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MOUNT CARMEL SECONDARY SCHOOL

Student diary and planner 2009/10 KNO

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Unit B5, Glasnevin Business Park, Ballyboggan Road, Glasnevin, Dublin 11, Ireland. t +353 (0)1 860 3477 f +353 (0)1 860 3480 e james@uniquediaryproductions.ie w www.uniquediaryproductions.ie

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KING’S

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S TA I S CHRIST URGET NO

MOUNT CARMEL SECONDARY SCHOOL


Friday Thursday Wednesday Tuesday Monday Time Name: __________________________________________________Class: ______________________ ________________________________________________________Tel: ________________________ Emergency Contact Name: __________________________________Tel: ________________________


Mount Carmel Secondary School

King’s Inns Street Dublin 1 Tel: 873 0958 Fax: 873 0033 E-mail: mtcarmel@eircom.net

Name: _______________________________________ Class: ________________ Year:__________________

Homework Journal

1


Mount Carmel is a voluntary Catholic secondary school for girls under the care of the Sisters of Charity. School Motto:

“Caritas Christi Urget Nos” The love of Christ urges us

Mission Statement: The King’s Inns Street School community works together to foster Knowledge and Integrity in a Secure and Safe environment.

2


Personal Record Name: _______________________________________ Class: ________________Year:___________________ Year Head:____________________________________ Tutor: ________________________________________ Address:______________________________________ _____________________________________________ Parent’s/Guardian’s Signature: ____________________ ____________________ Phone Numbers:

(Home)

____________________

(Mobile)

____________________

(Others)

____________________ ____________________

Please inform the office if your address or contact number(s) change during the school year.

3


SCHOOL RULES 2009–2010 To make our school a place where learning can take place, the following rules are essential and must be followed at all times. SCHOOL HOURS 1. The school building opens at 8.30am every morning and classes begin punctually at 8.45 am. 2. It is the responsibility of each student to swipe in every morning as they enter the school building using their swipe card or journal. Students who do not swipe in will be recorded as absent on our database and will also receive detention. ABSENTEEISM AND PUNCTUALITY 3. Girls are strictly forbidden to leave the school premises without permission. Unacceptable behaviour will be dealt with as outlined in our Code of Behaviour. (See pages 7 & 8 ) 4. If a pupil is sick or absent: (a) parents should phone the school before 9.30 a.m. (b) a written explanation of absenteeism must also be brought in on the day the pupil returns after being absent. (Blank printed notes are available at back of this Journal) 5. Punctuality is taken very seriously and students who come to school late will be given a 40 minute detention on the Tuesday/ Thursday following their offence. If a student does not do the detention the time will be doubled and the student will be detained for 1 hour 20 minutes on the following Tuesday/ Thursday. If a student misses detention 3 times they will be suspended for 1 day. SCHOOL BEHAVIOUR We expect a high standard of courtesy and respect from all pupils at all times. 6. No chewing gum is allowed in the school building. 7. Students may not bring inappropriate reading material, fireworks or aerosols to school. 8. Mobile phones, ipods and mp3 players are to be switched off before entering the school building and placed in the student’s 4


locker. They must not be switched on again until the student has left the school building. If the above items are visible to a teacher they will be confiscated (phone must include the SIM card), whether or not they are switched on, and will be kept by the Principal for one week. This time will be extended for repeated offences. 9. Vending Machine may be used at break times only and not between classes. 10. Each girl must take her turn in cleaning her classroom as per the cleaning rota. 11. The following are considered serious offences and will be dealt with accordingly: a) Taking, pushing and supplying drugs b) Taking alcohol to school, drinking alcohol on the premises or coming to school under the influence of alcohol c) Bullying d) Fighting or any behaviour that endangers another or one-self e) Pupils are forbidden to bring to school anything which might offend or cause disruption f) Smoking g) Vandalism or damage to school property h) Using offensive or vulgar language i) Leaving the school building without permission PERSONAL APPEARANCE 12. Every girl must wear full uniform as on the uniform list. While in school uniform students are to remember that they represent their school. We also expect a high standard of personal hygiene and grooming appropriate to school girls. In relation to jewellery, only one ring and one pair of stud ear-rings are allowed to be th worn. With the exception of 6 Year students make-up is not allowed. PUPILS’ PROPERTY 13. Each girl is responsible for her own personal property. Every student must have their own locker (available for 5) 14. The management accepts no responsibility for the loss of personal property and money. Books are to be locked in lockers each evening. 5


15. Money and other valuables are to be kept on one’s person, NEVER in school bags. It is advisable in the case of a large amount of money to hand it into the office for safe keeping. HOMEWORK JOURNAL 16. This homework journal must be brought to school every day where they will be inspected regularly. Students are not allowed graffiti anywhere on their journal. Parents are asked to sign the journal once a week

ESSENTIAL CONTACT PHONE NUMBER It is essential that the school has a contact phone number where a parent/guardian can be contacted during school hours. The school cannot take responsibility if the number given is incorrect or no longer in use. If a student is ill the school will phone a parent/guardian to come and collect her. In the event of an emergency where the student must be brought to hospital, parents/guardians will be informed immediately.

School Policies Due to limited space in this Student Journal we cannot print all school policies. We have however printed our Discipline Policy and a summary of our Substance Use Policy for your information. All other school policies including Attendance, Punctuality, Child Protection, Admissions, Internet Safety, Homework, RSE, SPHE etc. are available from the school on request. Translated versions of these documents are also available on request.

6


Discipline Policy Mount Carmel Secondary School sets out to promote and foster a positive learning environment for all students. In order to learn and develop, each student is entitled to be accommodated in an environment where learning can flourish, free from any behaviour which disrupts the learning process. Teachers will endeavour to promote positive discipline and learning through the praise and encouragement of their students and through insistence on a high standard of work relative to each student’s ability. Students are expected to show respect and co-operation to each other, to their Teachers and to Management. Each student is expected to adhere to the Behaviour Code as laid out as follows.

Code of Behaviour The Code of Behaviour was agreed between Parents, Teachers and the Board of Management. There are six stages which apply. The purpose of these is to help the student improve her behaviour and avoid the next stage. PROCEDURE STAGE 1:

Repeated misconduct – Letter One to Parent/ Guardian. Student’s behaviour checked on Discipline Card 1.

STAGE 2:

Continued misconduct – Letter Two to Parent/ Guardian. Student’s behaviour checked on Discipline Card 2.

STAGE 3:

Further serious offences – the student is referred by Year Head to the Deputy Principal. Letter is sent to Parents/Guardians.

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STAGE 4:

Further serious offences – the student is referred by the Deputy Principal to the Principal. Principal will contact parent/guardian. Student will be asked to remain at home until parent attends meeting the Principal. Pupil will be suspended for a period up to one week.

STAGE 5:

Further serious offences – Principal will contact parent/guardian. Student will be asked to remain at home until parent attends meeting with Principal. Pupil will be suspended for a period up to two weeks.

STAGE 6:

Further serious offences will result in recommendation to The Board that the student be excluded. From then on, Parent/Guardian will communicate with the Board of Management.

The Board of Management may be involved in this procedure at whatever stage is deemed appropriate. Abusive and/or threatening language audibly directed at a member of Management and/or Teaching Staff will warrant Suspension of up to 2 Days. Parents/Guardians will be informed in advance of the Suspension. Suspension/Exclusion may be automatic following a very serious offence irrespective of the stage the student may have reached in the disciplinary procedure. Any notice required to be given to Parent/Guardian shall be deemed duly served if sent by ordinary prepaid post to the Parents/Guardians addresses. Ratified by the Board of Management February 2007.

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Substance Use Policy This is a summary of our School Policy on Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Use. In this policy “Drug” means any substance which changes the way the body functions, mentally, physically or emotionally. The School Position • The School does not allow the possession, use or supply of illegal drugs in the school, or on outside school activities by any member of the school community. • The School does not allow the possession, use or supply of alcohol or tobacco in the school or on school activities by any student. • The School does not allow the misuse of solvent based substances. • Students may have prescribed or “over the counter” medicines for legitimate personal use only. • Parent(s)s/Guardian(s)s of a student who has a medical condition and who may have in her possession medication on an ongoing basis, must inform the school. All relevant staff members will be informed. • Not withstanding the previous paragraph and in compliance with Health & Safety requirements the school nor it’s staff will administer over the counter medication to a student. • Chemicals in school laboratories will be held under lock and key. Students will handle and use such substances only under their teacher’s supervision. Dealing with Drug Related Incidents A limited number of people will be involved in all suspected or confirmed drug incidents. People will be informed on a “need to know” basis only. All written records will be held confidentially by the Principal or Deputy Principal. Parent(s)/Guardian(s) will always be involved. They will be informed sensitively and every available support will be offered to them. If a student has a problem, then appropriate referral will be undertaken. Parent(s)/Guardian(s), staff and other students involved in the incident will be offered support. Confidentiality is a complex issue. It is important that the limits of confidentiality are discussed with students before any disclosure is made. The welfare of the students, parents/guardians and staff must be a primary focus. 92


The Principal or Deputy Principal will handle all enquires by the media. They will not comment on individual cases but will refer to the school policy and procedures in place to manage all drug related incidents. Disciplinary Procedures for Students Under our School Rules the following are considered ‘serious offences’: • • •

Smoking (this is now an offence in a ‘place of work’) Taking, pushing or supplying non-prescribed or recreational drugs or drugs to those for whom they have not been prescribed. Taking alcohol to school, drinking alcohol on the premises or coming to school under the influence of alcohol.

Smoking: parents/guardians will be informed and a minimum 2 day suspension will follow. If students are found with cigarettes and/or a lighter in their possession, these will be immediately confiscated. Alcohol: parents/guardians will be informed and a minimum 3 day suspension will follow. If students are found with alcohol in their possession, it will be immediately confiscated. Drugs: the school will investigate all those involved. Parents/guardians will be informed and asked to contact the school. If there is actual evidence of drug-taking, the Gardai/Drug Squad will be notified. The student in question may be suspended indefinitely and may only be allowed back to school provided they are participating in on-going counselling and/or appropriate treatment. The student may also receive support from the Pastoral Care team in the school. In all cases of suspicion, parents/guardians will be notified and asked to come to the school. If a student is found pushing/supplying drugs the Gardai/Drugs Squad will be informed as well as the parent(s)/guardian(s). If proven, then the student may be expelled with the sanction of the Board of Management. All staff, parents/guardians and students have a responsibility to report any suspicion of drug abuse to the Principal. th

Ratified by the Board of Management 29 May 2007. 10


Detention Record Date

Reason for Detention

Parent’s Signature

11

Teacher’s Initials


Student Self Assessment Record Fill in the result and date for each class test or exam under each subject. Irish

English

Maths

History

Sept. 1 Sept. 2 Oct. 1 Oct. 2 Nov. 1 Nov. 2 Dec. 1 Christmas Jan. 1 Jan. 2 Feb. 1 Feb. 2/ Mocks March 1 March 2 April 1 April 2 May Summer

12

Geog.

