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My World Breeding a brain-infecting parasite may sound like the plot of a horror movie. But for senior biochemistry major Mira Kim, it’s work that may help lead to the halt of toxoplasmosis worldwide. She currently grows the crescent-shaped Toxoplasma gondii in a lab near campus 12 hours per week. This is her second

S P U.E D U / M Y WO R L D

year at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, which strives to eliminate the world’s most devastating infectious diseases. Mira says she’s thankful for the job options in Seattle. “I don’t think I would have had the same opportunities at a rural school. There are so many research places here.”


CONT ENTS

From abelia to zinnia, thousands of plant varieties thrive at SPU.

SEATTLE PACIFIC UNIVERSITY | WINTER 14

DEPARTMENTS

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Inquiring Minds

What do you want to know about college life? We asked Micah Lund to tackle your questions about living on campus, Seattle weather, and classes. He’ll show you what it’s like to be a student at Seattle Pacific.

12 16 Big Ideas

Real Life

Rubi Diaz could not stop taking photos on her study abroad to Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland. “You could say I went a little crazy,” she says. We’re glad she did — and you will be too.

What happens when you mix the Cinderella story with Seattle’s favorite burger joint? Dickerellas of course! It’s an SPU tradition that will help you make friends fast. And find out what items freshmen brought to SPU.

ON THE COVER

6 Senior Alli Cutting (pictured with Associate Professor of Biology Ryan Ferrer) conducted a study on the predatory behavior of seagulls toward starfish. David Murahashi ’13 graduated from SPU despite a massive brain bleed during his senior year. And senior Scott Nellessen performed with his a capella group in front of 1,500 people in Seattle. How did they do it? Through the mentorship and support of professors who believed in them.

20 24 28 Heart & Soul

Urban Adventure

SPU: Nuts & Bolts

Seattle has hundreds of churches, and SPU also has campus worship services available to enrich your week. In the future, you could even help lead one as a student.

Travel books and websites will happily give you their top Seattle picks, but we want to show you where SPUers go when they show off the city to their friends and family.

This is where you’ll find all the nitty-gritty details, such as majors, deadlines, financial aid, and more. Plus, Tucker Goodman reveals what he does to help pay his school bills.

COVER PHOTO BY LUKE RUTAN SPU | WINTER 2014

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Inquiring Minds

editor

from the WINTER 14

VOL 9 NO 1

Julia Siemens

Inquiring Minds want to etc is more than a name — it's SPU's vision: to engage the culture and change the world with the gospel of Jesus Christ. At Seattle Pacific, students study big ideas, experience Christian community, live out urban adventures — and learn to make the world a better place.

spu president Daniel J. Martin   etc staff Publisher

Seattle Pacific University    Editor

Julia Siemens    Art Director

Dale Kegley   Staff Writers

CONTACT To submit a question or a letter: etc@spu.edu   To subscribe, unsubscribe, or change your address: etc@spu.edu     PRODUCTION etc is produced three times a year by SPU’s Office of University Communications, Jennifer Gilnett, director. Be GREEN! SPU cares about the environment, which is why we print on paper that contains recycled fibers. Please recycle this etc or pass it on to a friend!

© Copyright 2014 Seattle Pacific University

Clint Kelly Hannah Notess Ineliz Soto-Fuller    

Student/Alumni Writers

Ashley Boucher Rubi Diaz Beth Douglass Micah Lund Holly Harris Wood   Photographers

John Crozier Rubi Diaz Nick Onken Chris and Sarah Rhoads Luke Rutan Mike Siegel Matthew Sumi Printer

Color Graphics, Seattle   admissions staff Director

Jobe Korb-Nice 206-281-2564 ADMjobe@spu.edu   

Admissions Counselors

Jason Chivers 206-281-2566 ADMjason@spu.edu    Kim Gilnett 206-281-3415 ADMkim@spu.edu    Tanisha Hanson 206-281-2559 transfer@spu.edu    Lisa Hirayama 206-281-2823 ADMlisa@spu.edu   Emily Kern 206-281-2540 ADMemily@spu.edu    Tony Nabors 206-281-2822 ADMtony@spu.edu    Noah Simpson 206-281-3518 ADMnoah@spu.edu    Ineliz Soto-Fuller 206-281-2561 ADMineliz@spu.edu      Lora Yoder 206-281-2392 ADMlora@spu.edu

The professor I’ll never forget I’ve often wondered how my life would have been different if I did not go to a university with a small student-to-faculty ratio like Seattle Pacific has. One journalism professor in particular offered me a lot of guidance despite my initial reluctance. When I told her I didn’t want to intern at a newspaper over the summer, she said that she wouldn’t sign off on a non-newspaper internship. As a communication major, there were other options available to me, but she wanted me to build up a portfolio of published writing samples. When I told her I didn’t think I had time to be an editor for the school newspaper, she urged me to make it a priority. When I told her that I didn’t think I could handle the professional level of work in her “Article and Feature Writing” class, she wouldn’t let me drop the course. I got my first non-student-newspaper articles published because of that class, and later co-authored a piece with her for a communication journal. “You could write for any newspaper or magazine you wanted to,” she’d say while peering at me through her glasses with the beaded chain. I knew she meant it, since she was never shy about using red ink on my papers. Her compliments and her criticism both came in healthy doses. I believe that my professor’s faith in me changed my course. I always wanted to write professionally, but there was no shortage of people telling me I’d be poor or unemployed if I did. Her confidence in me became my own. It got to the point where I no longer believed anyone who said I couldn’t find a writing job right after college. Instead, I heard her in my head saying that I was meant to tell stories: I had a reporting job within a week of receiving my diploma. I often hear about Seattle Pacific University professors who encourage, challenge, and pray for their students, and partner with them in professional research and projects. This is one of the reasons Seattle Pacific is such a great value. You won’t find that kind of mentorship just anywhere.

