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Vol. XXVII No. 1

October 2016

FESTIVAL MARKETPLACE CONTINUES TO SIGNAL DOWNTOWN KINGSTON RENAISSANCE

REA AR A L A Z A B VA FOOD HE FESTI CHON T PE OF CE, 1 OWN A L P NT KET MAR EET, DOW N STO STR KING

SEE STORY ON PAGES 4-5


UDC...Making Development Happen since 1968

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ver the last 48 years, the Urban Development Corporation (UDC) has impacted the lives of thousands of Jamaicans through the successful completion of numerous projects in primary and secondary infrastructure, housing, tourism, education, sports, and health. Since receiving our mandate on March 21, 1968, “to make development happen, when and where it is needed in the context

of national priorities,” the UDC has established a proud tradition of programmes and projects such as:

Hospital, Manchester; Yallahs Police Station in St Thomas and the Annual Fireworks on the Waterfront, in Downtown Kingston.

Silverstone Basic School in St. Catherine; Dunn’s River Falls and Park, St Ann; the National Indoor Sports Centre, Kingston, The Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James; Simon Bolivar Cultural Centre, downtown Kingston; Mandeville

Silverstone Basic School

Established just six years after Jamaica gained independence, the UDC has been instrumental in managing the island’s urban spaces, building infrastructure, and preserving national treasures. At inception, the UDC was

Simòn Bolìvar Cultural Centre

Dunn’s River Falls & Park

Cont. on page 3

The UDC - Leading the Way with Modern Development “A city is not an accident but the result of coherent visions and aims.” - Leon Krier, The Architecture of Community

Increasingly, urban planning around the world has become more responsive to population structure and distribution, technological advancements, economic goals and an inclusive agenda. The universal concept of sustainable development - development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs – has also been shaping approaches to planning.

What’s in building a city? It’s far more than gathering sand, cement and steel, and a dozen workmen and starting construction on the first available spot of ground. It takes thorough planning which not only caters to present needs, but also to those of the future.

Thanks to a strong team of technical UDC staff with diverse expertise, Jamaica is not trailing, but is making the leap into the future while continuing to attract the interest of people across the globe. This edition of UDC Update highlights past projects as well as plans which are guiding work in areas, such as the Montego Bay Hip Strip, Sewerage system in Caymanas, National Heroes Park among others.

Being the flag-bearers of urban planning in Jamaica, the UDC has embraced these elements by applying a cohesive strategy and incorporating consideration for both people and the natural environment, as we step into the future. Our vision for modernized urban spaces is interwoven with the Government of Jamaica’s development agenda.

Thorough understanding of this reality will reflect in how the Corporation executes its most recent mandate from the Prime Minister, the Most Honourable Andrew Holness – that of creating Jamaica’s third city. It is an exciting time to be alive, as present2

As the vision emerges from the ground over time, as in the cases of the redevelopment of downtown Kingston, and the “One Bay For All” development vision for Montego Bay, St. James, the architectural mix is balanced to achieve functionality, structural durability, and appealing aesthetics.

day Jamaicans will be able to witness from the beginning, the integrated and participatory strategy that the Corporation is applying as it carries out this vision.

UPDATE October 2016


UDC...Making Development Happen since 1968 Cont. from page 2

charged with managing development in the Ocho Rios Waterfront area and the Kingston Waterfront. Our portfolio grew rapidly and evidence of the Corporation’s impact is etched across the island. As the nation reaches for the vision of a better quality of life for citizens,

Artist’s impression of the West Street Residential High Rise Complex being proposed for downtown Kingston subject to a market research exercise.

the UDC recognizes that progress is a continuum and is committed to carrying out its mandate. As an agency of the Government of Jamaica, and hand in hand with, our corporate partners and individual citizens the UDC will continue to undertake development that is in keeping with economic trends and ready to meet

the needs of a diverse and growing population. Our mission continues to unfold as we invest in the future through transformative projects being pursued.

A section of the Sewage Conveyance System constructed at Caymanas Estate in St. Catherine.

A section of the Dunn’s River Falls and Park Central Gardens expected to be completed during 2016.

