By Roger Nielsen the three small cities near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The 11-mile corridor runs between regionally significant landmarks like the Atlanta State Farmers Market, Clayton State University and Southlake Mall— which forward-looking municipal leaders view as rallying points to help attract businesses and employers. TRI-CITIES REDEVELOPMENT AREA “This project is unique because three communities formed a partnership to promote regional development in CITIES a corridor that’s important to all three,” said Langford HolForest Park brook, an institute faculty member. “It provides these three Lake City cities with an 18-month work plan to implement redevelopMorrow ment activities and an outline for exploring potential funding sources.” Two years ago, municipal leaders’ informal conversations about their common challenges grew into the Tri-Cities Initiative, a formal agreement to collaborate on revitalization projects in cooperation with the state Department of Community Affairs. The cities engaged the Institute of Government to help prepare a detailed urban redevelopment plan for the corridor, and in 2015 the cities cemented their relationship by adopting an intergovernmental agreement that specifies their roles in fostering the economic revival. To capitalize on a regional resurgence that is driven by projects like the expansion of Clayton State University and the privatization of a closed Army post in Forest Park, the cities will engage in four main activities:

POPULATION

PARCELS

ACREAGE

18,468

464

1,200

2,612

245

400

6,445

226

750

The Tri-Cities Urban Redevelopment Area encompasses nearly 1,000 parcels of land clustered along major commercial corridors traversing the cities of Forest Park, Lake City and Morrow near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

n Providing tax credits to existing and relocating businesses that hire

employees; n Revitalizing housing; n Redeveloping transportation opportunities; and n Marketing the corridor as a vibrant destination in southern metro

Atlanta. “This project was born of the idea that we collectively understand we want to participate in a more deliberate way in the economic health of our three cities,” said Morrow city manager Sylvia Redic. n

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NORTHWEST

GEORGIA CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

TALKING HANDS The Georgia Center helps address the state’s need for more ASL interpreters. By Angela Seal

Students practice signing during a continuing education course held at the UGA Gwinnett campus.

WHEN ALPHONSO MCKIBBINS wanted to expand his skill set to include working with deaf people, he looked no further than the Georgia Center for Continuing Education. The substance abuse counselor from Riverdale, Ga., found an American Sign Language (ASL) course offered through the Georgia Center at the UGA campus in Gwinnett County. “I’m using the class to prepare me to interview for the interpreter program at Georgia Perimeter (College),” said McKibbins. “I know some people who are deaf and I also want to be able to communicate with them.” The courses offered by the Georgia Center are helping address a demand, both in Georgia and across the country, for more sign language professionals. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for sign language interpreters and translators will increase by 46 percent between 2012 and 2022, due to the increase in video relay service and video remote interpreting technologies, which will allow real-time ASL translation over the Internet. Georgia public schools already are feeling the pinch, said Frank Nesbit, deaf and hard of hearing program consultant for the Georgia Department of Education. Often schools will characterize hearing impaired students with a broader label, such as developmentally disabled, he said, because they cannot provide services the state requires for hearing impaired and deaf children. “There’s more need than people are willing to admit to,” he said. As demand for ASL courses increase, the Georgia Center is offering more classes in and outside Athens and is considering adding ASL courses geared toward people in specific careers, such as medicine and education. The center now offers four levels of ASL classes in Athens and at the UGA campus in Gwinnett County. Students have been asking for an additional level of study to further increase their proficiency. “Students are as far advanced as they are because they do a lot of practice at home. They’re a very dedicated group of folks,” said Venus Stone, a program coordinator for the Georgia Center. Some of the students who enroll in the ASL continuing education courses want to be able to communicate better with friends or family who are deaf, Stone said. “There are some people who come in who are looking to use it in their jobs,” she said. “We have people who are in healthcare or particularly in education (who are) looking at it from a more professional standpoint.” n Learn more about courses offered by the Georgia Center for Continuing Education at http://www.georgiacenter.uga.edu.

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INTERNATIONAL

FURTHER BEYOND THE ARCH OUTREACH PROGRAMS at the University of Georgia extend beyond the state and even the national borders. Programs developed at UGA are being used throughout the world, faculty and staff are collaborating with universities and governments in foreign nations, and service-learning courses are taking students around the globe to learn about and help address critical issues in other countries. IN FISCAL YEAR 2015 n The Carl Vinson Institute of Government hosted administrators and faculty for a training academy for Chinese government officials. During the three-week program the Chinese guests learned how American organizations instruct government officials, develop curriculum and evaluate course results. n Faculty from the Vinson Institute traveled to Bucharest, Romania to give presentations on effective ways of working with elected officials. The presentations were part of a two-day workshop coordinated by the National University of Political Studies and Public Administration in Bucharest, Romania. n More than 750 enrollments in courses offered by the Georgia Center for Continuing Education came from people in 86 countries outside the U.S. The highest number, 96 enrollments, came from China, followed by 76 from Canada, 62 from the United Kingdom, 40 from Brazil and 33 from Australia. n About 25 percent of the study abroad courses offered by UGA include a service-learning component. In Costa Rica, for example, students in an English as a Second Language service-learning course design and run a “Vacation English Camp� for local school children, work in the community library organizing reading circles, and work with local groups of parents as they explore connections between language and culture. n The J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development is an active member of the International Leadership Association, a global, cross-sector, inter-disciplinary, professional development organization devoted to the study and development of leadership. Fanning will host the conference in Atlanta in 2016.

