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A Magazine for the Families of UGA Residence Hall Students

ership Lead ls Skil

Acade m Excell ic ence

Conve n

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Multicultural Events and Programs

Social s Activitie

Success Starts Here! Begin your journey of living on campus. Lifelong Friendships

www.uga.edu/h ousing

SUMMER 2011


BULLDOG Families SUMMER 2011

Editors Tracy Giese Larry Correll-Hughes

contents Welcome from the Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Keep Your Sense of Humor: Advice for Parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Contributors Kay Anderson Mathew Braun Tamara Burke Larry Correll-Hughes Diana Fruth Melissa Garber Tracy Giese Ryan Hill Gerard Kowalski Richard Mullendore Jessica Pence

Understanding What FERPA Means for Parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Move-in: It’s Time to Hunker Down with Housing! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Who’s Who in Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 What to Bring & What to Leave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Residence Hall Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 UGA Housing Wireless Access Point Acceptable Use Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Safe and Secure on the UGA Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Get Involved Through the Residence Hall Association (RHA) . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 A Place to Make Friends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 An Environment of Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Get On Track with Academic Enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Important Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residence Hall Amenities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back cover

Bulldog Families Is written and published by the Department of Housing at the University of Georgia Russell Hall, Athens, GA 30602-5575 Bulldog Families is distributed free of charge to families of University of Georgia residence hall students. Comments or questions about articles should be directed to Tracy Giese 706-542-1421

Our Mission: The Department of University Housing provides comfortable, affordable and secure on-campus housing options in residential communities where the academic success and personal growth of residents are encouraged and supported.

Email: housing@uga.edu All suggestions and ideas for articles are welcomed.

©2011 The University of Georgia

We encourage you to familiarize yourself with our website. Most questions can be easily answered after reviewing these pages. Should you have any questions, please contact us at 706-542-1421 or housing@uga.edu.

• The University of Georgia is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.

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www.uga.edu/housing


Welcome from the Executive Director

Dear Families,

L Community Phone Numbers Brumby Office 706-542-8250 Desk 706-542-8357 Creswell Office 706-542-8344 Desk 706-542-8289 East Campus Village (McWhorter, Rooker and Vandiver Halls; Building 1512) Office 706-542-2041 Desk 706-542-1780 Family and Graduate Housing Office 706-542-1473 Hill (Boggs, Church, Hill, Lipscomb and Mell Halls; Oglethorpe House) Office 706-542-5934 Desk 706-542-9424 Myers (Mary Lyndon, Myers, Rutherford and Soule Halls) Office 706-542-5217 Desk 706-542-8271 Reed (Building 1516, Morris, Payne and Reed Halls) Office 706-542-3753 Desk same

iving on-campus is an important part of the UGA experience for first year students. We know that the transition to college is a big step for your student and you. Hopefully, you will find this edition of Bulldog Families helpful as you prepare for your student’s transition to UGA and Athens. Students may encounter all kinds of challenges during the initial adjustment from living with family to residence hall life. Many students are excited about trying a more independent lifestyle and experiencing new freedoms and responsibilities. There are also apprehension and questions about the unknown: Will I get along with my roommate? How well prepared am I for college academically? Will I make the right decisions about studying, time management, friends, peer pressure, sexual activity, alcoholic beverages, spending money and taking care of myself? University Housing staff members genuinely care about the well-being of each student and can be a resource for new students finding their individual answers to these questions in order to have a successful transition to college and residence life. Living on-campus may be the first time your son or daughter has had to share a bedroom or bathroom with other individuals. Sharing space with a roommate will require good communication, compromise, and a mutual understanding of roommate rights and responsibilities. Students may also experience new interactions with individuals who are different from them – having diverse backgrounds, ethnic identities, physical abilities, sexual orientations or religious affiliations. Developing the requisite skills and awareness to be success in our diverse living and learning environments may also lead to the development of lifelong friendships through making positive connections with roommates and members of the residence hall and UGA communities. The Department of University Housing provides comfortable, affordable and secure places where the academic success and personal growth of residents are encouraged and supported. There are many resources available in the residence halls and larger University community designed to help your student transition both personally and academically. This issue of Bulldog Families lists some of the resources available. Our full time and student housing staff members are also knowledgeable about campus resources, so please encourage your student to contact staff within the residence halls whenever questions or concerns arise. We look forward to being your partner in assisting with your student’s transition to UGA. We are excited about meeting your student this fall and hope he or she will have a positive and enjoyable on-campus experience.

Sincerely,

Russell Office 706-542-8331 Desk 706-542-1694

www.uga.edu/h ousing

Gerard J. Kowalski, Ph.D. Executive Director of University Housing

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Keeping Your Sense of Humor: Advice for Parents by Dr. Richard Mullendore

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s your student begins college, you may wonder what you can do to support him or her in this new environment. How can you encourage your student to make good decisions? What messages can you send to show your trust? How can you help your student become an independent, responsible adult? How do you keep your sense of humor through the trials and tribulations of parenting a college student?

Here are a few guidelines to help your student succeed in college: 1.

Understand that parenting a college student can be exciting, frustrating, rewarding, anxiety-producing, fulfilling, and traumatic…all in the same day!

11. Money issues cause the greatest stress on the studentparent relationship. Build a budget together and negotiate who will pay for what.

2.

Attend your student’s parent orientation program. Orientation helps you understand how the college functions, what resources are available to you and your student, and how the student-parent relationship may change.

12. If you want to give your student some great academic advice, make sure you tell him or her to:

3.

4.

5.

Obtain contact information for college staff members who can address first-year student issues, but understand that there are legal limitations about the information that colleges may share with parents. Learn about the college’s billing process, including timing (when, how often), format (electronic or paper), and forms of payment (online, credit card, check). Become familiar with the academic calendar of important dates for advising, registration, and bill payment. Encourage your student to share information sent by the college, so that important tasks are completed in a timely fashion.