French

RE

Science


Fill in the result and date for each class test or exam under each subject. Tech.

Business

Home Ec

Art

Biology

13

Chem.

Acc

Music


School Holidays No School October Mid-Term Break No School Immaculate Conception Christmas Holidays February Mid-Term Break St. Patrick’s Day Easter Holidays May Bank Holiday No School Summer Holidays

nd

th

2 and 5 October th th 26 October – 30 October th 7 December th 8 December rd th 23 December – 6 January th th 15 February – 19 February th 17 March th th 29 March – 9 April rd 3 May th 4 May th School closes on 4 June

Parent Teacher Meetings th

6 Year st 1 Year & TY rd 3 Year th 5 Year nd 2 Year

th

Friday 16 October th Tuesday 10 November th Monday 30 November th Thursday 10 December th Thursday 14 January

1.30 – 3.30pm 1.30 – 3.30pm 4.15 – 6.45pm 4.15 – 6.45pm 4.15 – 6.45pm

Staff Meetings Friday Thursday Wednesday Tuesday nd Monday 22 Tuesday

th

28 August th 8 October nd 2 December rd 23 February March th 11 May

11.00 – 1.00pm 1.30 – 3.30pm 12.05 – 2.05pm 1.30-3.30pm 2.30 – 4.30pm 2.30 – 4.30pm

(The above dates may change due to unforeseen circumstances)

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Merit Record

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Merit Record

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y r a i d t n e d 0 1 u 0 2 t s 09 + 1 = 20 sting e r e t n i r’s a e y s i h t on s u c o f facts ions t n e v n i & s r o t n e v in

keep a rec your stud ord of y progress ! don’t forget tes to take plenty of no


: T. A. Edison use Just beca something at wh es do n't do it to d ne an pl u yo mean do doesn't . it's useless

August ‘09

Monday 24

Lundi Montag Lunes Lunedí Dé Luain

Subject

Tuesday 25

Homework

Mardi Dienstag Martes Martedì Dé Máirt

Wednesday 26

Mercredi Mittwoch Miércoles Mercoledì Dé Céadaoin

Due


Did you know? In 1846, American inventor Elias Howe (1819–1867) patented a sewing machine which used two separate threads. This created a tight lockstitch instead of the chain stitch of earlier machines that could unravel. Howe's business did not thrive. Others, like Isaac Singer made slight modifications in the machine and built successful businesses.

Thursday 27

Jeudi Donnerstag Jueves Giovedi Déardaoin

Subject

Friday 28

Homework

Vendredi Freitag Viernes Venerdì Dé hAoine

Teacher Comments

Guardian Comments

Guardian Signature

Teacher Signature

Due


: A. Einstein s If the fact e th t fi t n' do ge an ch , ry theo the facts.

Aug/Sept ‘09

Monday 31

Lundi Montag Lunes Lunedí Dé Luain

Subject

Tuesday 1

Homework

Mardi Dienstag Martes Martedì Dé Máirt

Wednesday 2

Mercredi Mittwoch Miércoles Mercoledì Dé Céadaoin

Due


Did you know?

Thursday 3

Levi Strauss (1829–1902) revolutionised the clothing industry by inventing blue jeans. Trained as a tailor in Germany, he moved to San Francisco, USA, to sell textile products to people joining the California gold rush. In 1873, Strauss and Jacob Davis patented the use of copper rivets in work jeans.

Jeudi Donnerstag Jueves Giovedi Déardaoin

Subject

Friday 4

Homework

Vendredi Freitag Viernes Venerdì Dé hAoine

Teacher Comments

Guardian Comments

Guardian Signature

Teacher Signature

Due


: B. Franklin all; to l vi ci Be sociable to iliar many; fam iend fr ; w fe h it w emy to one; en to none.

Nov/Dec ‘09

Monday 30

Lundi Montag Lunes Lunedí Dé Luain

Subject

Tuesday 1

Homework

Mardi Dienstag Martes Martedì Dé Máirt

Wednesday 2

Mercredi Mittwoch Miércoles Mercoledì Dé Céadaoin

Due


Did you know? The first automatic analogue cellular phone was made in the 1960s. Commercial models were introduced in Japan by NTT in 1979, in Scandinavia in 1981, in the USA in 1983 (by Motorola) and in Europe in the late 1980s. Early mobile FM radio telephones had been used in the USA since 1946 but technology was not advanced enough to enable many calls at once.

Thursday 3

Jeudi Donnerstag Jueves Giovedi Déardaoin

Subject

Friday 4

Homework

Vendredi Freitag Viernes Venerdì Dé hAoine

Teacher Comments

Guardian Comments

Guardian Signature

Teacher Signature

Due


A. Smith: the Science is to te do ti an t grea of on is po e th and enthusiasmon. superstiti

March ‘10

Monday 1

Lundi Montag Lunes Lunedí Dé Luain

Subject

Tuesday 2

Homework

Mardi Dienstag Martes Martedì Dé Máirt

Wednesday 3

Mercredi Mittwoch Miércoles Mercoledì Dé Céadaoin

Due


Did you know?

Thursday 4

Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) was an Italian inventor, artist and scientist. Da Vinci had an interest in engineering and made detailed sketches of the airplane, helicopter, parachute, submarine, armoured car, ballista (a giant crossbow), rapid-fire guns, centrifugal pump to drain wet areas and ball bearings.

Jeudi Donnerstag Jueves Giovedi Déardaoin

Subject

Friday 5

Homework

Vendredi Freitag Viernes Venerdì Dé hAoine

Teacher Comments

Guardian Comments

Guardian Signature

Teacher Signature

Due


: T. A. Edisonay w a e's er h "T tter to do it be find it."

May ‘10

Monday 24

Lundi Montag Lunes Lunedí Dé Luain

Subject

Tuesday 25

Homework

Mardi Dienstag Martes Martedì Dé Máirt

Wednesday 26

Mercredi Mittwoch Miércoles Mercoledì Dé Céadaoin

Due


useful info

diary content

green energy pollution

internet safety

stop bullying first aid

nutrition time management

literacy skills s study skill goal setting

SQ3R-reading

mind mapp ing

periodic table of elements physics mathematics exam timetable

timetable

he “V ision is t ing art of see le� the invisib

maps

plan your future comment

forms

r explanations fo e nc se ab notes to and from parents


: study help, games and information

ework www.nationalgeographic.com/hom

study skills: www.studygs.net

useful info

ere all young NYCI's vision is one wh red to develop persons are empowe nce to fully the skills and confide citizens in an ive act participate as y. iet soc inclusive

ools Green Sch

ternational ools is an in e Green-Sch programm n o ti tal educa d an en s m n te o ro m vi en e that pro em h sc d ar rm and aw ges long-te acknowled ronment vi en e th r on fo school acti

nd.org schoolsirela n e re .g w w w

CO ECO-UNES national is Ireland’s n organisatio l ta environmen le specialising eop for young p tion. ental educa m n ro vi en in e is ra d ote an e to prom Our aims ar tal awareness and rotection environmen mote the p ro p to and g, in vironment, understand n of the en io t of at en rv m se p n and co al develo the person te o m ro p . to ple young peo

www.youth.ie

The Nationa l Youth Healt h Programm (NYHP) wor e ks to provide a broad base flexible health d, promotion, su pport and training serv ice to youth organisation s and works to ensure that young pe ople’s health is on the policy agenda.

www.youthhe alth.ie

esco.ie www.ecoun

ce portunity to experien ldren are given the op chi y all elt t cru tha d e en sur to en ion of children and The ISPCC exists to crimination and exclus dis p sto to , ess pin love and hap en. www.ispcc.ie and injustice to childr


66 1800(free66phon66 e) calculate your ca rbon footprint

www.planet-posit ive.org

You can call Childline for a chat or to talk about any problems you might have. We are here to listen to whatever you want to say.

www.childline.ie Social Innovators! Youn g Social Innovators is a social awareness education and action programme for 15-18 year olds.Young social innovators can help cre ate a better world!

www.youngsocialinnov ators.ie

National House is The it is the re o St he T 1948, An Taisce Established in dy in Ireland. d. an el Ir r Fo Trust ental bo tial environm a high quality most influen at th is f lie be ing a Their core Ireland achiev l as to l ra nt ce el is w t en as onomy environm sustainable ec isce seeks to d an ul sf es Ta succ on y of life. An a high qualit and lead public opinion e th rm r fo fo in rs e, e at rt uc ed ung repo o Y e t. id en -w nm an Europe the enviro t (YRE) is a n e e m m am n gr ro o vi pr en tal education environmen condary schools run by se r n developed fo r informatio An Taisce. Fo taisce.org an e-mail:yre@

ce.org www.antais

provides l Youth Work Internationa ional at rn te in r s fo opportunitie le from op pe among young affect at co-operation th es su is tries on different coun . le all young peop

onal.youth.ie www.internati

and ean Union The Europ n io at in non-discrim imination,

all discr The ban on ased on imination b cr is d native including r, , skin colou ion or gender, race as su er p olitical which language, p to le is a princip ropean u nationality, E e th States of er b em M re l u s in al ere and feat Union adh gislation. le n d Europea an al n io at n

ayouth.eu www.europ


green energy

! We have to start saving energy now Running out of energy produce ourselves, get around, build things and We need energy to keep warm, feed uranium – and coal le sources of energy – oil, gas, goods. But the world’s non-renewab known ld’s wor the that Energy Agency forecasts are running short. The International rt 70% impo to have will pe Euro that years – and oil resources will have run out in 40 of its energy need by 2030. Wind power tion. The g developed that might provide a solu Climate friendly technologies are bein important and is er pow solar and r as wind, wate development of renewable energy such wind for ld EU is the leading region in the wor part of our future energy strategy. The a to d ecte conn is that propellers drive a rotor power. How does is work? Revolving – land on ther Whe gy. ener l trica energy to elec generator, which converts mechanical rate gene to ntial pote the has wind sea, – or at in fields, farms, parks or wind farms thing. good a are days tery blus So gy. ener Solar power and weather, the sun. This energy drives the climate Solar energy is energy directly from sun's the ess harn gies nolo tech gy h. Solar ener and supports virtually all life on Eart doesn't rely on and ld, wor the ss acro ing grow is er energy for practical ends. Solar pow bulk of money. In the average size home the a sunny climate for saving energy and r heaters wate r Sola ). 85% to (up r heating wate domestic energy consumption is used nd. Irela in hot water for your home here can be a cost-effective way to generate Energy saving light bulbs and the been a bright idea – for your pocket Energy saving light bulbs have always produce but , bulb dard electricity than a stan environment. They use up to 80% less the same amount of light.