PROJECT UPDATES STORES

UDC Facilitates Small Business Development at Dunn’s River Falls

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he UDC, owner and operator of the Dunn’s River Falls and Park has invited business operators to take advantage of new offers at the attraction inclusive of selling Confectioneries, Jamaican Patties, Fast Food, and operating a Pizzeria. Proposals are currently being assessed in keeping with the Government’s procurement policies and procedures. The successful addition of these services will aid in the continued development of the world famous Dunn’s River Falls & Park (DRFP), St. Ann and help meet the diverse needs of the over 700,000 visitors from across the world who travel to the facility annually. Over the last two years, the UDC also extended invitations to the public for the development of other offerings such as entertainment activities, natural beverage station and icecream. Currently, the property is also benefiting from the development of

the Central Gardens project which will see the completion of kiosks in 2016 offering more variety to patrons, as well as a water feature for recreational purposes.

The attraction opens daily between the hours of 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. and on cruise ship days from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00p.m.

Visitors to Dunn’s River currently enjoy activities such as climbing the waterfall, swimming at the beach, taking part in picnics and walking through the gardens. A craft market, two restaurants, four video and one hair braider licensees, one logo shop, two water shoes sales points and two snack counters are other services offered at the attraction.

Over the years, Dunn’s River Falls and Park has achieved significant milestones. The facility was named most popular and exciting attraction by cruise officials during 2004 and Leading Caribbean Tourist Excursion by the World Travel Awards in November 2009 and 2010. Among its most recent achievements is TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence for 2015 and 2016.

The rates for non-residents to access Dunn’s River Falls and Park are US$20 for persons aged 12 years and over and US $12 for children between the ages of 3 – 11 years. The discounted rates for Jamaican residents are J$600 for persons ages 12 years and over and J$300 for children between the ages of 3 and 11.

The UDC’s relationship with Dunn’s River Falls and Park began in the 1970s, when the Corporation acquired the Belmont Property. Since 1998, the UDC has been engaged in major upgrading of the property with a view to ensuring parity with other world class attractions and enriching the Dunn’s River experience.

UPDATE October 2016

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PROJECT UPDATES STORES

UDC Completes Food Bazaar Kiosks at Festival Marketplace bars; multi-use commercial/office space; indoor/outdoor exhibition space, vendors arcade, marina and docking facilities. The Marketplace is located on 8.9 acres of prime land in downtown Kingston adjacent to the Kingston Craft Market. The facility is intended to be one more element and attraction in the development of the Kingston Waterfront for which the UDC has development responsibility. It will be a waterfront extension of the renewed Market & Commercial districts to the north, as well as the terminal point of the existing east-west pedestrian arcade and promenade.

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s a part of its programme for the continued development of the downtown Kingston area, the UDC has completed in phase 1 of its Festival Marketplace area called the Food Bazaar.

Plans are being finalised for a suitable operator to manage the facility. In the meantime, it is available for the hosting of events such as art shows, socials, corporate parties, weddings and other activities.

The Food Bazaar comprises vending kiosks and recreational seating with a parking lot that can double as a multipurpose outdoor recreational space. Other phases will see development of facilities for in-bond and local shopping; restaurants and

Reach Falls Gaining Popularity among Locals and Visitors Nature lovers can expect a 30 - minute tour upstream the Driver’s River, and a tour of breathtaking rock formations in the underwater cave. The tour upstream will also reveal dramatic rock pools that the river has carved along in its flowing path. These features are said to relieve the most troubled minds and provide the ultimate relaxation and renewal of body, mind, and spirit.

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he world is discovering a hidden haven nestled in the valley close to the the Blue and John Crow Mountains in the parish of Portland. Nature’s overtones ring soothingly dominant as water cascades down dome-shaped rocks into pools of refreshing water overarched by lush green foliage. The 4

Visitors to the attraction have been liberal with their positive reviews. Reach Falls is “An amazingly beautiful place in nature,” says Empress Camille Camille, a fan on Facebook. She adds that “Staff was especially courteous, knowledgeable and helpful.” Sheena Kay, another fan, agrees. She commented. “It is a small fall but so beautiful and exquisite. The tour guide was friendly and made us feel right at home,”

world is discovering Reach Falls, a growing sensation among attractions operated by the UDC. Fed by the Driver’s River and named after the district in which it is located, Reach Falls offers a unique blend of comfort, relaxation, and adventure.

Cont. on page 5

UPDATE October 2016


PROJECT UPDATES STORES

Reach Falls Gaining Popularity among Locals and Visitors Cont. from page 4

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he site boasts a picnic area and patrons are welcome to take food along. In addition, its world-class restroom and changing facilities help to optimize the experience for families, friends or the adventurous individual. The location is also ideal for special events such as weddings and small parties. New entrance rates for Jamaican residents took effect since the start of 2016, with adult entrance rates moving

from $300 to $500 and children rates from $150 to $250. For non-resident visitors, the price remains at US$10 for visitors over 12 years and US$5 for those aged 4-12 years, respectively. Reach Falls is committed to building a tradition of consistency in its delivery of unforgettable recreational experience for the discerning nature lover. Hence for every group of ten persons, one person will receive free entry to enjoy the attraction.