6.

The cell phone has changed the way parents and students communicate, and you may be accustomed to daily communication with your student. Try to allow your student to initiate most text messages and calls. This sends a message of confidence and trust.

7.

When concerns, difficulties, and/or issues arise, your job is to listen and advise, not to intervene, rescue or fix. Help your student learn to resolve his or her problems.

8.

Recognize that all college students, especially those in the first year, make a bad decision or choice now and then. It is part of the developmental process. Affirm the good decisions and help your student learn from the poor ones.

9.

If your first-year student is going to live in a campus residence hall, move-in day will be a stressful, emotional experience for everyone. Try to consistently send a message of support, belief, and love throughout this day.

10. College is a time of personal exploration. Be patient as your student decides upon a major and a career…and let your student make these important decisions.

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• Go to class despite the temptation to skip now and then. • Meet each faculty member during scheduled office hours in order to become a name and a face, not just a number. • Seek help early in the term if he or she is struggling in a course. College classes move too fast to wait. • Get involved in a club or activity outside the classroom. Involved students get better grades and graduate at a higher rate than non-involved students. • Master time-management skills. This is often the difference between success and failure. • Stay healthy by eating well and getting plenty of sleep and exercise. It is easy to get away from good habits in college. • Know when to seek medical attention for an illness or injury. Many college students have never been to a doctor without a parent before. • Be aware of personal safety issues. Colleges are not immune from crime. 13. Keep your sense of humor! You’ll need it! Richard Mullendore is a professor of College Student Affairs Administration at the University of Georgia. Dr. Mullendore served as a college administrator for 30 years before moving to the classroom. He has two daughters who have successfully completed college. He is the co-author of Empowering Parents of First-Year College Students: A Guide for Success, which is available in English and Spanish from the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

www.uga.edu/housing


Understanding what FERPA Means for Parents by Larry Correll-Hughes and Kay Anderson

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ne of the major transitions that you will face as parents will How can I get information to advise my son or daughter? This be the way you will be able to receive information about your doesn’t mean that you won’t be able to get information when you student’s educational experience and what you are able to need to advise your son or daughter on how to make a decision. do on behalf of your student. For most of your student’s life, There are a number of ways you can receive information about you’ve probably been able to call up one of his or her teachers your student’s situation. The fastest, easiest way is to have your whenever you had a concern, or log in to an online account to see son or daughter provide that information to you. You can visit his or her daily class grades. But as your son or daughter graduates the Registrar’s website for more information on the university’s high school and goes to college, the rules about how schools and FERPA policies and submitting a “Prior Consent for Release.” It is parents exchange this type of information also change. This is very important that you know that even though many school because of a specific federal law: the Family Educational Rights and officials might not have your student’s permission to speak with Privacy Act of 1974, or FERPA, which was established to protect the you about a specific matter, we are always happy to answer general privacy of your son or daughter’s academic records and personal questions about our policies and procedures and to discuss matters information. hypothetically. In fact, we have found that FERPA is an acronym that you may have in most cases, we can fully assist the vast Educational records are heard before. This law applies to all majority of parent concerns in this way. broader than a transcript students, whether they are in elementary, middle, high school, or college, but FERPA’s What if there’s a situation concerning the Educational records for rules change depending on the student’s health or safety of my student or other undergraduates include, level of schooling. Up through a student’s individuals? FERPA allows institutions graduation from high school, parents and to release information, without consent, but are not limited, to students share access to the student’s in connection with an articulable and the following: routine records. Again, this meant that you could significant threat to the health or safety of a information, such as get information from your student’s school student or other individuals. In emergency address and room number; whenever you wanted it. But, when a situations, when a student’s health or admissions records; student enrolls at a college or university, well-being is seriously at risk, please call completion of requirements the rights to receive and release this type the UGA Police Department at (706) 542and progress towards the of information transfer exclusively to the 2200. In non-emergency situations, the student. Office of Student Support Services is degree; advising reports the main contact for parents and can be and evaluations; letters of What does this mean for me as a parent? contacted at (706) 542-8220 during regular recommendation; various This means that while you naturally have an business hours. statements, forms and interest in your son or daughter’s progress, cards filed by the student; you will no longer automatically have access What should my student and I discuss and any other official to her education records in the same way now that will help in the future? One of you did when she was in high school. Now the most helpful things you can do before correspondence with or you are probably thinking, “But I’m paying your arrival this fall is to talk about this concerning the student. the bill!” It’s not that we don’t recognize issue with your student, and discuss how that, but the federal law considers college you’d like to handle sharing information as students to be responsible adults, and it allows them to determine a family. There are many good reasons to put the responsibility to who will receive information from their education records. This share information directly in the hands of your student. Remember impacts University Housing staff’s ability to discuss some issues that a student venting about a situation is different from a request with you because the policy restricts others’ access to personally to intervene in the situation. It can also be helpful to discuss with identifiable information about the student. Therefore, we are your student how they can tell you when they want to handle often unable to discuss matters specifically relating to a situation something on their own or if they just need a little space. As a involving your son or daughter. Additionally, you may be unable family, you’ll know how to the make the decision that’s best for you. to do things on behalf of your son or daughter because doing so would involve our releasing personally identifiable information and information that is likely part of their education record, as defined by FERPA.

www.uga.edu/h ousing

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It’s Time to Hunker Down with Housing! by Tamara Burke

2011 Residence Hall Move-In Information

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ach year, the University of Georgia community welcomes nearly 7,000 students into the many residence halls in a very condensed time period. The Hunker Down with Housing program serves to streamline the move-in process and address resident and family feedback concerning traffic congestion, parking lot availability and elevator service. Hunker Down with Housing volunteers work diligently to ensure that the initial days of move-in will run smoothly and serve first-year students. Hundreds of Hunker Down with Housing volunteers will be located throughout campus on August 9th and 10th to greet new students and parents, give directions to area parking lots, direct traffic and generally serve as a resource for residents and their families. Since the first Hunker Down with Housing in 1998, volunteers have successfully moved in over 70,000 students and helped them begin to call UGA home; 2011 will be no exception!