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INTERNATIONAL

INTO AFRICA Students learn about public health issues during service-learning in Ghana. By Kinsey Lee Clark

Top: UGA Student Erin Singleton (in gray shirt) and Caroline McArthur (in blue shirt) teach children at a learning center in Accra, Ghana. Middle left: Chederli Belongilot holds a newborn baby at a hospital in Accra. Lower right: Student Julia Whitaker takes blood samples during a nutrition screening.

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A MALNOURISHED INFANT WITH HIV in Ghana led Caroline McArthur to her career path. Before participating in UGA’s Ghana Service-Learning Program in summer of 2015, McArthur’s plan was to become a physician’s assistant. But after spending time with 8-month-old Joseph, barely bigger than a newborn baby, she hopes to start a nonprofit organization to promote public health. “I didn’t have a love for public health the way I do now,” says the 21-yearold health promotions major, who shadowed health professionals at Princess Marie Louise Children’s Hospital in Accra, Ghana, during her service abroad program. Hospital visits are one of the many hands-on experiences attendees receive during the four-week study abroad program, which have been guided by Alex Kojo Anderson, associate professor of foods and nutrition in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, since 2006. The students also provide free health screenings and education to residents, who often lack preventative care. “The impact is amazing,” says Anderson, a native of Ghana, who holds a doctorate in nutritional sciences and a master’s in public health. “(Patients) come year in, year out and tell us, ‘Because of the results that I got from your clinic, now I’m taking care of my diabetes, my hypertension, this condition or that.’” In addition to learning about public health in the African country, Anderson also urges his students to explore the culture and get to know the people and history of Ghana. “I tell them, you need to immerse yourself in the culture,” he says. “To help students appreciate diversity, that is one of the core goals of this program. That is what I always tell them will make them better (health care) providers.” Linda Fox, dean of the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, agrees. “Each year when I read the blog or journal entry written by one of our students I remain convinced a study abroad experience involving service to others is clearly the most powerful reason for our students to spend weeks of their summer in another country, in another culture,” Fox said. McArthur says she learned more from her experiences in Ghana than she ever had in a classroom. She learned to hold back judgment in a new-to-her culture and country. “We learned how to put ourselves into this completely different culture and not only be a part of it, but serve it,” she says. “Ghana isn’t the only place that needs that love and serving and caring. If I don’t get a chance to go to Africa again, then I can bring that back and make a difference in an underprivileged population here.” n

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INTERNATIONAL

A PARTNERSHIP WITH SEOUL BUILDING ON THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA’S longstanding foreign outreach mission, the Carl Vinson Institute of Government brought together the leaders of two university communities this summer to launch a new international economic and educational exchange. The institute’s International Center helped arrange a six-year agreement between the Athens-Clarke County government and a district in South Korea’s capital of Seoul. Athens-Clarke County Mayor Nancy Denson and Seodaemun District Mayor Seok-Jin Mun signed the compact during a ceremony in Athens City Hall. Mun is the chief executive of Seodaemun, one of 25 districts in Seoul and home to nine universities. The memorandum of understanding calls for the two governments to explore international cultural, educational, and economic exchanges through at least 2021. “I am confident that through the signing of this MOU we can begin efforts to develop even stronger relationships and friendships between the people of Athens and Seodaemun,” Denson said. The agreement states that Athens and Seodaemun leaders will cooperate in sharing information, knowledge and resources to promote economic and entrepreneurial activities between the two governments. Mun led a three-member delegation from Seodaemun. They met with UGA President Jere W. Morehead and Vice President for Public Service and Outreach Jennifer Frum, visited the Athens Community Career Academy and toured cultural, recreational and edu-

Athens and a district of Seoul, Korea, launch an economic and education exchange. By Roger Nielsen

Seodaemun District Mayor Seok-Jin Mun and Athens-Clarke County Mayor Nancy Denson sign an agreement to explore cultural, educational and economic exchanges between the two communities.

cational facilities. In addition, the delegation attended a presentation on town-gown economic development collaborations moderated by Institute of Government Director Laura Meadows. The institute’s International Center provides technical assistance and comprehensive training and development programs that have attracted scholars and government leaders from 30 countries around the globe. n

REDUCING THE RISK A HAIR-TESTING PROGRAM developed to measure mercury levels in Georgia women of child-bearing age is now being used in countries around the globe. Since its inception, the mercury hair testing program has served nearly 1,700 individuals from more than 500 U.S. cities in 40 states. The program has also helped participants in 14 countries, including India and Bengal. Recently, the program has been used in Latin American countries as part of a larger study of the prevalence of dietary risk factors for heart disease

in children and adults. A mercuryThe UGA mercury testing program hair testing program was created to inform women goes global. about how simple dietary By Michele Nicole Johnson changes can naturally lower the amount of mercury in their bodies to levels that are safe for a developing baby. Mercury in the body comes from eating fish that ingest water contaminated with mercury released in coal production. n