Reach Falls is open to visitors Wednesday to Sunday and public holidays except Good Friday and Christmas Day, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. However, since the start of 2016, the attraction has been operating on a daily basis to satisfy the mounting interest in the facility. Reservations can be made via 276-8663 or reachfalls@udcja.com.

Fort Clarence Beach Park to Receive Major Upgrade

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he tropical sun, sea, and sand come together along 16 hectares of Jamaica’s south eastern coastline to form Fort Clarence Beach Park. With a wide blanket of pristine white sand and a mesmerizing view of the Caribbean Sea dancing endlessly to the tune of the wind, it is the perfect getaway from the hustle and bustle of city life.

meditation, for relaxation,” says Elaine Wint, a regular patron. “I like the fact that it has a large beach area, it also has a long front on the beach which allows me some jogging facilities, it’s also beautiful and I find usually there’s no harassment,” she adds. This was not the thinking in 1782 when the fort was established, at

Whenever fun-lovers, families and friends, particularly in the Kingston Metropolitan area, feel the need to escape from their routine, this centralized attraction is among the most popular options. “I have been coming to the Hellshire beach area now for over 45 years, It is my get away place for solitude, for

Artist’s impression of the façade UPDATE October 2016

A Family enjoying a picnic at Fort Clarence Beach. Patrons may take their meals or purchase savoury escoveitch fish and more prepared by concessionaires on location.

Perfect place for play time. Kids love Fort Clarence Beach.

Cont. on page 6 5


PROJECT UPDATES STORES

UDC Showcases Investment Opportunities at JAPEX 2016

Fort Clarence Beach Park to Receive Major Upgrade

L-r Jennifer Griffith, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Tourism, Mr. Courtney Lawes, General Manager, SADCo; Mr. Jomo Pitterson, Manager at Dunn’s River Falls, Ms. Janice Chong, Property and Events Manager at SADCo, the Hon. Ed Bartlett, Minister of Tourism and Ewald Fuchs, Senior VicePresident of Our World Magazine enjoy lens time at the UDC/SADCo’s Kabana-style booth.

Cont. from page 5

that location. British colonizers at that time saw it as an ideal point from which to protect the island against possible invasion from their European rivals. Fort Clarence was originally named after its builder, an Englishman named David Small and later renamed after Prince William, Duke of Clarence, King of England from 1830 to 1837.

Attractions owned and operated by the UDC featured prominently at Jamaica Product Exchange (JAPEX) 2016, held in April at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James.

Its purpose then, was to protect the bay between Port Henderson and Hellshire Hills, close to where the British themselves attacked the island and captured it from the Spaniards in 1665. Fort Clarence Beach Park is now a popular attraction that caters to Jamaicans and visitors from all walks of life.

URBAN TOUCH

Snapshots of UDC 48th Anniversary Celebration Forty-eight years of UDC was observed by staff members across the island. Here we share highlights of the cake-cutting ceremonies held at each location in the month of March.

The latest venture being undertaken is a multi-million dollar upgrading project for the facility. One aspect of the project commenced in October 2016 and the work will progress in phases, to make the visitor experience even more memorable and exciting.

Head Office Cake.

Outlining the plans, UDC Director of Sales, Rean Goulbourne says that while UDC undertakes phase 1, which entails constructing a new administrative building, the Corporation has not ruled out private sector involvement for the subsequent phases.

The trade event organized by the Jamaica Hotel & Tourist Association’s (JHTA), is the largest tourism trade show in Jamaica, attracting participants from the Caribbean, North America, Latin America and Europe.

The UDC’s display highlighted Dunn’s River Falls, Fort Clarence

With the colonial era long passed, the UDC now manages the facility. Since the beach park’s official opening in 1976, the UDC has worked to transform the location from a battleground to an inviting waterfront playground.

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Beach and Reach Falls as prime locations for commercial investments.

Runaway Bay Water Company.

Green Grotto Caves and Attractions.

St. Ann Development Company.

