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SENIOR DESIGN

SHOWCASE 2019


6 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


WE CONNECT

Rigorous academics to real-world challenges. The University of Georgia College of Engineering provides students with challenging experiential learning opportunities, including our innovative Capstone Senior Design course for each of our eight undergraduate degree programs.

CONTENTS PROJECTS DISPLAYED

5

PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS

9

2018 - 2019 SPONSORS

44

At the Senior Design Showcase, students display prototypes and discuss the mechanics, design, and engineering behind a wide range of projects they have spent months designing and refining. Working with partners from industry, government and non-profit groups on real-world challenges, the experience is designed to help students develop essential skills for the workforce including team building, creative problem solving and collaboration.

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 3


2019 DESIGN PROJECTS 6 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Creative Machine Design Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

1

9

Rapid, room-side method of disinfection for reusable radiation safety gloves in veterinary practice

2

9

Fluid Structure Interaction of a Business Jet Landing Gear Door

3

10

ASME Human Powered Vehicle Design

4

10

Automated Coffee Machine - Sensors/Control Logic/User Interface/Auxiliary Mechanisms

5

10

Automated Coffee Machine - Inlet Design/Framing/Brew Operation/Cleaning/Reset Mechanism

6

11

Dehumidification for Indoor Agriculture Applications

7

11

Design of a device to skim and remove duckweed from the surface of a wetland pond

8

11

Suspension - UGA Motorsports (SAE)

9

12

Power Train - UGA Motorsports (SAE)

10

12

Phonograph Record Hole Punch for Vinyl Recycling (Team A)

11

12

Plastic Contamination Mitigation in Seed Cotton

12

13

Advancing Heat Exchanger and Heat Sink Technology for the United States Air Force (Team B)

13

13

Design of a Crash-Proof Dog Crate (Team A)

14

13

Automotive Power Running Board/Step

15

14

Optimization & miniaturization of an electrostatic sampling device for airborne pathogens & toxins

16

14

Haptic Simulator for Golf Training

17

14

Chassis/Composite -UGA Motorsports (SAE)

Medical Device or Biological Process Design Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

18

15

Bioreactor Design for Expansion of CAR T cells (Team C)

19

16

Canine Seizure Detection System

20

16

Optimization of Airflow and Estimation of Gas Holdup for Fermentation Processes

21

16

Design of a new Everest & Jennings wheelchair (Team A)

22

17

Small Animal Vibrating Coupage Vest for Treatment of Pneumonia

23

17

Conversion of a standard small animal patient cage into climate-controlled oxygen cage

24

17

Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility (Team A)

25

18

Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility (Team B)

26

18

Retractable fluid pump rack (Team A)

27

19

Electrical monitoring of anesthetized animals

28

19

Bluetooth Stethoscope for Hearing Aids

29

19

Experimental Design Set-up for Drug Delivery into Lung Models

30

20

Design of a new Everest & Jennings wheelchair (Team B)

31

20

Fluid Pump and ECG Support

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 5


Manufactured System or Process Design Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

32

21

Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility (Team C)

33

21

Continuous Glycolide Manufacturing Process Design (Team A)

34

22

Continuous Glycolide Manufacturing Process Design (Team B)

35

22

Bioreactor Design for Expansion of CAR T cells (Team B)

36

22

Measurement and visualization of fluid flow around vertical tail and rudder of business jet

37

23

Design of a Crash-Proof Dog Crate (Team B)

38

23

Advancing Heat Exchanger and Heat Sink Technology for the United States Air Force (Team A)

39

23

Benchtop Melt Spray Congealer Prototype

40

24

Electrical - UGA Motorsports (SAE)

41

24

Water and Wastewater Sludge Management Program

42

25

Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team A)

43

25

Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team B)

44

25

Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team C)

45

26

Custom Small Scale Starch Mogul Machine

46

26

Amici Kitchen Redesign

47

26

Design of a Mars Rover for NASA Competition

48

27

Conveyor reject system using PLCs

49

27

Bacterial Fermentation Tank Using PLC

50

28

Wastewater treatment process to remove/reduce selenium

51

28

Bioreactor Design for Expansion of CAR T cells (Team A)

52

28

Phonograph Record Hole Punch for Vinyl Recycling (Team B)

Computerized System or Software Design Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

53

29

VR + Haptic + Eye Tracking Feedback

54

29

A pressure-sensitive plate for identifying initial contact of a human foot with the floor

55

29

Video monitoring system in UGA cleanroom

56

30

Augmented Heads Up Display with Waze Integration

57

30

Cloud Integration Challenge

58

30

CyberDawg - A cybersecurity software that helps identify and display cyber threats

59

31

A Mobile APP Design for Assisting Physicians for Mechanical Ventilation Protocols

60

31

HAZMAT Tracking through Blockchain-IoT

6 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Community Impact Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

61

31

Flint River Water Trail

62

32

Shotgun Target Range

63

32

Feasibility Study for the Expansion of North Hart Elementary School

64

33

Protecting Turtles from Aquaculture Gear in Georgia

65

33

Woodsong Housing Development

66

33

Learning Thermostatic control for Residential Heat Pump Water Heater

67

34

Southern Crescent Technical College: Campus Entry Redesign

68

34

Downtown Water Issues and Parking Lot Redesign/Upgrade

69

34

Sensor Design for Monitoring Environmental Control of Lab Units

70

35

Remote access lock for EvaKuula

71

35

Feasibility Study for Recreation Center at the Hart County Sports and Recreation Complex

72

35

City of Johns Creek Snake Cut Through Jones Bridge Road at Sargent Road and Douglas Road

73

36

City of Johns Creek Old Alabama Road Extension to State Bridge Road via Tunnel

74

36

Site Development Plan – Clay National Guard Center

75

37

Planning, Design & Construction Services for the new University Science Learning Center

76

37

NeSmith Gas Station Remediation Analysis

77

37

Wolf Creek Preserve Bridge Design and Trail Stabilization

78

38

Panther Creek Trail Head and Recreation Area Parking Lot Design

79

38

Whigham: Structural Integrity Assessment of Magnolia Room Building

80

39

Laser autofocusing system for high resolution microscopy

81

39

Trail phase expansion

82

40

Spalding Drive at Dalrymple

83

40

Hawkinsville: Commerce Street Redesign

Sustainable Design Projects TEAM/TABLE

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PROJECT TITLE

84

41

Office/Warehouse Site Development

85

41

ASHRAE Integrated Sustainable Building Design Competition

86

41

Hartwell: Wastewater Discharge Feasibility Study

87

42

Water Savings-Plant and community partnership

88

42

Sustainable Methods for Improving Water Usage Efficiency in Data Centers

89

43

Etowah 32 Dam Removal Feasibility Study

90

43

Industrial Building Authority: Gateway Park – Solar/LED Lighting Improvements

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 7


PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS


1

Rapid method of disinfection for reusable radiation safety gloves in veterinary practice SPONSOR: University of Georgia Veterinary Medical Center FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Gun An, Cash Carlson, Malcolm Norris, Timothy Ruiter Many varieties of bacteria can form on veterinary radiation gloves after multiple uses, creating threats to the veterinarian as well as the animal. The veterinary hospital must dispose of a large quantity of gloves after a few months. The objective of our project is to identify the different types of bacteria present in the gloves and find a way to disinfect them to reduce the number of discarded gloves. Our device would keep the interior of the gloves sanitary for a longer amount of time by cleaning them periodically. The device works by placing a set of gloves in the mechanism. Once the gloves are placed securely, the user must press the button to start the spraying process. After the spraying is finished, they must press another button on the device. This button will activate a fan within the device to expedite the drying process. This approach would allow a veterinarian to start the device at the end of the work day, with the device providing clean gloves the following morning.

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Fluid Structure Interaction of a Business Jet Landing Gear Door SPONSOR: Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation FACULTY MENTOR: Ben Davis, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Bryce Johnson, Jake Jensen, Herit Patel, Andrew Botkin, Eric Norton Gulfstream engineers wish to investigate the occurrence of landing gear door flutter observed during takeoff of a G650 aircraft during early stages of flight testing. Flutter is a safety concern when designing aircraft because it leads to catastrophic failure due to increasing material oscillations. Flutter is believed to be a function of a variety of different factors including object geometry, boundary conditions, and material. The goal of this capstone project is to theoretically analyze these factors and design a model that effectively simulates the G650 landing gear door flutter conditions. A test article was created with the principles of the water-to-air analogy and tested in the UGA water tunnel. The tests are intended to experimentally demonstrate how the critical flutter velocity is influenced by different structural factors such as mass ratio, actuator location, and chord/span lengths. Our team predicted the flutter point prior to executing each test and then compared our analysis to the experimental results. A laser vibrometer and an impact modal hammer were used to perform frequency and damping studies. The data collected gives insights to how certain design changes can reduce flutter and improve Gulfstream aircraft.

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ASME Human Powered Vehicle Design SPONSOR: ASME FACULTY MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: John Branstetter, Jeffrey Kohn, Kevin Dyson, Conner McCullough, Luke Wells, Alex Massardo, Julie Roseberry The Human Powered Vehicle Challenge creates a platform for future engineers to think about the future of transportation. Teams from all around the country create their vision for what human powered vehicles can be, and ASME gives us the opportunity to showcase our vision. Our overall goal was to use our engineering skills and knowledge to create a sustainable and efficient vehicle that can be used in daily life. Our vehicle, named the Junkyard Dawg, is a recumbent bicycle that has been designed using CAD software in conjunction with computer assisted finite element analysis. Its frame is made of 6061 aluminum rods for its affordable cost and lightweight properties. The vehicle design is rear wheel powered for its simplicity. The rollover protection system implemented in the design also provides the driver with a safe riding experience in the event that the vehicle rolls over or collides with another vehicle or object. Through the design decisions we have made we believe that our vehicle can create a strong foundation for future capstone groups with the same project to advance UGA’s vision of the future of human powered transportation.

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Automated Coffee Machine - Sensors/Control Logic/User Interface/Auxiliary Mechanisms SPONSOR: Jittery Joe’s FACULTY MENTOR: Roger Hilten, Ph.D. and Mark Trudgen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Elizabeth Turner, Michael Ilardi, Jawad Iqbal, Dylan Brown, Andy Sheppard This group’s Capstone Project has the stated goal of designing and building a coffee vending machine that can brew and dispense fresh coffee for a user with the simple push of a button. The only inputs required from a user include a brief interaction with a user interface and the placement of a coffee cup into a cup holder. From this point, the user will wait for the coffee vending machine to create a fresh cup of coffee from the raw ingredients that are already in the machine. This machine autonomously completes all the processes necessary to brew a cup of coffee, including grinding coffee beans, heating and dispensing the coffee, and filtrating the coffee. Further, this coffee vending machine utilizes a method of brewing coffee similar to that of an AeroPress coffee maker. Simply put, coffee is produced by mixing ground coffee beans and heated water in a designated chamber. After a brief steeping period, a plunger is utilized to push the coffee out of the chamber through a coffee filter. After the coffee is dispensed into a coffee cup, the vending machine then automatically cleans the metal coffee filter and resets itself for future use. As such, this coffee vending machine automatically produces a fresh cup for the user with the push of a button.

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Automated Coffee Machine - Inlet Design/Framing/Brew Operation/Cleaning/Reset Mechanism SPONSOR: Jittery Joe’s FACULTY MENTORS: Roger Hilten, Ph.D. and Mark Trudgen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Tatsuya Kudo, Davis Adler, Jacob Cochran, Chandler Minter, Ian Huff This group’s Capstone Project has the stated goal of designing and building a coffee vending machine that can brew and dispense fresh coffee for a user with the simple push of a button. The only inputs required from a user include a brief interaction with a user interface and the placement of a coffee cup into a cup holder. From this point, the user will wait for the coffee vending machine to create a fresh cup of coffee from the raw ingredients that are already in the machine. This machine autonomously completes all the processes necessary to brew a cup of coffee, including grinding coffee beans, heating and dispensing the coffee, and filtrating the coffee. Further, this coffee vending machine utilizes a method of brewing coffee similar to that of an AeroPress coffee maker. Simply put, coffee is produced by mixing ground coffee beans and heated water in a designated chamber. After a brief steeping period, a plunger is utilized to push the coffee out of the chamber through a coffee filter. After the coffee is dispensed into a coffee cup, the vending machine then automatically cleans the metal coffee filter and resets itself for future use. As such, this coffee vending machine automatically produces a fresh cup for the user with the push of a button.

