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aecREVIEW

in this issue . . .

SPRING 2014

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Tony Andenoro, assistant professor of leadership education, and Jaron Jones, leadership development doctoral student, give TEDxUF talk on February 8, 2014 at the University Auditorium.

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Challenge 2050, a new College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Course with an academic home in AEC, teaches students how to develop human capacity to address complex challenges in a global world.

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AEC was well represented at the 2014 College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Scholarship and Leadership Awards Banquet in April. Five members of AEC took home awards at the banquet.

AEC Faculty Travel to Paraguay Written by Kevin Herzog & Kyle Hunter

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gricultural Education and Communication (AEC) faculty traveled to Paraguay several times this year as part of a project to encourage women to pursue agriculture as an academic major and a career field. The Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay (WLPP) is designed to support national development goals that promote gender equality and female empowerment. The purpose is to improve the ability of highereducation institutions in Paraguay to develop women’s leadership and see more female students graduating with jobs in agriculture, said project director and AEC lecturer Marta Hartmann.

“This is an opportunity to inspire women to receive a college education, but also a chance to work in management positions and rise through the ranks of their companies,” Hartmann said. WLPP represents a partnership between UF-IFAS and the National University of Asuncion’s School of Agricultural Sciences (UNA-FCA). During the first year of the threeyear program, AEC faculty and faculty at UF and other universities conducted training in such areas as leadership and communication skills and gender issues. The program is creating alliances with companies and governmental and nongovernmental

“This is an opportunity to inspire women to receive a college education, but also a chance to work in management positions and rise through the ranks of their companies.” agencies, in an effort to develop program sustainability and enhance opportunities for women, Hartmann said. The team of UF faculty and UNA faculty collaborated to develop workshops and to create a career resource center. The team is not only (Continued on page 6)


University of Florida Department of Agricultural Education and Communication

Graduate Student Spotlight: Teaching Award Winners 2013 - 2014 Avery Culbertson received the 2013-2014 University of Florida Graduate Student Teaching Award, presented in April to only 20 UF teaching assistants this year. In addition, Avery was also selected as one of the top two award recipients this year and received the Calvin A. VanderWerf Award. Avery graduated in December 2013 with her Ph.D. in leadership development.

305 Rolfs Hall P.O. Box 110540 Gainesville, FL 32611-0540

(352) 392-0502 aec.ifas.ufl.edu

Newsletter Editor: Andrea Davis

Contributing Writers: Collier Clemens Kevin Herzog Kyle Hunter T. Buddy Miller

Scholarships and endowments offer much needed student and program support in the department. Current endowment campaigns include a graduate student professional development fund, study abroad scholarships, and an AEC Program Excellence Fund. Other gift opportunities also exist. Please contact Ed Osborne (ewo@ufl.edu) for additional information.

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Avery Culbertson Jessica Holt was selected as the 2014 recipient of the Jack L. Fry Award for Teaching Excellence by a Graduate Student. Jessica is a thirdyear doctoral student in agricultural communication.

Jessica Holt Milton Newberry, second-year doctoral student in extension education, received the 2013-2014 University of Florida Graduate Student Teaching Award, presented in April to only 20 UF teaching assistants this year.

Milton Newberry


Flexibility of AEC’s Online Master of Science Program Helps Student to Achieve Success Written by Andrea Davis

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arly Barnes, University of Florida master’s student studying agricultural education and communication (AEC), started her graduate program as a traditional, on-campus student. However, after dealing with some health concerns midway through her graduate program, Barnes had to relocate back home, nearly four hours away from the University of Florida’s main campus in Gainesville. Being nearly four hours away from the university’s main campus and still needing to complete her master’s degree, Barnes chose to utilize the department’s online Master of Science option. With the program’s flexibility and wide variety of course offerings, the online Master of Science option through AEC proved to be a solid choice for Barnes. Barnes, studying agricultural education and communication, with a specialization in agricultural communications, had taken the majority of the classes she needed for her agricultural communications specialization. At this point in time, she was looking for supporting courses to add to her program of study. “The nice thing about AEC’s online program is that while the specializations are different, each course’s curriculum is complementary. I have taken classes in the department’s leadership, education and extension specializations that really complement the things I have learned within my own agricultural communications specialization,” said Barnes. Barnes, a unique case, as she started the program as an on-campus student, says that because she has