get recycling

Reduce, reuse, recycle water bottles s away? Yesterday’s newspaper, empty How often do you simply throw thing ntain of waste. mou ld’s cled to help reduce the wor and drink cans can all be reused or recy tly. ourselves, it just means buying intelligen Reducing waste doesn’t mean depriving simply ugh thro tear much packaging do you have to Only buy the things you need. How . aging pack is bins of rubbish we put in our to get to the thing you bought? 50% r is just as ding the money: well filtered tap wate spen th wor not ally Sometimes it is actu fuel, and it burn to be transported in trucks that good as bottled water. It does not need is not packaged. : environmentally friendly products When you are buying goods, buy less waste and h muc of ce sour the are l labe dly • Products that have an eco-frien pollution than other products. buy loose fruit and vegetables. • Packaging can be avoided if your the product want to buy is likely to last and go for • Check how long the product you that will last longer. Think before you print! citizen uses 20kg of paper a month? Did you know that average European energy and t or email? By saving paper, you save Do you really need to print a documen tats. habi al anim and sts fore save help paper you money and by reducing demand for


pollution Clean air is vital for ou r health, but air pollution caused by ind ustry and traffic still has huge impact on the health of people in urban areas, where alm ost 80% of Europeans live these days. Polluted air is responsible for respiratory problems such as asthma and a wide range of allergies.

breathing is very important for all of us and driving cars is our biggest single air polluting activity. You can be a part of the solution!

Pollution affects the environment we live in Air pollution is caused by industry, transport, power generation and agricultu re, as well as by people in their own homes. The EU has worked hard to cut air pollution : cars now emit 90% fewer pollutants than they did 20 years ago. But air pollution is still damagin g human health and the environment, and that is why the European Commission has propose d a new strategy that will make further significant improvements to air quality by 2020. What can you do? • Most electricity and other energy comes from fossil fuels, which give off air pollution and greenhouse gases when burnt. So don’t waste energy: switch off lights, the TV, the computer and other appliances when they’re not being used, and don’t over heat your home. • Check how your home is heated. Heating with oil produces more pollution than gas. If your home uses oil but gas is available in your neighbourhood, ask you parents to consider switching. • A coal or log fire in the living room gives off a cosy glow but it pollutes the air in your neighbourhood. Try to light it only on special occasions like Christmas or New Year. • Try to use alternatives to cars whenever you can. Cycling or walking not only cuts down on air pollution and greenhouse gases but is also healthy exercise. Otherwise use public transport or share a lift to school through a carpool. • In the car, use air conditioning sparingly: it increases fuel consumption and CO2 emissions by around 5%. If you absolutely need to use the A/C, drive for a few minutes with open windows, then close them and turn on the A/C. This will save you the fuel needed to bring down the initial temperature. • Don’t burn rubbish in the garden – in many places it is illegal – and keep bonfires to a minimum. The smoke from open fires pollutes the air and contains highly toxic substanc es called dioxins.


water pollution can harm almost all forms of life it comes in contact with!

affects birds and wildlife

Water pollution Over two thirds of the Earth's surface is covered by water; less than a third is taken up by land. As Earth's population continues to grow, people are putting ever-increasing pressure on the planet's water resources. In a sense, our oceans, rivers, and other inland waters are being "squeezed" by human activities – not so they take up less room, but so their quality is reduced. Poorer water quality means water pollution. What can we do about it? There is no easy way to solve water pollution; if there were, it wouldn't be so much of a problem. Broadly speaking, there are three different things that can help to tackle the problem – Education, Laws, and Economics – and they work together as a team. • • •

Education – Making people aware of the problem is the first step to solving it. Law – Environmental laws can make it tougher for people to pollute, but to be really effective they have to operate across national and international borders. Economics – Whoever causes pollution should have to pay to clean it up, one way or another.

We know that pollution is a human problem because it is a relatively recent development in the planet's history: before the 19th century, Industrial Revolution, people lived more in harmony with their immediate environment. As industrialisation has spread around the globe, so the problem of pollution has spread with it. When Earth's population was much smaller, no one believed pollution would ever present a serious problem. It was once popularl y believed that the oceans were far too big to pollute. Whether intentional or accidental, large or small, an oil spill has the potential to cause tremendous and far-reaching damage. Oil can affect almost any form of life with which it comes in contact. Petroleum products released into the environment have an enormous impact on everything from animals to plants to people. Some creatures experience subtle changes in behaviour or short-term health problems. Some suffer immediate, acute toxic effects and even die. Others only show the effects in the long-term. The above picture shows what happens when oil and wildlife collide.


internet safety

never give your full name, address or phone number on line!

@

A uniform tie or crest can identify where you go to school

stay safe online While the internet is a great way of meeting new people who share your interests, you can’t always be sure who you are communicating with in cyberspace. In a recent study in Ireland of 9–16 year olds, 27% of the respondents said they met someone new on the Internet who asked for information like their photo, phone number, street address, or their school. One in fifteen had met in real life someone they’d first met on the Internet: most of these were positive experiences, but 11% said that the other person tried to physically hurt them. In all cases of physical and verbal abuse reported in the survey, the children said that the person who introduced themselves to them on the Internet as a child, turned out to be an adult.

• • • • • • • • • •

Never give out your full name (first and last). Don't give out your first name without checking with your parents or another adult first. Remember any information you share about yourself can be seen by anyone who is online. Don't give out your phone number. Talk to your parents (or your teacher or another adult) about the kinds of places you go and things you do and see when you are online. Pick a name – different from your real name – to use online. Before you go into a public area, like a chat room or discussion forum, decide with your parents if it is okay to give out your e-mail address. If someone online asks too many personal questions, be suspicious. Stop talking with them. Don't give out the name of your school. Always remember that people online may not be who they say they are. It is very easy for people to pretend to be someone they are not. Don't do things online that you wouldn't do in real life.


stay safe on line

never meet in person with anyone you f irst met on line!

set your page and blog on private!

cyber bullying Know what to do when cyber bullied • Ignore harassing or rude comments posted on your profile • Save or print the evidence • Tell an adult you trust Know how to prevent it • Only share your password with your parent or guardian • Change your passwords often • Set your page and blog to private • Keep your personal information private Know how much is too much • Use nicknames that don’t identify your gender, age, or location • Think before posting or sending photos - they could be used to hurt you later • Alter your pictures before you post them to remove any identifying information • Never meet in person with anyone you first met online • Don’t post provocative or ‘sexy’ photos of yourself online • Think about the real-life consequences of what you post. • • •

You wouldn’t give a stranger in the street your name, phone number and address, so don’t do it online. Avoid posting anything that would make it easy for a stranger to find you, such as where you hang out every day or after school. If you receive messages that are sexual, hostile, threatening or in any way inappropriate tell a trusted adult.


stop bullying

nasty texts are bullying

you are not alone it’s not your fault! you can do something about it!

Let’s beat bullying If you see someone being bullied and you don't do anything to help them then you're helping the bully! People who are being bullied can feel their lives are such a misery that they want to die. Often other people at school don't realise the effect that bullying has when it goes on day in, day out. Bullying makes people so upset that they often need to see a doctor. They might even try to kill themselves, or they self-harm or perhaps suffer an eating disorder, particularly if they are called names about their weight or appearance. There are usually quite a lot of pointers that someone is being bullied and if you see or hear any of them you're in a good position to help. ed How to tell if someone is being bulli g to avoid being in of time off, getting to school late, tryin lot a g takin class your in • Is anyone rooms? situations like the toilets or changing hear? es, not loudly, but so that they will over nam them g • Do you hear someone callin t them? • Are rumours being spread abou when partners are chosen in class? s thing of out left g bein • Are they htime on their own? • Are they spending break and lunc out? to do out of school and leaving them s thing • Are people organising nice nt messaging? insta by or net Inter the s and abuse on • Are they getting nasty phone text eone who is being bullied. • If so then you already know som might pick on you do something about it, the bully You might be afraid that if you you can do to help. next but there are lots of things

What you should do to help • Tell a teacher. • Go with the person being bullied and back up what they say to the teacher. • Tell the person being bullied that you'll help them to tell their parents. • Tell your parents what's happening and ask them to have a quiet word with your head of year. • Agree with your friends that you will all make it clear to the person doing the bullying that you don't like what they're doing. • Keep a diary of what you see going on so that you can give a teacher a reliable account of what has been happening. • If you tell a teacher what has happened then the bully shouldn't find out that you've done that. The teacher should be able to quietly alert other teachers and keep an eye on the situation so that the bully is caught red handed and has only themselves to blame.