10 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


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Dehumidification for Indoor Agriculture Applications SPONSOR: Southern Company FACULTY MENTOR: Ernest Tollner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Corey Swade, Phillip Spratling, Aaron Williams, Nicholas Heavner, Christopher Reddick, James Allen Our team’s project was to design a dehumidifier for Southern Company. This design was meant to be optimized for use in a small, controlled agriculture environment, such as a repurposed shipping container. The design was to be less than 3 ft. by 3 ft. by 3 ft., minimize heat rejection, and maximize cost efficiency while removing the amount of water needed for optimal plant growth. The design was to use an unconventional approach other than a refrigerant cooling loop. With this requirement, we began to research 3 different design possibilities and compared them to Southern Company’s current solution. From this initial analysis, we decided that a thermoelectric cooler would provide us the most control over the process while also allowing us to minimize the heat rejection that the client wanted. Our final product is the performance analysis of a Peltier dehumidifier design that utilized a tube bank array to cool and condense moisture out of the air.

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Design of a device to skim and remove duckweed from the surface of a wetland pond SPONSOR: University of the South, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences FACULTY MENTOR: Ernest Tollner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Robert Townes, Ben Couey, James McCarty, Benjamin Wright Throughout the world, constructed wetlands are used to help remove pollutants from watersheds before these pollutants can enter nearby rivers and streams. Our project worked in partnership with the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee to help remove an invasive cover of duckweed from one such constructed wetland. Because it is an active research station however, conventional methods of duckweed removal such as herbicides and animal removal strategies were not an option. Our team has designed a pumping filtration system that can skim the duckweed off the surface of the water, pump it onto the shores of the wetland, and then filter it out before returning the water to the wetland. One large design qualification of our project was that the duckweed not only be removed from the pond, but also be collected so that it can be used in later research studies for the University of the South. Through our dewatering bag filtration and collection system we have not only met, but exceeded these goals in an easily portable and complete duckweed removal system.

8

Suspension - UGA Motorsports (SAE) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTOR: John Mativo, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Connor Chambless, Erik Steelman, Jhun Saw, Blake Manzer, Kyle Larsen This project team is an ongoing endeavor into the research, conceptualization, design, evaluation, simulation, fabrication, and assembling of a complete, complex suspension system on a standard Formula SAE Race Car. This project is unique in that we are the contracting specialists for a pre-existing student-led design team in its inaugural year of existence at UGA. We started with existing themes and concepts, then applied our knowledge of advanced engineering, physics, and mechanical systems to evaluate and fortify designs that we either helped to generate or were pre-existing. After designs were evaluated in software, we moved to Finite Element Analysis testing and design improvements to ensure the designs were legitimate and safe. Upon completion of simulation and evaluation, we moved to the current stage of fabrication, manufacturing, and assembly of these designs to implement a real-world, usable prototype suspension on the Inaugural UGA FSAE Race Car. Upon completion, this suspension will consist of working control arms, rockers, pushrods, tie rods, uprights, and all relevant mounting tabs and fasteners, all designed, tested, and fabricated here at UGA. Combined with carefully researched and selected shocks, wheel hubs, wheels, tires, and brakes, this suspension system will make sure that this car corners, brakes, and maintains maximum contact with the pavement in a safe, consistent, and reliable way to propel UGA towards goals of victory in FSAE competitions.

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 11


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Power Train - UGA Motorsports (SAE) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTOR: John Mativo, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Joshua Pierson, Edwin Chiuz, Ross Oliver, Jacob McCannon, Connor Gilligan The objective of our project is to design and manufacture the powertrain that will propel UGA Motorsports’ first competition Formula SAE race car. This powertrain project includes the design of a custom air intake, exhaust, fueling, cooling, and final drive systems. This project was designed to kickstart UGA’s involvement in the Formula Student competition and bring an recognition to the prestige of the College of Engineering at UGA. We have achieved this through two steps. The first step involved researching possible designs and the second involved performing calculations both by hand and in Solidworks to test these solutions. Due to the vast array of restrictions set by the Formula SAE organization, we were forced to design a top performance race car that also meets a set of strict regulations. The completion of this project results in the University of Georgia owning a fully-functioning race car that will be used to compete against other Universities across the nation. Going forward, UGA will be able to use this achievement to market their engineering program to prospective students.

10

Phonograph Record Hole Punch for Vinyl Recycling (Team A) SPONSOR: Kindercore Vinyl FACULTY MENTOR: Dan Geller, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Farozaan Abidi, Justin Parsons, Austin George Our group has been tasked with constructing a device capable of punching holes in vinyl records for Kindercore Vinyl, a local vinyl record shop. Kindercore wishes to begin recycling vinyl records, but requires a way to remove the central labeled region of the records before they can be fed into the recycling machine. In order to remove this labeled region, our group has designed a hand operated press with a large circular blade in order to cut through the records and remove the centers. The intent of the device is to be easily operated by Kindercore employees and to preserve the centers so that Kindercore may potentially sell them as a separate product.

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Plastic Contamination Mitigation in Seed Cotton SPONSOR: Lummus Corporation FACULTY MENTOR: Ernest Tollner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kyle Gill, James Wilfong, Melanie Plummer Our team was tasked with devising a solution to America’s increasing issue with plastic contamination in seed cotton due to the increasing prevalence of round module wrap. As of right now, there is much research being conducted worldwide on the best way to detect and remove plastic from cotton. The majority of this research has gone into the detection of plastic contamination without a tangible way to remove it. Our main objective was to design general removal system that does not necessitate a detection system in order to operate effectively and that meets the requirements given by our client, Joe Thomas of Lummus Corporation: A. Must detect the presence of plastic in seed cotton early in the ginning process and tactically remove and/or segregate the extrinsic with as little loss of seed cotton as is practicable B. Must be applicable to a flowing system in which seed cotton is mechanically conveyed via belt conveyor, in an enclosed duct using air, or by gravity in a flowing cascade We designed a dual roller system to be placed at the very beginning of the ginning process that will use suction to remove plastic from the seed cotton as the cotton is being fed through the rollers.

12 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


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Advancing Heat Exchanger & Heat Sink Technology for the United States Air Force (Team B) SPONSOR: United States Air Force FACULTY MENTOR: Rawad Saleh, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Nathaniel Howard, Kamil Bagain, Benjamin Tonks, Hayden Magill, Christopher Humes Advancements in additive manufacturing technology present an efficient and cost-effective approach to the industrial manufacturing and production of parts and systems. Some challenges to widespread implementation of this technique in the defense sector include relatively low product quality, inability of machines to operate in some climates, and lack of workplace expertise. The United States Air Force sponsored this project to design a fluid-air heat exchanger to be manufactured by an EOS M 290, an additive manufacturing system that utilizes powder bed fusion. The heat exchanger must be optimized for additive manufacturing technology in addition to fulfilling performance and application requirements. Outside surface area is maximized through the use of radial fins attached along the length of each pipe, resulting in increased contact between the design and the surrounding ambient air. Static mixers within the pipes and the collision of the fluid within the nodes allow for turbulent flow throughout the design from inlet to outlet, further increasing heat transfer. Design features are angled up to 45 degrees from the vertical axis for print compatibility with the EOS M 290 and to ease the removal of excess powder.

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Design of a Crash-Proof Dog Crate (Team A) SPONSOR: Dagmar Nelson FACULTY MENTOR: Sidney Thompson, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jonathan Hall, Darren Wright, Samuel Burgh, Nicholas Redden Our task was to create a restraint device that could protect a dog during a common car crash while costing under $500 retail. The design would need to be compatible with all SUVs on the market while comfortably fitting a medium dog. We decided to tackle this challenge using a specially designed crate. To achieve our safety goals, we adapted many of the innovations that are in standard in cars. Our design is larger than standard crates so that it can redirect energy from the dog, protecting it from a variety of situations. To keep prices down we utilized standard metal beams and plates to build the body. Combined with a padded coating, the resulting cage is safe, relatively cheap, and comfortable.

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Automotive Power Running Board/Step SPONSOR: Southeast Toyota FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Christian Antwi, Cale Heard, Austin Turner, Andrew Scruggs Our team created an aftermarket Power Running Board for Southeast Toyota that is compatible with the Toyota Tundra, 4Runner, and Tacoma. Our design competes with the market’s two competitors in design, functionality, and performance, while delivering the product in half the cost. We implemented an innovative Ridged Chain Drive (RCD) design that minimizes space and improves performance. The RCD acts as a linear actuator to deploy the board and is able to coil up when the board is retracted. The motor runs completely through the car’s battery, and the board is LED compatible when deployed. We designed our system to deploy the step when the vehicle’s door opens and retract when the door closes. There is a safety sensor incorporated into the system that stops the board from closing when something is obstructing its full range of movement. This board will provide Southeast Toyota with another aftermarket product to add to their arsenal and will help them stay a step past their competitors.

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 13


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Optimization and miniaturization of an electrostatic sampling device for airborne pathogens and toxins SPONSOR: Electrostatic Space Charge Systems, LLC FACULTY MENTOR: Rawad Saleh, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Adit Alam, Anthony Zenere, Swecha Kranthi Our Project has been to modify an existing design for an electrostatic precipitator to make it smaller and more efficient. The original design was patented in 2006 and works by inducing an electrostatic charge between an electrode configuration and a grounded collecting medium. This field will capture pathogens on a petri dish, which can then be incubated and inspected to identify biological contaminants in the air. We have modified the original design to have a smaller footprint, to have only one moving part (the on-off toggle), to be waterproof, and to switch seamlessly between batteries and an AC-DC converter. The spacing between the medium and the electrode has been changed from 4 centimeters to 5 centimeters and arranged in a circle rather than the original single line, which will increase the volume of air sampled, without significantly reducing the ion count in the capture volume, a measure of field effectiveness. The top of the device will support a rounded electrode configuration, and the bottom will contain the electronic components, providing improved stability and a more pleasing aesthetic.

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Haptic Simulator for Golf Training SPONSOR: Virtual Experiences Laboratory FACULTY MENTOR: Kyle Johnsen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kyle Weiland, Hulu Fasil, Caleb Gerber, Alberto Giarola, Frederick Wendt Haptic feedback helps to create a realistic sensation when paired with virtual reality, which allows for deeper immersion and simulations that feel more realistic. Currently, haptic feedback is limited to only three main types: vibration, pushing and pulling. In order to add additional levels of immersion to assist with VR training, a device needed to be created for impacts. Impacts, such as those commonly occurring in ball sports, are more difficult to simulate due to their sudden, more powerful nature. To create this sensation, the device needed to actually be able to generate an impact while also not imposing unnecessary ergonomic constraints (size, weight, motion restriction) that could hamper the user. A custom solenoid was used to create the needed impact force. Variable power delivery using pulse width modulation was used in order to generate multiple varying impact forces. A wireless transmitter connected to the VR program relays the necessary pulse width to be used, which is received by device and output by the solenoid. The solenoid, circuit, microcontroller and batteries are all housed in a mountable device that applies the impact to the club shaft. With the capacity to generate substantial varying impacts, a multitude of new opportunities are created in the field of haptic feedback and virtual reality training.

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Chassis/ Composite - UGA Motorsports (SAE) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTOR: John Mativo, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Chris Parrish, Joshua Hampton, Parker Bolick, Erich West, Mackenzie Hanus We have designed and fabricated a frame for a Formula SAE race car. We designed it with help from our sponsor SolidWorks and manufactured it with no assistance. It serves to protect the driver, while maintaining a high level of rigidity under heavy loading. It is a rear-mid engine single seater layout that standard in many open-wheel formula series. We have also manufactured the bodywork for the vehicle by hand laying fiberglass. In partnership with Composites One and Comprent Motorsports, we acquired the materials, made the mold and laid the fiberglass. It now serves to protect the frontal crash structure and provide a limited amount of aerodynamic performance increase to the car. This will be for our inaugural race car here at the UGA College of Engineering and we are competing in a national competition in June. We hope to see the program grow and develop to match those of other colleges in the U.S.

14 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


TEAM 17: Chassis/Composite - UGA Motorsports (SAE)

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Bioreactor Design for Expansion of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells (Team C) SPONSOR: Earth and Environmental Systems FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Ryan Boykin, Spencer King, Mary Mahaffey, Kylie Thurber, Nicole Prolow, Helyne Soleyn Immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells presents an opportunity to personalize cancer treatment and improve upon the prognosis of patients worldwide. This therapy has the ability to treat adult B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which together account for 4% of cancers worldwide. Currently, a safe and cost efficient way to expand T cells is lacking, thus limiting the availability of this treatment. Creating a bioreactor which can expand a colony of CAR T cells to necessary numbers while minimizing cost and contamination is the ultimate goal. T cell therapy begins with taking T cells from the patient and ends with the engineered cells being put back into that same patient to attack their cancerous cells: an autologous treatment. The entire process contains a total of seven main steps, and this project group designed a bioreactor that combines the steps of T Cell activation, CAR gene delivery to the T Cells, and final expansion of the cells in one closed system. This bioreactor lowers costs and contamination by decreasing human interaction through the addition of automated parts, eliminating the need to physically transfer cells and chemicals from one stage of the process to another. The bioreactor contains five chambers interconnected with tubes and a total surface area small enough to fit under a fume hood in a laboratory. This system will transform the desired cell population into an effective treatment for blood-borne cancers at a reduced cost from that of the current market.

SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 15


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Canine Seizure Detection System SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Joseph Guyton, Edward Infante, Aron Williams, Brian Mackes, Caleb Weeks Seizures in canines require a pharmaceutical balancing act that relies on accurate monitoring of seizure duration and severity. Since most seizure dog owners cannot continuously monitor their dog through the week most prescriptions are based on estimations and can be over or under prescribed resulting in a low quality of life for the dog. To address this problem, our team has designed a prototype device that monitors excess repetitive motion, the most common indicator of seizure in dogs, and logs the number and duration of seizures experienced throughout the day. The device connects via Bluetooth to the owner’s mobile device where they can access the information and is robust enough to withstand normal wear-and-tear expected from a dog’s daily environment. The prototype’s size can easily be scaled down and production scaled up by implementing purpose-built electronics on a single printed circuit board. At a commercial production level this product could increase the quality of life for both seizure dogs and their owners.

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Optimization of Airflow and Estimation of Gas Holdup for Fermentation Processes SPONSOR: Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Victoria Williams, Sierra Milligan, Christopher Santa Maria Corteva Agriscience fermentation engineers recruited a team of biochemical engineers to review a resource conservation project focused on utility savings for the Indianapolis facility with the potential for implementing conservation strategies in other plants. The process improvement project of interest is targeted toward optimizing the supply of air into bioreactors supporting aerobic fermentations. Fermentation reactions produce the active ingredient, Spinosad, for Corteva’s profitable line of insecticides. For industrial applications, the mass transfer of the aerobic fermentation is limited to the airflow capacity. Parameters such as the pressurized vessel, variable mixing, broth viscosity, and presence of foaming apply additional limitations to the desired product yields. The students were asked to devise a multifactor kinetic model to predict the gas holdup in fermentation to optimize the process and prevent foam outs. Upon meeting the client’s request for a model, the team would estimate airflow changes to minimize the utility requirements while maintaining dissolved oxygen concentrations. The client also requested an estimation of the utility surplus, cost savings, and environmental impacts associated with lowering utility demands. To establish the model, the client provided assumptions for the conditions of airflow, density, evaporation, agitation, and vessel volume, of a dataset for 36 batches which included age, dissolved oxygen, level, oxygen uptake rate, and viscosity. The students selected viable data and performed multiple analyses to assess trends and characterize the gas holdup for the experimental runs.

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Design of a new Everest & Jennings Wheelchair (Team A) SPONSOR: GF Health Products, Inc. FACULTY MENTOR: Sidney Thompson, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Andrea Duncan, Lauren Griffin, Matthew Osborn GF Health Products, Inc., through Ken Kusel, Cynthia Counts and Andrew Kamrowski, requested a line extension to the Everest & Jennings Traveler HD Manual Wheelchair. The users of this wheelchair are 65+ years old, non-disabled and up to 500-pound people who need assistance in transitioning from a sitting to standing position. They challenged our team to design a feature to assist in the sit-to-stand motion. There are existing designs on the market, both of standing wheelchairs and sit-to-stand wheelchairs as well as similar designs in other industries, but these are quite expensive. Our goal was to help reduce the cost to wheelchair users through the development of this embedded feature. We analyzed many concept iterations via MATLAB and SolidWorks. GF Health Products, Inc. then manufactured our prototype of two electric linear actuators powering a combination of rotational linkages that lift and angle the user forward. Our final design brings mobility and independence to wheelchair users so that they can enjoy a flexible and active lifestyle.

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Small Animal Vibrating Coupage Vest (for treatment of pneumonia) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Emergency and Critical Care Service FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Hannah Bass, Simona Bovonova, Joshua Bridwell, Chelsea Murray, David Scott Schneider, Rafael Tudela Coupage is the technique used by veterinarians to treat aspiration pneumonia in dogs, which can be fatal if left untreated. Coupage works by loosening the buildup of phlegm in the airways. Unfortunately, this treatment often results in additional patient distress and requires the patient to be removed from a high oxygen environment, prolonging recovery. Additionally, this process is unstandardized and commonly results in veterinarians being bitten. Our vibrating harness, the Phlegm Fighter, serves as an alternative to manual coupage by inducing coughing to allow mucus excretion while avoiding the drawbacks commonly associated with coupage. The harness uses motor packs firmly fitted to the patient’s sides to generate vibration in order to simulate coupage. The design eliminates the need for the device to be placed over the patient’s head and prevents shifting of the motors to improper locations on the patient’s body. All specified parameters from our client, Dr. Amie Koenig, veterinarian at the UGA College of Veterinary Medicine, were met: ability to fit a range of dog sizes, varies in vibration intensities for differing patient sizes, easily disinfectable, impermeable to liquids (i.e. bodily fluids), and able to operate in a high O2 environment.

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Conversion of a standard small animal patient cage into climate-controlled oxygen cage SPONSOR: Dr. Amie Koenig FACULTY MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kyle Aaron, Connor Bayliss, Cameron Holsomback, William Jan, Soroush Shariat The UGA Veterinary Hospital uses large, immovable oxygen-supplied cages to house small animals in respiratory distress. The cages are bulky and expensive, so the hospital requires a portable, cost-effective alternative that will work with existing standard aluminum cages. The stakeholders at the hospital provided several basic operating points to work from, and stressed the importance of portability and cost effectiveness as a basis for design. This report will encompass the design process of a portable unit that regulates oxygen, removes CO2, regulates temperature, and removes humidity from the standard cages already in the hospital operating rooms. Testing procedures of the dehumidifier/temperature control module will be discussed in-depth; additional systems played a less critical role in the testing process. However, design considerations will be summarized for all elements of the unit.

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Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility (Team A) SPONSOR: University of Georgia FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Linda Banks, Longjun Zhu, Lauren Levy, Lindsay Magill In the United States, there are about 250,000 people with spinal cord injuries that have severely affected their quality of life. Spinal cord injuries were thought to be irreversible until research trials showed that stem cells could improve the damage. This project is aimed toward treating 12,000 patients with spinal cord injuries per year. The therapy consists of neural stem cells derived from the patient. Using neural stem cells derived from the patient will be accepted without any rejection and the neural stem cells will restore the function to the central nervous system, thus improving the patient’s quality of life. We have designed a process and a bioreactor that will proliferate 100,000 stem cells from the patient into 107 stem cells, differentiate the stem cells into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes needed for central nervous system restoration, and then purify the cell therapy used in our patients all within 58 days. Our results allow us to meet our goal of treating 12,000 patients per year and meets the stem cell count for proper treatment of this injury.

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Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility (Team B) SPONSOR: University of Georgia FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Lauren Wilson, Samreen Fatima, Dean Barber, Meghan Hovell Our process will efficiently produce a large number of autologous, neural progenitor cells from 100,000 undifferentiated, adult stem cells. Ultimately, these cells will be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The cells will be differentiated via induction into neural progenitor cells ex vivo, while maintaining the ability to further differentiate into glial cells, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes after injected back into the patient’s body. They will arrive cryopreserved, and then will be thawed with the appropriate method to maintain cell viability. Following this, they will go through the various processes of induction, proliferation, purification, filtration, and modification. Since the cells are growing in an adherent monolayer, well plates, T-flasks, and roller bottles will be utilized for proliferation. To control various conditions such as pressure, humidity, and temperature, multiple largescale incubators will house our vessels. Neural progenitor cells grow and form neurospheres that limit the diffusion of nutrients and oxygen. Therefore, cells must be passaged every few days into vessels of various sizes. After proliferation, the cells are purified to separate the live and dead cells, as well as the undifferentiated cells from the differentiated cells. Finally, before being modified for cryopreservation, the cells will undergo the process of virus removal via filtration.

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Retractable fluid pump rack (Team A) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Emergency and Critical Care Service FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jason Boone, Andrew Bumgardner, Avalon Kandrac, Alison Luther The University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital and the University of Georgia Animal Emergency & Critical Care Clinic are facing several issues regarding their cage setup in the ICU and Critical Care Clinic. Currently, EKG machines, fluid pumps, and IV bags are suspended on patient cages. They are warping the cage doors, blocking the view into the cages, and allowing the IV and electrical cords to hang into the cages with the patients. Extensive research has been performed throughout the course of the past two semesters to see what products are currently available on the market and to determine the necessary components for the client’s design. Our team is proposing a pole that the various machines and IV bags can be suspended on. This pole will be affixed to a hinge and mounted on a ceiling track so that the pole unit can be retracted to hang in front of the animal cages when in use, stored away when not in use, and moved horizontally to access multiple cages. Due to cost constraints, the team is working on a half-scale prototype of the retractable pole mount that will display the functionality of the design. The long-term goal of this prototype is to organize the machine and IV bag setup and create a safe design for suspending medical equipment in front of the animal cages. The parameters of this study include cost, total weight of the system, and functionality.

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Electrical monitoring of anesthetized animals SPONSOR: University of Georgia Veterinary Medical Clinic Zoological Medical Service FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Sophie Jordan, James Kanceruk, Justin Saetia, Katherine Smith At the University of Georgia Veterinary Medicine Clinic, exotic animal patients such as birds, rabbits, and turtles, undergo procedures requiring the administration of anesthesia. Monitoring the recovery of these patients can be challenging due to insufficient equipment. The goal of this project was to create a simple, inexpensive, non-invasive solution for extended monitoring of patient recovery. The solution is a device that will continuously detect heart rate to determine the patient is alive and recovering well. To begin developing this product, preliminary research was conducted on the anatomical characteristics of birds and current market methods for monitoring heart rate. The developed solution uses an infrared sensor to detect heart rate of the patient and report this to an LED screen. If a heart rate is not picked up, a thermistor is used to determine surface temperature of the patient. A change in heat signature is indicative of the patient’s health status. This device could create a positive impact on the world of veterinary medicine by reducing costs and implementing simplicity in post-procedure monitoring.

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Bluetooth Stethoscope for Hearing Aids SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine Small Animal Medicine and Surgery MENTOR: Brian Boland TEAM MEMBERS: Hussein Mawaw, Patrick McAnulty, Michael McMahon, Noah Scott Stethoscopes are an important tool used across the world by physicians. Unfortunately, there are numerous physicians with hearing loss that experience discomfort using traditional stethoscope earbuds with their respective hearing devices. We are working with Dr. Ira G. Roth, VMD at the UGA Community Practice Clinic, to develop a system that allows physicians with hearing loss to utilize the functionality of traditional stethoscopes without physical discomfort. Our goal was to create a device that transmits heartbeat audio from a stethoscope bell to a set of Bluetooth-enabled hearing aids. The traditional earpieces-and-tube design was replaced with a handheld enclosure containing the circuit elements and Bluetooth transmitter module. One of the main design challenges was amplifying the faint signal of a heartbeat without excessively adding noise to the signal. A transimpedance amplifier followed by an active low-pass filter formed the basis of our analog signal conditioning circuit. This configuration allowed for a high-gain amplification and filtering of undesirable higher frequencies. Powered by two 9-volt batteries and housed in a lightweight 3D printed enclosure, our system retains the portability of traditional stethoscopes. To wirelessly stream the audio from our system to the user’s Bluetooth-enabled hearing devices, a microcontroller and Bluetooth transmitter module have been utilized.

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Experimental Design Set-up for Drug Delivery into Lung Models SPONSOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jennifer Calahan, Nicole Morris, Rachel Phillips, Carley Ann Suarez, Amber Tejeda, Jeremy Tilson Bacterial lung infections, such as pneumonia, are treated by inhalation of antibiotics. Treatment of any bacterial infection by antibiotics can be relatively lengthy and not always entirely effective. Treatment methods for lung disease are explored in this project by study of the effect of nitric oxide on bacteria in the lungs. Nitric oxide is a powerful compound for promoting several physiological processes. An experimental setup was designed in order to study the function of nitric oxide in the lungs, as an aid to treatment with antibiotics. Artificial lung models will be 3D printed using an elastic resin. The models will be coated with E. coli and treated with an atomized nitric oxide and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. There will be four different trials of treatment. One trial will be a control with no treatment with the other three being three different concentrations on nitric oxide in a PBS solution. Bacterial population following treatment will be analyzed with a culturing method to give results. We expect the trials with nitric oxide PBS solution will have significantly less bacteria after treatment than the control model. Further investigation will be required to determine the biological significance of this experiment and its findings.

