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Contents Letter From the Director .............................................. 1 Mission Statement ........................................................ 1 Clinical Services ............................................................ 2 Group Therapy .............................................................. 4 Crisis, Emergency & Resource Center ......................... 6 Our Training Program ................................................... 7 Outreach & Consultation .............................................. 8 Alcohol & Other Drug Services ..................................... 10 ASPIRE ........................................................................... 11 Peer Support Program .................................................. 12 Kognito At-Risk ............................................................. 12


2015-16

Letter from the Director The Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) is part of the Division of Student Affairs at the University of Florida (UF). As the primary provider of mental health services, CWC provides high quality counseling and psychiatric care as well as developmental and preventative services to UF students. CWC also supports the larger UF community, including parents, faculty, staff, and administrators, through consultation on matters related to collegiate mental health. Our students seek CWC services to address a wide range of concerns and needs; from concerns about finding one’s place on campus to relationship problems; from mental health emergencies or crises to chronic and severe mental illness requiring psychological and psychiatric care; or to be educated on a wide range of mental health topics aimed at preventing mental health concerns. As part of our comprehensive efforts to meet the needs of all UF students, we offer individual, couples, and group counseling, outreach programs and workshops, web-based counseling and other digital services, consultation services, and are engaged in various

other educational activities. Some of our clinical staff are members of a Crisis Response Team, which dispatches teams to assist members of the university community who may be dealing with a tragedy or the loss of life. Many CWC clinicians are also affiliate faculty members in the APA-accredited doctoral program in Counseling Psychology and/or the Department of Counselor Education. All of us at CWC, including those who serve in our technology, administrative/fiscal, and support staff teams, are committed to serving our students with the utmost dedication, respect, and care. We thank you for your support and trust in our services. We also hope that this year’s report offers you a meaningful picture of the varied and multiple efforts and contributions in support of the personal and academic development of our students and our overall mission. If you should have any questions, please feel free to contact me, Dr. Ernesto Escoto, at 352392-1575, or at: eescoto@ufl.edu

On behalf of everyone at CWC, thank you. Ernesto R. Escoto, PhD, Director

Our Mission Statement

Fostering human development in all its diversity through compassion, empowerment, advocacy, hope, empathy, and heart. Embracing differences and nurturing a healthy and healing campus environment for all.

1


UF | CWC Annual Report

Clinical Services Being there for students is at the heart of what we do. The following illustrations provide clinical information, including presenting concerns, referral sources, and other data such as appointment numbers and the percentage of UF students who are also our clients.

To Meet a Rising Need

6000

As the stigma around mental health fades we see the need for our services growing. This chart illustrates that over 9% of UF students received services by CWC. Given UF’s growth, we anticipate that number growing quickly, approaching 10% by 2020. This is a modest estimate as attitudes toward mental health among students change.

5000

4,764

10.0% 9.8% 9.6% 9.4%

4000

9.2% 3000

9.0%

9.11%

2000

8.8% 8.6% 8.4%

1000

8.2% 0

8.0% 13-14

14-15

15-16

17-18

18-19

19-20

The following two charts (comparing 2014-15 and 2015-16 CWC Clients Served % of UF Students Served by CWC data) reflect growth in the areas projected projected of utilization and referrals. The first graph shows academic demographics of our clients. This year we experienced a 2.3% increase in Freshmen utilizing our services, possibly due to students’ values around mental health. The second graph illustrates how students were referred to our services with a 3.5% growth in Faculty/Staff referrals, and a 1.3% growth in referrals from friends. Mental health services are becoming a more integral part of the campus environment, with clients referring their friends to our services and faculty and staff taking a more active role in identifying students who would benefit from counseling, group therapy, workshops and many other services we provide. As UF strives for preeminence we expect this growth to continue.