taken AEC department courses both on-campus and online, she is able to see that the academic rigor and collaborative nature of the on-campus program still remains present in the online program. “The online program is still very rigorous. The curriculum is very strong. We conduct the same research, discuss the same theories and work on the same studies as those students in the on-campus program. The difference is that this program is a bit more flexible and meets the needs of a practitioner’s life,” said Barnes. Barnes says she enjoys how the online program mimics the collaborative nature of the on-campus program, allowing for research workgroups with fellow students and opportunities to peer-review other’s work and interact with classmates. Students utilize discussion posts and develop video presentations to showcase their work, which helps to develop a sense of community with other students in the program.

“The online program is still very rigorous. The curriculum is very strong. The difference is that this program is a bit more flexible and meets the needs of a practitioner’s life.”

Barnes graduated with her bachelor’s degree in AEC in 2011 and is currently finishing her master’s degree in AEC online.

“You’re not alone. You’re likely to take classes with many of the same people. You develop friends and colleagues. You help each other out and peer-review each other’s work. Constructive criticism and critical thinking is encouraged in this online program, and it is very helpful,” said Barnes. Barnes also says that the academic support offered through this program is second to none. “I know that if I every need anything, I can always call any of my instructors or the program’s e-Learning coordinator and they will be happy to help me. They are all so understanding and flexible. They go above and beyond to meet my needs and help me to succeed,” said Barnes.

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AEC Assistant Professor and Doctoral Student Take the Stage at the 2014 TEDxUF Event

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wo members of the AEC family were selected out of hundreds of applicants to give a TEDxUF talk Saturday, Feb. 8 at 10 a.m. at the University Auditorium. Tony Andenoro, assistant professor of leadership education, and Jaron Jones, leadership development doctoral student, were two of six presenters chosen by TEDxUF to give the talk. A diverse selection of speakers was offered, including presenters ranging from undergraduates, graduate students, faculty members and members of the community from varying areas of interest. Andenoro and Jones attended the 2013 TEDxUF talk and noticed many of the themes covered at the event involved leadership. They immediately became interested in getting involved

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with a future event. They met with TEDxUF staff and went through an interview process that ultimately led to their selection as two of the six presenters for the 2014 event. At each of the TEDxUF events,

“The most important thing I took from giving this talk is that everybody has something of importance to give to the world. Everybody has something to say and something for someone to hear.”

speakers are given around 17 minutes to present a TEDworthy “idea worth sharing.” The topics of this year’s event included using emotionally engaged thinking (EET) to solve tomorrow’s problems, using advanced technology to help people with disabilities, learning how to be receptive when dealing with tragedy and demonstrating how to properly give aid to countries in need, just to name a few. “My presentation incorporated my passion for music and leadership to stress the importance of crafting your own narrative. I showed the audience how to compose a beat and layered my personal experiences to sounds,” Jones said. Andenoro’s presentation stressed the importance of using EET to solve global problems such as food

IDEAS WORTH SHARING Tony Andenoro, assistant professor of leadership education (pictured above), presents his TEDxUF talk at the University Auditorium this past February.


insecurity and a rapidly growing world population. He discussed how he uses EET in his “Challenge 2050” class, where students work to solve pressing, global issues facing agriculture. “There’s a misconception that many of these global issues can be solved by science or technology, but these problems require real shifts in human attitudes and behaviors as they are social issues. During my talk, I discussed how Challenge 2050 affords us an opportunity to shift education by utilizing EET to empower students to think differently and act authentically with respect to solving global problems,” Andenoro said. Both Jones and Andenoro said having the opportunity to

“It was a truly humbling experience to be selected considering all of the amazing things that are being done at the University of Florida.” participate in this TEDxuF talk was an unforgettable experience. “The most important thing I took from giving this talk is that everybody has something of importance to

give to the world. Everybody has something to say and something for someone to hear,” Jones said. Andenoro said that he felt humbled by the experience. “It was a truly humbling experience to be selected considering all of the amazing things that are being done at the University of Florida.” TEDxUF is an independently organized TED event that brings people together to share a “TEDlike experience.” TEDxUF occurs once a year and is open to the public upon completion of a free, online application. For more information on TEDxUF, visit www.tedxuf.com.