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Design of a new Everest & Jennings Wheelchair (Team B) SPONSOR: GF Health Products, Inc. FACULTY MENTOR: Sidney Thompson, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Arjun Gibson, Caroline Morris, Sara Wilder, Jose Reyes Frequently for populations using a wheelchair above the age of sixty-five, it can be difficult to transition between a sitting and standing position with the wheelchair. There is a high risk of falling and injury to the user of the chair, and also a risk of injury to the caretaker of the individual. The objective of our senior design project is to provide the Graham Field Traveler SE wheelchair with a low cost assisted sit-to-stand mechanism that orients the user in a position that allows them to stand with ease. In order to create a system to accomplish these needs, our team implemented an air compressor and air bladder system to safely lift the user five inches at an angle of thirty degrees to provide an advantageous stance for standing. These goals were accomplished while maintaining the features of the Traveler SE wheelchair that make it an attractive option to consumers like the frame size, the foldability of the wheelchair, and the affordability of the system.

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Fluid Pump and ECG Support (Team B) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Emergency and Critical Care Service FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Miles Gaylen, Daniel Wallon, Trevor Neal This project is a fluid pump and ECG support for the UGA veterinary clinic. The veterinary clinic previously attached IV pumps and ECGs to the front of the cages, which in turn, caused damage to the cage door hinges from the extra load. The task was to find a solution that prevents damage to the cages, increases patient visibility and maintains a high level of safety for all veterinary clinic staff working in the area. This team has designed a support that can be affixed to the shelving unit above the cages which suspends IV poles in front of the cages. Using channel strut and roller bearings, the IV poles can be easily moved from side to side for patient access.

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Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injuries: Commercial Manufacturing Facility SPONSOR: University of Georgia FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jongin (Jemma) Hwang, Aqib Momin, Dieu Thao Nguyen, Kylie Thurber, Katie Turner, David Yu Figures estimate around 375,000 new cases of spinal cord injury appear every year. Data from the World Health Organization shows those affected become two to five times more likely to die prematurely. Depending on the extent of injury, many individuals become dependent on external caregivers and suffer a decrease in their quality of life. Given this prevalence and morbidity, it becomes increasingly important to design solutions that extend life and improve outcomes for spinally-injured patients. Studies have shown stem cells for being effective treatments in replacing nerve cells that have died from injury and for neuroprotective purposes which limit further loss of function. Thus, we are designing a facility that specializes the refinement of spinal stem cells. Our focus lies with the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), commonly harvested from bone marrow, which are multipotent, better harvested over other types, and adept in preventing inflammatory response activation which can contribute to cell death. Our final design not only includes the facility layout and bioprocessing methods but also a new spin bioreactor design.

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Continuous Glycolide Manufacturing Process Design (Team A) SPONSOR: Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Nida Janulaitis, Brian West, Shaheen Hadadzadeh, Trevor Tyus Glycolide is a monomer of polyglycolic acid, which is a polymer that is used to synthesize absorbable sutures that are nontoxic and biodegradable. Traditionally, glycolide is produced using a batch process, but the goal of this design was to demonstrate the feasibility of producing glycolide through a continuous process. A continuous manufacturing process could potentially increase production efficiency and decrease the cost of production of glycolide for the client. If a continuous process proved to be more efficient, it could also increase worldwide production, which would decrease the cost of glycolide and increase patient access to absorbable sutures. Our process employs a series of evaporators to replace the traditional batch process. We anticipate having a complete design for the manufacturing process, including sizing, timing, and energy requirements. We also anticipate on having a complete economic analysis of our process.

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Continuous Glycolide Manufacturing Process Design (Team B) SPONSOR: Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Christine Baker, Austin Parham, Joseph Holland, William Schutte Glycolide is a pharmaceutical that is an essential component in the production of dissolvable sutures and other biocompatible medical devices. Glycolide is currently being produced by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. via a batch process. In order to improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness of this process, an alternative process that is continuous operation will be developed and evaluated. The design objective for the continuous process was to match the annual output of the current batch process. The continuous process consists of 3 thin film evaporators in series that function as continuous reactors. The chemistry involved with the formation of glycolide has two fundamental steps, pre-polymer formation and glycolide cracking. The first evaporator performs the pre-polymer formation step from glycolic acid using a metal oxide and an acid catalyst while pulling off water to drive the condensation reaction. The second evaporator operates under a vacuum at high temperatures in order to break down the pre-polymer into glycolide monomers. Simultaneously, short-chain by-products are vaporized and removed from the system. The third evaporator purifies glycolide further by removing the long-chain by-products. The mass balance of the continuous system was developed on the basis of previous lab scale experiments using similar equipment. The reactors were sized based off of required evaporation rates to meet the annual production needs. An economic analysis of the installation and operation of the continuous system was used to determine its cost-effectiveness compared to the current process.

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Bioreactor Design for Expansion of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells (Team B) SPONSOR: University of Georgia FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Yusong Zou, David Roberts, Eric Valdez, Jianwen Li Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States. In this proposal, we will be looking into a possible treatment for pediatric relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system, through the introduction of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells.​​CAR T cells are engineered T cells that are modified so that there cell membranes will express specific antigen receptors. This change allows for CAR T cells to distinguish these cancer cells from other body cells. We will be proposing a method of growing CAR T cell. CAR T cells will be grown with the use of a perfusion style reactor, that will have an internal filter. This type of reactor allows for the cells to grow in a supportive environment along with a way for waste products to be easily removed. Through the course of our testing we found that a concentration of 6 x 10^8 cells/L is able to be produced in a sevenday period through the use of our set up.

Measurement and visualization of fluid flow around the vertical tail and rudder of a business

36 jet with variation in tail cones SPONSOR: Gulfstream Aerospace FACULTY MENTOR: Ben Davis, Ph.D.

TEAM MEMBERS: George Moll, Bianca Bitere, Eliza Mariel Guteierrez, Rachel Hammond, Joshua Hanner This project involves the measurement and visualization of fluid flow around the the vertical tail and rudder of the Gulfstream G550 business jet with four unique tail cone geometries. All experiments were conducted in UGA’s high speed water tunnel within the Dynamic Devices and Solutions Lab, run by Dr. Ben Davis. Flow visualization data was collected in the form of photos/videos of the tail cones as colored dye was injected into the water tunnel to highlight flow fields. To collect force response data, the UGA team used intelligent laser optical displacement measurement to detect deflection due to flow-induced forces placed on the test articles. The qualitative deliverable consists of dyeinjection images from the flow visualization experiments. The quantitative deliverable is the mean static deflection of the tail for a modified tail cone geometry at a given alpha and beta angle, normalized by the mean static deflection of the tail for the standard tail cone geometry at the same alpha and beta angles.

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Design of a Crash-Proof Dog Crate (Team B) SPONSOR: Dagmar Nelson FACULTY MENTOR: Sidney Thompson, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jacob Ursrey, Aaron Stafford, David Giuliano, Michael Hennick The mission is to design a crash-resistant dog enclosure capable of saving a dog’s life in the event of an accident without compromising the safety of the vehicle or passengers in any way. The enclosure: must withstand the forces of a high-impact collision, must provide adequate ventilation, cannot infringe on existing patents, must be a comfortable lifting weight for an adult, must be suitable for longer transports, and cannot retail for more than $700. The crate will be analyzed in ANSYS using testing conditions from ECE-R17, as advised by the Center for Pet Safety (CPS). The design phase began with the creation of concept drawings for various components that would help prevent movement of the crate, while also eliminating the possibility of the dog becoming a projectile in the event of a collision. The components were then listed and condensed based off of customer feedback and available resources. Several complete designs were created including these components, and a final design was chosen via a decision matrix. A model was then created using AutoCAD, and computations were run in ANSYS to confirm the reliability of the design.

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Advancing Heat Exchanger and Heat Sink Technology for USAF (Team A) SPONSOR: United States Air Force FACULTY MENTOR: Ben Wagner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Anthony Rudolph, Elsa Jaworski, Kyle Chastain, Giacomo Martiriggiano, Travis Onyima The U.S. Air Force tasked us with designing an aircraft heat exchanger produced by its Additive Manufacturing (AM) Research and Development Department to explore how it can push the limits of traditional heat exchanger designs. The design constraints include cooling 30 GPH of water from 200 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit through natural convection and fitting within the build plate dimensions of the eos M290 (9.5” x 9.5” x 11.5”). We approached this project by determining the issues with current heat exchangers in industry. We found that subtractive manufacturing leads to a reduction in the amount of design complexity achievable, increases the amount of material waste, and increases the overall volume of the heat exchanger. Next, we optimized design features such as pipe length and fin geometry in ANSYS Fluent to determine which feature(s) generate the most heat transfer while maintaining printability. We then created our final design which has 12 multi-directional pipes that fully utilize the build plate, as well as optimize flow length. We designed these pipes to have longitudinal fins to facilitate high heat transfer from natural convection. Our design also takes advantage of the added heat transfer from turbulent flow by using reduced inner diameters.

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Benchtop Melt Spray Congealer Prototype SPONSOR: Boehringer-Ingelheim FACULTY MENTOR: Cheryl Gomillion, Ph.D. and Cheryl Leach, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Phillip Adjei, Dakota Arrington, Aditya Chandak, Alexander Eckstrom, Jiasui Lui One of the greatest barriers to pharmaceutical development is the inability to fully test and develop candidate drugs due to a limited amount of drug material available. Typical developmental batches fall in the range of 1 to 5-gram samples and cost in the hundreds of thousands to create. Therefore, reducing material waste and improving the efficiency of material processing is imperative. This is especially true for candidate materials with poor solubility, as additional processing is required to ensure these drugs will properly diffuse throughout the body. This project aims to improve the solubility of material samples with as little loss of material as possible using Melt-Spray Congealing. This technique is currently used in large-scale manufacturing to process hot liquid-wax emulsions into solid microsphere products. Current Melt-Spray Congealing apparatuses operate at a large scale, and are ill-fitted to process small batches of materials such as those present in a pharmaceutical sample. Therefore, to better accommodate limited material samples, this project team has scaled-down the Melt-Spray Congealing process to a size that can operate on a laboratory benchtop. This allows researchers to conduct physical processing of their samples in a manner that reduces material loss, improves solubility, and can be tailored specifically to their candidate drug.

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Electrical - UGA Motorsports (SAE) SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTORS: John Mativo, Ph.D. and Mark Trudgen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kayvon Gahremani, Hunter Hornsby, Scott Malone, Michael King Formula SAE is an annual competition between engineering programs where teams design and fabricate an open wheel race car prototype. The vehicle prototypes are judged based on vehicle performance, design analysis and cost considerations. The project team was tasked with the design and implementation of all electrical and electronics systems on UGA’s first Formula SAE vehicle. System considerations include power distribution and circuit protection, engine system controls and sensor data acquisition. The proposed system was designed to conform with all competition rules including driver safety features. The system consists of an aftermarket engine control and data acquisition unit, a custom-wired fuse and relay box, and a sensor suite to measure critical systems parameters such as fuel pressure, steering angle and vehicle accelerations. The system was designed with reliability, cost and ease of service as top considerations. The current design creates a solid foundation for future teams to iterate and optimize.

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Water and Wastewater Sludge Management Program SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Spalding County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Olivia Nickel, Emily Bonner, Cole Garrett Our team worked with the Griffin Public Works Department to implement a new sludge dewatering system at the Potato Creek Wastewater Facility in Griffin, Georgia. The city was in need of a dewatering system at their newly renovated treatment plant as well as a disposal plan for the dewatered sludge. A pilot test was conducted on site by the team to evaluate what technology would be best suited for the type of sludge the plant produced. Our team determined the sizing of the chosen rotary press to include 4 channels with the ability to add 2 additional channels in the future and designed a building to house the equipment. A building was designed to house the new system as well as a separate structure for the containment of the dewatered sludge. Our building design meets the needs and specifications of our client, an erosion control plan for construction, electricity and utility demands, and post-dewatering dry sludge containment and management plan. A plan for disposal at a local landfill was implemented and a schedule of disposal created. The cost analysis of this new system and disposal plan was included as a deliverable to the city.

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Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team A) SPONSOR: Terrapin Beer Company FACULTY MENTORS: Thomas Lawrence, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Wesley Barrett, Brenden Buckley, Adam Nelson, John San Fratello, Daniel Plant Beginning in September of 2018, our group was tasked with assisting Terrapin Beer Company in planning and implementing a new clean-in-place system for their brewery. The existing system involved a small unit that had to be manually moved and operated to service different parts of the brewing facility. Terrapin wanted an automated system that reduced human labor time, minimized the amount of cleaning solution wasted, and serviced the entire brewery from one location. We have worked closely with Terrapin to formulate the specifics of their ideal system, and communicated with contractors to construct their new design.