Check-In Process

UGA Residence Halls officially open Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. Early Check-In: Those participating in Sorority/Fraternity Recruitment may check into their residence hall on Tuesday, August 9, 2011 @ 9:00 a.m. for an additional fee of $20.00. Early check-in fees will be charged to the resident’s Student Account to be paid at a later date. No registration is required to participate in early check-in. General Check-In: All students may check in starting at 9:00 am on Wednesday, August 10, 2011 @ 9:00 a.m. for no additional fee. General Parking Procedures: Parents, families, and students may drive to their designated halls on the day of move-in for short-term unloading. Once you have unloaded, you are expected to move your car to a long-term parking lot so that others may unload their cars. If you are a resident of the Brumby Community, you are required to go first to the designated staging area and check in with a member of the Hunker Down with Housing Volunteer Staff. More details will be provided this summer. Brumby Community All Brumby residents arriving on campus Tuesday, August 9, 2011 must first drive to the designated parking lot staging area. Signs on Baxter and Hull Streets will direct you to the staging area. This area is for the Brumby Community only. All vehicles will wait in the staging area until space is available in the designated unloading zones surrounding Brumby Hall. Vehicles will be directed to the Brumby Hall unloading zones by Hunker Down volunteers as space becomes available in these parking lots. Lots adjacent to Brumby Hall will be designated as unloading zones and

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parking will be permitted for one hour in these areas. Entrance to the Brumby unloading zones will not be permitted without an approved pass issued by a Hunker Down volunteer in the staging area. After this one hour time period expires, vehicles must be moved to long-term parking areas such as the West Campus Parking Deck or other nearby lots. Unloading zones will be strictly enforced and towing will occur if vehicles are left unattended for longer than one hour. Brumby residents moving in on or after August 10, 2011, may drive directly to Brumby Hall to check in. However, the one hour time limit will still be enforced. Creswell Community Several lots adjacent to Creswell Hall will be designated as unloading zones. Residents assigned to Creswell may drive directly to these zones. Unloading will be permitted in these areas for one hour. Vehicles left unattended after one hour will be towed. After unloading, all vehicles will be directed to nearby lots where long-term parking will be permitted. East Campus Village (McWhorter, Rooker and Vandiver Hall; Building 1512) While no unloading zone time limit will be enforced, University Housing asks that you move your vehicle after unloading to the section of the lot furthest from the building. Vehicles may not park on River Road to unload. Any vehicles parked on River Road will be towed. Hill Community (Boggs, Church, Hill, Lipscomb & Mell Halls; Oglethorpe House) Unloading zones will be designated in the following areas: the lots by Hill Hall and Legion Pool off of Lumpkin Street , Church Hall lot off of Lumpkin Street , and a portion of the Boggs Hall lot. Vehicles will be permitted in these areas for one hour. After unloading, all vehicles will be directed to long term parking in nearby lots. Any vehicle left unattended in the unloading zone after the designated one hour period will be towed. Myers Community (Mary Lyndon, Myers, Rutherford and Soule Halls) The unloading zone will be designated at the S03 parking lot. Vehicles will be permitted in this area for one hour. After unloading, all vehicles will be directed to long-term parking in nearby lots. Any vehicle left unattended in the unloading zone after the designated one hour period will be towed.

www.uga.edu/housing


Reed Community

Payne and Reed Halls The unloading zone will be designated at the N10 parking lot. Vehicles will be permitted in this area for one hour. After unloading, all vehicles will be directed to long-term parking in nearby lots. Any vehicle left unattended in the unloading zone after the designated one hour period will be towed.

Beginning on move-in day the following are some of the University Housing staff members you might meet in the residence halls:

Morris Hall The unloading zone will be designated at the W02 parking lot. While no unloading zone time limit will be enforced, University Housing asks that you move your vehicle after unloading to the section of the lot furthest from the building.

Area Coordinator (AC): A full-time, professional staff member who manages the day-to-day operations of one of the seven residential communities. This individual also coordinates educational programs and activities spanning the halls and the university community.

Building 1516 While no unloading zone time limit will be enforced, University Housing asks that you move your vehicle after unloading to the section of the lot furthest from the building. Vehicles may not park on River Road to unload. Any vehicles parked on River Road will be towed. Vehicles should be parked in long-term parking areas such as the East Village Deck or other nearby lots.

Assistant Area Coordinator (AAC): A full-time, live-in professional staff member who supervises the front desk, desk assistants, and C.L.A.S.S. Advocates, as well as advises the community council. They also assist in the development of academic initiatives for first year students.

Russell Community A portion of the large lot behind Russell Hall will be designated as an unloading zone. Vehicles will be permitted in this area for one hour. After unloading, all vehicles will be directed to long-term parking in nearby lots. Any vehicle left unattended in the unloading zone after the designated one hour period will be towed.

C.L.A.S.S. Advocate (CA): “Continuing the Legacy of African American Student Success” (C.L.A.S.S.) Advocate Program responds to the concerns of African American students living on campus while providing multicultural programming to all residents.

Thank you in advance for making Hunker Down with Housing Move-In 2011 a success!

Community Secretary: a full-time administrative assistant who supervises the community office, coordinates room/hall changes for his or her community, and is the first stop for information about a community.