Our Clients’ Academic Status with Yearly Change By Percentage 905

871

866

666

2015-16 3,932 responses

624

+0.3%

-2.2%

-0.7%

+0.3%

+2.3%

838

896

838

611

500

Senior

Junior

Graduate

Sophomore

Freshman

2014-15 3,683 responses

Who Our Clients Were “Referred by...” with Yearly Change By Percentage 1101 +3.5%

2

1037 +1.3%

634 -1.9%

501

400

249

-1.4%

-0.7%

-0.7%

897

919

660

518

397

258

Faculty/Staff

Friend

Other

Web Page

Brochures or Poster

Family

2015-16 3,922 responses 2014-15 3,649 responses


2015-16

Most Frequently Reported Presenting Concerns

PRESENTING CONCERNS AT TRIAGE, BY PERCENTAGE Difficulty Concentrating 75%

This year the majority of our clients reported •• “Difficulty Concentrating” (75%) •• “Sadness/Depression” (58%) and •• “Academic Distress” (50%) as concerns presented during their triage

Sadness/Depression 58% Academic Distress 50% Shyness/Social Anxiety

48%

Suicidal Thoughts 35% Eating Concerns 26% Relationships 18% 18% Abuse/Assault in History 15% Substance Abuse 0

500

Client Outcomes A client outcome is a change in a clients behavior or attitude resulting from their therapy sessions at the CWC.

1000

1500

2000

2500

3000

3500

2015-2016 Client Outcomes (BHM-20) Scale

Recovered

Signficantly Improved

Global Mental Health

38%

63%

Anxiety

36%

60%

Suicide

56%

73%

Alcohol/Drugs

62%

71%

Depression

35%

60%

Well-Being

40%

63%

Symptoms

48%

60%

Life Functioning

32%

52%

Client Contacts 2014-15 Number of students served by CWC 4,401 Number of individual counseling sessions 15,735 Number of group and group related sessions 6,818 Psychiatric referrals 447 Psychiatric appointments 5,762 Number of Non-Client Consultations (students, faculty, staff, family, community members, etc.) 1,607 Hospitalizations 38 Peer Support/High Risk Groups 4 Medical Amnesty Policy Appointments 67 Avg. individual counseling sessions per client 7 Total number of appointments 37,726

2015-16 4,764 17,261 7,628 475 6,027 1,802 51 6 53 6.28 39,719

3


UF | CWC Annual Report

Group Therapy The CWC is home to one of the largest Group Therapy programs in the nation, offering 86 unique therapy groups during this academic year. Our groups provide support for diverse student populations (e.g. international, LGBTQ, first generation, graduate students) and address specific presenting concerns (e.g. depression, eating disorders, substance use, bereavement). Drop-in workshops aim to increase coping skills and mindful living by focusing on building confidence, managing stress, improving concentration and managing low mood.

NUMBER OF THERAPY GROUPS

NUMBER OF WEEKLY WORKSHOPS

Research shows that group therapy has equivalent outcomes compared to individual therapy, and in many cases, group therapy is the treatment of choice! With such a wide range of groups offered, students are able to get matched to a group or workshop which addresses their specific concerns.

NUMBER OF UNIQUE CLIENTS RECIEVING GROUP SERVICES

NUMBER OF CLIENT HOURS PROVIDED IN GROUP

AVERAGE NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH GROUP SESSION

The Group Therapy program substantially allows more UF students to be seen for therapy, provides them the best treatment fit for their concerns, and offers a form of treatment many other university counseling centers would be unable to provide.

During this academic year, the CWC logged over

THREE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SIX

more client hours than if each group leader was seeing an individual therapy client instead.

4


2015-16

Feedback About Our Therapy Groups At the end of each semester, members who complete group therapy are provided an opportunity to evaluate their group experience. 307 group members from 71 groups indicated the following: “I WOULD RECOMMEND GROUP TO OTHER UF STUDENTS.”

“AFTER GROUP, I HAVE MORE SKILLS TO HELP ME WORK THROUGH MY PROBLEMS.”

“THE GROUP COUNSELORS WERE RESPONSIVE TO THE GROUP’S FEEDBACK.”

“I AM SATISFIED WITH THE QUALITY OF MY GROUP EXPERIENCE.”

“I FELT ENGAGED AND PARTICIPATED AS MUCH AS I WANTED TO.”

“THE GROUP COUNSELORS CREATED A SAFE AND SUPPORTIVE GROUP ENVIRONMENT”

“GROUP IMPROVED MY ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE AND INTERACT WITH OTHERS.”

“MY OVERALL WELL-BEING HAS IMPROVED.”

“I found listening to others’ stories and journeys inspirational.” “I learned that I am not alone in my experiences, and that I am stronger than I think.” “Openness between group members was very helpful, and it contributed to overcoming obstacles.” “I was completely against group therapy prior to this experience and now I’ll be looking to join another group in the near future.”