UPDATE October 2016


URBAN TOUCH

Sigma Corporate Run 2016

And the winner is! Wildred Wilson, Falls Guide at Dunn’s River Falls copped the top prize in the male Corporate Run. UPDATE October 2016

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URBAN TOUCH

Jamaica Day Remember when…? Members of the public as well as UDC staff were taken on a stroll down memory lane. The Corporation’s Information Centre was transformed into a nostalgic zone displaying elements from Jamaica’s past as the country observed Jamaica Day on March 4.

UDC at Wolmer’s Annual Career Day

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accounts of the many dimensions and career paths that go into making development happen.

Day at Wolmer’s Boys School worth the while. Representatives at the event held on April 22, were able to inspire students with intriguing

Keen students and passionate UDC staff, who were willing to share the highlights of their career made the Corporation’s participation in Career

UPDATE October 2016


URBAN TOUCH

Expo Jamaica 2016 The UDC was present at this year’s staging of Expo Jamaica, the biannual exhibition hosted by the Jamaica Manufacturers’ Association (JMA) and Jamaica Exporters’ Association (JEA) from April 14-17. Inspired by the event’s theme “Brand Jamaica to the World” the UDC showcased its world-famous attractions and the numerous projects through which the Corporation helps to shape the

island’s social and infrastructural landscape. Visitors to the UDC booth included the Hon. Daryl Vaz, Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Mrs. Vaz.

University of Technology’s Faculty of the Built Environment 17th Annual Awards Ceremony

Lorna Clarke (right), Director, Corporate Communication UDC, presents Steve Robinson (left) with the Most All Rounded Fourth Year Urban and Regional Planning Award at the University of Technology’s Faculty of the Built Environment 17th Annual Awards Ceremony on Thursday, March 17, 2016 at the University. The Award is given by the Corporation annually along with a cash prize.

UPDATE October 2016

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URBAN SPARKS

National Heroes Park – Keeping Jamaica’s Buried Treasures Alive

Artist’s impression of the future layout of National Heroes’ Park

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he Right Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jamaica’s first National Hero and the first to be interred at the National Heroes Park, once said “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.”

commerce and the repatriation of many North American Blacks to Africa. Garvey, along with Sir Alexander Bustamante, Norman Manley, Paul Bogle, Sam Sharpe, George William Gordon and Nanny of the Maroons, are memorialized at the Shrine at National Heroes Park. Each of these individuals made contributions in phenomenal ways to the weaving of Jamaica’s history, and a visit to this well maintained botanical cemetery resurrects their inspiring stories.

It was then quite fitting that in 1964, twenty-four years after his passing in England, Garvey’s remains was brought to Jamaica and is now entombed in a star-shaped mausoleum, replicating the symbol of the Black Star Line, the shipping line through which he facilitated 10

The park also houses a cenotaph in honour of soldiers who perished in both World Wars I and II. The monument is always guarded by two sentries and every hour on the hour there is a changing of the guards. It is a place where Jamaicans can gather snapshots of history and reconnect with their roots. On a daily basis, individuals including tourists, visit the park to reflect, to relax and sometimes just to enjoy a quiet time alone or with company.

UPDATE October 2016


URBAN SPARKS Evidence of construction can be seen at the park as the UDC manages the building of state of the art block and grille perimeter fence. When completed, the property will have six main pedestrian access gates, which will each bear the name of a National Hero, the main gate or the Ceremonial Entrance will be named after National Heroes Norman Manley, and Sir Alexander Bustamante as designed by the UDC. Transitions Kamau Kambui, Chief Architect at the UDC explains that the installation of the perimeter fence is just the first phase in the National Heroes Park Redevelopment Project. “Heroes Park is the location that hosts the national memorials for Jamaica and so it’s important for us to upgrade to a space that’s befitting of the national shrines that are located here,” he says. “When we have state visits, Heroes Park is [among] the first places where visitors are taken, and so we need to refurbish it and redevelop it so that it fits within what we want to showcase to the world. It’s our living room.” This will be yet another dimension in the dynamic history of the property. From 1808 to 1953, the location was the centre of horse-racing activities and was known as Kingston Racecourse. In 1953 it was renamed the George VI Memorial Park in honour of the late King, and father of Queen Elizabeth II, at the time of her first visit to the island. Horse-racing was transferred to what was then the Knutsford Park Race Course. After Jamaica gained independence in 1962, the Government decided that it would

be fitting to have a park dedicated to the honour of National Heroes and, in 1973 the National Heroes Park was the name given to this historical site. With the completion of the fencing on the horizon, the next step will be to refurbish the sidewalk. The remaining phases will then enhance the interior of the park and will see the addition of multiple features across the more than 20 hectares expanse of the property. Features will be added in zones as Mr. Kambui explains, “We have the shrine zone which will be the monuments and the location for dignitaries and cultural icons. Then we will have a passive contemplative [zone] where we will have a walk of fame where we will recognize personalities in the society [such as] athletes, musicians, and the security forces.” In the big picture, the National Heroes Park is an epicentre of commercial and recreational activities for all ages. In addition to being an educational zone, the park is also set up to facilitate sports and physical exercise.