Parking Lot Usage Plan The following parking lots will be closed at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 8. The lots will be used as unloading zones adjacent or near the residence halls from 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 9, to 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, August 10. W02 - Lot adjacent to Morris Hall W03 - Both lots on the east side of Hull Street. W06 - The small lots at Mell, Lipscomb, Church and Hill Halls. Also the Legion Pool lot, with the provision that pool users will be able to park there while the pool is open. The lot on the corner of Baxter and Lumpkin is not included. W07 - The Brumby circle lot and all three lots around Creswell, but not the Bolton Hall lot. W08 - Lots on Church street and adjacent to Brumby Hall W10 - The north half of the lot nearest Russell Hall W11 - Approximately half of the lot adjacent to Boggs Hall S03 - The lots north of Myers and Rutherford Halls off Cedar St., and the “heads-in” parking spots along Sanford Drive at the east end of Myers Quad. Final details have yet to be confirmed. Residents may expect to receive additional parking instructions and a detailed map in midJuly. For additional parking information, please visit the UGA Parking Services website at www.parking.uga.edu

www.uga.edu/h ousing

Desk Assistant (DA): an undergraduate student worker who staffs the 24-hour desks in one of the seven residential communities. They are responsible for checking the ID cards of residents, checking out temporary keys and answering phone calls. Graduate Resident (GR): a graduate student who provides advising and personal/disciplinary counseling for individuals and groups of students, as well as assist in student development programming, facilities management, multicultural awareness efforts, and other special projects. Resident Assistant (RA): an undergraduate student who lives with the residents on most floors. These student staff members are selected for their skills, interests, and campus activities, which enable them to help other students get the most from their UGA experience. RAs are trained to assist and/or refer students with academic and personal concerns and to help maintain an academically supportive environment in the halls. Residence Hall Director (RHD): a full-time, live-in professional staff member who manages a residential area of approximately 500 students. The RHD coordinates educational programs and activities, supervises an RA staff, and is the primary day-to-day administrator of the residence hall.

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Hunker Down What to Bring... •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • •

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• • • •

• • • •

• • •

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Linens — Bed sheets and pillow cases, pillows, comforter, mattress pad, towels, hand towels and washcloths. Check our website under “Amenities” for mattress sizes. Bathroom supplies — Soap, shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, etc., for the shower and the sink. Bring a shower basket if you will have community showers. Laundry supplies — Basket, laundry detergent, fabric softener, etc. Clothes hangers Storage containers and the five-pant hanger — Organize your room and closet and make the best use of space by storing items under your bed. Shoe holder — A shoe organizer with pockets that hooks over your closet door can save a lot of floor space in your room. Iron and ironing board Refrigerator — Store your favorite foods and leftovers. You have no idea how much you’ll use it. Must be ENERGY STAR® compliant: may not exceed 118 volts (+/- 5%) and 60 Hz, and not draw more than 1.5 amps or 180 watts of additional power. Compact microwave — Must be 1.0 cubic feet maximum capacity and 700 watts maximum power. Earplugs — Your neighbors or roommate might have a different interpretation of “quiet hours.” Headphones — You might have a different interpretation of “quiet hours” than your roommate. Foam mattress pads — Make every night’s sleep a great one! Laptop or computer — There are lots of computer labs on campus, but it’s nice to have your own computer in your room. Cat. 5 cable — Wireless Internet is available in all of our halls, but not in all rooms. It’s best to prepared to have a strong connection for your computer. Television and coaxial cables — Each room is cable-television ready. But don’t wait until you’re in Athens to get your cables, because Wal-Mart will already have sold all of theirs to the other 33,000 college students. Surge protector — To protect your electronics. Broom and/or vacuum cleaner — Your room will be gross by the end of the year without one, and you’ll be the most popular person on the hall because no one else will have thought to bring one. Area rug — For halls which do not have carpet in the rooms. Alarm clock Small fan — This is useful, especially if you can’t control your own air. Desk lamp or portable lamp — A lamp that can be moved will come in handy when you have your first all-nighter and your roommate is ready to go to sleep. Stapler — This may sound obvious, but it’s nice to have one instead of desperately scrambling to find one five minutes before a paper is due. Poster mounts Trash can liners Bicycle and helmet — A bicycle is great exercise and transportation in one! Don’t forget a helmet equipped with a light if you plan to ride at night. Umbrella Small tool kit — Just in case of… you never know. Febreeze — Sharing space with another person? You’ll definitely need this!

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cat. 5 internet cable

poster mounts

desk accessories (pen caddies, stapler, portable desk lamp, thumb tacks) laptop

trash can liners surge protector

television

favorite movies

leave: candles (no open flame apparatus)

area rug

www.uga.edu/housing


with Housing!

What to Leave...

Leave: nails, screws or permanent adhesives

bed linens

vacuum cleaner (or HandiVac/broom)

compact microwave (1.0 cubic ft./700 watts max.)

Coffee Maker (no exposed heating elements)

storage organizers compact refrigerator (118 volts/60 Hz/1.5 amps)

www.uga.edu/h ousing

Space heaters

Appliances with exposed heating elements — Electric stoves with heating coils, grills.

Halogen lamps

Pets — Except for fish in properly maintained aquariums of 20 gallons or less.

Candles or any open flame apparatus

Lofts — Adjustable beds that can be raised to save space are provided by University Housing.

Trash cans — University Housing provides each resident with a flame retardant trash can.

Nails, screws, permanent adhesives — Anything that could damage walls.

Buyer Beware As the start of fall semester draws closer, you can expect to receive a number of commercial solicitations from futon companies, refrigerator rental companies, and other businesses that provide various products and services targeted to our student population. As you review this information, keep a few things in mind. First, Georgia’s open records laws require the University of Georgia, as well as University Housing, to provide mailing addresses to any outside party that submits a request for the information. While information on items such as student grades and health records are protected from such a request, unless you have restricted the information, student addresses are not protected. Although you may receive mailings regarding products which look to be official from the university, University Housing does not endorse, solicit on behalf of, or in partnership with, any outside vendors or manufacturer. The department does not certify that any products or appliances meet our specifications or abide by our policies. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that products and services used in the residence halls are permitted and adhere to housing guidelines and policies. Further, should a product or service be defective or fail to meet University Housing guidelines, recourse through the university is not an option. If you choose to do business with one of these vendors, we urge you to contact your chosen company well in advance of opening day to insure timely delivery and installation, for which you must be present. Orders placed during hectic move-in days are often riddled with mistakes, ranging from the wrong product being delivered, a lack of parts or delayed installation. Be sure to shop around, and most importantly, DO NOT PAY IN CASH! A cancelled check or credit card statement may be your only proof of payment. Above all, be a wise consumer!