2015-16 Groups & Workshops Academic Confidence • Bereavement Support • Building Personal and Interpersonal Fulfillment • Coping with Medical Challenges • Creative Expressions • First Generation Empowerment • Graduate Student Support • Intentional Peer Support • International Student Support – English and Mandarin • Invincible Black Women • LGBTQ Empowerment • Low Mood and Depression • Making Peace with Food • Mindful Movement • Ready for Success • Recovery Support • Sexual Assault Survivors Support • Success Not Excess • Taming the Anxious Mind • Trans*Empowerment • Understanding Self and Others • Wellness Recovery Action Plan • You Are Enough

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UF | CWC Annual Report

Crisis, Emergency & Resource Center The UF Counseling and Wellness Center’s Crisis and Emergency Resource Center (CERC) serves as a centrally located emergency consultation service to faculty and staff and walk-in emergency service for students. CERC provides training in crisis and behavioral-health issues for student affairs, academic and public safety personnel. Additionally the UF Crisis Response Team’s emergency counseling service and the behavioral-health component of the UF Disaster Plan is administered and implemented through CERC.

CERC Outreach

Two of CERC’s more common outreaches are Question, Persuade, Refer Suicide Training and Crisis Response Team Outreaches. A QPR is a 1 ½ hour interactive training about myths regarding suicide, warning signs, how to inquire about suicide and refer to resources. A CRT is a response by a team of counselors for a requested on-site consultation, intervention or support services after a tragedy on campus.

TOTAL STAKEHOLDERS, IMPACT AND OUTREACH EVENTS

Total stakeholders reached Avg. attendance per outreach Number of outreach events

3500

2982

3000 2500

STAKEHOLDERS REACHED - 2982

680 QPR

2302 CRT

2000

1631

1489

1500

1582

1000

CERC OUTREACH EVENTS - 46

14 QPR

65

32 CRT

70 60

47

46

47

40

On Call Interventions

37

On Call Interventions are for clients with an immediate crisis or whose paperwork triggers a “flag-of-concern”, CERC manages a rotating staff of on-call counselors for various types of interventions, ranging from in-person consultations to phone calls and emails.

50 40

35

30

34

20

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

INTERVENTIONS

372

288

273

95

200

29

94

HOURS OF INTERVENTIONS

259

132 Non-Client Consults are either in person or over the phone and cover interventions with students, faculty, and staff, where typically the student of concern has not received CWC services at the time of the consultation. General Consultation appointments are consultations related to Behavioral Consultation Team, Crisis Response Team services, or other consultation areas.

On-Call Intervention Types Client Consults are either in person or over the phone, where typically the student of concern has received CWC services.

After-Hours Service

If a client calls the CWC during times when the center is closed their call is forwarded to ProtoCall, an after-hours mental health consultation service, staffed by licensed mental health providers. Calls are reviewed by CWC counselors the next work day and categorized for aftercare/ follow up.

Phone/Email Consultations are completed by CERC counselors on duty when they receive a phone call or email from a client. These are often follow up phone calls after a paperwork or ProtoCall review. Triages are in person consultations to assess the nature and type of service needed and are typically scheduled for 30 minutes. Triages are completed by counselors on duty and include both individual and couple’s sessions.

PROTOCALL CALL TYPES, BY PERCENTAGE Clinical 57% 16% Hang-Up/Misdirect 12% 8%

Next Day Follow-Up

Information

5% On-Call Clinical Consult

This year there were 811 after-hours calls.

2% On-Call Psych Consult 0

6

75

10

20

30

40

50

60


2015-16

Our Training Program The CWC’s training program is an integral part of our mission at CWC. We strive to develop counselors and psychologists who are competent, highly ethical, and culturally sensitive. Our program utilizes competency based training and requires participants to observe high standards of cultural competence and inclusivity during their training at the CWC. The majority of our trainees are UF students completing clinical requirements for their degree.

Psychology Internship Program

85

This year we recieved

Our internship program is one of the oldest in the country, accredited by the American Psychological Association in 1982.

D TE 2 DI E A AP 98CCR 1 A

APPLICATIONS

Trainee Feedback

for

5

Where Do They Go? Virtually all interns complete their internship with job placement across the country, in both academic and practice settings. In 2015-16 interns completed our program and went to the following universities.

“This year has been incredible and very important to me personally and professionally. I feel very lucky/grateful to have been here.”

Columbia University New York City, NY

Hamilton College Clinton, NY

Ohio State University

On average, trainees rated their experience

internship positions for the 2016-17 year

Columbus, OH

4.8

University of IllinoisUrbana-Champaign

out of 5

Champaign, IL

Hands On Training

Our interns and practicum students receive hands on experience serving our clients, with supervision from clinical staff to help guide them as they learn.