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Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team B) SPONSOR: Terrapin Beer Company FACULTY MENTORS: Thomas Lawrence, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Thomas Benson, Benjamin Bullard, Rachel Fisher, Davis Fleming, Calvin Wheeler Beginning in September of 2018, our group was tasked with assisting Terrapin Beer Company in planning and implementing a new clean-in-place system for their brewery. The existing system involved a small unit that had to be manually moved and operated to service different parts of the brewing facility. Terrapin wanted an automated system that reduced human labor time, minimized the amount of cleaning solution wasted, and serviced the entire brewery from one location. We have worked closely with Terrapin to formulate the specifics of their ideal system, and communicated with contractors to construct their new design.

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Clean in Place System and Piping Improvements (Team C) SPONSOR: Terrapin Beer Company FACULTY MENTORS: Ben Thomas, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: John Ross Uhlar, Charlie Bouchillon, Dhaumya Shah, Christopher Young, Joseph Slappey This Capstone Senior Design project contributes to the redesign of an undersized carbon particulate filter with Terrapin Beer Company. The problem is a result of inadequate filters that cannot handle the required flow rate for their production volume. The water comes directly from the city line through the undersized filter and into a buffer tank to be held. With the current filter in place, production is halted throughout the brewing process to refill the buffer tank. Our project was divided into three groups working with Terrapin, two tasked with the Clean in Place System and one (our group) on Piping Improvements. The project investigates different brands of carbon particulate filters that will achieve a minimum 120 GPM flow rate Terrapin required to adequately meet their filtered water needs. We created a cost analysis of three filter quotes from different suppliers providing Terrapin with options to choose from to best meet their needs. Additionally, we created our own filter design through AutoCAD and priced the materials that we presented to Terrapin as an alternative option. Furthermore, we gathered four different filter quotes (including our own design) that will surge efficiency of the brewery and increase profit margins on Terrapin’s final product. We recommend an ACA-42G-2 Duplex Parallel Activated Carbon filter from Marlo Inc. This filter meets the flow rate constraint, has a lower annual maintenance cost, and will require the carbon media to be changed once every two and half years versus annually when being compared to the other filters.

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Custom Small Scale Starch Mogul Machine SPONSOR: Georgia Center for Continuing Education FACULTY MENTORS: Ben Wagner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Max Prete, Khalid Tewfik, Anna Hoffman, Sam Berry, Benjamin Hoover The Georgia Center’s Strawberry Ice Cream Pie has been a signature menu item since its introduction in 1963. The goal of this project was to develop a means of producing jelly beans that possess the iconic flavor and look of this famous dessert. The Georgia Center plans on using these beans as favors for guests of the hotel and as gifts at alumni events. The design is a small scale starch mogul device that creates molds from cornstarch by imprinting a negative shape into a tray of starch through the use of a guided hand press. The newly formed mold then moves to the next process by the use of an automated conveyor belt. Molten confectionary sugar, preheated in a steam kettle, is then dispensed into the mold and left to cool. Due to the lubricating qualities of cornstarch, the cooled beans can then be easily removed and sifted out from the tray. The starch can then be reused in future batches. The beans are finished in a rotating panning machine. Sugar, coloring, and flavor are added, which gives the beans their final polished look. The beans are then complete and ready for packaging. An advantage of this design is that it can produce more than just jelly beans, as the starch can be imprinted with a multitude of shapes. The consistency, or chewiness, of the candy can also be altered by pouring it into the mold at different temperatures.

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Amici Kitchen Redesign SPONSOR: Amici Food Group, LLC FACULTY MENTORS: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Jared Johnson, Stephanie Genty, Nadiya Anderson, Brian Patrick, Corey Parker Amici is looking to reduce the cost of labor at their Madison, Georgia location through changes to their processes and design. Utilizing Avero software, introducing a tablet POS system, installing kitchen view televisions in the kitchen, and installing sound dampening in the dining areas are the main points of focus in reducing labor costs. Avero is a revolutionary restaurant management software that uses advanced artificial intelligence learning techniques to track every aspect of a restaurant. Avero will be used to reduce the time it takes to place an order and count inventory, saving hours every week. On the physical side, the POS (Point of Sale) system Amici uses takes time for each waiter to go back to the machine to place orders for customers. A tablet POS system would allow waiters to be able to place orders from anywhere in the restaurant. This will increase the accuracy of orders and will save waiters from making unnecessary trips to the back of the restaurant. Kitchen view will revolutionize how orders are kept track of at Amici. This will replace paper tickets and will display orders on screens in the kitchen. The introduction of sound absorbing panels in the dining area will keep ambient noise from flooding into the private dining area for events.

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Design of a Mars Rover for NASA Competition SPONSOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. FACULTY MENTORS: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Eleonora Ardissone, Matteo Mercuri, John Cartens, Grant MacNeill, Matthew Bartholomew, Parker Ensing, Zachary Adams, Daniel Epstein Koch, Anatole Roper, Andrew Liquori As the United States revamps its space program to return to the moon and eventually send people to Mars, innovations in transportation technology will build the foundation for human exploration missions and scientific surveys. With this necessity in mind, NASA hosts the annual Human Exploration Rover Challenge where university and high school students build human-powered vehicles to handle the simulated terrain of Mars. The goal of our team was to design and fabricate a variety of subsystems crucial to the rover’s performance. Over the course of the past year, we have developed the chassis, drivetrain, wheels, and steering for a rover which will enter the 2020 competition. The design process began with constraints set by NASA as well as an analysis of the previous UGA rover. Once design goals were set in place, each subsystem team began creating plans for fabrication. After final designs had been settled on and materials had been purchased, the team spent the remainder of the project building and testing the subsystems.

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Conveyor reject system using PLCs SPONSOR: Rockwell Automation, McGinn Wilkens Automation, University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTORS: Roger Hilten, Ph.D. and Mark Trudgen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Sui (Kelly) Strohecker, Ian Mashburn, Rikki Brown, Jordan Laskey, Colin Moore, Antonie Martin, Trevor Palmer, Lindsay Minnick, Sean Kelley The purpose of the capstone is to design a PLC system that will used in the engineering curriculum to further engineering students understanding of industrial control system. The task was to create a conveyor reject system that can sort 50 Jenga blocks based on the labels on the blocks, and use the UR10 collaborative robot for the manual lifting and palletization of the blocks. First, the blocks are placed inside a feeder tower that will automatically dispense the block onto the conveyor belt. Next, the blocks are scanned with a Cognex Insight 2000, it will determine if the block is a “good” part or a “bad” part. Based on if the part is good or bad, the diverter will direct it to different lanes. Finally, the “bad” part will be dropped into a box, while the “good” parts will be palletize with the UR10 robot arm. The UR10 robot arm will be tasked with picking up the blocks from the buffer lanes and placing them on a separate table. The user is able to control the system through HMI touch screen.

TEAM 48: Conveyor reject system using PLCs

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TEAM 49: Bacterial fermentation tank using PLC

Bacterial fermentation tank using PLC SPONSOR: Rockwell Automation, University of Georgia Department of Biochemistry, UGA College of Engineering FACULTY MENTORS: Roger Hilten, Ph.D. and Mark Trudgen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Sui (Kelly) Strohecker, Ian Mashburn, Rikki Brown, Jordan Laskey, Colin Moore, Antonie Martin, Trevor Palmer, Lindsay Minnick, Sean Kelley The purpose of the capstone is to design a PLC system that will used in the engineering curriculum to further engineering students understanding of industrial control system. The task was to create a conveyor reject system that can sort 50 Jenga blocks based on the labels on the blocks, and use the UR10 collaborative robot for the manual lifting and palletization of the blocks. First, the blocks are placed inside a feeder tower that will automatically dispense the block onto the conveyor belt. Next, the blocks are scanned with a Cognex Insight 2000, it will determine if the block is a “good” part or a “bad” part. Based on if the part is good or bad, the diverter will direct it to different lanes. Finally, the “bad” part will be dropped into a box, while the “good” parts will be palletize with the UR10 robot arm. The UR10 robot arm will be tasked with picking up the blocks from the buffer lanes and placing them on a separate table. The user is able to control the system through HMI touch screen.

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Wastewater treatment process to remove/reduce selenium SPONSOR: Stantec Consulting FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Joel Singh, Summer Smith, Philip Smith, Glenn Volpe After EPA standard changes in November 2015, Selenium removal has become an issue at the forefront of wastewater treatment needs. The use of Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) for the removal of selenium has shown much promise and is explored throughout our research and design specifications. Using micro-scale ZVI, along with a stream specification provided by Stantec Consulting, a process flow diagram and molecular level activity of ZVI with Selenium is described with an engineering perspective in the following paper. A pretreatment process is detailed in reducing NTU and undissolved particulate matter from the incoming waste stream. A novel process design is considered for the implementation of three CSTR in parallel to reduce mass flow and increase residence time for a conversion of nearly 90% of the selenium in the original stream. Nitrate reduction slows aqueous selenium removal; therefore, nitrates are removed via ZVI reduction to increase aqueous selenium removal. Selenite is reduced to selenite with selenite ultimately being reduced to elemental selenium with a first order reaction rate and a rate constant of 0.47 hr-1. A final clarifier is employed to remove the elemental selenium before the clean wastewater is discharged from process. Energy requirements for mass transfer are analyzed and calculated to ensure proper transportation of material. The design is completed with a basic cost study of operation.

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Bioreactor Design for Expansion of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells (Team A) SPONSOR: University of Georgia FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kejie Rui, Connie Carroll, Michael Harris, Nathaniel T Mallory Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to spread throughout the body and more often than not, become fatal. The illness is known to have very little treatment options that are uncomfortable for the patient alongside low success rates. The engineers were tasked with producing at least 1*10^8 CAR-T cells for a cellular therapy treatment to combat Acute B Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL). Challenges involved for the engineers were to chose and optimize a reactor system for autologous CAR-T cell manufacturing while reducing biohazard and cost issues within the process. The engineers achieved this through extensive literature review alongside math modeling of mass and energy within the reactor system. The reactor design chosen was the WAVE perfusion bioreactor that is capable of measuring critical parameters within the system such as dissolved oxygen content, pH, temperature, nutrients concentrations, and inhibitory concentrations to grow the required cell number. The engineers achieved their goals of producing the required cell number while minimizing possible risks during the process using the WAVE system. Treatments using the CAR-T cell therapy have proven to be successful with rates ranging from 78-91% in patients after a 5 year period and is a promising treatment for patients with B-ALL.

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Phonograph Record Hole Punch for Vinyl Recycling (Team B) SPONSOR: Kindercore Vinyl FACULTY MENTOR: Dan Geller, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Umer Ishtiaq, James O’Quinn, Bret McGowan The project was to design and build a phonograph record hole punch for Kindercore Vinyl, a vinyl record production company based in Athens. The record hole punch had to be capable of removing the centers of 7” and 12” vinyl records, without damaging these removed centers, so that they could be repurposed while the remaining outer vinyl could be properly recycled. The device had to be affordable, safe, easy to use, relatively small, and completely distinct and unique compared to existing similar products. While not required, it was requested that the device also have the capability to remove multiple vinyl centers with one punch. After many brainstorming sessions and weeks of research, the team settled on a pneumatic punch as the best design to meet the project criteria. Necessary components, including a compressor, air valve, single-acting actuator, proper tubing and fittings, and a filter, were ordered, and once arrived, were assembled into the desired pneumatic punch setup.

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VR + Haptic + Eye Tracking Feedback SPONSOR: Gulfstream Aerospace FACULTY MENTOR: Kyle Johnsen, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Ben Burgh, Paul Kinderman, Anton Franzluebbers We implemented a virtual reality (VR) simulation that makes use of haptics to allow users to more accurately experience and interact with the cockpit of an aircraft. To achieve this, we used both a ultrasonic haptic feedback generator as well as a robot arm to allow softwaredefined button and knob layouts to be felt in a more tactile way. To test these systems, we created a flight simulator with basic functions to create a more realistic experience. In addition, we experimented with the use of eye tracking for predictive robotic arm movement, but currently the system is only used for analytics. The ultrasonic haptic device uses sound waves to create differentials in air pressure. These “bumps” in the air can be moved very quickly to simulate a grid of buttons, but the effect is not as strong as touching a physical object. Seeing this, we also developed a system that uses a robotic arm. This system moves a single button and knob to simulate the effect of having a full size hardware

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cockpit model without the size or cost associated with that setup. The robotic arm takes time to move from one software-defined button position to another, but the haptic feedback is much higher fidelity. Our robotic arm system is innovative in haptics research in VR.