Bullying can take place anywhere, in your neigh bourhood, at school, spo on your computer, or rts club, your mobile phone an d can be for different rea sons: • Homophobia (gay bul lying) is if people call you names then they might ma remarks saying that you ke nasty are gay, whether you are or not. Rumours and gos spread about you.You mig sip might be ht be picked on in this wa y because you're quiet, goo or because you have goo d looking, d friends of the same sex . • Racist bullying means you are subjected to abu se and harassment becaus colour or beliefs. e of your race, • Many pupils are being targeted in their own hom es, by phone texts, silent messenger and by abusive callsor instant websites and forums set up to cause humiliation embarrassment. Fortunate and ly, no matter how carefu l the bully is to cover his there is no hiding place /her tracks, in cyberspace and the pol ice can track their digital down to an individual com fingerprints puter or mobile phone.

they're probably very upset, If you see someone being bullied ds don't like what is going on and frien and your so make sure they know that you ask them to join your group.

bullies are weak, don’t be a bully!

don’t suffer in silence!

it’s not cool to be cruel!


what to do in an emergency

ure it make s to is safe he h t approac scene

if casualty is breathing place in recovery position

Give Emergency First Aid Use of the guide to resuscitation to assess each casualty (see below) Get Help • Don’t attempt to help if you are not sure how – you might make the situation worse. Tips • Treat the unconscious first • Never give a casualty anything to eat or drink Guide to Resuscitation • Open the airway by lifting the chin and tilting the person’s head • Check breathing – spend 10 seconds checking if the person is breathing • Look to see if chest is rising and falling • Listen for breathing • Feel for breath against your cheek • Check circulation • Look for any signs of movement • Check pulse in the neck The Recovery Position • Turn casualty onto side, protecting the face • Tilt head with the jaw forward to keep an open airway • Check casualty cannot roll forwards or backwards What to do with a Burn or Scald • Place area under cold, slow running water • Never apply plasters to burns or scalds • Seek help What to do when someone has a Broken Bone • Do not move them • Support the injured part, but do not put any pressure on it • Seek help

Don’t attempt to help if you are not sure how – you might make the situation worse


if casualty is not breathing seek help

What to do when someone is Choking • Encourage coughing • Bend casualty forward and slap sharply between the shoulder blades up to 5 times • Check mouth, remove any obvious obstruction • Seek help

join What to do when someone has a Nose Bleed • Pinch fleshy part of nose to stop bleeding n’s St. Joh • Don’t lean backwards nce • Sit straight, breathe through mouth, hold nose gently closed Ambula • Continue for 10 mins and gently let go st aid • If bleeding stops, use an ice-pack, if it continues seek medical help fir s • Avoid hot drinks for a few hours to keep temperature down course What to do when someone Feels Faint • Lean the person forward • Lower head towards knees (as the head is lowered below the heart, blood will flow to the brain) • If person becomes unconscious from fainting • Put them in the recovery position • Keep the victim lying down with head lowered and legs elevated • Loosen any tight clothing • Apply cool, damp cloths to face and neck Meningitis Meningitis is extremely dangerous and can be fatal if not treated quickly. It is highly infectious and is spread through coughing and sneezing. Early Signs • Fever • Pain and stiffness in joints • Nausea and vomiting • Drowsiness

Serious symptoms • Rash (pale, blotchy skin) • Eyes severely sensitive to light • Disorientation • Severe headaches

courses throughout the country. St. John’s Ambulance holds First Aid 7 Street Upper, Dublin 4 (01) 668807 St. John’s Ambulance, 29 Leeson


teen nutrition

eat better, look better, feel better!

8 tips for eating well A healthy balanced diet contains a variety of types of food, including lots of fruit, vegetables and starchy foods such as wholemeal bread and wholegrain cereals; some proteinrich foods such as meat, fish, eggs and lentils; and some dairy foods. 1. Base your meals on starchy foods 2. Eat lots of fruit and veg

5. Try to eat less salt – no more than 6gm a day 6. Get active and try to be a healthy weight

3. Eat more fish

7. Drink plenty of water

4. Cut down on saturated fat and sugar 8. Don't skip breakfast

Eating for exams Feeling tired and stressed? You're not the only one. But it might not just be your looming exams – it's possible you're not getting enough iron in your diet. When you're short of iron – known as iron deficiency – it isn't pleasant. The symptoms can include: tiredness and lethargy, difficulty concentrating and shortened attention span – not good news if you're trying to revise – looking pale and feeling faint/breathless, and the news gets worse. Because if you've got iron deficiency and you don't do anything about it, you could end up with anemia. But don't worry, the news isn't all bad, because it's easy to get enough iron. Young women should be having 14.8 milligrams (mg) iron a day (men need 8.7mg a day). You can easily pump up your iron stores, but first you need to know which foods are rich in iron: beef and other red meat such as lamb, pork, offal are rich in iron that is easy for the body to absorb. The darker the meat, the more iron it contains: chicken contains some iron – choose leg meat rather than breast meat if you want to get more iron. Other sources include baked beans, boiled eggs, canned sardines or other oily fish and mussels, breakfast cereals with added vitamins and minerals, green leafy vegetables, such as watercress, kale, spring greens and broccoli, dried fruit such as raisins, figs, apricots and prunes, wholemeal bread, lentils, beans and peas, nuts such as peanuts, cashew nuts, almonds and brazils, seeds such as sesame and sunflowe r. Eating fresh fruit or salad vegetables (including tomatoes) or drinking fruit juice (all of which contain vitamin C) with meals helps the body absorb the iron in food.


the eatwell plate

The eatwell plate shows how much of what you eat should come from each food group. This includes everything you eat during the day, including snacks.You don’t need to get the balance right at every meal. But try to get it right over time such as a whole day or week.

So, try to eat:

chy foods atoes, pasta and other star plenty of bread, rice, pot enever you can wholegrain varieties wh

– choose

bles plenty of fruit and vegeta

Try to choose options that are lower in fat, salt and sugar when you can.

ds some milk and dairy foo ns and other non-dairy some meat, fish, eggs, bea

sources of protein

and/or sugar ds and drinks high in fat just a small amount of foo

Healthy weight It's not a good idea to be either underweight or overweight. Eating too much can make you overweight, which can lead to ill health, such as heart disease, high blood pressure or diabetes. Not eating as much food as your body needs could also affect your health. If you're concerned about your weight, get in touch with your GP or a dietitian. But if you just need to lose a little weight, try taking part in sport or just getting physically active to help you burn off excess calories and maintain your body weight. It will also help reduce your risk of many diseases, such as heart disease.

But remember to check with your

GP before starting a new exercise programme, particularly if you haven't exercise d for some time.


time management green energyskills create a study environment

Spend Time Wisely: rything done. e.g. use ntly to ensure you get eve cie effi e tim r you e Us • ework. day to study or do hom rt and the "free classes" during the this gives you a head sta as ed, ign ass are y the as n soo as ts jec pro • Work on ns. opportunity to ask questio ng up wastes time. chi cat e; ignments, practices • Arrive at class on tim at all times and record ass you h wit r nne pla l oo • Keep your sch n as you get them. ing to and appointments as soo an opportunity. Avoid hav jects whenever you have pro erm g-t lon ad. on rk ahe • Wo didn’t plan they are due because you at "cram" the night before will have less work to do you t tha so l oo sch in ed vid ad. pro es ahe d iliti rea fac iew notes or • Use the study lar project to work on, rev ticu par a e . hav ork ’t ew don hom you home. If uble with a project or help if you are having tro assignments • Ask the teacher for s out on discussions and mis l l if possible, as you wil oo sch g sin mis id Avo • do when you return. and still have the work to

lp k, as this will he your homewor do to d an y At Home: ch night to stud specific time ea een • Set aside a ute break betw routine. clude a ten-min a in d ish an bl y, ta ud es st u yo of time to e-hour blocks the work you • Schedule on ingly. Try to do rd co ac r. an pl d blocks. ill take an ork will be easie each project w e rest of the w th ng d lo an . w e TV ho g tim e in y at watch your stud • Estim on the phone or the beginning of te time talking as find hardest at w t . n’ em do ; th ay e u complet k straight aw t Planner as yo • Get to wor in your Studen ts ec the hardest. oj d pr fin f u of • Cross e subjects yo th ng yi ud st e ng e tim day. • Spend mor them. By breaki red in class each d having to rush t you have cove oi av ha w to ts ew vi . ec ss oj Re stre • erm pr sier and reduce work on long-t make the job ea ill • Continue to w it s, sk ta r alle them up into sm day, you can plan Keep a ‘To Do’ List gs you need to do every thin the of list a ng tisi ori the list. This will give By compiling and pri plete a task, cross it off com you As k. tas h eac te your productivity. time to comple , and a visible measure of ent hm plis om acc of se sen you a real


write page number, subject, reference and date on each page of notes

take plenty of notes

How to Create a ‘To Do’ List • Every morning, list the tasks you have to do that day. Avoid including routine things that you are not likely to forget. • Rank each task in order of priority, listing what you have to do first, seco nd, third, and so forth. • Complete the tasks according to their priority, and cross them off on com pletion. Utilise Your Student Planner • On a daily basis, record all assignme nts and their due dates. • Record long-term assignments in several places including the day they are given, the day they are due, and on various pages in-be tween as reminders. • Record times and dates of meetings , sports, rehearsals and other appointm ents as soon as you find out about them. • Use the yearly planner to record important dates such as birthdays, anniv ersaries, and holidays. Listening Skills • Speed up your writing by using abbr eviations and symbols. Keep your syste ms simple so you can easily understand your note s. • Listen out for important ‘cues’. Teac hers will often signal specific informati on that you should take note of. Pay particular atten tion to the following types of phrases: "This is an important topic," "Listen to what I have to say," "Let’s go over this once mor e," "Don’t forget this subject," "This will be in your test". • Listen intently during class and keep your thoughts on the topic being discu ssed. If you don’t understand, ask the teacher to explain the material again or in another way. Note Taking Skills • Use a pen or pencil that doesn’t smear. • Write the page number, subject, and date on each page of notes. • Keep all your subject notes toge ther. • Use highlighters or a red pen to mark different topics. • Record new vocabulary terms. • Evaluate what you read or hear before writing it down. • Try to keep up, and catch up as soon as possible if you fall behind. • Learning to take good notes can be a great help when it comes to revis ing for exams.


literacy skills te of o n a e mak ks in boo s d r o w ant to you w ber remem

you will be awarded extra marks in exams for the accuracy of your spelling

Spelling Rules You CAN improve your spelling. As you will be awarded marks on your final exams for the accuracy of your spelling then it is worth spending time trying to improve it. If you have been told that your spelling is poor, do not despair; be positive and adopt some of the methods shown here. Methods to use Method 1 – Method 2 –

Method 3 – Method 4 –

Rather than trying to memorise a long list of 'difficult' words, make you own list of words you want to remember. Write down words you mis-spell. To learn each one; look at it carefully, say it out aloud, cover it up, and then write down without looking at your original. Check and repeat if necessary. Learn groups of words with the same combination of letters. Learn how words are built up e.g. DIS + APPOINT + MENT = DISAPPOINTMENT.