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NOTABLE

FOUR FOR THE FUTURE AWARDS IN APRIL 2015, Georgia Trend magazine and the Office of Public Service and Outreach announced the winners of the Four for the Future awards, which recognize community collaboration, leadership and innovation. This marked the third year of the awards, acknowledging communities and regions that have worked with public-private sectors and nonprofits to address challenging issues. Recipients represent cross-community partnerships with the promise of long-term community benefits, and their work reflects UGA’s land- and sea-grant mission. CITY OF CLARKESVILLE Clarkesville Main Street–Clarkesville Downtown Development Plan When fire swept into the city’s downtown in March 2014, the community worked quickly to restore downtown activity. Clarkesville Strong signs were erected all around the county and city. Community leaders contacted the Carl Vinson Institute of Government to come in and develop a master plan. The master plan brought everyone together and transformed the area with the help of people and government, both local and state. JEKYLL ISLAND AUTHORITY Jekyll Island Master Plan Several years ago this state-owned coastal island was falling into disrepair. Jekyll Island Authority asked the Carl Vinson Institute of Government to facilitate a new development master plan that has transformed the island. New development included a Holiday Inn Resort, a Hampton Inn and a Westin hotel next to a new 128,000-square-foot convention center. More hotels and tourism facilities are on the drawing board for future expansion. CITY OF MCRAE-HELENA McRae-Helena City Consolidation When two cities, McRae and Helena, located Representatives from Rome accepted their award at the 2015 PSO annual meeting in in this southeast Georgia area wanted to exApril. From left: Georgia Trend magazine publisher and editor-in-chief Neely Young, plore merging, they called on the Carl Vinson PSO Vice President Jennifer Frum, Floyd County Commissioner Evie McNiece, Rome Institute of Government to help lead the way. Downtown Development Director Ann Arnold, Rome Assistant City Manager Patrick One area of concern was the fact that City of Eidson, Provost Pamela Whitten and President Jere Morehead. Helena needed to fix its wastewater system but lacked funds. McRae had plenty of capacity with its system to handle Helena’s needs. The merger solved this and was one of many services the new master plan addressed. Their action creating the town of McRae-Helena is the first city-to-city consolidation since 1921. It is a plan to create a more efficient community and open up options for economic development. CITY OF ROME–ROME DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Rome Downtown Master Plan The city of Rome asked UGA to develop a revitalization plan for its downtown area. The city was able to obtain a Downtown Development loan as gap financing from the Department of Community Affairs that made low interest loans available to public and private use. The result has generated close to $26 million reinvested in its downtown, which in turn has created 320 new jobs. n

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BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


NOTABLE

PSO FACULTY FELLOWS 2014-15 THE FELLOWS PROGRAM, created by the Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach in 2011, is designed to create more service and outreach opportunities for tenured and tenure-track faculty members. The goal is for professors to enhance their academic courses, conduct research and apply their academic expertise to outreach initiatives. n ROSANNA RIVERO has spent part of her career working with geographic information systems (GIS) that assist in mapping and visualizing future planning scenarios, including the effects of natural disasters. As a 2014-15 Public Service and Outreach Faculty Fellow, Rivero worked with Marine Extension/Georgia Sea Grant and the Carl Vinson Institute of Government to develop programs that would help local governments enhance their environmental resilience. Rivero worked on three projects during her PSO Fellowship: coordinating a geodesign workshop for Chatham County; using GIS to support local Georgia communities in their eligibility for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Community Rating System; and teaching a Regional Environmental Planning Studio to graduate students at UGA earning their master’s degrees in environmental planning and design. The geodesign workshop was a three-day collaborative meeting in which participants discussed and agreed upon a design for Chatham County based on long-term environmental factors such as rising sea level and natural disasters. Geodesign is a framework utilized to improve methods to analyze large land areas and make decisions about conservation and development. “In an event like this, it was interesting to hear people from different disciplines talking to each other and really arguing and negotiating, because at the end of the day, that’s one of the objectives,” Rivero said. Students enrolled in Rivero’s course developed proposals to improve environmental resilience of coastal counties in Georgia, specifically Glynn and McIntosh. Students took an inventory of the region, examined regional problems and developed proposals to help counties address those problems. n

n THEODORE KOPCHA has dedicated the majority of his career to finding better ways to integrate technology in K-12 and higher education. During the 2014-15 academic year Kopcha worked directly with the Archway Partnership to design and implement various technology programs for K-12 students throughout Georgia specifically focused on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines. Kopcha initially spent his fellowship time traveling to five of the eight Archway communities to attend executive meetings around the state to learn more about each community’s unique needs. “At those meetings, I was able to identify specific ways to help educational efforts within specific communities,” he said. “Afterward, I was able to travel to those communities and help them implement reform focused on STEM integration through technology, specifically in Hart and Candler counties.” In Hart County, Kopcha provided professional development for teachers who were interested in using technology to support deeper student thinking. He met with small groups of teachers throughout the semester offering ideas for ways to integrate new technologies into the classroom. In Candler County, he assisted teachers with planning and implementing place-based STEM projects for middle-school students. Each grade level selected a topic of interest within their community then used math, science and engineering to solve the issue. “Throughout my fellowship I also wanted to simply grow a stronger relationship with each community,” Kopcha said. “Change in any community takes time—especially changes like the ones I was trying to achieve, which require a persistence when challenges emerge and a shift in the way students interact with teachers and each other.” n

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STUDENT SCHOLARS

Front row, from left: Paul Matthews (Associate Director of the Office of Service-Learning), Andrew Boyer, Achyutta Patel, Gracelyn Jones, Ashley Wilson, Katherine Johnson, Taylor Stubblefield, Lauren Tricksey. Middle row, from left: Janai Raphael, Stephanie Stathos, Alexandra Case, Elizabeth Hardister, Katie Sanders, Chloe Weigle, Joshika Money, Allison Johnson, Greer Helms. Back row, from left: Brian Holcombe, Robert Hines, David Harshbarger, Iva Dimitrova, Frances Plunkett, Erin Cavalli, Parker Bray, Paul Brooks (Associate Vice President for Public Service and Outreach.)