Trainees Provided:

Practicum & Advanced Practicum Students

Interns

2136 hours of Learning Disability and ADHD Assessments

2359 118

2334

70 1537

Group Therapy Hours Outreaches

Individual/Couples Hours

Education is Part of Our Mission Teaching at UF

Continuing Education (CE)

Having opportunities for our counselors to distribute our knowledge in an academic setting is very important at the CWC. Not only does it help support our students but it also supports the academic mission of the university.

Learning is an on-going process and doesn’t end at graduation. To stay up to date with current trends in counseling practice the CWC sponsors a number of workshops for counselors and psychologists to help them grow professionally.

Courses our counselors taught this year Ethics and Skills Introduction to Counseling Trauma Theory and Crisis Intervention Consultation and Supervision The Mindful Therapist Multicultural Counseling The Counselor as a Person

11 This year we held

Continuing Education workshops

Some of our most popular CEs in 2015-16: •• Transgender Protocol •• Intergroup Dialogue: Overview, Research and Clinical Applications •• Preventing Medical Errors in Behavioral Health •• Florida Ethics, Laws and Rules

7


UF | CWC Annual Report

Outreach & Consultation Through outreach we provide information about our services, help build wellness skills, and promote a healthy campus through events and presence around UF. Below you’ll find a summary of this year’s efforts.

ASPIRE - Social Justice Summit - Nov 12-15, 2015 Hosted by ASPIRE In collaboration with Division of Student Affairs, College of Medicine, Center for Gender and Woman’s Studies, LGBT Affairs, Department of Psychology, Black Student Leadership Conference. Attendance - 680

The keynote was presented by Dr. Joseph White, the “godfather” of Black Psychology.

Aware - Live Optimally Fair & Play Day Live Optimally Fair (LOF) and Play Day are two CWC signature events organized by our student ambassador group, AWARE. This year LOF continued to provide students with an opportunity to know about CWC and other on-campus wellness resources. Play Day provided a number of options for students to relax right before finals and remember the importance of play and laughter to facilitate success. Attendance - 1,090

Tabling Hours - 86 General 63

Reach - 2,077 Initiatives General 23 1,326

Initiatives 751

Reach - 18,356

General 403

General 6,531

Initiatives 408

Preview 6,929

Initiatives 4,896

ASPIRE 3

ASPIRE 300

ASPIRE 66

ASPIRE 1,038

Kognito 3

Kognito 150

Crisis Management 56

Crisis Management 948

Preview 10

Preview 241

Veteran Services 7

Veteran Services 60

Tabling - CWC tables at many different campus events in order to introduce our wide range services and give students a friendly face to associate with the CWC. We bring interactive games and promotional items to make the experience more attractive, engaging and meaningful.

Outreach Categories

8

Presentations Hours - 811

UF International Initiatives Team 17 UF International Initiatives Team 1,104

Veteran Services 0.5

Veteran Services 20

QPR Suicide Prevention 16

QPR Suicide Prevention 487

Biofeeback Orientation 66

Biofeeback Orientation 124

RFS Workshops 21

RFS Workshops 233

Preview 40

Presentations - This category represents our training efforts where one or more CWC representatives addressed an audience about our services or building personal skills. This might include giving presentations, conducting workshops, taking part in panels, or teaching as a guest lecturer.


2015-16

Who Are We Reaching?

At CWC we are cognizant of the importance of serving different groups that make up UF. Having a healthy campus is our shared goal and we are committed to work with our students but also with those who support them through their academic journey. The graphs below summarize our outreach by the type of stakeholders we have reached and the time we have spent sharing our message with them. Hours

4,062.75

People

39,999 Students

Division of Student Affairs

Combined Campus and External Community Professional Organizations

UF Faculty, Staff and Administration Only Campus Community

Family Members

Only External Community

How Are We Reaching Them?

