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Get Home Safe Othelia Jumapao | Third Year My piece is a poem I wrote in response to the #metoo movement. I wrote it because I realized that the sexual harassment APIDA women face on a daily basis is considered a norm. We are expected to ignore these insults and our pain. As the model minority myth, we must look perfect and not show our suffering. Thus, APIDA women are inherently incognito. We often must invisbilize ourselves in white cishet spaces to survive. "We can be hurt in our homes." This line means we can release our suffering in our private spaces away from the outside world. That seems to be the only acceptable form of grief from my perspective as a Pilipinx American.

We can be hurt in our homes, and we can scrape off The sediments of dirt, On our shoes. We can let our eyes Finally close Because of that burning. That burning of uncried tears From my mother and my grandmother Sears through my eyelids. We can roll our shoulders back In our homes. And remember our weight is the weight, Of halo block cement and shuddering waves. We can exhale in our homes, let our breastbones collapse. Hear, the air seethe through our clenched teeth. All of that air inside of us that muggy, island air that reclines and hangs heavy with apologies. We can be hurt in our homes, but never on the streets.

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APIA Affairs Anthology 2018  

This year’s anthology aims to liberate us from living our lives INCOGNITO. In a fast-paced apathetic society, finding vulnerable spaces is a...

APIA Affairs Anthology 2018  

This year’s anthology aims to liberate us from living our lives INCOGNITO. In a fast-paced apathetic society, finding vulnerable spaces is a...

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