Some spelling rules to learn Rule 1 – Examples: Rule 2 – Examples: Rule 3 – Examples:

'c' or when sounded as 'a'. 'i' before 'e' except immediately after Receive / Neighbour. consonant for words ending in more than one t. do not double the final consonan . Walk – Walked / Prompt – Prompted for words ending in soft 'ce' or 'ge' '. keep the 'e' before the 'able' and 'ous le. Advantageous / Noticeab

Examples:

ng to 'y' for verbs ending in 'ie' change the endi before adding 'ing'. Die – Dying / Lie – Lying.

Rule 5 – Examples:

nning with a vowel. drop the final 'e' before a suffix begi ving. Wea – Race – Racing / Weave

Rule 6 – Examples:

ning with a consonant. keep the final 'e' before a suffix begin eful. Peac Fierce – Fiercely / Peace –

Rule 4 –

Unfortunately each rule has a few exceptions


The 8 Parts of language

Whether you are writing essays, repo rts, or in later life, your CV, learning the eight parts of language on this page will serve you well. Noun

Examples:

A Noun is the word we use to identify a person, place, object or idea. Common nouns refer to any of the above, whereas proper nouns refer to any particular person, place, object or idea. Common Nouns Proper Nouns boy, shop, table, dream Sally, Dublin, Port Tunnel

Pronoun Examples:

A Pronoun is a word used in the place of one or more nouns. You are surely the nicest person I know. After reading the leaflet, Helen threw it into the bin.

Adjective

An Adjective qualifies a noun or pronoun. It describes size, colour, how many, which one, whose, or what kind. An old man shouted from an upper window of the terraced house.

Examples: Verb Examples: Adverb Examples:

Preposition Examples:

A Verb is a word which expresses action or state of being. The tense of the verb shows the time of that action or state. He ran to the shops. (Past) I feel cold. (Present) We will leave next week. (Future) An Adverb is used to modify a verb, an adjective or another adverb. It expresses in what manner, when, where, and how much. The man spoke loudly. (Modifies the verb spoke) He was very annoyed. (Modifies the adjective annoyed) He spoke too quickly. (Modifies the adverb quickly) A Preposition shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and some other word in a sentence, making the meaning clear. She waited beside the lift. The cow jumped over the moon.

Conjunction Examples:

Conjunctions (or connectives) join words or groups of words. Work with care and do not worry. Although it was dark, we continue d our search.

Interjection

Interjections are used to express feeling and emotion. They are often identified by the use of an exclamation mark. Help! I'm slipping. But then, alas, he fell into the pond.

Examples:

learn the 8 parts of language

they will help you with everything you write


study skills

take notes as an; much as you c rget it’s easy to fo what you’ve learned

I hear: I forget I see: I remem be I do: I underst r and

Where to Study Find a quiet place to study and do your homework. Do not listen to the radio or television while studying, as it is distracting. Always study in the same place, preferab ly in a well-lit area. Sit in a straight-backed chair near natural light if possible. Assemble and keep your study supplies to hand. These may include a dictionary, calculator, ruler, pens, pencils, erasers, paper, paper clips, note cards, highlighters. Keep your study area clean, tidy and well organised. Learning While You Read • Try to actively learn while you read, and think about what you are reading. If the material is hard to understand, stop after a few paragraphs and summarise, either out loud or by taking notes. If you are still having difficulties, read the section again slowly and look up words you do not understand. • Grasp the context of what you are reading from groups of words, rather than individual words. • Don’t move your lips when reading as it slows you down. • Don’t follow the text with your fingers, as this also slows you down and can make it harder to understand the material. • Read a variety of different materials and books. The more you read, the easier and more enjoyable it becomes. • Summarise the material you read in your own words, as this will help you remember the content when you are revising the notes later on. • Look at photos, charts, maps, or illustrations that accompany the text to help you understand the material. • Before you begin a textbook assignment, look at the questions, and you will then be able to focus on finding the answers as you read.

Six Quick Study Tips: your notes something off-by-heart, try to condense • CONDENSE:When you’ve learned er to learn. again leaving only the topics that are hard be questions within the time you would exam g doin tice prac • EXAM QUESTIONS: expected to do them in the exam. own voice can es and points on tape – listening to your • RECORD: e.g. put important quot help you memorise them! y sessions time to relax and unwind between stud • RELAX: It is very important to take and on the night before exams. can help you recall them. • TALK: Reading your notes out loud n you don’t and see what you can remember whe try • TEST: when you’ve studied a topic have your notes to look at!


goal setting

highlight subjects in different colours so it is easy to f ind them Setting personal goals and planning how to accomplis h your goals are proven achieving success. Goal set methods of ting can help you get bet ter grades, save time, red increase self-esteem. On uce stress, and ce you know what your goals are, you can devise to achieve them. and follow a plan Examples of Goal Settin g • Short-term goals e.g . get a "B" or better on the next French test; tidy my • Long-term goals e.g. bedroom. look at college brochures ; make a list of interesting • Long-term quarterly courses. or yearly goals e.g. read Ulysses. • Make your goals spe cific e.g. walk for 20 min ute s a day, NOT exercise mo • Make your goals rea re. listic, e.g. don’t watch tele vision on Wednesday nig watch television. Stick to hts , NOT never fulfilling your potential, not other people’s expectatio • Establish a time line by asking yourself when ns. you want the goal to be the steps you need to tak accomplished and e to achieve your goal. Steps to Achieving You r Goals Step 1 Step 2

Step 3 Step 4

Step 5

Decide what is important to you and make a list of these things. Better grades Sports achievements? To ? attend a particular colleg e? and so forth. When you have establish ed what’s important, set out your personal goals. long-term goals on the yea Write rly calendar pages of you r Student Planner and sho term goals on the weekl rty calendar pages. Plan how to achieve you r goals, and decide what you need to do each we order to achieve them. ek in Follow through on the goa ls you have set, and when you score a goal, celebrate some small way! Reaching a goal is an important ach in ievement. It will also hel learn what works well for p you you by reviewing the ste ps you took that helped achieve it. you Continue to plan and rev ise your goals, making sur e they are realistic.


SQ3R-reading r o othe t t a h c about s t n e d stu learned e v ’ u o what y

SQ3R = survey! question! read! recite! review!

SQ3R – survey, reading and study skill system SURVEY – gather the information necessary to focus and formula te goals. Read the title – help your mind prepare to receive the subject at hand. Read the introduction and/or summary – orient yourself to how this chapter fits the author's purposes, and focus on the author's statement of most important points. Notice each bold heading and subheading-organise your mind before you begin to read – build a structure for the thoughts and details to come. Notice any graphics – charts, maps, diagrams, etc. are there to make a point – don't miss them. Notice reading aids – italics, bold print, chapter objective, end-of-chapter questions are all included to help you sort, comprehend, and remember. QUESTION – help your mind engage and concentrate. One section at a time, turn the bold heading into as many questions as you think will be answered in that section. The better the questions, the better your compreh ension is likely to be. You may always add further questions as you proceed. When your mind is actively searching for answers to questions it becomes engaged in learning. READ – fill in the information around the mental structures you've been building. Read each section (one at a time) with your questions in mind. Look for the answers, and notice if you need to make up some new questions. RECITE – retrain your mind to concentrate and learn as it reads. After each section – stop, recall your questions, and see if you can answer them from memory. If not, look back again (as often as necessary) but don't go on to the next section until you can recite. REVIEW – refine your mental organisation and begin building memor y. Once you've finished the entire chapter using the preceding steps, go back over all the questions from all the headings. See if you can still answer them. If not, look back and refresh your memory, then continue. ANT. REMEMBER: THE INFORMATION YOU GAIN FROM READING IS IMPORT IF YOU JUST "DO IT" WITHOUT LEARNING SOMETHING, YOU'RE WASTING A LOT OF TIME. TRAIN YOUR MIND TO LEARN!!!


mind mapping Mind Mapping helps you to see relationships, connections and patterns in your ideas – thereby improving your efficiency.

e creativ be as can as you Mind Mapping is something that will increase the quality of your thin king and help you to do better in your studies, tests and exams. You will learn how to Mind Map which will give you a visual represen tation of any subject matter, show ing you the key points and the connections betw een them, making it highly memorab le. How to do a Mind Map Mind Mapping involves writing down a central idea and thinking up new and related ideas which radiate out from the centre. By focu ssing on key ideas written down in your own words, and then looking for branches out and conn ections between the ideas, you are map ping knowledge in a manner which will help you unde rstand and remember new informati on. Look for relationships Use lines, colours, arrows, branches or some other way of showing conn ections between the ideas generated on your Mind Map. Thes e relationships may be important in you understanding new information or in constructing a structured essay plan. By personal ising the map with your own symbols and designs, you will be constructing visual and meaning ful relationships between ideas which will assist in your recall and understanding. Write down key ideas Some students find that using capital letters encourages them to get dow n only the key points. Capitals are also easier to read in a diagram.You may, however, wish to writ e down some explanatory notes in lower case. Som e students do this when they revisit the mind map at a later date while others write in such things as assessment criteria in this way. Put main idea in the centre Most students find it useful to turn their page on the side and do a Mind Map in "landscape" style. With the main idea or topic in the middle of the page this gives the maximum space for other ideas to radiate out from the centre. Leave lots of space Some of the most useful Mind Maps are those which are added to over a period of time. After the initial drawing of the Mind Map you may wish to highlight thing s, add information or add questions for the duration of a subject right up until exam time. For this reason it is a good idea to leave lots of space.