Outreach is an umbrella term that covers many different activities and services, from giving a presentation or tabling at an event, to providing psychological support at a campus event. The graphs below summarize the types of outreach we provide by the number of stakeholders we have reached and the time we have spent sharing our message with them. Hours

3,876

People

37,592 Tabling

Presentations

Visibility

Non-Client Consultation

Visibility Hours - 324.5

Reach - 9,814

Non-Client Consulation Hours - 2,654.5 Reach - 7,345

General 176

General 5,161

General 1,760

Initiatives 148.5

Initiatives 4,653

Initiatives 894.5

General 4,631

Initiatives 2,714

ASPIRE 36

ASPIRE 1,995

ASPIRE 88

ASPIRE 427

Crisis Management 23

Crisis Management 845

Crisis Management 420

Crisis Management 1,359

UF International Initiatives Team 19 UF International Initiatives Team 1,450

UF International Initiatives Team 99

UF International Initiatives Team 165

Veteran Services 25.5

Veteran Services 127

Veteran Services 1.5

Veteran Services 7

Therapy Dog Engagement 12.5

Therapy Dog Engagement 95

Medical Amnesty Policy 61

Medical Amnesty Policy 65

Preview 4

Preview 9

Visibility - CWC takes part in important and potentially triggering campus events such as vigils, protests, awareness nights like Take Back the Night, an interpersonal violence awareness event. Our presence ensures that students in distress would have immediate assistance and stakeholders would have a mental health provider to consult.

Non-Client Consults - We provide consultation to stakeholders who are not clients at the CWC but are part of our campus community. Such consultations may take place at the CWC in person, over the phone or before and after outreach events. Through non-client consultations we are able to provide general psycho-educational information as well as individualized support.

ABOUT OUR INITIATIVES • ASPIRE aims to facilitate timely graduation of African American/Black, Hispanic/LatinX, and First Generation College students. • Biofeedback teaches students how to calm their nervous system to increase their health and wellness. • Crisis Management services encompasses all efforts that address crises that impact our students. • Kognito teaches how to recognize a student in distress and help them connect with a resource through an online simulation training. • QPR is a 90-minute in-person suicide prevention training. • Therapy Dogs, Siggi and Gabe, provide a relaxation opportunity for our students. • UF International Initiatives Team (UFIIT) aims to support international and study abroad students and globalization efforts of UF campus. • Veteran Services aims to reach out to, serve and support our student veterans.

9


UF | CWC Annual Report

Alcohol & Other Drug Services With the number of referrals AOD receives from the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution as well as through for voluntary programs, interventions have been developed and refined to meet students needs. AOD services include one on one prevention/educational meetings, substance abuse seminars, substance abuse assessments, Back on TRAC program prevention groups and the University of Florida Collegiate Recovery Community. AOD Outreaches SAP

Back on Trac 37 128

13.5 239

50.5 hours 367 people reached

366

188

10 341

89 hours 529 people reached

Outreach Types

Collegiate Recovery Community 105

79

101 317

32.5 141

238.5 hours 824 people reached

Totals 378 hours / 1,720 people reached

Non-Client Consultations are when we provide consultation to stakeholders who are not clients at the CWC but are part of our campus community. Presentations represent training efforts where we address an audience about our services or building personal skills. Visibility is when we are present at campus events such as vigils, protests, awareness nights. Our presence gives students in distress and other stakeholders a mental health provider to consult.

Back on TRAC The BOT program is for students facing potential separation from the university due to alcohol/other drug use. The program emphasizes accountability and personal responsibility while providing on-campus treatment resources, case management, peer-group support and individually tailored treatment plans.

“(Back on TRAC) did help me improve almost every aspect of my life, and I am extremely thankful.” - BOT client

Collegiate Recovery Community Learning Day - May 12th, 2016 This year AOD hosted the Collegiate Recovery Learning Day. Experts presented on the best practices for developing and maintaining a CRC on campus as well as raise awareness about the benefits of doing so. Over 40 people attended our Learning Day from universities and treatment centers around Florida. The CRC Learning day was funded through the Transforming Youth Recovery grant.

“The Collegiate Recovery Movement brings students with substance use disorders out of the shadows and into communities where their educational, psychosocial and interpersonal goals can be met through a system of care and support.” - Opening remarks

Florida/Georgia Sober Tailgate For the second year in a row, the University of Florida and the University of Georgia have collaborated to host a FL v. UGA sober tailgate at Everbank Field. Informally dubbed as “No Rivals in Recovery,” this weekend long event includes recovery meetings and fellowship, as well as tailgating at the “biggest outdoor cocktail party in the country.” The tailgate offers a safe space for fans to enjoy the festivities without drinking, because no one should have to choose between sobriety and college life. Some of the places and events that AOD’s outreach efforts took them this year: National Conferences - Student Senate - Guest Lectures - Substance Abuse Seminars - Professional Schools - Intern Training Treatment Centers - Student Health Care Center - Professional Resource Networking Event - High Schools - Fraternities - Residence Halls - University Police Department - Florida/Georgia Tailgate - Pain and Addiction Intensive Workshop - the Association of Recovery in Higher Education - CRC Learning Day 10