effort is a multi-sectoral undertaking, bringing together entities such as Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC), CHASE Fund, Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF) and China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) among others. The island stands to benefit from this investment in numerous ways. For one “We’ll have a redeveloped space to showcase our national monuments,” notes Mr. Kambui. With a wide range of interests being catered to, it will be a park for Jamaicans, at home and in the diaspora, and a key attraction for heritage tourism. In generating social and economic value, the National Heroes Park is emerging as a more excellent guardian of the memories of the valiant men and women whose honour it stands to preserve.

National Heroes Park is also being explored as a possible location for the future parliamentary building and Government zone. “We also have an area that is reserved to the north for future building, the possibility [exists that] the future parliament or some other prominent building could be housed there,” says Mr. Kambui. Cost The redevelopment project is being carried out under the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation at a projected cost of US$25 million. The

UPDATE October 2016

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Visit the UDC’s exciting Locations today! Dunn’s River Falls and Park, St. Ann

Green Grotto Caves and Attractions, St. Ann

Reach Falls, Portland

Fort Clarence Beach Park, St Catherine 12

UPDATE October 2016


Mission Montego Bay – UDC Advancing a Vision for Western Jamaica’s Model Sustainable City

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ontego Bay, St. James, the island’s second city is a very important strand in Jamaica’s socio-economic fabric. It is home to over 110,000 citizens and one of the Western Hemisphere’s major tourist destinations. The city is ripe for development and the UDC is in high gear as it formulates plans in collaboration with key stakeholders for the development of Montego Bay into a model Sustainable City. The plans include a revitalized hip strip, and a world class intermodal north transportation hub. This will

allow pedestrians and cyclists to move hassle-free along well-shaded and aesthetically pleasing corridors spanning the Hip Strip, Fort Montego Bay, with a redeveloped Sam Sharpe Square being a focal point for social engagement. The Montego Bay Redevelopment Plan, projects a slew of infrastructural changes to be implemented by the end of 2018. As these are introduced, they will help to decongest Montego Bay and expand opportunities for further social and economic development. Some of the targeted areas include:

• Montego Bay Old Hospital Park and Gun Point Beach – Draft plans outline the integration of Gunpoint Beach with the Old Hospital Park. The area will be landscaped and the Beach’s administrative building will be refurbished. Additionally, there are plans to expand the bathroom block with changing rooms and showers. Other amenities will also be installed, such as parking, and ramps, to facilitate ease of access by persons, including the disabled. • Montego Bay Close Harbour Beach – The 16 Acre property is to be developed into an active public park and recreational focal point for the Second City. Features will include beach football, volleyball, jogging, swimming and provisions for outdoor concerts. • Montego Bay Board Walk - Efforts will see the widening of the existing sidewalk between Closed Harbour Beach and Old Hospital Park and will form a new waterfront promenade leading to the existing Hip Strip.

Artist’s impression of the transformation of Close Harbour Beach, Montego Bay

Aerial photo showing section along Closed Harbour Beach to be converted to the Montego Bay Boardwalk

UPDATE October 2016

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Are you prepared for a hurricane? Don’t forget to keep an emergency survival Kit, just in case a storm should come. Here are some smart things to include in that kit!

• Portable battery operated radio

• Flashlight

• Extra Batteries

• Candles

• Matches

• Medication

• Five-day non-perishable food

supply

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ach year June 1 to November 30, marks the Atlantic Hurricane Season. Bringing strong winds, thunderstorms, storm surges, heavy rains, hurricanes can be devastating to life and property. The 2016 season has been the most active since 2012, producing 17 named storms, with Hurricane Matthew claiming close to 600 lives in Haiti and parts of the United States of America. As the season comes to a close, we encourage

It would be dreadful if it slid downslope and sank.

I will secure my roof firmly So the strong winds cannot lift it easily.