“Public service and outreach fellowships, graduate assistantships and undergraduate scholar programs enable our faculty and students to apply their academic knowledge to critical needs in Georgia and beyond. They are a vital link between the University of Georgia and the state and nation we serve.” —Pamela Whitten, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

PSO FACULTY FELLOWS 2015-16 THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH began the Faculty Fellowship program in 2011 to help create more outreach opportunities for tenure-track and tenured professors. Selected participants immerse themselves in the work of a PSO unit and then incorporate the knowledge they gain into their academic courses. They also conduct research and apply their expertise to outreach initiatives. To date, there have been 17 Faculty Fellows.

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Janette Hill, professor of instructional technology in the College of Education, is working with the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development.

Henry Young, Kroger associate professor in the College of Pharmacy, is working with the Archway Partnership.

Erin Lipp, professor of environmental health science in the College of Public Health, is working with Marine Extension/Georgia Sea Grant.

Wendy Zomlefer, an associate professor of plant biology in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, is working with the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. n

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH


PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH

HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

THANK YOU. With these two words, we convey our heartfelt appreciation of your generosity. Every donor is a part of our giving family, and we are proud to recognize you here for your part in the success of Public Service and Outreach at the University of Georgia. The following donors have made a gift to Public Service and Outreach in the 2015 fiscal year. Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. W. Randall Abney Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Inc. Allan Adams AFLAC, Incorporated Ms. Anne C. Agnew Mrs. Elizabeth Alig Mr. Joseph M. Allen and Ms. Susan A. Allen Mr. and Mrs. B. Heyward Allen, Jr. Ms. Joyce B. Allen Ms. Margaret C. Allen Mrs. Donna L. Alley Ms. Janice Alonso American Public Works Association– Georgia Chapter Ms. Merry C. Anderson Mr. Robert P. Andoh Andrew T. Crawford Ironworks, Inc. Dr. Grover J. Andrews Ann Hand, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Applegate Gus Arrendale Ms. Cynthia A. Arrendale AT&T Foundation Athens Area Community Foundation Athens First Bank & Trust Co. Athens Garden Club Athens Regional Medical Center Athens Video, Inc. Auxiliary to the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Avants Dr. Robert H. Ayers Mr. Ted C. Baggett Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Balentine, Jr. Bank of America Mrs. Elizabeth Barge Mr. Michael Barger and Ms. Karen Barger Ms. Suzanne L. Barnett Barrons Rental Center, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Craig Barrow III Dr. Jeanne A. Barsanti and Dr. Craig E. Greene Ms. Mary E. Bass Ms. Tanya Bass Mr. and Mrs. John D. Bateman, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Razvigor Bazala Mr. and Mrs. C. Victor Beadles III Ms. Deborah L. Bell and Mr. Roy L. Bell, Jr. Dr. James T. Bell and Ms. Jean Simone Ms. Nancy G. Benoit Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Benson Mr. Larry R. Benson Benson’s, Inc. Mr. James M. Bettandorff and Dr. Ruth S. Bettandorff Mrs. Mary L. Beussee Mr. and Mrs. Gregory S. Bickley Dr. Leann Birch Mr. and Mrs. James A. Bishop

*Deceased

Dr. Matthew L. and Mrs. Natalie F. Bishop Mr. and Mrs. Glenn J. Black, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Cory F. Blackwell Dr. Lori Purcell Bledsoe Mr. and Mrs. J. Daniel Blitch III Mr. John A. Blount and Mrs. Linda W. Blount Blue Frog Construction, LLC Mrs. Nancy Hilpp Blum and Dr. Murray S. Blum* BNY Mellon Wealth Management Bobbin Mill Garden Club Rev. and Mrs. Larry N. Boling Dr. Eric S. Bonaparte, Jr. Ms. Emily R. Boness Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Bonsall Mr. Ezekiel M. Booker Mr. David S. Bothe Dr. and Mrs. James E. Box, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. W. Waldo Bradley Brand Properties BrandBank Mr. and Mrs. Barney L. Brannen, Jr. Mr. Lawton E. Brantley Mr. John Breen Ms. Anne M. Brockenbrough Dr. Paul J. Brooks and Mrs. Kay L. Brooks Dr. Ray Brooks, Jr. and Mrs. Paula Bush Brooks Ms. Sandra Brown Dr. and Mrs. John F. Brown Mr. Dennis Brown Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Buchholz Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Burch, Sr. Ms. Laura Burch Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm S. Burgess, Jr. Ms. Dorine L. Burkhard Mr. Mark Butler Dr. and Mrs. Robert R. Byrne Dr. and Mrs. W. Harvey Cabaniss, Jr. Cable East, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Dennis P. Calbos Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Callaway Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Cannon II Ms. Emily G. Carr and Mr. Dale L. Hoyt Ms. Cristina E. Carrell and Mr. Fredrick W. Huszagh II Ms. Roberta H. Carrier Bob Carson Carson Advisory, Inc. Dr. Mary E. Case Cassina Garden Club Celtic Bank Ms. Mary L. Chamberlin Mr. and Mrs. James R. Chambers, Jr. Dr. Kevin L. Chapman and Dr. Sue I. Chapman Ms. Amanda L. Chapman Dr. Clay H. Chappell Charter Communications Ms. Shara L. Cherniak Ciné CitizensFirst