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Security within the Residence Halls by Larry Correll-Hughes

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oving away from home and into a residence hall is a significant change for most college students, and understandably, a common concern among students and their families is safety. UGA Housing is also concerned about resident safety, which is why the provision of secure on-campus housing options is a core element of our mission statement. Access: The UGACard is the official University of Georgia identification card for students and plays an important role in maintaining a secure environment in every residence hall on campus. Upon moving into a residence hall, each student is given a holographic sticker to affix to the front of their UGACard to provide a quick and easy way for housing staff to identify the authorized residents of each residential community. In addition to providing a form of identification, the UGACard is necessary to enter the residential areas of residence halls in conjunction with biometric hand readers that control the doors to residential areas of all UGA residential communities. Security at some entry points is enhanced through the use of surveillance camera systems. Also, in the event of lost keys, doors to resident rooms are rekeyed. Security Personnel: University Housing also supports safety with employment of its own team of uniformed security personnel, who

monitor residence halls between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. every night of the week. Responding to emergency situations, identifying safety and/or security problems and monitoring access to residence hall entrances and exits are just a few of the nightly duties of these security personnel. UGA Alert: Every resident is encouraged to participate in UGAAlert, the emergency mass notification system employed by the University of Georgia Office of Security & Emergency Preparedness to contact students, faculty and staff. Participants may submit up to three telephone numbers and two email addresses that will be automatically contacted in the event that a severe threat to public safety and the health of the entire campus is identified. A valid UGA MyID is required to activate this service. For more information and to sign up to participate, please go to www.ugaalert.uga.edu. Resident Responsibility: But our most important resource for residence hall security lies in the hands of our residents. Students must remain diligent in complying with all of University Housing’s security policies, including not holding doors for persons who may be seeking to sneak in past a secure checkpoint, not allowing unescorted visitors to circulate in living areas, and never propping open exterior doors. Safety is part of our departmental mission, but it is also every resident’s responsibility!

UGA Housing Wireless Access Point Acceptable Use Policy Students have the option of connecting Wireless Access Points (WAP) to the network. If a student brings a personal wireless router, and wishes to connect it, they must abide by the Housing Wireless Access Point policies. These are detailed at www.sts.uga.edu/pawsa.html. Students are required to secure their routers via password, and they are responsible for all traffic that passes through their router. Student Technology Support (STS) can assist students to secure their routers when they arrive to the UGA campus or at any point during their time living in the UGA residence halls.

Wireless access points are allowed in the UGA residence halls. However, the following rules apply:

 Wireless access point must be officially registered with UGA for

 WAP must not have default manufacturer administrative

 All use of WAP must comply with all applicable laws, The

 WAP must not interfere with any PAWS network or other official

Internet access. Call STS to register.

University of Georgia Policies on the Use of Computers, and other relevant UGA policies.

 All use of WAP and all data transmitted through WAP is the

responsibility of the student to which the WAP is registered.

 WAP must be WPA/WPA2 enabled. STS can assist students to configure their WAP properly.

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password.

wireless network.

 UGA cannot prevent other wireless networks from interfering with user WAP, or otherwise guarantee signal quality or data transmission rates of user WAP.

 UGA reserves the right to deny network access to the WAP and any other device connected to it.

www.uga.edu/housing


Safe and Secure on the UGA Network: Protect Your Computer by Mathew Braun, Student Technology Support Manager

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onnecting to the Internet on campus is different from connecting at home. Your student’s computer will generally be more open to the Internet and the thousands of other computers connected to the UGA network. Consequently, the potential for getting infected with computer viruses and spyware is much greater at school. Virus and spyware infections can be a real nightmare. They can easily cause the loss of important data such as papers and homework, and can degrade basic computer functions like connecting to the Internet. Criminals can even use viruses and spyware to gather personal information and commit identity theft. Fortunately, there are four easy steps you can take to protect a computer on the UGA network. I highly recommend that all students: 1) Run anti-virus software. 2) Enable automatic computer updates. 3) Use a firewall. 4) Use a strong system password. All four steps can be completed even before your student moves to campus. Anti-Virus Software Getting anti-virus software is easy because most new computers come with McAfee or Norton already installed. However, both of these programs have a subscription fee for up-todate protection. Make sure to purchase a subscription that will last at least through the school year, or the computer will remain at risk for infection. Alternatively, UGA’s Information Security department recommends that students download Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) for free. You can download MSE from http://www.microsoft.com/ security_essentials but you should never install more than one anti-virus program on your computer at one time.

www.uga.edu/h ousing

Automatic Computer Updates Your student’s computer should also be configured to automatically download updates that fix security holes that viruses and spyware can exploit. Fortunately, all new computers will be configured for automatic updates by default. Windows users should visit www.windowsupdate.com to make sure automatic updates are enabled. If your student’s computer is not already set to receive updates automatically, click the button on the right-hand side of the page that says “Turn on Automatic Updates.”

Firewall A firewall allows your computer to connect to the Internet, but prevents other computers from connecting to you without permission. Most computers already have a built-in software firewall, and McAfee or Norton will come with their own software firewall as well. Your student’s Should my student be concerned about downloading music and movies? computer will be protected Yes. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Motion Picture from most network attacks as Association of America (MPAA) actively monitor file-sharing networks and have long as the built-in firewall or filed suits against individuals for sharing copyrighted materials.You can find out anti-virus program’s firewall is more about downloading music from www.musicunited.org not disabled.