2015-16

ASPIRE Since 2005 ASPIRE has addressed the needs of African/Black American, Latinx, and First Generation students in support of achieving academic success by providing outreach and seeking to build strong collaborative relationships. ASPIRE Highlights 2015-16 Social Justice Summit: For the Gator Good In collaboration with Division of Student Affairs, College of Medicine, Center for Gender and Woman’s Studies, LGBT Affairs, Department of Psychology, Black Student Leadership Conference

New Officer Diversity Consultation/Orientation Meetings with UFPD 4 hours – 10 officers served

CWC Senior Staff Cultural Awareness Dialogues 13 hours – 6-10 staff per session

Intern Diversity Process Series 9 hours – 6 interns per session

ASPIRE Led Groups Invincible Black Women’s Group

First Generation Student Empowerment Group

Fall – 18 hours – 9 students served; Spring – 13 hours, 7 students served.

Fall – 12 hours – 4 students served

During 2015-16 ASPIRE provided outreach to

• Office of Academic Support • Machen Florida Opportunity Scholars • UF Student Government • Student Organizations • Housing • Black Affairs

Committee Representation

• Association of Black Faculty & Staff • Machen Florida Opportunity Scholars • African American Studies Advisory Committee • Black Affairs Task Force • Bias Education and Response Team (Fall 2015) Dr. Pritchett-Johnson speaking at the 1st Annual Social Justice Summit

11


UF | CWC Annual Report

Peer Support Program Peer Support is: a shift in how we see mental distress • helping each other through trauma • cutting edge— the first university in the country with this kind of program • trauma-informed • recovery-oriented • rooted in social justice and civil rights values During the past year we began the first stage of a long-term program aimed to empower students to take control of their recovery and transform the culture of mental health services at the university. During this first stage, we offered two modes of recovery-oriented Peer Support, Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) and Intentional Peer Support (IPS), in six groups, serving 49 students. These students were referred from CWC, Psychiatry, and the Dean of Students Office. CWC also trained 15 of its staff and one psychiatrist in WRAP. In stage two, we will be moving into our newly renovated Peer Support Resource Room and getting the next level of training. With this advanced training we can teach students to offer various peer support modes to each other. This, in turn, empowers students to help themselves and each another recover from the effects of trauma and other long-term barriers to wellness.

Kognito At-Risk Kognito is an interactive online training that is designed to help students, faculty, and staff recognize common signs of psychological distress and learn how to motivate students in distress to seek help. The CWC provides three versions of Kognito At-Risk: •• peer to peer for college students •• for faculty and staff to identify struggling students •• for faculty and staff to identify student veterans who may be struggling The goals of Kognito At-Risk are to •• increase students’ use of protective strategies and decrease stigma to encourage early intervention and prevent serious mental health crises •• increase students’ confidence and competence in identifying, approaching, and referring fellow students who are in distress •• increase faculty and staff confidence and competence in identifying, approaching, and referring students who are in distress

Since Sept 1st, 2015 2468 students, 950 faculty, and 77 student veterans have accessed the training. 12


UF | Counseling & Wellness Center Annual Report 2015-16 Contributors Jennifer Alonso, Group Therapy Chun-Chung Choi, Training Program Ernesto Escoto, Introduction Jaime Jasser, Kognito Alvin Lawrence, Clinical Services Natasha Maynard-Pemba, Training Program Sara Nash, Peer Support Program Brandi Pritchett-Johnson, ASPIRE Jim Probert, Peer Support Program Joan Scully, Alcohol & Other Drug Services Meggen Sixbey, Crisis, Emergency & Resource Center Gizem Toska, Outreach & Consultation Design, Illustration & Photography Adriana Chwala Daniel Ypsilanti Editing Carla Connell Ernesto Escoto Thomas Parker


UF | Counseling & Wellness Center 3190 Radio Road Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 392-1575 www.counseling.ufl.edu

UF Counseling & Wellness Center | 2015-16, Annual Report  

This is the annual report for the University of Florida's Counseling and Wellness Center, for the 2015-16 academic year.

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