IDEAS WORTH SHARING Tony Andenoro, assistant professor of leadership education, and Jaron Jones, leadership development doctoral student present their TEDxUF talks in February at the University Auditorium.

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AEC Faculty Travel to Paraguay Written by Kevin Herzog & Kyle Hunter

(Continued from page 1) developing women’s empowerment but it also aims to develop career professionals in business and the workforce, Hartmann said. “There is a huge gender gap in terms of educational opportunities and leadership positions, and this program is designed to lessen that gap,” she said. AEC professor Ricky Telg conducted workshops in March and July on how to give effective presentations and how to use different forms of social media. “I really enjoyed interacting with the students and faculty at the university,” Telg said. “I believe what we are doing will make a positive impact as the university in Paraguay develops more opportunities to empower women.” Other AEC faculty, including Hannah Carter, Grady Roberts and Sebastian Galindo, also traveled to Paraguay in 2013 to begin the process of developing leadership programs,

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enhancing educational efforts and assessing and evaluating the program. In March, the UF team participated in a ceremony to kick off the program attended by representatives from UF, the National University of Asuncion, and U.S. and Paraguayan governmental officials. “The president of the university, representatives from public and private sectors of Paraguay, and even the U.S ambassador to Paraguay participated in the event and delivered speeches,” Hartmann said. “It was truly amazing.” The program in Paraguay, along with similar sister programs, is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). In July, the Paraguay team, led by Hartmann, gathered with four similar USAID-funded programs in Rwanda, a location of two of the programs. During the conference in Rwanda, Hartmann had a chance to discuss the challenges that the Paraguay team had to overcome. Hartmann offered

“There is a huge gender gap in terms of educational opportunities and leadership positions, and this program is designed to lessen that gap.” advice on how to reinforce women’s empowerment and leadership if teams encounter similar situations to what the Paraguay team encountered. Currently, Hartmann is trying to find a way to get UF students involved with the leadership aspect of the Paraguay program. However, she said it is challenging to prepare students for the language and cultural differences particularly of a developing country. “Some students handle the culture shock better than others, but it is generally part of the study abroad experience,” Hartmann said.

PICTURED ABOVE: Ricky Telg and Marta Hartmann teach communications workshops at the National University of Asuncion’s School of Agricultural Sciences (UNA-FCA) as part of the The Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay (WLPP)


AEC Alum Serves as Director of Leadership Foundation Written by T. Buddy Miller

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ne University of Florida Agricultural Education and Communication alumnus is preserving the legacy of one man by positively impacting students and helping them pursue secondary education. Micah Scanga is the executive director for the Mason G. Smoak Foundation, an organization named for a UF alumnus who died in a plane crash. This foundation provides students with scholarship awards and teaching leadership qualities through its Youth Leadership program, Scanga said. “The foundation wants to partner with the community to impact lives,” he said. “I come to work every day working to expand the number of lives we are able to positively impact.” The foundation provides select graduating students from Avon Park, Lake Placid, Sebring, DeSoto and Hardee high schools with a $4,000 scholarship annually, Scanga said. Karley Freeland, a recipient of the scholarship in 2010 and UF student, said she appreciated the scholarship