Frequently Asked Technology Questions

Is it dangerous for my student to use social-networking websites? Not really. Most students have already used social-networking sites like Facebook, and Twitter well before they arrive on campus. The dangers in using these sites are really no different than the dangers of using anything on the Internet. It is important not to assume privacy, to understand that anything you post could be copied or cached elsewhere, and to be wary of any individuals or resources that you do not already know and trust. Is there wireless Internet access in every room? Not yet. Housing and Enterprise Information Technology Services are extending wireless Internet access to every residence hall on campus. Currently, all halls except ECV have access to the UGA wireless network. Wireless Internet access is also available in the lobby and common areas of each building. Wired connections are available in each room. Visit www.uga.edu/sts for more information on wireless Internet access and connecting to the wired network in your room. Should my student bring his/her own printer? Having your own printer can be very convenient. However, a student can save a lot of personal space by choosing not to bring one. Printing in computer labs does cost money but can be paid for using Bulldog Bucks. Where are computer labs located? Computer labs are located within Brumby Hall, Building 1516, Creswell Hall, Russell Hall, Oglethorpe House, and the East Campus Village. There are many other labs on campus including several in the Miller Student Learning Center and in the libraries. Visit www.eits.uga.edu/sites for more information. May my student physically secure his/her laptop in the room? Yes. Students may use a notebook security lock or cable. However, students are prohibited from attaching adhesive anchors or mounts to University furniture.

Strong Password My last recommendation is to secure your student’s computer with a strong password. Attackers can easily guess blank or weak system passwords to gain access to a computer. Students should select a strong password with a mix of both capital and lower case letters, numbers, and special characters like # or $. “goD@Wgs!” demonstrates a good mix of characters in a strong password. If you follow these 4 easy steps, your student will be much safer on the UGA network. You or your student should feel free to call us at (706) 5423106, visit www.uga.edu/sts or www.infosec.uga.edu, or e-mail us at sts@uga.edu with any questions or concerns you have about computer security and protection. Also, be on the lookout for our Computer Health and Security Fair in October.

We’ll see you at Hunker Down 2011!

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Get Involved through the Residence Hall Association (RHA) by Ryan Hill

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he RHA Executive Board would like to formally welcome new students to the Residence Hall Association, University Housing and the Bulldog family. The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is the second largest student organization at UGA, consisting of the nearly 7,400 residents living in University Housing. For more than 40 years, RHA has sought to give residents of housing a unified voice in policies and programs that affect our students and life in the halls. RHA offers a number of services and programs to residents in an effort to make living on campus one of the greatest aspects of a college career. One of the most important ways RHA impacts residents is through the community councils. Every fall, residents of the seven residential communities on campus elect a council of students to represent them, and to act as stewards of the housing activity fee each resident pays. These representatives work throughout the year to organize and implement programs and pursue initiatives important to the residents of their community or hall. The councils hold weekly or bi-weekly general body meetings that all residents are welcome to attend. Representatives from each council also attend the RHA General Body meetings held every Tuesday during the academic year. In addition to community and hall councils, residents can get involved in RHA in a number of ways. RHA has several active committees in which residents are encouraged to get involved. These include: Sustainability, DAWG Days, Constitution and Policy Book Review, Fundraising/Auditing, Homecoming/ Scrapbooking, Advertising, and others. Residents interested in event planning are also invited to assist with our events. These are large-scale programs targeted at all residents on campus, so help is always needed! Students in housing are also welcome to join the National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHH) after living on campus for more than one semester. NRHH represents the top 1% of oncampus students and is built upon the pillars of leadership, service and recognition. More information about NRHH can be found at www.uga.edu/nrhh. Students interested in media and television production can get involved in Residence Hall Studios (RHS) that runs housing’s television stations: Cinema 77 and Housing 12. They feature original programming and assist with movie selections for Cinema 77. The RHA Executive Board also coordinates a number of traditional programs throughout the year for our residents. Our programs are known for having awesome t-shirts and delicious food, all of which are free. Students can look out for great programs this year including First Fling/Welcome Week, Cosmic Bowling, Kiss Me I’m Sustainable, RezFest, and many more! The Residence Hall Association has been recognized on the campus, state, regional and national level as an outstanding and influential organization. Its leaders, programs and services

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have received numerous awards over the past year that we are incredibly proud of. We hope that your student will want to be a part of the award winning efforts of RHA next year. We are anticipating an exceptional year full of opportunities for your students to get involved and make memories that will stay with them long after graduation. If you would like more information about RHA and the organizations and programs that fall under its purview, please go to www.uga.edu/rha.

Leadership Experience That Pays Is your student looking for a way to increase his or her income while building a track record of leadership success in real-world business operations? They should consider a position with University Housing! Student employees plan an essential role in the success of the Department of University Housing by supporting maintenance, administrative and customer service operations in all residence halls and business offices. Student positions include office assistants, desk assistants, mail clerks and maintenance team members, with flexible scheduling that is supportive of student academics. Resident Assistants and C.L.A.S.S. Advocates capture invaluable leadership skills while supporting hall residents. To apply online or for more information about a student position with University Housing, please visit the “Work for UGA Housing” section of the website at www.uga.edu/housing/work.