H

1.0079

89 - 103

**Actinides

57 - 71

*Lanthanoids

Radium

Francium

[226]

Ra

88

Barium

[223]

Caesium

Fr

87

Ba

137.33

Cs

56

Strontium

132.91

Rubidium

55

Sr

87.62

Rb

85.468

Calcium

37

38

40.078

Potassium

20

Ca

39.098

K

19

Magnesium

Sodium

24.305

Mg

12

Na

22.990

Beryllium

Lithium

9.0122

Be

4

Li

6.941

Hydrogen

11

3

1

Sc

44.956

Zr

91.224

Titanium

Hf

178.49

[262]

Pa

231.04

Protactinium

91

Praseodymium

Pr

140.91

Dubnium

Db

105

Mo

95.94

W

183.84

[266]

144.24

Nd

92

Uranium

U

238.03

Neodymium

60

Seaborgium

Sg

106

Tungsten

74

Molybdenum

42

Chromium

Cr

51.996

Mn

54.938

Tc

[98]

Pm

[145]

Bohrium

Bh

[264]

Rhenium

Np

[237]

Neptunium

93

Promethium

61

186.21

Re 107

75

Technetium

43

Ru

101.07

Iron

Fe

Sm

150.36

Hassium

Hs

[269]

Osmium

Pu

[244]

Ir

192.22

151.96

Eu Am

[243]

Americium

95

Europium

63

Meitnerium

Mt

[268]

Iridium 109

77

Rhodium

Rh

102.91

Cobalt

Co

58.933

Pd

106.42

Nickel

Ni

58.693

Pt

195.08

157.25

Gd 96

Curium

Cm

[247]

Gadolinium

64

Damstadtium

Ds

[271]

Platinum 110

78

Palladium

46

28 63.546

158.93

Bk

[247]

Terbium

Tb

Berkelium

97

65

Roentgenium

Rg

[272]

Gold

Au

196.97

Silver

Ag

107.87

Copper

Cu

111

79

47

29

Noble gases

Non metals

Cd

112.41

Zinc

Zn

65.39

200.59

162.50

Dy Cf

[251]

Californium

98

Dysprosium

66

Ununbium

Uub

[285]

Mercury

Hg 112

80

Cadmium

48

30

Al

26.982

Boron

B

10.811

69.723

164.93

Es

[252]

Holmium

Ho

Einsteinium

99

67

Ununtrium

Uut

[284]

Thallium

Tl

204.38

Indium

In

114.82

Gallium

Ga

113

81

49

31

Aluminium

13

5

Atomic weights (mean relative masses): elements for which the atomic weight is given within square brackets have no stable nuclides and are represented by the element’s longest lived isotope.

Plutonium

94

Samarium

62

190.23

Os 108

76

45

27

Xx Synthetic 55.845

Ruthenium

44

26

Xx Solid

Manganese

25

Xx Liquid

Note: Symbols and names: the symbols and names of the elements, and their spellings are those recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Names have yet to be proposed for the most recently discovered elements 112 118 so those used here are the temporary systematic names.

Thorium

Actinium

232.04

Th

90

Ac

[227]

Cerium

89

Ta

180.95

Niobium

Nb

92.906

Tantalum

73

41

24

Xx Gas

50.942

V

Poor metals

Alkali earth metals

Transition metals Rare earth metals

Other Non-metals

Alkali metals

State at standard temperature and pressure (0 °C and 1 atm)

Vanadium

23

140.12 59

Lanthanum

58

Rutherfordium

Rf

[261]

Hafnium

104

72

Zirconium

40

Ti

47.867

Ce

138.91

**

*

Yttrium

Y

88.906

22

La

57

39

Scandium

21

Element Name

Symbol

Atomic No. Atomic Weight

KEY

periodic table of elements

Ge

72.61

Silicon

Si

28.086

Carbon

C

12.011

118.71

P

30.974

Nitrogen

N

14.007

Sb

121.76

Arsenic

As

74.922

Bi

208.98

[288]

Bismuth 115

83

Antimony

51

33

Phosphorus

15

7

Se

78.96

Sulphur

S

32.065

Oxygen

O

15.999

Po

[209]

Tellurium

Te

127.60

116

[292]

Polonium

84

52

Selenium

34

16

8

167.26

Er

Fermium

Fm

[257]

Erbium 100

68

Ununquadium

168.93

Mendelevium

Md

[258]

Thulium

Tm 101

69

Ununpentium

173.04

Yb [259]

Nobelium

No

102

Ytterbium

70

Ununhexium

Uuq Uup Uuh

[289]

Lead

Pb

207.2

Tin

Sn

114

82

50

Germanium

32

14

6

F

18.998

174.967

Lu

Lawrencium

Lr

[262]

Lutetium 103

71

Ununseptium

Uus

[?]

Astatine

At

[210]

Iodine

I

126.90

Bromine

Br

79.904

Chlorine

Cl

35.453

Fluorine

117

85

53

35

17

9

4.0026

Ununoctium

Uuo

[ 294 ]

Radon

Rn

[222]

Xenon

Xe

131.29

Krypton

Kr

83.80

Argon

Ar

39.948

Neon

Ne

20.180

Helium

He

118

86

54

36

18

10

2


heat Specific heats of common materials in

J ---------------------------kg.K

Water . . . . . . .4190

Steam . . . . . .2100

Glass . . . . . . . .669

Brass . . . . .385

Alcohol . . . . .2450

Aluminium . . . .920

Iron . . . . . . . . .450

Silver . . . . .235

Ice . . . . . . . . .2090

Carbon . . . . . . .710

Copper . . . . . .380

Lead . . . . . .130

astronomy Measurements of Astronomy: Measurement

Earth

Sun

Moon

mass (m)

5.98 x 10 24 kg

1.99 x 10 30 kg

7.35 x 10 22 kg

radius (r)

6378 km

6.96 x 10 5 km

1.738 x 10 3 km

average density

5.52 g/cm

1.42 g/cm

3.34 g/cm 3

3

3

physics equations weight = mass x gravity moment of a force = force x perpendicular distance

force pressure = ---------------------------area

liquid pressure = density x gravity x height potential energy = mass x gravity x height voltage (v) = current (1) x resistance (R) m

Density: d = ----------

voltage resistance = ---------------------------current

Kinetic Energy: K.E. = 1/2 m x v 2

v

m is mass; v is volume.

m is mass; v is velocity.

Distance: d = v x t

Work: W = f x d

v is velocity; t is time.

f is force; d is distance.

(vf-vi)

Acceleration: a = ---------------t

vf is final velocity; vi is initial velocity; t is time.

W

Power: P = ---------- W is work; t is time. t

P = V xI

V is voltage; I is Current.

Force: F= m x a

Momentum: p = m x v

m is mass; a is acceleration.

m is mass; v is velocity.


mathematics o

Triangles & Angles: The three angles of a triangle add up to 180° Equilateral Triangle:

Isosceles Triangle:

Scalene Triangle:

all sides of equal length; all angles of equal degrees

two sides of equal length; two angles of equal length

no sides equal; no angles equal

Right Triangle:

Pythagorean Theorem:

Acute angle:

one angle is 90°

sides a and b are legs; side c is hypotenuse; a2 + b2 = c2

less than 90°

(applies only to right angle triangles)

Right angle: equals 90°

Obtuse angle:

Straight angle: equals 180°

more 90° but less than 180°

Complete angle rotation:

Complimentary angles:

Supplementary angles:

equals 360°

two angles up to 90°

two angles up to 180°

a= b angles subtended on the same arc AB

C is the centre of the circle

Circle Theorems:

x = 90° PQ is diameter


calculating area S = side

L = length

W = width

H = height

B = base

Square: S2

Triangle: 1/2 B x H

Rectangle: L x H

Parallelogram: B x H

Circle: R2

Trapezoid: 1/2 (B1 + B2) H

R = radius

surface area and volume Surface Area: Find the area of each face and add together. Volume of Prisms: Find the area of the base (B) and multiply by the height (H). Cube: volume (V) =S3

Rectangular Prism: V = L x W x H

Triangular Prism: Volume = 1/2 length x width x height

Cylinder: V= R2H Surface area (sa) = 2



R +2RH 2

Volume of Pyramids: Find the area of the base (B), multiply by height (H), and divide by 3.

Square Pyramid: V= 1/3 BH

Rectangular Pyramid: V= 1/3 BH

Triangular Pyramid: V= 1/3 BH

Cone: V= 1/3

R H 2

R

Sphere: Volume (V) = 4/3

Remember:

3

The answers to surfac e area problems are lab elled as square units (un 2 The answers to volum its ). e problems are labelle d as cubic units (units3 ).


trigonometry r = hypotenuse

x = adjacent

y = opposite

Cast:

S

Quad II sin +

Quad I all ratios +

A

T

Quad III tan +

Quad IV cos +

C

sin  = y/r (opposite/hypotenuse) = 1/csc 

cos  = x/r (adjacent/hypotenuse) = 1/sec  tan  = (opposite/adjacent) = 1/cot 

sin  = y/r (opposite/hypotenuse) = 1/csc 

cos  = x/r (adjacent/hypotenuse) = 1/sec  tan  = (opposite/adjacent) = 1/cot  Law of sines:

a/sinA = b/sinB = c/sinC

Law of cosines: a2 = b2 + c2 - 2bc cos A b2 = a2 + c2 - 2ac cos B c2 = a2 + b2 - 2ab cos C

S.S.S. (Side, Side, Side)

ABC ≅ DEF

S.A.S. (Side, Angle, Side)

ABC ≅ KLM

A.S.A. (Angle, Side, Angle)

ABC ≅ QRS

H.S. (Hypotenuse, Side)

ABC ≅ XYZ sin (A+B) = sin A cos B + cos A sin B sin (A-B) = sin A cos B - cos A sin B sin 2A = 2 sin A cos A sin 1/2A =  (1- cos A)/2 cos (A+B) = cos A cos B - sin A sin B cos (A-B) = cos A cos B + sin A sin B

cos 2A = cos2 A - sin2 A cos 1/2A =  (1+ cos A)/2 tan (A+B) = (tan A + tan B)/(1- tan A tan B) tan 2A = 2tanA/1 - tan2 (A) tan 1/2 A =  (1- cos A)/(1 + cos A) = (1- cos A)/sin A = sin A/(1 + cos A)


algebra

Quadratic Equation: if ax2 + bx + c = 0 - bb2-4ac x = _______________ 2a

Equations of a Line: (m=slope; b=y intercept) Slope – Intercept Form:

Slope of a Line:

y= mx + b

m=

Point – Slope Form:

y2 - y1

______

(y - y1) = m (x - x1)

x2 - x1

Variation Models: For variables x,y, and z where k is a positive constant called the constant of variation... Direct Variation: y= kx or y/x = k Inverse Variation: y= k/x or xy = k Joint Variation: z= kxy

Law of Exponents: If a, bR, a, b ≥ 0, and p, q, r, s are Q, then; 1) ar as = ar+ s

5) (a/b)r = ar / br (b  0)

2) ar as = ar - s

6) a° = 1(a  0)

3) (ar )s = ar s

7) a-r = 1/ar (a  0)

4) (ab)r = ar br

8) ar/s = sar = (sa)r

Logarithms:

Special Products:

Log xr = r Log x

(a-b)2=a2-2ab+b2

Log (xy) = Log x + Log y

(a+b)2=a2+2ab+b2

Log (x/y)=Log x - Log y

(a-b)(a+b)=a2-b2

Log x=n

a(b+c)=ab+ac

Log ax=n Ln x=n

 

x=10n(Common log) x=an(Log to the base a) x=en(Natural log)

3.14159265 2.71828183

(a+b)(c+d)=ac+ad+bc+bd (a+b)3=a3+3a2b+3ab2+b3 (a+b)(a+c)=a2+ac+ab+bc (a-b)3=a3-3a2b+3ab2-b3


equivalences Metric System: Basic Unit

Length metre(m)

Volume Litre(l)

Weight gram(g)

x10 x100 x1000 #10 #100 #1000

decametre(dam) hectometre(hm) kilometre(km) decimetre(dm) centimetre(cm) millimetre(mm)

decalitre(dal) hectolitre(hl) kilolitre(kl) decilitre(dl) centilitre(cl) millilitre(ml)

decagram(dag) hectogram(hg) kilogram(kg)* decigram(dg) centigram(cg) milligram(mg)

*a metric ton is 1000 kilograms

Length/Distance

Area

Weight

1 foot = 12 inches 1 yard = 36 inches 1 mile = 1760 yards 1.5 miles = 1 nautical mile 3 miles = 1 league

1 acre = 4840 sq. yards 1 sq. mile = 640 acres 1 sq. foot = 144 sq. inches 1 sq. yard = 9 sq. feet 1 sq. metre = 10,000 sq. cm.