and all of Scanga’s effort to make the scholarships more available. “Micah has really made significant strides with the foundation. It was a huge honor to receive the scholarship in Mason G. Smoak’s name,” Freeland said. “He was an outstanding person, and it was very humbling to receive such a prestigious award.” Scanga heard about the executive director position with the Mason G. Smoak Foundation through AEC associate professor Hannah Carter and largely attributes his success at his job to his experience in his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the AEC department, he said. “[The AEC] department developed my writing, speaking and strategic planning skill sets,” he said. “I use the undergraduate degree in communication and leadership development every day when meeting with and working with board members, committees and supporters of the foundation.” Ed Smoak, vice president of the foundation and brother of the late Mason G. Smoak, said Scanga has

used his experiences to change the Mason G. Smoak Foundation so that many more people know the legacy of his brother. “Micah provides a sense of purpose and intent, strong integrity, ethics and character,” Ed Smoak said. “He has the gift of having a natural leadership ability that rivals people twice his age to have a serious, positive impact in the growth of our foundation.”

PICTURED DIRECTLY ABOVE: Scanga meets Governor Scott through his work with Mason G. Smoak Foundation. TOP RIGHT: Scanga snaps a picture with a Mason G. Smoak 5K participant.

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Faculty Member Stays Fit Written by Collier Clemens

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n Agricultural Education and Communication lecturer is helping to bring fitness and a healthier lifestyle to her fellow citizens in Union County. Born into an agriculture family in the Florida panhandle, lecturer Becky Raulerson was not very interested in sports as a child. “I spent all my afternoons on the school farm,” she said, “so my physical activity really involved carrying more feed bags, moving equipment around and carrying water hoses.” Raulerson did not become interested in other types of physical fitness until her junior year of college. She worked as a receptionist for Gainesville Health and Fitness’ Women’s Center. “I was a receptionist, but as part of being an employee there, you received a membership to the gym,” she said. “I later cross-trained on the equipment floor which taught me about using weights and nutrition.” After receiving her degree in Agricultural Education and Communication, Raulerson married Daniel Raulerson and said she stayed in shape but did the minimum. She later became pregnant, which drove her back to an unhealthy lifestyle. “I did not take care of myself,” she said. “I ate junk and did not exercise.” Raulerson said while she was sitting on her sofa one day with her 3-month-old son, Dr. Phil came on the television and spoke about his book, The Seven Keys to Weight Loss Freedom.

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“After reading it, something just clicked,” she said. The book was the motivation Raulerson needed to get her back to a healthy lifestyle. She started slow by going on long walks with her son in a stroller. She eventually got the baby weight off. “By the time I was pregnant again, I knew what it meant to take care of myself,” she said. “All through my second pregnancy I exercised and I ate right.” Raulerson was approached by a friend in the summer of 2011 asking if she would like to do group boot camp. Raulerson did and enjoyed it so much she decided to co-teach it the following summer. “The kind of things we did in fitness boot camp were the kinds of stuff I grew up doing on the farm, like carrying water buckets, hauling feed in wheelbarrows,” she said. The boot camp lasted for a full hour during the weekday summer mornings beginning at 6:15. It lasted for six weeks and catered to around 10 women per day. Every Tuesday and Thursday, Raulerson taught the class, and her friend

“I feel like it’s really important to be a role model so that my kids and others understand the value of their health.”

taught the rest of the week. Raulerson is currently finishing her group fitness instructor certification through the National Association for Fitness Certification so she can be labeled as a certified group fitness instructor. Kelly McNeal is the owner Studio 3, a women’s fitness and Zumba studio in Lake Butler. She said Raulerson interacts well with people and puts others first. “She is amazing with people,” McNeal said. “Everyone just gravitates towards her.” Raulerson feels she has connected with people well and said she wants to inspire others to exercise and eat healthy. “I feel like it’s really important to be a role model so that my kids and others understand the value of their health,” she said.

PICTURED ABOVE: Becky Raulerson, AEC lecturer, takes a break to snap a picture after completing her first 5K. She completed this race in under 30 minutes.