A pressure-sensitive plate for identifying initial contact of a human foot with the floor SPONSOR: Amit Abraham, UGA Department of Kinesiology and Rebecca Gose, Ph.D., UGA Department of Dance FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Hyeong Jin Park, Andrew Patterson, Sallie Torell Dancers perform amazing and beautiful leaps on a near daily basis during training and performances, but the true test of athleticism lies in how they land. Landing from leaps/jumps is a core skill that, if done poorly, allows the largest room for injury. We are working with Dr. Amit Abraham from the UGA kinesiology department and Professor Rebecca Gose from the UGA dance department to aid in their study on how a dancer’s leap/land can affects the body. We were tasked with creating a pressure sensitive plate that will light up when a dancer’s foot touches the ground, alerting a pre-existing system of cameras and motion capture equipment. We were able to create a safe and reliable matt able to accomplish this while measuring the ground reaction force exerted on the dancer during the landing.

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Video monitoring system in UGA cleanroom SPONSOR: Amit Abraham, UGA Department of Kinesiology and Rebecca Gose, Ph.D., UGA Department of Dance FACULTY MENTOR: Kun Yao, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Vincent Tiano, Joseph Kucia, Connor Fitzgerald Due to the nature of a clean room, it is often difficult to monitor one from the outside. Currently, the University of Georgia’s clean room, located at the Riverbend research laboratories, has no video monitoring system, meaning to determine the status of the people and experiments inside, one would need to go through the lengthy process of entering the cleanroom. The goal of this system is to remotely monitor this clean room, allowing for quick responses to machine malfunctions or personal injury, without the need to actually enter the room. Our design consists of four Raspberry Pis, each with a camera module, that individually record and process the live video before sending the video over WiFi to a fifth Raspberry Pi that acts as a hub. The hub combines the four video feeds into one and both stores the video locally and streams it to our web page where it can be accessed from anywhere via the internet.

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Augmented Heads Up Display with Waze Integration SPONSOR: Southeast Toyota FACULTY MENTOR: Ben Manning, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Hayley Nguyen, Ezra Underwood, Evan Cantu, Abel Belet Southeast Toyota is an international automotive distributor responsible for supplying dealerships with new cars and augmenting their existing fleet in order to meet customer needs and enhance the overall driving experience. One of the recent upgrades available in various 2019 models is a Heads-Up Display, which is a device that projects driving information such as speed, fuel level, and even turn-by-turn directions directly onto the windshield in the drivers line of sight. Southeast Toyota tasked us with augmenting this technology to be more adaptive to consumer needs by allowing users to connect their smartphone to the device so they can display navigational information from Waze. Our design uses Google Firebase to connect Waze to a user’s account, and can track the user’s location constantly and update a live map displaying Waze information such as police spotted, accident ahead, or obstructions in the road. Using a Raspberry Pi, we can put all of this information onto an LCD, and insert that within a mirror sub-assembly unit which projects a virtual image of this map directly onto the windshield in the line of sight of the driver.

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Cloud Integration Challenge SPONSOR: Capgemini FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Daniel Lim, Mariam Hammady, Travis Dillonm Hassan Kedir, Christopher Bywaletz Location sharing through a mobile device has become one of the best ways for families to monitor each others’ locations and for groups of friends to use location to initiate hangouts and find out what their friends are up to. The Meetup application is a group based application that allows for group communication, location sharing, and event planning. Meetup provides an environment in which users can create and form groups with their families and friends. Only the people that you share a group with can see your location and the group will have its own message board for talking to group members and for the posting of group events so that group members can know the time and location of future events. Meetup uses a secure, realtime database to store authentication and user information for instantaneous access to all personal data and data shared with you by other users. There is both a web platform and a mobile application to provide full functionality to every type of user. A feature that will make routine group meetups easier is the smart event creation function that will provide users with the ability to automatically create events that have happened routinely in the past. This feature will allow for sharing of group events with concise time and location information as well as real time monitoring of your fellow group members.

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CyberDawg - A cybersecurity software that helps identify and display cyber threats SPONSOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. FACULTY MENTOR: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kristijonas Bileisis, Zenil Patel, Huiyang Chen, Dorothy Gilchrist As an everyday user of the World Wide Web, it is difficult to find a free threat intelligence software that is designed to be user-centric. Most threat intelligence software is meant for commercial use that requires proficient knowledge in data analytics. We were tasked with developing a program that takes threat intelligence data from online sources and presents this data in a user-friendly graphical interface. Using Python scripts to collect data from open-source threat intelligence feeds, our program sorts this data based on location, ISP’s, type of threat, and other categories. A thorough statistical analysis is computed with this data and is displayed in the interface in terms of graphs, charts, tables and a location map. The interface is made with an ordinary consumer in mind; therefore, navigating the program is meant to be smooth and effortless. Furthermore, the program is prioritized for residential utilization and not commercial. Combining an accessible front-end with a robust back-end will allow users to monitor cyber threats that are occurring in a local and global network.

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A Mobile APP Design for Assisting Physicians for Mechanical Ventilation Protocols SPONSOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. FACULTY MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Michael Brackett, Rudy Montayre, Pravallika Nallamota, Emily Nieves, Kim Alice Heng, Jacob Weiser

A mechanical ventilation teaching application would allow young physicians to check ventilator settings on a model that would give them realistic outcomes for a variety of different patients. This kind of application would be based on compiled data, and would be available as a mobile app. We believe this kind of application will radically improve the confidence and efficacy for young health care professionals who need to administer a mechanical ventilator.

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HAZMAT Tracking through Blockchain-IoT SPONSOR: Capgemini FACULTY MENTOR: Brian Boland TEAM MEMBERS: Kyle Arnett, Thomas Kruegler, Tyler Murray, Kolbe Nix, Sam Pennington Capgemini Consulting has requested an automated tracking device for hazardous materials located in warehouses and other industrial environments. This system was built to replace a current system that revolves around a user manually checking materials in and out while keeping track of the amount of material used and left, all by hand. Our system uses RFID tags adhered to the hazardous materials and an RFID reader mounted on a scale. This allows the system to check items in and out via the RFIDs while also monitoring the weight with the scale. The weight can be used to track how much of a material is left inside a container. All of this is managed through a software application built using nodeJS, HTML, CSS, and front-end Javascript which is run on a Raspberry Pi 3B+. A key component of this software is the Ethereum Blockchain. Etherium is used to store attributes of the materials and is updated when a material is checked in or out. The use of a Blockchain means that entries cannot be tampered with. This achieves our goal of increasing accountability among users. Our entire system is enclosed in a 3D printed plastic enclosure that has spaces designed to exactly fit our electronics, weight scale, and the Raspberry Pi.

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Flint River Water Trail SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Spalding County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Leigh Lloveras, Tanner Buggs, Griffin Ghesquiere The Flint River is 344 miles long in the state of Georgia. The river drains approximately 8,460 square miles of western Georgia and flows south from the upper Piedmont region of south Atlanta to the wetlands of the Gulf Coastal Plain in the southwestern corner of the state. The Flint River Water Trail project is located on the portion of the Flint River which flows through Spalding County, Georgia. To begin construction of the Flint River Water Trail, this project developed designs for a put-in and take-out location at 5756 Newnan Road in Brooks, Georgia and Line Creek Bridge (33°13’41.00” N 84°26’22.00” W) respectively. This project was completed through collaboration with the Flint River Water Trail Council, City of Griffin and Spalding County Parks and Recreation Departments. Both design locations consists of gravel parking, a wooden boardwalk from parking to the river, and a concrete ramp into the river, all within the American Disability Act jurisdictions.

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Shotgun Target Range SPONSOR: Tift County Shotgun Team FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. and David Gattie, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Corey Childs, Jack Haughawout, Bria Thorne Bennie Branch contracted THC- Engineering to construct a feasibility analysis, attain grants, examine proposed field placement, and research the possible licensure and litigations associated with the development of a shotgun range in Tift County, Georgia. Mr. Branch intends for this design to lessen the burden of travel placed on parents and on the Tift Shotgun Team. As it stands, the team has to travel more than an hour to practice. In addition to making the site safe, our team focused on minimizing the environmental impact this site would cause. The final design includes a three stage erosion control and storm water plan that would prevent the spent shells from leaching into the wetlands on site.

TEAM 62: Shotgun Target Range

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TEAM 65: Woodsong Housing Development

Feasibility Study for the Expansion of North Hart Elementary School SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Hart County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: William Perry, Catherine Cangemi, Michael Brewer Due to Hart County’s proximity to the Interstate-85 corridor, a large population influx is expected over the coming years as job availability increases due to continued land development. North Hart Elementary School (NHES) is quickly approaching classroom capacity, and given the location of NHES and the major employers in the community, it is highly likely that NHES experiences a significant increase in student population. HCCS is seeking a feasible plan for expansion. The first goal of the project was to investigate a feasible expansion design that complied with all regulations and accounted for any additional infrastructure modifications that had to be made to the site. A timeline for the construction phase of the project was generated to ensure construction could be completed in a timely manner while still ensuring the safety of the students. The final goal of the project was to provide a complete cost analysis for the expansion that accounted for all engineering and construction costs.

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Protecting Turtles from Aquaculture Gear in Georgia SPONSOR: University of Georgia Marine Extension and Georgia SeaGrant FACULTY MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Aubree van Winkle, Benjamin Chi, Christine Brady, Megan Spence, Noell Appling The objective for our project is to develop a solution to the potential problem of marine megafauna entanglement in shellfish aquaculture gear at UGA’s Shellfish Laboratory on Skidaway Island. Our device needs to be as inexpensive as possible and relatively low maintenance as the employees have to manually flip the cages; additionally, it will need to keep tension in different tidal heights. The main goal of the project is to help the client make it easier for Georgia shellfishermen to receive their DNR certification to commercially farm shellfish. Through research we concluded that no external pre-existing apparatus fits the criteria for the design solution and instead we would need to manipulate the manner in which the ropes are set up in the water column to decrease the likelihood of marine entanglement. Through careful research and cost consideration we developed three potential design solutions: weighted chain attached to the bottom of the longlines to pull them taut during low tide, cut PVC pipe sections wrapped around the longlines to keep them from wrapping around marine life, and using triple-braided rope with high resistance to bending as longline material. The sponsors are looking at all three solutions for long-term testing and hope to show the DNR these solutions as a method of reducing entanglement likelihood and allowing commercial shellfishermen to grow and harvest oysters on Georgia’s coast.

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Woodsong Housing Development SPONSOR: Armentrout Matheny Thurmond, PC FACULTY MENTORS: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. and Brian Bledsoe, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Jasmine Badiee, Ashley Pilcher, Shelli Herring The objective of this project was to create an innovative, high-performance student housing facility that seamlessly integrates environmentally conscious design and function into the provided cutting edge amenities, sufficient outdoor and recreational space, and a competitive townhome living experience located on the eastside of Athens, Georgia. Our initial research included a survey of people aged 18-24, mainly University of Georgia students. The results showed that most students would be very interested in a sustainably designed housing complex. However, most would not be willing to pay a higher rent to live in a more sustainable housing complex. Due to this, our design includes cost-effective, but natural stormwater mitigation such as rain gardens, porous paving, and maximum conserved buffer. Additionally, impervious surfaces were consciously reduced where possible in order to promote a more pedestrian complex while also reducing stormwater runoff. Further sustainable design choices were made in choosing to keep the maximum conserved buffer, an in depth erosion control plan, and use of native plant species. Our survey also included a chance for students to voice what kinds of amenities would be useful to them in this complex: study rooms, gym, and cafe area. To accommodate these amenities, a clubhouse was designed and will be located at the front of the complex.

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Learning Thermostatic control for Residential Heat Pump Water Heater SPONSOR: Southern Company Services FACULTY MENTOR: Brian Boland TEAM MEMBERS: Rohith Ramireddy, Olivia Jones, Thomas Glenn, Bora Gunay Southern Company Services asked our group to make a machine learning algorithm to minimize the energy consumption of residential electric water heaters. With the use of hot water usage patterns, our algorithm is responsible for determining the most cost-effective operating times for water heaters without impacting the comfort of the end user. Our algorithm was tested using hot water flow rates from 3 homes from 1/2018 – 11/2018 from data gathered by Southern Company Services. In addition to our machine learning algorithm, we developed an app in order to simulate the optimization of a Rheem Hybrid Electric water heater, the simulation displays an estimated energy savings one would expect when machine learning can be applied to reduce excess energy consumption.

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Southern Crescent Technical College: Campus Entry Redesign SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Spalding County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Mackenzie Cown, Angela Nguyen, Darby Burk, Kyle Kanzler Our team at Perspective Engineering was partnered with Southern Crescent Technical College (SCTC) to redesign the entryway of the college’s Griffin campus. SCTC aims to provide economic growth opportunities for west central Georgia from Atlanta to Macon. To keep up with the demand of their mission and growing student population, the campus entryway must be redesigned functionally and aesthetically. Functionally, the campus entry redesign entailed implementation of entryway intersection traffic light, rerouting traffic inflow and outflow roadways, and establishment of safe student drop-off area. These developments will allow for increased travel efficiency in and around the campus and increased pedestrian safety. Aesthetically, the campus entry redesign entailed development of roadside green space and large entryway signage. Both of these aesthetic improvements will add to the campus’s visual voice aspired to the president of SCTC.