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Clark Dr. George W. Clarke, Jr. Classic City Orthodontics Classic City Roaster Classic Hair & Spa Mr. Robert R. Cleary, Jr. Coastal Area District Development Authority Coastal Digital Marketing, LLC Drs. Shari and Mark J. Cobb Mrs. Sally Wyche Coenen and Mr. Dan T. Coenen Dr. and Mrs. Ronald S. Cole Dr. and Mrs. David C. Coleman Mr. and Mrs. Wade H. Coleman Coleman Talley, LLP Columbus Bank & Trust Co. Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. Community Enterprises, Inc. Community Foundation of the Chattahoochee Valley, Inc. Community Foundation of South Georgia, Inc. Community Welfare Association of Colquitt County, Ga. Mr. and Mrs. Don Cook Mr. and Mrs. Glenn W. Cook Mr. Stephen D. Cooke The Cousins Foundation, Inc. Senator and Mrs. William S. Cowsert Dr. and Mrs. Sean L. Coy Ms. Mallory Crane Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Cravey Mr. Andrew T. Crawford Dr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Crawley Dr. and Mrs. Clifton E. Crews, Jr. Mr. Charles R. Crisp Ms. Jenny Crisp Dr. and Mrs. William R. Crowe CSRA Regional Development Center Dr. and Mrs. John V. Cuff Ms. Ruth A. Curtis Ms. Julia Merkle Dancy Dr. Benny C. Darbisi David C. Smith, PC Mr. and Mrs. James Davie Mr. Ed Davis Ms. Kathy Davis Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Davis, Jr. Ms. Courtney B. Dean Dr. and Mrs. Orville C. Dean, Jr. Dr. Lawrence S. and Mrs. Rebecca R. Dempsey Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow W. Denney, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Daniel V. DerVartanian Colonel Earnest W. Dill and Mrs. Mary E. Dill Ms. Cydney C. Wells and Mr. William A. Dix Ms. Katherine D. Dixon Mr. and Mrs. David T. Dodge Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Dooley Dr. Barry A. Dotson Mr. and Mrs. William W. Douglas III Down To Earth Foundation, Inc.

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HONOR ROLL OF DONORS CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Mr. Jay Duggan and Mrs. Cherie Duggan Mr. and Mrs. David W. Dukes Ms. Susan R. Duncan Ms. Aletha L. Dunlavy Dr. Delmer D. Dunn and Mrs. Ann S. Dunn Mr. John W. Duren and Mrs. Carol Duren Earth Share of Georgia Ms. Amy L. Edwards and Mr. Steven G. Hilliard Dr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Edwards III Dr. and Mrs.* Gaylen L. Edwards Dr. and Mrs. William R. Edwards, Jr. Prof. and Mrs. C. Ronald Ellington Mr. and Mrs. Lamar H. Ellis, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Mark F. Ellison Mr. and Mrs. Alan Elsas Enduring Conservation Outcomes Mr. and Mrs. W. Dennis Epps Mr. Lee E. Epting Ms. Sharon D. Estes Ms. Juliana K. Evans Ms. Mary K. Everitt Ms. Georgia Everson Fairyography Faithful Servant Charitable Foundation Mr. James T. Farmer III Mrs. DeWayne Farrar Mrs. Emily C. Fawcett Ms. Shannon Ferguson Ms. Nancy Ferguson Mr. Renato B. Ferreira Mr. William A. Fickling, Jr. Mrs. Neva J. Fickling* Fidelity Bank Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Fieldale Farms, Inc. First American Bank and Trust Company Mr. Dexter L. Fisher Frank Watson Consulting, Inc. Drs. Mary and Byron J. Freeman Mr. Brian P. Freese The Fresh Market Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Friedlander Friends of the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Frierson, Jr. Ms. C. Gail Frost Dr. Jennifer L. Frum and Dr. Andrew J. Herod Dr. Robert S. Galen and Dr. Lorilee R. Sandmann Garden Club Council of Athens Garden Club of Georgia, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Henry G. Garrard IV Dr. and Mrs. Branham Garth, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James C. Gatewood General Electric Foundation Georgia Association of Marine Education, Inc. Georgia Federation of Women’s Clubs Georgia Pine Level Foundation Georgia Power Company Georgia Power Foundation, Inc. Georgia Science Teachers Association Georgia Skin Cancer & Aesthetic Dermatology Georgia Small Business Lender, Inc. Georgia Transmission Corporation Mr. and Mrs. John A. Geyer Dr. and Mrs. David E. Giannasi Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Gibson Ms. Kay A. Giese and Judge David R. Sweat Mrs. Caroline M. Gilham