www.uga.edu/housing


A Place to Make Friends

F

by Jessica Pense

or over a century, the powerful impact of peer relationships and friendships on a student’s learning in college has been known, and decades of research tells us that student involvement plays a key role in their likelihood of being successful in college. We also know that making new friends can be difficult, especially when you add social media sites such as Facebook and twitter into the mix. More than ever before, students are connected to the world through their computers, iPads and phones, and yet sometimes disconnected from the world immediately around them. While technology helps students keep in touch with you and friends back home, it can sometimes keep them from taking the initiative to make new friends, get involved and really experience what UGA has to offer. College is a time to discover who you are and what you want to be, meet new friends and learn about new cultures and ideas. Living on campus in a residence hall provides students with the perfect opportunity to experience all of these things and more. Simply living in close proximity to so many other students affords the opportunity to meet students from different cultures, beliefs and walks of life. There are also many opportunities to get involved within the residence halls. Onetime events such as programs put on by the community staff allow students to learn something new or form friendships with others that live in the same community. Program topics range from community service, to health and wellness and events with faculty. Other opportunities, like Community Council, is a great way for students who want an ongoing experience; students will meet others from their community, plan programs, propose and make improvements to the hall, and gain valuable leadership experience. How can I help as a parent? Encourage your student to step outside their comfort zone. After all, they are not alone in not knowing very many other people; there are 5,000 other new first-year students all looking to make friends. Living on-campus provides countless opportunities to meet new friends on a daily basis. Asking someone to go grab a bite to eat, to play a game of frisbee, join an intramural team, or attend a program or event in their community or on campus can be a great way for your students get to know someone they have only met in passing in their residence hall Saying “hi” to someone while brushing their teeth in the morning, sitting with someone they don’t know in the dining commons, or stopping by an open door on the hallway can introduce them to new friends, cultures and ideas to which they may have not been exposed. Students can actually use social media to help get to know people they meet in college, but there is still real-life effort required. They need to put themselves out there and find out someone’s first and last name so that they can actually friend them on Facebook, because “Jennifer in Brumby Hall” won’t narrow it down too far! If your student is on the shy side, ask them to try going to a program, talking to their RA about their interests, or joining Community Council. Outside of the residence halls, UGA’s Center for Student Organizations has more than 500 groups in which students can get involved. No matter your student’s interests, the opportunities to get involved and meet new people are seemingly endless when you live on campus.

www.uga.edu/h ousing

If I Could Tell Them ONE THING… UGA Housing’s Resident Assistants and C.L.A.S.S. Advocates share pearls of wisdom with new college students and their families: •

Don’t come in with expectations about how people will act, who you’ll be friends with, or even what your roommate will be like. If you keep an open mind, most surprises will be good ones!

On the first day of moving into the residence hall, go around to the other rooms where people are moving in because they are new too and being that outgoing person will make you a lot of friends fast.

Don’t limit yourself to your high school crowd. Even if you have a group of friends from high school who came up to college with you, it’s important to expand that group of friends.

Leave your door open in the residence hall when you are there, especially in the first few weeks. You’ll meet a lot of people just by leaving that door open.

Think of your residence hall as home. This is where you live now, and you’re going to spend most of your time here. Bring more than just the essentials! Grab your guitar, a few board games, that show you have every episode of on DVD or on your iPad. Any of those little things that allow you to be you and bond with other people.

Don’t go home every weekend. There are productive things to do in Athens besides partying. Join clubs and organizations to get you out and about.

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An Environment of Learning by Diana Fruth

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tudents decide to attend the University of Georgia for many reasons: traditions, a distance away from their hometown or the institution’s reputation to name a few. But students attend the University of Georgia for one goal… to further their education. The Department of University Housing promotes this endeavor by supporting the academic success and personal growth of the residents through a variety of collaborative academic initiatives based in the residence halls. These programs create an environment of learning both inside and outside of the classroom, creating an environment where learning takes place all around them. Research demonstrates many positive benefits for students engaged in learning activities like the ones provided in the residence halls, including academic achievement, richer engagement with the institution, development of collaborative learning and working with peers, and a sense of belonging. Many of these programs begin in the first year of college to aid in the transition from high school to college and getting students on the right track to academic success. Below is a listing of the residential programs that University Housing and partners offer to first-year students: Learning Communities – Creswell Hall http://www.uga. edu/housing/academic/learning.html Twenty students in each community register for three classes together for fall semester and one service-learning course for spring semester. The communities for 2011-2012 include: Business, Family and Consumer Sciences, Global Engagement, Life Sciences, Music, and Pre-Law. One of the courses in the fall and the spring course are taught by the same faculty member each term, creating some continuity for the students. These students also benefit from interacting with an upper-level student peer mentor who assists them in navigating their first year at UGA. Freshman College Summer Experience (FCSE) - Creswell Hall http://www.uga.edu/housing/academic/freshman. html Students take part in this month-long summer experience to earn six hours of academic credit prior to the traditional fall term start. FCSE assists students with the transition from high school and creates connections to faculty, staff and peers. The 276 students in this program benefit from getting a jump start on college life by creating strong friendships and learning to navigate life at UGA before the rest of their 33,000 friends arrive on campus! Honors Magnet Program – Myers Hall http://www.uga. edu/housing/academic/honors.html This residential program creates a community living environment for approximately 220 first-year UGA Honors Program participants to share ideas and views from different disciplines. The Honors Program provides courses in first and second year students’ core curriculum, with enrollments averaging 20 students or less. Participants enjoy convenient access to on-site academic advisors and other resources.

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Franklin Residential College (FRC) – Rutherford Hall http://www.uga.edu/housing/academic/franklin.html The Franklin Residential College consists of 150 first-year and upper division students enrolled in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. These students participate in various student-run activities including cultural events and trips. A live-in faculty member as well as the FRC dean, supports the programs in the residence hall by hosting cookie nights, dean’st, attending cultural campus events and dinner with the students. The Department of University Housing also promotes connections and academic learning beyond the first year. While your student may not currently be eligible for these programs this fall, recruitment begins mid-fall term (beginning in October) for many of these programs. Encourage your student to apply! They are: Franklin Residential College (FRC) – Rutherford Hall http://www.uga.edu/housing/academic/franklin.html (See listing above) Language Communities (French & Spanish) – Mary Lyndon Hall http://www.uga.edu/housing/academic/ frenchspanish.html Eighteen students per language are selected through an application and interview process and commit to only speak the chosen language while in common spaces within their residence hall. Through coursework, activities and daily interaction in the community, students improve and master French and/or Spanish. Students benefit from access to mixed media language libraries, academic credit for enrolled courses and priority registration for French and Spanish courses. Some first-year students proficient in the chosen language may apply to participate in the Language Community. Leadership & Service LLC - Reed Hall, Payne Hall and Building 1516 http://www.uga.edu/cls/students/living/ index.html The Leadership & Service LLC (Living-Learning Community) provides a supportive environment for students to engage in the meaningful exploration of leadership and service. Students will achieve development in four areas: leadership capacity, appreciation of and commitment to servicelearning, social mindedness and responsibility, and the ability to draw connections between the curricular and co-curricular experience. Fall 2011 will launch the inaugural year for the Leadership & Service LLC. American Sign Language Community On the horizon for fall 2012 will be the launching of the American Sign Language Community. Modeled after the French and Spanish Language Communities, members of the American Sign Language Community will only use non-verbal methods (mainly American Sign Language) to communicate. Participants will also learn and be immersed in the deaf culture.