2014 Alpha Tau Alpha Induction

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he Epsilon Chapter of Alpha Tau Alpha had an exciting year in 2013-14. New member induction programs were held in October and April, and 36 AEC undergraduate and graduate students were received into membership. Alpha Tau Alpha is the national honorary for students enrolled in agricultural education, extension education, agricultural communication, and leadership education in agriculture and natural resources. The primary purpose of ATA is to recognize outstanding academic achievement and create a professional bond among students in these specializations. The UF chapter organizes several professional development and social events during the year, including the kickball cookout and Ag Issues Forum. Lake Wauberg provided a great venue for the 8th annual kickball cookout with more than 30 students, staff, and faculty attending the Sunday afternoon event. The final program event of the year was the Ag Issues Forum, held in March at the UF/IFAS Straughn Extension Professional Development Center. This event was initiated in 2008 to provide a special opportunity for AEC students to become more informed about the major issues affecting Florida’s agriculture and natural resources. The 2014 Ag Issues Forum focused on GMOs, and guest speaker Dr. Kevin Folta, Chair of the Department of Horticultural Sciences, delivered a very engaging

and informative presentation, using science to dispel numerous misconceptions about GMOs. Nearly 90 students from AEC and other majors in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences attended. The program also included a question and answer session, a GMO issues brief distributed to attendees, and a catered meal. All 2014-15 events were organized by the officer team of Adam Boudreau, Valerie McKee, Amber Huff, Gretchen Wulff, and Kyle Hunter. The 2015 Ag Issues Forum, scheduled for March 19, will address the facts related to media messages on food animal agriculture. Other events in the coming year include new member inductions programs on October 9 and April 2 and the ninth annual kickball cookout on November 16.

Newly elected officers for the upcoming year include Tre Easterly, Raychel Rabon, Seth Heinert, David Swartzfager, and Mary Rodriguez. Ed Osborne serves as the faculty advisor of Alpha Tau Alpha.

2014 - 2015 ATA Officers Tre Easterly David Swartzfager Raychel Rabon Mary Rodriguez Seth Heinert

PICTURED ABOVE: The 2014-2015 ATA officer team at the April 2014 induction program. From left: Tre Easterly, David Swartzfager, Raychel Rabon, Mary Rodriguez and Seth Heinert.

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Challenge 2050: Addressing Complex Chal

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he College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) is offering a new program, Challenge 2050, that aims to provide students with opportunities to address questions about food, agricultural, and natural resource industries in conjunction with academic researchers and community leaders. “This program is about working with students and helping them to develop the human capacity to address what’s going on in the world,” said Tony Andenoro, assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication (AEC) and Challenge 2050 program leader. Challenge 2050, a 10 credit hour certificate program, involves five different courses, taken in a sequence: Global Uncertainty, Tools for a Changing World, The Experience, The Solution and Taking Action.

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The first set of Challenge 2050 courses introduce students to the complex problems we are facing in agricultural and natural resources

“This program is about working with students and helping them to develop the human capacity to address what’s going on in the world.”

and teach them how to approach these problems. The concluding courses allow students to actually experience these problems through a study aboard program, develop solutions to the problems and collaborate with fellow students to present those solutions to industry leaders, course instructors and classmates in the program. “Our program is different from many programs because we have what we call an ‘authentic challenge’ and an ‘authentic audience,’” said Andenoro. “The problems our students are addressing are real world, global problems affecting agricultural and natural resources, and the audience our students are working with are industry leaders coming from all throughout the globe.”

ADDRESSING COMPLEX CHALLENGES IN A GROWING WORLD Dana Bigham, Teri Balser and Tony Andenoro, Challenge 2050 program leaders, with students in the Challenge 2050 program.


llenges in a Growing World Part of the Challenge 2050 program’s authentic audience includes industry leaders from HM-Clause, an organization that specializes in the breeding, production and commercialization of vegetable seeds varieties for professional growers, also a part of the Limagrain Group headquartered in France. Along with Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) faculty, HM-Clause has also been a big supporter of Challenge 2050, working one on one with students as they complete the program. “The problems we’re addressing in this program are not just about feeding the world. It’s more about addressing global population fluctuation,” said Andenoro. “Our goal [as Challenge 2050 program

leaders] is to change the way our students think in order to help them to make meaning of the problems we are facing and to make decisions based upon those problems that will change the world.”