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Ms. Jenna K. Gilleland Ms. Lois Givens GKW Enterprise, Inc. Ms. Judy Glenn Glenwood Garden Club Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Godwin Mr. Robert E. Gordon, Jr. and Dr. Leslie A. Gordon Green Acres Garden Club Green Power EMC Ms. Karen W. Greider Drs. Kelly and Parker Grow Gulf Coast Community Foundation, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Hajduk Mr. and Mrs. John N. Haley Dr. and Mrs. Brian P. Hall Dr. and Mrs. James D. Hall Mr. Lynwood L. Hall Brian P. Hall, D.M.D. Ms. Ann Hand Mrs. Mary I. Hardman Dr. Wilma M. Harrington Mrs. Emily Harris Governor and Mrs. Joe Frank Harris Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Hatcher The Hawks Firm, P.C. Mr. Harry W. Hayes and Mrs. Brenda W. Hayes Ms. Maxine H. Heard Mr. Robert D. Heath and Mrs. Jeannie Heath Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Heery Heery’s Clothes Closet Dr. Jason A. Hendley, Jr. and Dr. Betsy A. Hendley Mr. Eric Herbst Heritage Financial Group Heritage Garden Club Mr. and Mrs. George D. Hester Mr. and Mrs. Neil H. Hightower Ms. Mary L. Hill Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hill, Jr. Mr. Christopher O. Hines Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Hodges III Hoffman Nursery, Inc. Mr. Paul Holley Ms. Priscilla L. Horne and Mr. David H. Horne Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Howard, Jr.

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Huckaby Dr. and Mrs. Cecil C. Hudson Ms. Brenda M. Rodgers and Dr. Richard A. Hudson Mr. and Mrs. William C. Huff Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hull III Dr. and Mrs. Loren W. Hunt, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Paul Hutchinson, Jr. il Canale Ms. Carolyn Ingraham Inspiring Excellence Mr. and Mrs. John H. Irby ITR of Georgia J. Crisp Enterprises, LLC Mr. Stanley D. Jackson and Mrs. Angelique R. Jackson Jackson Electric Membership Corporation James Farmer Designs James, Bates, Brannan & Groover, LLP Drs. Mary Bess Jarrard and Geoffrey P. Cole Dr. Ronald Javitch Mrs. Sibyle Jenks Ms. Christine E. Jepsen Mr. and Mrs. James M. Jeter Mr. and Mrs. Warren Y. Jobe Mr. David S. Johnson and Dr. Laura C. Johnson Mr. Ralph F. Johnson and Mrs. Karen R. Johnson Mrs. Erin Johnson and Dr. Farris T. Johnson, Jr. Ms. Beverly E. Johnson Dr.* and Ms. Kenneth D. Johnson Mr. David S. Jones and Ms. Stacy Bishop Jones Mrs. Shana Jones Ms. Lydia C. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Jones III Mr. and Mrs. Steven Jones Ms. Theresa A. Jones Mr. and Mrs. William W. Jopling, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Kane Mr. and Mrs. Steven L. Kassay Drs. Sandra E. Kays and Stanley J. Kays Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Kenyon Mr. and Mrs. Kelly K. Kerner Kinetic Credit Union Mr. and Mrs. James L. Kitchens Dr. and Mrs. Scott A. Kleiner Mr. and Mrs. Klonowski Mr. and Mrs. John W. Knight Kroger Company Dr. and Mrs. James E. Kundell Mr. and Mrs. Thompson Kurrie, Jr. The David and Gail Kurtz Fund Dr. and Mrs. P. D. Kurtz Associate Dean and Mrs. Paul M. Kurtz Mr. and Mrs. James L. LaBoon, Jr. LandLovers Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Landrum Drs. Christine and John Langone, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Reese Lanier Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Lanier II Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Lanigan, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Lauth Mr. Roswell Lawrence, Jr. and Ms. Tionya N. Lawrence Mr and Mrs. Robert W. Lawson, Jr. Mr. Robert Lee Mrs. Betsy Leebern Leona S. Hudson Charitable Foundation, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Patrick Levelle

*Deceased


Mr. David P. Lewis and Mrs. Jennifer Lewis Dr. and Mrs. A. Jefferson Lewis III Mr. and Mrs. James R. Lientz, Jr. Ms. Sharon A. Liggett Mrs. Jeanne H. Lindberg Lindsay Thomas Consulting, Inc. Mrs. Tyra Little Ms. Patricia H. Lowe Ms. Elizabeth A. Lueken Dr. Alisa L. Luxenberg Mrs. Katheryne K. Lynch Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Lynch Ms. Kari A. Maclauchlin Dr. and Mrs. Daniel H. Magill III Ms. Amanda Mahoney Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Maier III Gordon and Roslyn Maner Mr. and Mrs. Gordon A. Maner Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Mansfield Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Marbut Ms. Charlotte Marshall Mr. and Mrs. Douglas M. Martin Ms. Mary W. Matthews Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick W. Mattox, Jr. Polly McLeod Mattox Interiors Ms. Helen Mauk Mr. and Mrs. John S. Maynard Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. McCamy, Jr. Ms. Yancey L. McCollum Dr. and Mrs. Fred M. S. McConnel Mr. Donald E. McCorkle, Jr. McCorkle Nurseries, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Cormac M. McGarvey, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David W. McKillip Mr. and Mrs. Patrick McMaster Dr. and Mrs. James W. McMinn Mr. and Mrs. John F. McMullan Ms. Retia McMullen Mrs. Marilyn L. McNeely Mr. Eric A. McRae Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. McTier Dr. Laura J. Meadows Mr. David Mealy Mr. Bernard J. Meineke Mr. Carlton N. Mell, Jr. Ms. Mary R. Mellein Mr. Michael Melnik and Mrs. Margaret E. Melnik Mr. and Mrs. Finley H. Merry Ms. Alexandra Mettler Mr. David H. Meyers and Dr. Dawn S. Meyers Midlands Technical College Dr. and Mrs. James S. Miller Mr. Hugh M. Mills III and Dr. Helen Mills Mr. and Mrs. Rodney L. Moody Mrs. Rebecca Moon Dr. J. A. Moore and Mrs. Laura W. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Moore Republic Salon Ms. Brandi Morgan Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Morneault Morris Communications Company, LLC Drs. Libby and Van Morris Mr. and Mrs. William S. Morris III Ms. Beverly Morton Morton Vardeman & Carlson Ms. Gwendolyn D. Moss Dr. Marie R. Mullan Mrs. Diane C. Murray and Mr. Robert E. Murray II