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Downtown Water Issues and Parking Lot Redesign/Upgrade SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Washington County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Madeline Broussard, Ronald Kent, Jaracoe Jackson Milestone Engineering worked in conjunction with the Archway Partnership and representatives of the City of Tennille to deliver designs for two areas of interest. The City’s public park was in need of stormwater management improvements to eliminate standing water after storm events. A desolate public parking lot was redesigned to maximize parking and improve pedestrian safety. Both of these projects were in concurrence with the City’s overall beautification process to increase tourism and community involvement. Our team was tasked with creating multiple solutions for each area of interest. After selection by Tennille representatives, Milestone Engineering created site, demolition, grading, and erosion plans for each project which illustrate detailed designs and implementation requirements. Included for each project solution is a rough cost estimate for execution.

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Sensor Design for Monitoring Environmental Control of Lab Units SPONSOR: Puliyur Mohankumar, University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine FACULTY MENTOR: Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Rachel Brown, Taylor Ng, Megan Norman The objective of this project is to create a sensor design for monitoring environmental control of lab units. Dr. Puliyur Mohankumar of the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine has freezers in his lab which contain expensive biological samples. The loss of samples due to a freezer malfunction would mean a loss of money, time, and hard work. The sensor system being designed by our lab group must be able to monitor the temperatures of the lab freezers and to immediately notify the appropriate personnel when the freezer temperature deviates from a set temperature, which in this case is -75 degree Celcius. The notification will be sent via a mobile application, which will notified the appropriate personnel through SMS text messages, phone calls, or push notifications. The system would notify lab members remotely and it would not require them to to be in the same location as the laboratory freezers.

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Remote access lock for EvaKuula SPONSOR: Smallholder Fortunes FACULTY MENTOR: William Kisaalita, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Linrun Mao, Breanna Leonard, William Rittmeyer, Tyler Shiett Smallholder Fortunes is a Ugandan non-profit organization that created a renewable energy-powered cooling system known as an EvaKuula to preserve the freshness of the evening milk, so it can be sold the following day. The purpose of this project is to create a remote access lock that will be able to deny access to the EvaKuula remotely to customers who fail to make their weekly or monthly payments. The remote access lock is controlled by a keypad and 4-digit code system which automatically locks every month or week depending on payment schedule and is only unlocked with a certain code given through telecommunication once payment is received. Additionally, a solar panel powering the lock will also be used to power a phone charger for own and neighbor’s phones, which creates an additional income stream for the EvaKuula customers.

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Feasibility Study for Recreation Center at the Hart County Sports and Recreation Complex SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Hart County FACULTY MENTORS: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Jose Hernandez, Jack Ludwick, Mitchell Rostowsky Our team developed a feasibility analysis for the proposed addition of a multi-purpose building to existing facilities on Elberton Highway in Hartwell. The team was tasked with delivering solutions for infrastructure needs such as stormwater, erosion control and utilities. In addition, the team sought to assist the client in creating more detailed concept designs. The proposed building has been designed to incorporate two full-sized gymnasiums, which features main courts for basketball or volleyball. The gym space can accommodate four basketball or volleyball games simultaneously when the bleachers are retracted. Additional building space has been designed to maximize functionality for multi-purpose use, including: a suspended indoor track, office space, additional restrooms, 3 large multi-use rooms, and a dining area for the existing concession stand. This project is expected to provide local tourism and increased revenue as well as provide the city with a much deserved modern facility.

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City of Johns Creek Snake Cut-Through Jones Bridge Road at Sargent Road and Douglas Road SPONSOR: Jacobs Engineering FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Adan Gonzalez,Brian Szoch, Margot Richardson, Josephina Tam Partnering with Jacobs Engineering, our team worked to develop a road redesign concerning an inefficient, hazardous intersection in Johns Creek, Georgia. There is a high traffic volume in this area due to commuters using these minor roadways to avoid heavy traffic congestion along a major roadway, McGinnis Ferry Road. The goal of this project is to reduce traffic congestion, eliminate safety concerns, and deter commuters from using this cut through. Our team was tasked with developing several innovative road redesigns for the client to choose between. The chosen design is a Median U-turn concept. This design will inhibit all left turns in the area of interest, so motorists are forced to only make through and right movements. This concept addresses all of the main problems with the current intersection by eliminating the current safety concerns and deterring motorists from using this cut through out of convenience. Our team developed a feasibility analysis of this design, drawings of the design and the related engineering work in MicroStation, and a cost estimate for the construction of this project. This will prove to be useful to Jacobs as they move forward with the construction of the road redesign.

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City of Johns Creek Old Alabama Road Extension to State Bridge Road via Tunnel SPONSOR: Jacobs Engineering FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Richard Strott, Joseph Saurini, Kallie Craft, Alex Niebieski The team was partnered with Jacobs Engineering to provide the City of Johns Creek with a design for an underground traffic tunnel connection Old Alabama Road to State Bridge Road without disturbing the existing high-end subdivision and golf course of the Atlanta Athletic Club that lie in the path of the tunnel. The City of Johns Creek is the 6th largest city in the state of Georgia, and experiences a heavy amount of commuter traffic along with a large traffic volume from the patrons of the city. In order to create a more direct route and to alleviate congestion from the nearby intersection of Medlock Bridge Road and State Bridge Road, the team was tasked with providing an innovate tunnel design and all related design concept drawings, a detailed cost estimate for the overall cost of construction of the project, and a traffic control plan for construction and post-construction of the tunnel.

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Site Development Plan – Clay National Guard Center SPONSOR: Burns and McDonnell FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Laura Ouderkirk, Bitia Paz Gonzalez, Robert Benson, Warren Mitchell The team worked cooperatively with Burns & McDonnell to satisfy the needs of our client, The Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG). The GAARNG is considering the development and restoration of an existing six-acre site at the corner of Atlanta Road and South Cobb Drive in Marietta. The objective of this project is to create a Site Development Plan (SDP) to suit the future users of the GAARNG. Per their request, the team provided the GAARNG with three potential alternatives: a 30,000 square foot (SF) Facility Maintenance Shop, a 60,000 SF multi-story Armed Forces Readiness Center, or a 20,000 SF Rigger Facility. The project team and the GAARNG determined that the Rigger Facility would be the best alternative to satisfy users. The team consulted current users of a Rigger Facility to determine essential needs to develop a purposeful use of the property. The team developed the SDP to include the Rigger Facility, parachute drying tower, and various other required facilities. The site around the facility was developed to include access roads, utilities, stormwater management, grading, and associated physical security measures. The team presented a rough order of magnitude cost estimate outlining the site development costs for the entire facility. The client will use the completed project design to submit a proposal in order to acquire the private property and required federal funding. The GAARNG is immensely important to the state and country, and assisting in this design will likely further their opportunity to grow and succeed.

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Planning, Design & Construction Services for the new University Science Learning Center SPONSOR: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Alex Bradford, Leigha Woodard, Ryan Horn, Chandler Banks Swift Design and Construction was tasked with providing turn-key construction and design services for the University of Georgia Science Learning Center. This new facility is being implemented to provide instructional, laboratory, and study space for students and faculty. The team was required to produce a Statement of Qualifications, outlining company structure, project history, and suitability for the project, as well as a full construction proposal, including a management plan, cost estimate, detailed schedule, and site logistics/safety plan. In addition, the team was contracted to produce alternative designs for the building foundation and the Auditorium Wing roof system. Finally, Swift Design and Construction provided a summary of Value Engineering suggestions, which will reduce the cost of the project.

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NeSmith Gas Station Remediation Analysis SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Pulaski County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Sullivan Shelton, Conner Keisling, Jocelyn Carver The City of Hawkinsville is considering the donation of a decommissioned gas station site. The site has been inactive since the late 1980’s and is considered a brownfield site, as defined by the U.S. EPA. A Phase I Environmental Analysis conducted by Preston Geotechnical Consultants, LLC recommended further study for contaminants. Our project team, Brownfield Remediations Group (BRG), was tasked to analyze the environmental needs and to design a remediation and redevelopment plan. To transform the site into a welcoming gateway and community green space, an analysis of present hazardous substances must be completed, including contaminated soil and groundwater. A soil and groundwater sampling and analysis was conducted through the UGA Laboratory for Environmental Analysis to test for petroleum contamination indicators (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Total Xylenes). BRG determined that one (5.46 ppb) of the five soil samples, taken from below the filling station platform, exceeds actionable limits (5 ppb). Following the removal of the two remaining underground storage tanks, BRG recommends air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction. BRG developed demolition, waste management, and erosion control plans to account for the necessary procedures involved in redevelopment of the site. BRG drafted a series of redevelopment plans for the site that included a welcome sign, benches, a garden, and other elements.

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Wolf Creek Preserve Bridge Design and Trail Stabilization SPONSOR: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Jacob Mabrey, Alex Trammell, Abuzar Turabi, Michael Purvis Our team worked with the local volunteers, led by Ms. Margaret Tyson, who manage the upkeep of the Wolf Creek Trout Lilly Preserve between Cairo and Whigham. The project calls for the design of a 30-foot pedestrian bridge spanning Wolf Creek to connect the northern and southern areas of the preserve for foot travel. In addition, an eroding length of trail required a stabilization design. The 40-foot arch bridge was designed to elegantly blend into its natural surroundings while also addressing unique floodplain design parameters. Overtopping during large flood events and poor soil conditions posed unique challenges our team had to tackle. The relatively steep section of trail received a “crib-step” design to prevent erosion while retaining stormwater runoff and passing it through the backfill aggregate. The project was delivered with construction documents, item quantities, and a detailed cost analysis.

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Panther Creek Trail Head and Recreation Area Parking Lot Design SPONSOR: United States Forest Service FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Gray Harrison, Mike Kochanik, Kyle Mantay, Nick Morlock The U.S. Forest Service has asked for a comprehensive solution for the current parking issues present at the Panther Creek Trailhead, located in Habersham County, Georgia. Due to an increase in visitor numbers, and a lack of available parking spaces, it is necessary to expand the current parking facilities. Frequently, trail visitors park outside the designated parking area, and do not pay the parking fee that helps maintain the trail and facilities on site. A collaborative solution has been proposed that emphasizes safety and security, and provides much-needed upgrades to the existing facilities. Design plans for a new lot have been proposed, including a full plan set for utilities, erosion control, and stormwater design. A cost estimate has been prepared based on these plans. The solution provides the U.S. Forest Service with a comprehensive site plan and design drawings that will help the Service apply for grants and move forward with construction of the extension of the trailhead parking facility.

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Whigham: Structural Integrity Assessment of Magnolia Room Building SPONSOR: Archway Grady County FACULTY MENTORS: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Alex Blankenship, Natalie Doker, Meg Stephens, Matthew Warren Classic City Structural Engineers was contacted to perform a structural integrity analysis of an over century-old historic building in Whigham, Georgai. The building once served Whigham as the City Hall and then the local fire department, but has since been vacant and unused. A previous UGA Archway student group that worked with the city of Whigham to rejuvenate the downtown area proposed that the building be converted into an open-air event space, similar to the Tree Room in Athens. This proposal involved using the existing exterior structural walls and demolishing the interior structures of the two-story building. Upon examination of the site and condition of the building, our team concluded that the existing building would cannot safely fill those initial design concepts. Because the building has significant value to the city of Whigham and its residents, our design involves a two-phase design and construction project that would ultimately result in a habitable building that mimics the overall feel of the original building.

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Laser autofocusing system for high resolution microscopy SPONSOR: University of Georgia College of Engineering FACULTY MENTORS: Peter Kner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Kaitlyn Summey, Brett Etheridge, Harrison Keller At the University of Georgia, Dr. Peter Kner’s lab specializes in cutting edge biological imaging using custom microscopes. In high resolution microscopy, it is crucial to maintain focal depth throughout the imaging process. Even the slightest drift in focus can decrease the resolution of the images. There are many factors that can contribute to focal drift over the course of an experiment,since the imaging takes place over a long period of time. To address this issue, we have implemented an off axis laser auto focusing system that will convert the change in focal depth to beam translation across a detector. The high resolution system includes an Olympus IX71 microscope, which our system attaches to. The autofocuser introduces an infrared laser beam into the system from a back port of the Olympus microscope, and from there, the beam is reflected off of the glass slide in the microscope sample stage. The reflected beam will deviate from the center of a quadrant photodiode, and that translation can be algorithmically converted to change in focal depth. Given the change in focal depth, the microscope stage can be repositioned to maintain ideal focus throughout the entire imaging process. With our optical and amplification circuit design, we should be able to measure deviations in focal depth that are more precise than the microscope stage step size. Our design prioritizes precision and usability to maintain a focal depth over time, preserving data that will be used to make important discoveries in the field of biology.