“Our program is different from many programs because we have what we call an ‘authentic challenge’ and an ‘authentic audience.’”

The Challenge 2050 program, with an academic home in AEC, is currently a college-wide program attracting students from a wide variety of CALS majors, including environmental sciences, food and resource economics and agricultural education and communication. The program currently has an enrollment of approximately 65 students, but hopes to expand its numbers and become an interdisciplinary program open to all UF students in the coming years. “What an honor it is to be an assistant professor here at the University of Florida working on a program that could potentially save the world,” Andenoro said. For more information on Challenge 2050, visit challenge2050.ifas.ufl.edu.

ADDRESSING COMPLEX CHALLENGES IN A GROWING WORLD Students engage in conversation and work to solve problems to complex issues affecting agricultural and natural resources.

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Here’s What We’ve Been Up To....

TOP ROW: Agricultural Communicators and Leaders of Tomorrow (ACLT) members visit the Florida Department of Agr award; ACLT members visit VisitOrlando; Faculty and graduate students visit Trinidid and Tobago with colleagues from at UF CALS commencement; Don Dillman delivers seminar on the survey methodology; Tony Andenoro is recognized fo commencement; Students meet with Mark Russell, Director of Horticulture at SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment in Or


SPRING 2014

riculture and Consumer Services; Ricky Telg is recognized at the Spring 2014 UF CALS commencement for his advising m Texas A&M and Penn State SECOND ROW: Students visit SeaWorld Orlando; ; AEC master’s degree recipients or his teaching award at UF CALS commencement. THIRD ROW: AEC bachelor’s degree recipients at UF CALS rlando; Dillman delivers seminar; Ricky Telg and Sonia Delphin-Perez teach communication workshops in Paraguay


AWARDS

AEC Awards & Accomplishme • A number of AEC students and faculty were recognized at the 2014 College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) Scholarship and Leadership Awards Banquet held in April: • T. Buddy Miller, from Lakeland, Florida received the E. T. York, Jr. Medal of Excellence, which is presented to the outstanding junior in the College. T. Buddy is enrolled in the Communication and Leadership Development Specialization in AEC. • Valerie McKee, from Okeechobee, Florida was one of three finalists for the CALS Alumni and Friends Leadership Award. • Jessica Holt was selected as the 2014 recipient of the Jack L. Fry Award for Teaching Excellence by a Graduate Student. Jessica is a third-year Ph.D. student in agricultural communication. •

Ricky Telg, professor of agricultural communication, received the CALS Undergraduate Faculty Adviser of the Year Award. Dr. Telg is the only faculty member in the College to have received both the Undergraduate Advisor of the Year and the Undergraduate Teacher of the Year awards twice.

• Tony Andenoro was selected as the 2014 CALS Undergraduate Teacher of the Year, one of two faculty members to receive this award. • Ph.D. students Milton G. Newberry, III and Avery Culbertson received the 2013-2014 University of Florida Graduate Student Teaching Award, presented in April to only 20 UF teaching assistants this year. In addition, Avery was selected as one of the top two award recipients this year and received the Calvin A. VanderWerf Award. Milton is a second-year doctoral student in extension education, and Avery received her Ph.D. in December. • Kirby Barrick received the Distinguished Service Citation from The National Association of Agricultural Educators at its annual conference in December. • Ricky Telg received the Teaching Award of Excellence from the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA). Additionally he won the Leadership and Management Award of Excellence from the Association for Communication Excellence (ACE).