*Deceased

Dean and Mrs. Daniel J. Nadenicek National Fish and Wildlife Foundation National Philanthropic Trust Ms. Rosa L. Nelson Nelson & Mullins The Dr. Hoke Smith Nash, Jr. Memorial Fund Network for Good Mr. and Mrs. James L. Newland Dr. Melvin G. Newton* Drs. Joyce Nicholls-Goudsmid and William Nicholls Mr. Floyd Nicholson and Ms. Mamie E. Nicholson North Georgia Community Foundation Northeast Georgia Orchid Society Dr. and Mrs. W. Felton Norwood, Jr. Novant Health, Inc. nsoro Educational Foundation The Colleen and Sam Nunn Family Foundation Ms. Frances P. Nunnally OB-GYN Centers, P.C. Oconee Golf Company, LLC Oglethorpe Power Corporation Ms. Annette Ogletree-McDougal Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. O’Reilly Mr. Harry E. Owens and Mrs. Glenda M. Owens P.E.O. Sisterhood Chapter BB Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Paris III Mr. Randall R. Parish, Jr. and Ms. Susan D. Parish Mr. and Mrs. Brian M. Parker

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth O. Parris Drs. Virginia B. and Gordhan L. Patel Mr. Christopher B. Patten Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Patterson Dr.and Mrs. Larry J. Payne Ms. Dyanne S. Pedersen Mrs. Elizabeth W. Pennington Dr. Theresa A. Perenich and Mr. William P. Novinger Mr. and Mrs. David S. Phlegar III Mr. John A. Pickett The Piedmont Gardeners, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. William A. Pittenger Mr. Thomas R. Pizzo and Mrs. Sara M. Pizzo Mr. and Mrs. Roy Plott Dr.* and Mrs. Gayther L. Plummer Mr. Lamar R. Plunkett Mr. and Mrs. Alec Poitevent Mr. Philip H. Pollock, Jr. Mr. Charles E. Pou and Mrs. Karen K. Pou Mr. and Mrs. Phil Powell Dr. and Mrs. William L. Power Mr. Mark E. Preisinger Dr. Thomas F. Proctor III Dr. and Mrs. William F. Prokasy IV Mr. and Mrs. John V. Quackenbush Mr. Roosevelt Quarles and Ms. Rosella H. Quarles Mr. and Mrs. Liviu Radu Mrs. Joyce Raffel

T H E I M PA C T O F G I V I N G

Alumnus Dan Sisson’s gift will help fund leadership programs throughout Georgia DAN SISSON has witnessed leadership in action all his life. Growing up in rural Wilkes County, he watched his father, who served for 55 years as city manager of Washington, Ga. Later he and his wife Susannah were tapped to participate in Leadership Georgia, a program that prepares young leaders to work for a better Georgia. One of the program’s founders was J.W. Fanning, who is also from Wilkes County. Through Leadership Georgia, Sisson became familiar with the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development and all that J.W. Fanning had done for leadership across the state. “It is interesting to see how different groups of leaders function—what becomes their initiatives and their successes,” said Sisson, a sales center vice president for the Mid-Atlantic Region of AT&T. “When the chemistry is right and the foundation is right, great things can happen.” Unfortunately, leadership development can be a challenge for many struggling communities. So Sisson established a fund—the Dan Sisson Community Leadership Fund—to help some of those communities. “My vision is to make sure that funding is not an issue for a community with a need for leadership development and to ensure that a community can access the expertise that the Fanning Institute offers,” he said. “Fanning has become a catalyst for emerging leaders who can make a difference by connecting them and helping to build the foundation that brings together experience, vision and ideas for the common good.” —Kathleen Cason

UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH 2014-15 BEYOND THE ARCH

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HONOR ROLL OF DONORS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 67 Mr. and Mrs. Marbury Rainer Mr. and Mrs. James R. Ramsey Mr. Richard P. Reaves Dr. and Mrs. Bryan H. Reber Ms. Janet E. Rechtman Mr. High L. Reece Ms. Mara Register Mr. Stephen A. Reichert Ms. Lisa Remedies Ms. Sally Revoile Ms. Jennifer Rhodes Ms. Elizabeth A. Richardson and Dr. Susan T. Goldstein Coach Mark A. Richt and Mrs. Katharyn Richt Dr. Pascale Riley and Mr. Ronald T. Riley Dr. and Mrs. Mark and Chris Risse Rivoli Garden Club Robert W. Woodruff Foundation Professor and Mrs. David D. Roberts Ms. Mary Roberts-Bailey Mr. and Mrs. John W. Robinson, Jr. Rose and Dahlia Garden Club Rose Garden Club Ms. Jeanette L. Rowe Dr. and Mrs. John P. Rudy Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Rudzinski Mr. Colin J. Rust Mr. Stephen Samples Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Sams, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Sams III Mr. and Mrs. James R. Sanders Dr. and Mrs. Walter M. Sanders III Dr. Mary C. Santora and Dr. Albert H. Santora Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve Savannah Presbytery MK Pentecost Fund Dr. Robert N. Saveland Mr. and Mrs. David Schell Mr. Tim Schipper Dr. Mardi Schmeichel and Mr. Patrick M. Winter Mr. and Mrs. Ted Shields Mr. William H. Short Dr. and Mrs. Michael B. Sigman Ms. Kelly Simmons Mr. and Mrs. John L. Simms The Honorable Ethelyn N. Simpson Mrs. Henrietta M. Singletary Mr. Warren D. Sisson, Jr. and Mrs. Susannah S. Sisson Ms. Jessica Skelton Mr. and Mrs. William D. Skinner Small Business Access Partners, Inc. Small Business Chamber Small Dreams Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Small Mr. Channing S. Smith, Jr. and Mrs. Elizabeth R. Smith Mr. David C. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Gerald E. Smith Ms. Corinne C. Allen and Mr. Harold L. Smith, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Henry M. Smith, Jr. Ms. Ruth N. Smith Mr. Bradley D. Snyder and Mrs. Rachel L. Snyder Mr. and Mrs. James A. Sommerville Judge and Mrs. Marvin W. Sorrells Source One Insurance and Benefits Group South State Bank Ms. Erica Spackman

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Mrs. Margaret R. Spalding Mr. Christopher Spencer Mr. and Mrs. Maurice M. Sponcler, Jr. Springer Mountain Farms St. Martin’s Episcopal School Ms. Helen C. Stacey The Honorable Margaret Stagmeier Ms. Janet Staihan Judge and Mrs. Homer M. Stark State Bank & Trust Company Mr. and Mrs. James Harlan Steele Ms. Kathryn J. Stege STK Washington DC Ms. Vivienne S. Stopper SunTrust Bank, Inc. Mr. Rob Sutter Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Symons, Jr. Mr. David H. Tanner Mr. and Mrs. Ben J. Tarbutton, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Tarbutton Mr. Nathan H. Tartak Tech Posse, Inc. Mrs. Elinor Terrell Terrell Family Foundation The Coastal Georgia Audubon Society The H. Foundation, Inc. Mrs. Patricia A. Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Thomas Mr. and Dr. Larry D. Thompson Dr. Karen L. Tinsley Mr. and Mrs. Jim Topple Dr. and Mrs. Lothar L. Tresp Mr. and Mrs. George G. Tribble William P. and Marihope S. Troutman Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Trulock Trustees Garden Club Tull Charitable Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin Turbidy Mrs. Carol Turner Dr. Patricia Turner Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center United Parcel Service Ms. Phyllis E. VanGotum The Vaughan Foundation

BEYOND THE ARCH 2014-15 UGA PUBLIC SERVICE & OUTREACH

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Ventulett Mr. and Mrs. W. Jerry Vereen Dr. Randal L. Walker and Dr. Jean E. Chin Mr. and Mrs. James A. Walker, Jr. Drs. Martha L. and Robert B. Walker Walton EMC Dr. and Mrs. Bi-Cheng Wang Mr. and Mrs. John S. Waters III Ms. Debra Watson Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. Weatherford Wells Fargo Bank Wells Fargo Foundation Dr. Emily E. Wheeler Mr. Raymond L. Whitefield Ms. Holly Whiteley Mr. and Mrs. George M. Whitton Mr. and Mrs. Leonard G. Whitworth Dr. and Mrs. R. G. Wiggans Mr. Thomas B. Wight III Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Wilde Dr. Lance J. Wilder and Dr. Shannon Wilder Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Wilheit, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Wilheit, Sr. Dr. F. Wen Williams Mrs. Suzanne B. Williams Mr. Thomas H. Williams Drs. Judith H. and John S. Willis Mr. and Mrs. H. Grady Wilson, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Harry L. Wingate III Mr. and Mrs. William T. Wingfield Dr. Carol Winthrop and Mr. Robert Winthrop II Ms. Sandra Wolf Mrs. Harriette H. Woodard Ms. C. Starr Woods Wormsloe Foundation, Inc. Ms. Elizabeth C. Wostbrock and Mr. Edward M. Wostbrock Rev. Patricia W. York Dr. George S. Young Mr. and Mrs. Neely Young Young Design Group, LLC Ms. Patricia Zaghi Ms. Nancy Zimmerman and Mr. A. S. Carpenter

Donors are recognized unless anonymity is requested. We have made every effort to ensure accuracy; however, if we have made an error or if biographical information has changed, please let us know by contacting the Office of the Vice President of Public Service and Outreach at (706) 542-6167.

2014-15 Public Service and Outreach Annual Report