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Griffin Trails Project - trail phase expansion SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Spalding County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Conner Fraser, Seth Rohring, Eric Peterson FRP Engineering was contracted by the City of Griffin through the UGA Archway Partnership to engineer an optimal route for the three phases of the proposed trail network of the Griffin Trails Project. The comprehensive plan sheets include the key details of the design needed for contractors to carry out the construction of the trail phases. These details are including but not limited to construction plans, signing and marking plans, cross-sections, typical sections of pavement, centerline profile, bridge and boardwalk plans and drainage and erosion control plans. Importantly, FRP Engineering has provided detailed quantities and cost estimates for the proposed project.

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Spalding Drive at Dalrymple Road/Trowbridge Road Intersection Improvement SPONSOR: KCI Technologies FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Marcus Rutte, Jeff Fitz, Cory Johnson, John Samuel D.G.D. Engineering was contracted as consultants to KCI Technologies on the Spalding Drive and Dalrymple Road intersection improvement project for the city of Sandy Springs. The project required an intersection redesign to relieve congestion while simultaneously providing the City of Sandy Springs the option to expand pedestrian and bike traffic in the area. The initial stage of the project required several site visits, a traffic analysis, and safety study. It was concluded that a roundabout would provide the highest level of service for the desired design year 2040. The final submittal will include: general notes, site/construction plan, details, typical sections, signing/ marking plans, profiles, grading plans, and staging plans.

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Hawkinsville: Commerce Street Redesign SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Pulaski County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Hampton Worthey, George Honiotes, John Nolin, Sterling Benson Commerce Street serves as the main thoroughfare through Downtown Hawkinsville and is known as U.S. Business 129, U.S. Business 341, State Route 11 and State Route 26. Currently, the road is four lanes through downtown with a speed limit of 35 mph. The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) has requested a reduction in lanes in order to change the speed limit. The community requested assistance changing the existing road to two lanes, adding a turning lane, and changing the parking from parallel to angled. In addition, they would also like assistance in designing median and mid-block crosswalks. Per their instruction, this project would make a speed limit reduction acceptable to GDOT on this state highway. The design developed for this project involved a change from four 12-ft wide lanes with 8-ft wide parking spaces to two 12-ft wide lanes, a 12-ft wide median, and 15-ft long angled parking. In addition to changing the roadway, the City of Hawkinsville has expressed their desire for the redesign to address certain needs within their community. This involved increasing the number of available parking spaces along Commerce Street, erecting a new traffic signal at the N. Lumpkin intersection, designing mid-block crosswalks, designing the medians with viable landscaping options, and diverting truck traffic through the use of signage to an adjacent road. Implementing these elements will impact the community by benefiting downtown business, reducing parking related accidents, and improving pedestrian safety.

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Norcross Office/Warehouse Site Development SPONSOR: Dovetail Civil Design FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Jeremy Pratt, Amanda Gruner, Kush Patel The project includes the development of a three and a half acre site located in Norcross, Georgia to house a warehouse. As per the specifications of the client, Dovetail Civil Design, the site had to contain a 30,000 square feet warehouse/ office space with four loading docks as well as meet all required codes of development as set by local government. The development of the site followed all applicable codes ranging from dumpster location to parking spaces and stormwater management as outlined by the Gwinnett County Code of Development handbook.

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ASHRAE Integrated Sustainable Building Design Competition SPONSOR: ASHRAE FACULTY MENTOR: Thomas Lawrence, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Ryan Ruff, Morgan Sutter, Keshav Bhatt, Rashaan Fowles, Henry Rittiner, Ikechukwu Emedosi Our Capstone Design team was tasked with competing in the 2019 ASHRAE Building Design competition. The competition entails designing an energy efficient hospital with the intent of sustainability and possibly achieving “net-zero” energy. Our team began the design project with discussions about the minimum project requirements, the project timeline for completion, and the software programs that we would utilize for our work. Once we concluded the pre-design phase, we split ourselves evenly into three teams: eQuest, Revit, and research. While the eQuest and Revit teams modeled the hospital layout through software programs, the research team evaluated the owner’s project requirements, the necessary standards, and began planning water/energy saving methods. As the research team continued their studies, the two software teams finalized their building schematics and began focusing on running an energy model of the entire property within the project boundary. Our final product was a successfully modeled hospital with an energy analysis model, explanations behind sustainable practices and fixtures implemented into the building, and a cost analysis spreadsheet of the hospital’s construction. In addition to following the owner’s project requirements and ASHRAE Standards, our design also followed the LEED certification minimum project requirements and some of the LEED credit category choices for sustainable design. Following our project team’s work, it is recommended that the hospital’s energy and water systems are continuously measured through metering systems. Ideally, these recordings would be shared with the U.S. Green Building Council as a requirement for LEED certification. Additionally, our project teams recommends the building’s commissioning authority to continue monitoring the building’s systems postoccupancy through the use of enhanced commissioning.

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Hartwell: Wastewater Discharge Feasibility Study SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Hart County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: William Perry, Catherine Cangemi, Michael Brewer The City of Hartwell, Georgia, currently disposes of its treated wastewater (effluent) by land application system (LAS) at the Cateechee Golf Course, where it is used for irrigation. Water in excess of irrigation requirements is disposed through land application on undeveloped spray fields within the Cateechee property. The city is expecting growth in industry and population, which would increase the demand for wastewater disposal beyond the existing system’s capacity to discharge effluent. CMF Engineering was commissioned to study the feasibility of various alternatives for future effluent discharge. We propose an expansion of the existing LAS to land adjacent to the golf course, increasing total effluent discharge capacity to accommodate future growth and development.

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Water Savings – Plant and community partnership SPONSOR: Rayonier Advanced Material FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Jackie Groarke, Zilan Yang, Kaley Hahn Rayonier Advanced Materials (RYAM) is a global supplier of high-purity cellulose, paperboard, and high-yield pulp. Their facility in Jesup, GA is the largest specialty cellulose plant in the world. RYAM has maintained a mutually beneficial relationship with the City of Jesup and hope to strengthen it with this project. The city is hoping to reduce the costs associated with the treatment of their municipal wastewater by eliminating the discharge of their treated water to the Altamaha River. Our team designed a new pipe system to reroute the city’s effluent from its current discharge point to the nearby RYAM facility, where it will be reused as process water in the recaust mud washer. The reclaimed water will serve RYAM by enabling them to reduce their withdrawal from the aquifer. Surge routes were designed for the excess water to be directly routed to their onsite wastewater treatment lagoons. Relevant regulations and all technical aspects of the instillation, such as backfill, boring, and reclaimed water standards were addressed in the design.

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Sustainable Methods for Improving Water Usage Efficiency in Data Centers SPONSOR: Johnson Controls FACULTY MENTOR: Jim Kastner, Ph.D. TEAM MEMBERS: Brandon Gacuzana, Jared Sirmans, Aaron Hall, Thomas Croland Aside from computing power, the biggest resource consumer within a data center is its evaporative cooling systems, which require large amounts of clean cooling water. As an evaporative cooler operates, divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ become concentrated and can form mineral deposits throughout the system, clogging pipes and promoting their corrosion, lowering the efficiency of the cooling media, and reducing the system’s overall performance. As a result, roughly 25% of the required cooling water must be dumped as waste. Considering annual price escalation rates for water utilities and growing demands for computing power, this waste will pose increasingly significant costs to cloud providers across the world. The purpose of this design is to increase water usage efficiency in data centers by preventing the buildup of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in cooling water beyond 300 parts per million (ppm). Continual ion removal is accomplished via two parallel ion-exchange (IEX) systems, which are integrated into a Johnson Controls evaporative cooler. IEX resins are regenerated in a reverse-flow manner to maximize regeneration efficiency while minimizing the amount of regenerant required. The resulting design provides a modular, low-maintenance, and energy-efficient solution that is capable of reducing water consumption of an evaporative cooler by approximately 60%.

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TEAM 88: Sustainable Methods for Improving Water Usage E�ciency in Data Centers

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Etowah 32 Dam Removal Feasibility Study SPONSOR: USDA-NRCS FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: Garrett Patridge, Liz Keith, Hampton Peay, Caleb Dickson The Etowah 32 Dam is a low hazard dam that was built in 1965 by the NRCS for flood control and is located in the Chattahoochee National Forest along Jones Creek, in northern Georgia. The dam is currently under evaluation for a possible removal. A feasibility study for the removal of this dam which includes a hydrologic, hydraulic, and economic analysis for the three removal options: partial, full and no removal was performed for the NRCS. Additionally the project team completed the construction drawing sheets for the site grading, earth removal/relocation, and rock-lined chute detail, completed for a partial dam removal. From these removal options, we recommend no removal for the current conditions due to economic and environmental concerns. However, circumstances change and we cannot rule out the possibility of the dam’s integrity being compromised in the future. Therefore, we moved forward and designed a partial dam removal -- finding this to be the most economically feasible removal option.

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Industrial Building Authority: Gateway Park – Solar/LED Lighting Improvements SPONSOR: University of Georgia Archway Partnership - Hart County FACULTY MENTOR: Stephan Durham, Ph.D., P.E. TEAM MEMBERS: John Skinner, Lindsey Allen, Roman Carey Our team has partnered with the Hart County Industrial Building Authority (IBA) and the Archway organization to design a completely solar powered lighting system to illuminate a 13-foot-wide marquee at the entrance of a new industrial park. This project is set up to provided immediate value to our clients, as there is currently no lighting system in place at the entrance of the park which creates difficulty for truck drivers searching for it at night. Our team has been tasked with keeping upfront capital costs under $5,000 dollars with no recurring operations and maintenance payments. The system has been designed to be completely “off the grid”. In order to best serve the needs of our client, the team needed to produce a site development plan, three-dimensional models of all components of the system, an electrical one-line diagram, and expected solar and lighting output models. Further, a “phase-2” design was completed to provide solar powered lights along Gateway Drive throughout the industrial park.

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PROJECT SPONSORS 42 | UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


American Society of Mechanical Engineers Amici Food Group, LLC Amie Koenig, Ph.D., University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine Amit Abraham, Ph.D., University of Georgia Department of Kinesiology Armentrout Matheny Thurmond PC Boehringer-Ingelheim Burns and McDonnell Capgemini Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont Dagmar Nelson Dovetail Civil Design, Inc. Electrostatic Space Charge Systems, LLC Georgia Center for Continuing Education GF Health Products, Inc. Gulfstream Aerospace Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Jittery Joe’s Coffee Johnson Controls KCI Technologies Kindercore Vinyl Lummus Corporation McGinn-Wilkens Industrial Automation Peter Kner, Ph.D., University of Georgia College of Engineering Ramana Pidaparti, Ph.D., University of Georgia College of Engineering Rayonier Advanced Material Rebecca Gose, Ph.D., University of Georgia Department of Dance Rockwell Automation Smallholder Fortunes Southeast Toyota Southern Company Southern Company Services Stantec Inc. Terrapin Beer Company The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company Tift County Shotgun Team United States Air Force United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Forest Service University of Georgia Archway Partnership, Grady County University of Georgia Archway Partnership, Hart County University of Georgia Archway Partnership, Pulaski County University of Georgia Archway Partnership, Spalding County University of Georgia Archway Partnership, Washington County University of Georgia Clean Room University of Georgia College of Engineering University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery University of Georgia Marine Extension and Georgia SeaGrant University of Georgia Veterinary Medical Center University of Georgia Veterinary Medical Center Emergency and Critical Care Service University of Georgia Veterinary Medical Center Zoological Medical Service University of Georgia Virtual Experiences Laboratory University of the South, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences SENIOR DESIGN SHOWCASE | 45


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a new generation of engineers. Sponsor a UGA College of Engineering senior design project. Fortune 500 companies, start-ups, communities, government agencies and nonprofits have all benefited from this innovative interdisciplinary academic program.

Explore new technologies Get assistance with real-world challenges Support engineering education Boost company profile on campus

Teams of senior engineering students mentored by partner liaisons and University of Georgia College of Engineering faculty spend an entire academic year taking your project from start to finish.

CONNECT with senior design at the UGA College of Engineering Contact Lauren Anglin, Director of Experiential Learning and Outreach, to learn how your company or organization can become involved with our dynamic capstone senior design program. Telephone: 706-542-1204 E-mail: lauren.anglin@uga.edu

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2019 Senior Design Showcase  

The University of Georgia College of Engineering’s annual Senior Design Showcase features the creative designs of hundreds of students who’v...

2019 Senior Design Showcase  

The University of Georgia College of Engineering’s annual Senior Design Showcase features the creative designs of hundreds of students who’v...

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