ACCOMPLISHMENTS •

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Ricky Telg, professor of agricultural communication in AEC, accepted an appointment as Interim Associate Dean for the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS), effective January 31, 2014. Telg’s primary responsibility is to provide leadership for CALS undergraduate and graduate programs, specifically in the areas of curriculum, assessment, advising, and enrollment management. He replaces Dr. Elaine Turner, who assumed the role of Interim Dean of the College earlier this month. Brian Myers, associate professor of agricultural education in AEC, was appointed Interim Associate Dean and 4-H Youth Development Program Leader in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida, effective December 1, 2013. In this full-time administrative position, Dr. Myers will provide overall leadership for the 4-H youth development program throughout Florida. Amy Harder was named coordinator of the Program Development and Evaluation Center (PDEC). Joenelle Futrell, Clay Hurdle, Amber Huff, Rebecca Mickler, and Sydney Stone were selected to be AEC Advocates for the 2014-2015 academic year.


ents

TOP ROW: Dr. Ricky Telg receives the 2014 CALS Undergraduate Adviser of the Year Award; Dr. Tony Andenoro receives the 2014 Undergraduate Teacher of the Year Award. SECOND ROW: Jessica Holt receives the Jack L. Fry Award; T. Buddy Miller receives the E.T. York Medal of Excellence. THIRD ROW: Valerie McKee becomes a finalist for the CALS Alumni and Friends Leadership Awards; CALS trophies from the banquet

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FACULTY

AEC Faculty and Staff

Dr. Ed Osborne Professor & Department Chair

Dr. Tony Andenoro Assistant Professor Leadership Development

Dr. Kirby Barrick Professor Agricultural Education

Dr. Cheri Brodeur Assistant Extension Scientist PDEC

Dr. Hannah Carter Associate Professor Leadership Development

Dr. James Dyer Professor Agricultural Education

Dr. Sebastian Galindo Research Assistant Professor Extension & Leadership

Dr. Amy Harder Associate Professor Extension Education

Dr. Marta Hartmann Lecturer Extension & Communication

Dr. Glenn Israel Professor Extension Education

Dr. Alexa Lamm Assistant Professor Extension Education

Dr. Paul Monoghan Assistant Professor Extension Education

Dr. Brian Myers Associate Professor Agricultural Education

Dr. Linda Perry Lecturer Agricultural Communication

Becky Raulerson Lecturer Agricultural Communication

Dr. Grady Roberts Professor Agricultural Education

Dr. Joy Rumble Assistant Professor Agricultural Communication

Dr. Laura Sanagorski Assistant Professor Extension Education

Dr. Nicole Stedman Associate Professor Leadership Development

Dr. Katie Stofer Research Assistant Professor Agricultural Education


Dr. Andrew Thoron Assistant Professor Agricultural Education

Catherine Clark Program Assistant

Diane Craig Coordinator, Statistical Research, PDEC

Hope Kelly Coordinator, Education & Training Programs

Holly O’Ferrell Administrative Assistant

Dr. Nick Place Dean & Director for Extension

Dr. Pete Vergot, III Professor Extension Education

Andrea Davis Coordinator, Educational Media & Communications

Tyann Haile Program Assistant PDEC

Rachel Harris Fiscal Assistant

Sonia Delphin-Perez Research Coordinator

Janice Shepard Executive Secretary

Kristin Theus Coordinator, Academic Support Services

STAFF

Dr. Ricky Telg Professor Agricultural Communication

Two members of the Florida Extension Leadership Team also hold their academic homes in the AEC Department: Dean Nick Place and Northwest Extension Director Dr. Pete Vergot.

Former AEC Professor Now FYCS Department Chair

Wedgworth Leadership Institute

Dr. Tracy Irani, former professor of agricultural communication in the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication (AEC) at the University of Florida (UF), was appointed Chair of the Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (FYCS), effective April 11, 2014. FYCS is one of 15 academic departments in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at UF. Dr. Irani had served as Interim Chair of FYCS since October 1, 2013. She began as an assistant professor in the AEC Department in 1999 and was instrumental in developing the department’s comprehensive teaching, research, and extension program in agricultural communication. Dr. Irani has also served as Director of the Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources since its inception in 2008 but will relinquish that role as she assumes her new position.


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AEC Spring Newsletter 2014  

UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication

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