www.uga.edu/housing


Get on Track with Academic Enhancement

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by Melissa Garber

or many students, the transition from high school to college can be quite challenging, as new ways of studying and learning must be cultivated in order to ensure success in the fast paced university environment. Students living in the residence halls don’t have to look far to get the help they need. With a satellite office conveniently located in the Brumby Rotunda, the Division of Academic Enhancement provides easy access to a wide variety of academic support services, including peer tutoring in math, chemistry and writing, as well as academic workshops and individual skill building assistance in study strategies, time management, test preparation and note taking. Academic Enhancement also collaborates with the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Advising offices located in Brumby, Russell, and Creswell halls, along with the Department of University Housing to plan and host cultural and academic events in the residence halls each year. These include GetSmart

Month, the Last Lecture Series, and the Majors Fair. The Division of Academic Enhancement is dedicated to helping students succeed academically. All residents of UGA Housing are encouraged to take advantage of the many academic resources available to them through their satellite office and other campus locations. For more information, please visit www.uga.edu/dae or e-mail care@uga.edu. To see a complete listing of the Division of Academic Enhancement’s residence hall programs please visit www.uga.edu/housing/academic-enhancement.

Important Dates FALL 2011

EARLY CHECK-IN

AUGUST 9 @ 9AM

MOVE-IN BEGINS

AUGUST 10 @ 9AM

THANKSGIVING BREAK (CLOSE)*

NOVEMBER 20 @ NOON

THANKSGIVING BREAK (OPEN)*

NOVEMBER 27 @ 9AM

FINALS END

DECEMBER 14

HALLS CLOSE - WINTER BREAK*

DECEMBER 16 @ NOON

COMMENCEMENT

DECEMBER 16

SPRING 2012

HALLS OPEN

JANUARY 3 @ 9AM

SPRING BREAK (CLOSE)*

MARCH 10 @ NOON

SPRING BREAK (OPEN)*

MARCH 18 @ 9AM

FINALS END

MAY 8

COMMENCEMENT

MAY 11

HALLS CLOSE

MAY 12 @ NOON

*ALL RESIDENCE HALLS CLOSE FOR THE DESIGNATED BREAK PERIODS WITH THE EXCEPTION OF EAST CAMPUS VILLAGE, REED HALL, AND PAYNE HALL.

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www.uga.edu/housing

160 165 160 161 496 122 404 159 90 555 147 204 296

Boggs

Church

Hill

Lipscomb

Mell

Oglethorpe

Mary Lyndon

Myers

Rutherford

Soule

Building 1516

Morris

Payne

Reed

384 269 246 322

Building 1512

McWhorter

Rooker

Vandiver

972

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

M/F

F

M/F

M/F

F

Gender

2

2

2

2

1

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Visit Type

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Some

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Carpet

--

--

--

--

7' X 10'

12’ X 15’ to 16' X 24'

9’ X 12’ to 12’ X 18’

8’ X 10' to 12’ X 15’

--

--

9’ X 12’ or 12' X 15'

9’ X 12’

9’ X 12’ to 14’ X 21’

8' X 10'

10' X 14'

10' X 14'

10' X 14'

10' X 14'

10' X 14'

8' X 10’ or 9' X 12'

6’ X 9'

Suggested Area Rug Size

Apts

Apts

Apts

Apts

Rooms

Suites

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Suites

Rooms

Mixed

Mixed

Suites

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Rooms

Room Type

• All UGA residence halls feature air conditioning, high speed Internet service access, cable television, and window blinds. • Community bathrooms are not connected to the student room, semi-private bathrooms are connected to the student room but shared by residents of at least one other room. Private bathrooms are connected to the student room and accessible only to the residents of that room. • Wireless Internet is available either in common areas such as lounges or in all areas of the building, including student rooms. • “Suggested” rug sizes: Rooms can vary greatly in size and dimensions, so floor plans should be consulted before making purchases.

East Campus Village

Russell

Reed

Myers

Russell

161

Creswell

Creswell

Hill

966

Brumby

Brumby 950

Hall

Community

Beds

Residence Hall Information

No

No

No

No

No

Some

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Room Sinks

86 X 54 Full

80 X 54 Full

86 X 54 Full

80 X 54 Full

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

75 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

75 X 36 Twin

80 X 36 Twin

Mattress Size

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

AC Only

Yes

Yes

Yes

AC Only

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

In Room Heat & Air Control

Common

Common

Common

Common

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

Wireless Internet

1 - Visitation permitted Monday – Thursday, 10am – 2am and 24 hours begining 10am Friday to 2am Monday (Sunday night) 2 - Visitation permited 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Visitation Type:

Private & Semi

Private & Semi

Private & Semi

Private & Semi

Community

Semi-Private

Community

Community

Private

Semi-Private

Community

Mixed

Mixed

Semi-Private

Community

Community

Community

Community

Community

Community

Community

Bathroom Type

Bulldog Families Summer 2011  

Bulldog Families Summer 2011