I will help to keep drains clean. It’s unsightly to have garbage flowing downstream. It could cause severe flooding of my community, If I dump my garbage inappropriately. I will not build my house on a river bank.

Hurricanes are fierce, but I must do all I can, To be ready and to stick with the preparedness plan. And should all this fail and I am advised to evacuate,

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I will heed the authorities and co-operate.

• Containers of water (2 quarts

• Sleeping bags or blankets

• Personal toilet articles and

sanitary needs

I will be very careful when planting crops on the hillsides. Over-farming, slashing and burning can lead to landslides.

The Hurricane Preparedness Creed

• Ice box

per person per day)

I will prune my overgrown trees This is a very important safety key If trees and wires are entangled Either I or my neighbour could wind up mangled

you to always be prepared!

• Disposable diapers

• Clothing

• Manual can opener

• Fuel for stoves or lanterns

• Important documents

UPDATE October 2016


Health Alert: Preventing Mosquito-Borne Viruses 5. True or false? Babies are immune to mosquito-borne diseases. 6. True or false? Chik v and zika can be transmitted sexually. 7. True or false? Jamaica has developed a vaccine for the Zika virus.

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osquitos are among the deadliest animals in the world. In recent times, Jamaica and other countries within the region have seen an increase in mosquito-borne diseases, such as Chikungunya (chik v) and the Zika Virus (Zik v), with symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. They have even resulted in fatalities, and persons with underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or hypertension are particularly at risk. The Government of Jamaica, through the Ministry of Health and other relevant agencies have been implementing programmes to control the spread of these diseases. However, each individual has a part to play in understanding the risks and in maintaining a clean and healthy physical environment to minimize. Let’s see how much you know about these mosquito-borne viruses and how to prevent them. 1. Which mosquito transmits the Zika and Chikungunya viruses? a. Anopheles b. Culex

8. True or false? There is no known cure for zika or chikungunya. c. Aides Egypti d. Tyrannosaurus Rex 2. True or false? Zik v symptoms are similar to chikungunya 3. Which of the following statements is not true about microcephaly? a. It has been identified as a possible complication of zik v b. It characterized by birth defects c. Once women contract zik v they should not get pregnant for the next 7 years as their babies are likely to be born with microcephaly. d. It is likely to affect babies born to mothers who contract zik v during the first trimester of pregnancy. 4. Which one of the following conditions is also linked to zik v? a. Guillain-BarrĂŠ Syndrome b. Cirrhosis of the Liver c. Hypertension d. Tuberculosis

UPDATE October 2016

9. Which of the following is a possible long term side effect of chikungunya? a. Irritable Bowel Syndrome b. Arthritis c. Tonsillitis d. Asthma 10. Which of the following are some ways in which we can control the spread of mosquito- borne diseases? a. Avoid mosquito bites by using an insect repellent containing deet. b. Keep environment free of debris. c. Identify and empty containers in your environment which may hold stagnant water. Cover containers such as drums which are used to store water d. Use mosquito nets e. Wear protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirts and pants. f. All of the above. See answers on page 16 15


(red eyes), muscle pain, headache, pain behind the eyes, vomiting. The infections are best identified by a medical practitioner and confirmed through blood testing. 3. C. It is advised that people wait six months to try for a pregnancy if the male partner had symptoms of zika. If the woman is pregnant and her male partner could possibly have been infected, they should use a condom or abstain from Answers: sex for the whole pregnancy. 4. A 1. C 5. False. 2. True. Symptoms of both 6. True. viruses include some or 7. False. Research is currently all of the following: Fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis being conducted to develop a vaccine which, if successful will

help to prevent the virus. However there is no vaccine for the zik v or chik v. 8. True. Talk to your doctor about medications which you may be used to relieve symptoms. 9. False. There is no vaccine for the zika virus (nor chikungunya). 10. True Information sourced online from the Ministry of health, the World Health Organization and the Centre for Disease Contro (CDC). For further information on mosquito-borne diseases, visit www. moh.gov.jm, www.who.int or www.cdc. gov/zika/prevention.

Produced by the

Corporate Relations & Marketing Department

12 Ocean Boulevard Kingston Mall Telephone: (876) 656-8031 Telefax: (876) 922-9326 Email: info@udcja.com Subscribe to our newsletter @ www.udcja.com To learn more about the UDC, please visit us on

DESIGN: UDCGRAPHIC

UDC Update - Oct. 2016  

UDC Update - A quarterly magazine of the Urban Development Corporation (Jamaica) presenting highlights on the Corporation's work is helping...

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