1 pound = 16 ounces 1 ton = 2240 pounds 1 stone = 14 pounds 1 gram = 1000 milligrams 1 kilogram = 1000 grams

converting measures Length/Distance: From . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .To . . . . . . . . . . . . .Multiply by cm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.3937 in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .cm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.54 m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2808 ft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.3048 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .mi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.6214 mi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.609

roman numerals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VIII

9 10 20 30 40 50 60 70

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XXX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LXX

80 90 100 200 400 500 600 700

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LXXX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DCC


exam timetable date

subject and paper

time


Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

study timetable


Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

study timetable


map of europe

Bulgaria Capital: Sofia Size: 110,910 km2 Population: 7,642882 Language: Bulgarian Religion: 82.6% Bulgarian Orthodox Church, 11% Islam, 6.4% Roman Catholic. Currency: Euro GDP - per capita purchasing power â‚Ź11,800


Romania Capital: Bucharest Size: 238,392 km2 Population: 22,276,056 Language: Romanian Religion: 82.6% Romanian Orthodox Church, Roman Catholic. Currency: Euro GDP - per capita purchasing power â‚Ź11,989


Dublin

GALWAY

SHANNON

A

53°

ATLANTIC OCEAN

FROM

N59

Dromore West

Galway

y

Strandhill L.Gill Sligo

Drumcliff N16

A4

ManorhamiltoL. n Macnean Dromahair

nn on

a

Sh

Dublin Britain

Ba

FROM

la ns

an n

Sh

KNOCK

Easkey

Grange

Sligo B ay A4

FERMANAGH

Er ne

A6

A4

Aughnacloy

M1

A3

ARMAGH

M2

A26

A1

Dublin

Str a

Bangor Newtownards

Ballinahinch

Hillsborough

Lisburn

DOWN

Banbridge

A1

o st L lfa Be

Whitehead

Larne

Carrickfergusugh

Belfast

A26

Lurgan Tandragee

Armagh

A3

Portadown

A29

Antrim

L. Neagh

Magherafelt

Ballyclare

Ballymena

A2

Cushendun Cushendall

Carnlough

A2

ANTRIM

Ballymoney

Coleraine

Kilrea

Cookstown

Dungannon

Emyvale

r wate

A5

Omagh

A505

TYRONE

Black

Dromore

Enniskillen

A32

LowerIrvinestown L. Erne

A32

A5

DERRY

Dungiven

A29

Limavaddy

A2

Ballycastle

Ba

nn

Bar

row

BELFAST

Britain Europe N. America

54°

DUN LAOGHAIRE

Europe N. America

Britain

DUBLIN

Liverpool & 53° Holyhead

FROM Douglas

DUBLIN

FROM Holyhead

FROM

Liverpool & Holyhead

FROM Douglas

DUBLIN

Portaferry

Donaghadee

FROM

BELFAST

FROM Stranraer Douglas Heysham Liverpool

St. John's Pt.

SEA

LARNE FROM Stranraer Cairnryan Fleetwood

55°

BALLYCASTLE FROM Campbeltown

Downpatrick

IRISH SEA

Monaghan Keady A28 Newcastle Derrylin Upper N54 N54 Clones Newry Swanlinbar Collooney N2 L. Erne Inishcrone Bangor Erris SLIGO Ballyconnell MONAGHAN N59 Crossmolina Belturbet Warrenpoint L. Allen Castleblayney N17 Ballina A1 Dee N4 Castlebaldwin Ca l L. Blacksod Bay rl Kilkeel Tubbercurry Carlingford ingfo N3 L. N57 Ballymote Arrow N59 Ballinamore Iniskeen Cootehill rd Drumshanbo L. Conn Foxford L. Oughter Achill Hd. L Key Dundalk Keel Shercock y LEITRIM Cashel Cavan Mo Boyle M1 Carrickmacross MAYO Charlestown Dundalk Achill Island Carrick-on-Shannon N52 Mulrany L.Gara CAVAN Bay Swinford Kingscourt N5 LOUTH Newport N5 N55 N3 Virgini a N17 Ardee Dunany Pt. Castlebar Clare Island Clew Bay Dunleer ROSCOMMON L. Gowna L. Sheelin M1 Westport N60 Strokestown Knock Bl N52 Granard N2 ac Roonah Quay kw Castlerea N5 Louisburgh LONGFORD at Kells N60 Ballyhaunis Claremorris Slane er Inishturk Edgeworthstown Drogheda Longford L. Carra N3 N51 Newgrange N60 N59 M1 Inishbofin N17 Castlepollard N55 Navan L. Derravaragh Lanesborough Leenáun N51 Renvyle N83 Roscommon Ballinrobe Balbriggan N4 L. Mask Athboy N84 M1 MEATH Skerries Cleggan Letterfrack Ballymahon e Clonbur N2 Trim Cong N61 Rush N63 yn o Mullingar Tuam L. Ree N55 B Lambay N3 Clifden Headford Sraith Salach Mount Bellew N59 N4 Island Swords WESTMEATH L. Corrib (Recess) Ballyconneely L. Ennel l Malahide N63 N59 Maynooth N17 Kinnegad Oughterard DUBLIN Athlone M4 N52 Roundstone Howth GALWAY Howth Hd. M50 N6 Moate Dublin Cárna (Carna) Kilbeggan Bay Clane Athenry Ballinasloe Edenderry Dun Laoghaire N6 Salthill iffey An Cheathrú Rua (Carraroe) Inverin ClonmacnoiseTullamore KILDARE L N7 Tallaght N6 Ros an Mhil (Rossaveal) An Spidéal Oranmore na Droichead Nua Golam Hd. Kilreekill Bros OFFALY N52 Naas Bray (Spiddal) M7 (Newbridge) Enniskerry Portarlington Galway Bay Kildare Banagher Kilcormac Loughrea Blessington N18 Greystones N66 kw g Cliffs of Moher Lacken LONGFORD Inishmore a Portumna Kells t Reservoir N60 Ballyhaunis M9 Claremorri s Slane er N7 Ballyvaughan Inishturk Edgeworthstown Drogheda LongfordBirr N11 L. Carra a n Inishmaan N3 N67 N51 Newgrange N60 N59 M1 Inishbofin N17 Castlepollard Gort Is Inisheer Doolin N55 Portlaoise Lisdoonvarna Glendalough TerryglassLanesborough lan Navan Ashford L. Derravaragh N62 N9 N51 Renvyle N83 Wicklow Roscommon d Leenáun s N81 Ballinrobe Stradbally N4 WICKLOW Balbriggan Athy L. Mask Athboy LAOIS Mountshannon L. Derg N52 N84 M1 MEATH SkerriesWicklow Hd. Ennistymon Rathdrum Hags Hd. Cleggan Roscrea Letterfrack Ballymahon N18 e Clonbur N2 Tri m Dromineer Cong Scarriff n Baltinglass Abbeyleix N11Rush N61 N63 Lahinch N7 oy N78 Mullingar Tuam L. Ree Killala

lla

Ballycastle

Ki

Béal an Mhuirthead (Belmullet)

Downpatrick Hd.

L.Melvin Beleek

rg

De

Newtownstewart

Strabane

Lifford

A5

Derry

hF ug

Lo

H

Fair Hd.

RT

n ga

54°

Benwee Hd.

N15

Bundoran

N15

Donegal L. Derg Rossnowlagh N15

N56

FinnStranorlar N15 Ballybofey

le oy

O

Rathlin Island

N

La

Erris Hd.

Mullaghmore

Ballyshannon

N56

Ardara

Donegal Bay

Killybegs

Kilcar

N56

Glenties

N14

Foyle

N13

Buncrana Rathmullen

Foyle

Dublin

Malinmore

Gleann Cholm Cille (Glencolumbkille)

Gweebarra Bay

N56

Letterkenny

DONEGAL

An Clochán Liath (Dungloe)

Milford

Portsalon illy h Sw Loug

Ailt an Chorráin (Burtonport)

Aran Island

Gaoth Dobhair (Gweedore)

N56

Dunfanaghy

Malin

Britain

DERRY

Culdaff Giant's Causeway Greencastle Inishowen Hd. A2 Carndonagh Portstewart Moville Portrush

Fanad Hd. Ballyliffen

Malin Hd.

FROM

nn Ba

SLIGO

Dublin

FROM

FROM

An Bun Beag (Bunbeg)

Gortahork

Bloody Foreland

Tory Island

y Ba

DONEGAL

ven ha eep

55°

10°

Sh

H

N ord L. ngf

on

C

AN

EL

ne Er

U

hi

n

Clare

r


e Bay

K

are enm

N70

Rive

r

M50

N22

N71

National Primary Routes

National Secondary Routes

Northern Ireland Border

County Boundary

Railways

Other Routes (selected)

M50

Motorways (under construction)

Mizen Hd.

N22

Goleen

y

N71

Adare

N20

N18

Blackwater

Macroom

Baltimore

Skibbereen

Clonakilty Rosscarbery

Local Car / Passenger Ferry

N71

Galley Hd.

n Bando

Bandon

N22

Lee

CORK

S

Cobh

Cahir

N74

N25

Youghal

10

20

FROM

N24

Clonmel

Cashel

Knockadoon Hd.

MILES

20

40 30

KILOMETRES

60 40

50mls

80km

Roscoff

Europe

CORK FROM Swansea

Britain

CORK

Ballycotton

Ferns

N11

N11

219 424 136 264 209 117 130 73 183 180 114 112 127 167 78 104 144 84 90 52 93 306 58 190 116 284 78 177 232 436 144 271 121 323 75 201 32 224 20 139 201 330 130 205 133 346 83 215 117 206 73 128 164 333 108 207 184 309 117 192

227 141

187 116

126 78

336 209

128 80

208 129

251 156

105 65

87 54

148 92

209 130

323 202

256 160

402 250

428 266

WATERFORD

Britain

69 43 237 147 156 97 272 169 335 208 441 274 328 204 211 131 397 247 351 218 135 84 383 238 378 235

85 53

157 98

80 51

98 62

25 15

48 30 80 50

372 135 226 253 231 88 141 157

82 51 19 12

254 190 222 158 118 138

213 307 133 191

152 293 95 182

325 218 203 136 193 129 208 120 80 129

85 53

154 234 96 146

275 211 241 171 131 150

135 135 85 84

214 166 138 245 343 232 135 104 86 152 213 144

93 57

158 264 149 98 164 94

357 163 242 220 222 98 151 137

66 41

282 218 264 176 138 165

391 153 245 274 243 101 153 170

151 156 151 94 91 94

296 193 242 104 113 111 184 123 150 65 70 69

407 304 350 193 198 253 192 219 120 123

309 114 197 172 192 73 123 107

204 212 237 127 136 148

233 138

Distances in Kilometres (blue) and in miles (red)

Rosslare Harbour Carnsore Pt.

ROSSLARE FROM Fishguard Pembroke Cherbourg Roscoff

61 39

52°

53°

DUN LAOGHAIRE

Europe N. America

Britain

DUBLIN

FROM Holyhead

FROM

ST. GEORGE’S CHANNEL

Cahore Pt.

Courtown

Rosslare

Wexford

Wicklow Hd.

Wicklow

Arklow

N11

Greystones

Bray

Wexford Bay

Enniscorthy

Howth Hd.

Dun Laoghaire

N11

Gorey

Avoca

Rathdrum

WEXFORD

FROM

Dunmore East

rford Hook Hd. Wate our Harb

Passage East

Tramore

Bunclody N80

Howth

Ashford

WICKLOW

Glendalough

Wellington N25 Bridge Fethard Kilmore Quay

Ballyhack

New Ross N25

Tallaght

Lambay

Arklow

Island Swords Malahide

Dublin GoreyBay

Enniskerry Blessington Lacken Reservoir

Tullow

N79

M50

Baltinglass

N81

y

Avoca

DUBLIN

Dublin

Naas

N7

Liffe

Graiguenamanagh

Bagenalstown

CELTIC SEA

Dungarvan

N25

Waterford

N25

N9

N9

CARLOW

N9

Athy

Thomastown

N9

Carrick-on-Suir

N10

KILKENNY

N24

N76

Callan

N10

Castlecomer

Carlow

N78

Suir

Ardmore

N25

Cappoquin

N77

Kilkenny

Urlingford

N8

Abbeyleix

LAOIS Durrow

WATERFORD

N8

N8

Roscrea

KILDARE

M9

N3

Tullow Maynooth

Droichead Nua (Newbridge) M7

Kildare

Stradbally

N7

l t

M4

CARLOW Clane

Edenderry B

N9

Carlow

Portarlington

Portlaoise

Kilcormac

Holycross

N62

N77

Kilbeggan Urlingford

N6

N4

Kinnegad Castlecomer

Ordnance Survey of Ireland Permit No. MP 001005 © Ordnance Survey of Ireland and Government of Ireland

0

Thurles

Midleton

N72

N7

N62

Birr

Banagher

TIPPERARY

N8

Moate

N52

L.N8Ennell

WESTMEATH Durrow

ClonmacnoiseTullamore na Bros OFFALY N52

Lismore

Crosshaven

0

Th l

Templemore

Cork H arbour

Old Head of Kinsale

Courtmacsherry

Kinsale

Carrigaline

Cork

Blarney

N8

N8

N25

Fermoy

Watergrasshill

N20

Mallow

N72

N73

N62

N55

Templemore Athlone

Terryglass

Tipperary

Mitchelstown

Kilmallock

N20

Buttevant

Millstreet

Inchigeelagh

Dunmanway

N22

N72

Kanturk

N7

Nenagh

Limerick

Killaloe

Tulla

LIMERICK

N69

Portumna

Loughrea

Kilreekill

N6

Ballinasloe

N7

Nenagh

ha nn on

Mountshannon L. Derg N52 Dromineer Scarriff

Newcastle West

N18

N18

N66

Gort

N18

N6

N18Athenry

GALWAY

De ale N20 Abbeyfeale Rath Luirc (Charleville)

N21

Rathkeale

International Car Ferry

Airports

Shannon

Foynes

N68

Coastal Sandy Beach

Clear Island

Schull

Bantry

Ba ntry

Glengarriff

Kenmare

N71

N71

Lakes of Killarney

Ennis

N85

Ennistymon

Castleisland

KERRY Killarney

N70

Bay

Ba

nus

ma Dun

Bere Island

Castletown Bere

Cods Hd.

Killorglin

Camp

N21

Tralee

N21

le

Tarbert

Fea

N67

Lisdoonvarna

Ballyvaughan

Galway Bay

CLARE

Killimer

Listowel

N69

Ballyheige

N67

Kilrush

uary Kilbaha n Est nno Sha

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Donegal Pt.

Glenbeigh

Sneem

Cahirciveen

Dingl

Waterville

Dursey Island

Bray Hd.

Valentia Island

Blasket Islands

An Daingean (Dingle)

Doolin

Miltown Malbay

Ballybunion

Tralee Bay

Kerry Hd

Loop Hd.

Castlegregory

Brandon Point

Galway

N68

Cliffs of Moher

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Motorways

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FROM

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N67

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plan your future now!

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are your talents?

check o ut P courses LC

choose a career you enjoy

what points do I need?

try to get work experience in the career that you’re interested in

calculate your leaving cert points (www.qualifax.ie)

don’t forget your CAO application form and submission date!

talk to stu are curr dents who ently in the course t h a t interest s you!

get a copy of t prospectus fo he develop your skills r e college of inter ach to make informed est career decisions

create a C.V

attend college open days to see what courses and facilities are available


Monday

System 1. Excellent work 2. Consistent good work 3. Average accomplishment 4. Poor performance 5. Behaviour improved

Parent:

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Student’s Name:

Comment Form

NB DB UU NW NH UA L NA

Tutor:

Thursday

Dean/ Year Head

Friday

Additional Comments

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

Comments: _____________________________________________________________________

Wednesday

No books, copy or equipment Disruptive behaviour Uniform unsatisfactory Not working in class No homework, incomplete Unexcused absence Late Negative Attitude

Tuesday

No. 1 - Week Commencing:


Details: __________________________________

Suspended

Other Transfer to another school

Unexplained

Urgent Family Reason

Reason for absence (Please Tick)

Illness

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Details: __________________________________

Transfer to another school

Other Unexplained

Suspended Urgent Family Reason

Illness

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________ Date ______/_______/_______

Details: __________________________________

Transfer to another school

Other

No.2

No. of days absent________________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Explanations for Absence

Unexplained

Suspended Urgent Family Reason

Illness Reason for absence (Please Tick)

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

From __________________ To ______________

No. of days absent________________

Explanations for Absence

No.3

Explanations for Absence

Date ______/_______/_______

No.1

No.2

Reason for absence (Please Tick)

From __________________ To ______________

Explanations for Absence

Explanations for Absence

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

From __________________ To ______________

Explanations for Absence

No.1

No.3

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________ Date ______/_______/_______

No. of days absent________________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________


Details: __________________________________

Suspended

Other Transfer to another school

Unexplained

Urgent Family Reason

Reason for absence (Please Tick)

Illness

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Details: __________________________________

Transfer to another school

Other Unexplained

Suspended Urgent Family Reason

Illness

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________ Date ______/_______/_______

Details: __________________________________

Transfer to another school

Other

No.5

No. of days absent________________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Explanations for Absence

Unexplained

Suspended Urgent Family Reason

Illness Reason for absence (Please Tick)

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

From __________________ To ______________

No. of days absent________________

Explanations for Absence

No.6

Explanations for Absence

Date ______/_______/_______

No.4

No.5

Reason for absence (Please Tick)

From __________________ To ______________

Explanations for Absence

Explanations for Absence

Received by ____________ Date ___ /___ /___

From __________________ To ______________

Explanations for Absence

No.4

No.6

Student Name __________________________________ Class ________ Date ______/_______/_______

No. of days absent________________

Date(s) of absence _____/_____/_____ to _____/_____/______ Reason for absence (tick one): ILLNESS

URGENT FAMILY REASON

SUSPENDED

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER SCHOOL

UNEXPLAINED

OTHER

DETAILS: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________


______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.1

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.2

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.3

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.1

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.2

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.3

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________


______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.10

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.11

______________________________________________

______________________________________________

Note ________________________________________

Received by _____________________Date __ /___ /__

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.12

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.10

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.11

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________

Note to/from Parent/Guardian

No.12

Student Name ______________________________

Class ____________

Date ______/_______/_______ Note __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of Teacher/Year Head ____________________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian______________________________________


MOUNT CARMEL SECONDARY SCHOOL

STUDENT DIARY & PLANNER 2009/10

STUDENT DIARY & PLANNER 2009/10 KNO

GR

W L

I NT E

SE

IT Y

CA

Unit B5, Glasnevin Business Park, Ballyboggan Road, Glasnevin, Dublin 11, Ireland. t +353 (0)1 860 3477 f +353 (0)1 860 348 e james@uniquediaryproductions.ie w www.uniquediaryproductions.ie

RI

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Y

C

UR

SC

RE E T ST ITY

KING’S

IN N S GE ED

SAF

HOOL

S TA I S CHRIST URGET NO

MOUNT CARMEL SECONDARY SCHOOL


Second Level Stucent Diary