So what do you Really. Anything.

Meet SPU Expert: Micah Lund Hometown: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Year: Junior Major: Visual Communication Free time: Watching hockey, exploring Seattle, making art, and eating Campus Involvement: Peer career advisor with the Center for Career and Calling Travel: Spent the summer teaching English in China


know …

want to know?

Are students required to live on campus? If so, what are the requirements? — THERESA DITTMAN, COEUR D’ALENE, IDAHO

You have to live on campus unless you are at least 20 years old, or are living at home with a parent or guardian. I enjoy living on campus because I have a five-minute commute to class and it is easy to make friends in a residence hall community.

How do you balance your social life with your study life?

We ask students to answer your questions because — let’s face it — they know best what it’s like to be a student at Seattle Pacific University.

How difficult are your classes? — JORDAN REED, BEND, OREGON

Classes range in difficulty. Your academic strengths will determine whether you find a class difficult or not. If you are passionate about what you are studying, it makes all the difference. I enjoy all of the art and design courses I have to take, so even when one is extremely challenging, I don’t mind spending the time it takes to excel in the class. I have found that the toughest part about classes is committing the hours it takes to study or work on projects.

— WYATT THANSTROM, GRANGEVILLE, IDAHO

Time management is one of the most important skills you need to succeed in college. You have to decide for yourself when to say “no” to friends and “yes” to studying, and vice versa. When I lived in the dorms I enjoyed studying in the lounge or lobby. That way I could spend time with friends while also being productive.

What is your favorite on-campus event?

Does Seattle’s weather limit the time you get to be outside? — KATIE NICOLICH, SAND POINT, IDAHO

Invest in a good jacket and you’ll be able to enjoy the outdoors all year long. I’ve hiked, canoed, and biked in Seattle regardless of the weather. If you’d rather be inside on a rainy day, go to an indoor rock climbing gym, check out the Seattle Art Museum, study at a coffee shop, or roam your dorm and make new friends.

Urban Involvement organizes weekly volunteer teams that serve nonprofit organizations and Latreia hosts quarterly service days that are usually project-based. During my freshman year, Urban Involvement connected me to the Neighborhood House program in South Seattle. Once a week, I spent an afternoon tutoring Somali refugee children with a group of students from SPU. Not only was it great to work with these kids, but I also got to meet student volunteers from other universities.

What is the best part about Seattle Pacific University? — YUNNA KIM, EDMONDS, WASHINGTON

My favorite things about SPU are small class sizes, passionate faculty, an urban setting, and the cookies in Gwinn Commons.

— AUTUMN DERN, FORT COLLINS, COLORADO

Tradition, SPU’s annual outdoor Christmas party. You get the chance to pull out your ugly Christmas sweater, grab a mug of hot chocolate, and hang out in SPU’s Tiffany Loop with friends.

What are some ways to extend yourself out into the community of Seattle?

Do you have questions about university life?

— ZOË SHELTON, SCIO, OREGON

Among other things, SPU’s John Perkins Center has two great programs for getting students involved with service in Seattle.

Oh, come on — you know you have questions! We’re here to help. We’ve got SPU students who will tell it like it is. Email your thoughts, concerns, or questions to etc@spu.edu.

SPU | WINTER 2014

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By Beth Douglass ’10, Hannah Notess, and Julia Siemens | Photos By Luke Rutan

Professor Mentors Professors at Seattle Pacific University have their ideas and research published in scholarly journals and books. Some compose symphonies, others write in Latin, and some earned their PhDs from Yale or Cambridge. But that doesn’t mean they are inaccessible. SPU professors will know your name, mentor you, pray for you, and maybe even invite you over for dinner with their family. This is not a place where you can slink under the radar, but it is a place where you’ll find the academic and personal support necessary to help you succeed at Seattle Pacific and beyond. We’ve gathered just a few examples to show what happens when professors invest in the lives and learning of students.

SENIOR ALLI CUTTING SETS UP A TRANSECT AT NORTH BEACH IN SEATTLE.

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Did you know? PISASTER OCHRACEUS IS A COMMON STARFISH FOUND ON WASHINGTON’S ROCKY BEACHES. MOST ARE PURPLE, BUT THEY CAN ALSO BE ORANGE AND BROWN. FEW ANIMALS EAT STARFISH, WHICH RYAN FERRER, SPU ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY (RIGHT), CALLS A “RAVENOUS PREDATOR” OF MUSSELS AND OTHER SHELLFISH. BUT SEA OTTERS AND GULLS MAY EAT THEM.

Beachcombing For Data Seattle Pacific University senior Alli Cutting spent a pretty amazing summer on the beach. But she wasn’t swimming or relaxing. Instead, rain or shine, she spent hours taking notes and video, watching seagulls dine on starfish. During the summer of 2012, Alli, an ecology major, and Associate Professor of Biology Ryan Ferrer regularly traveled to one of six Puget Sound beaches, arriving an hour before low tide. They would find a particular starfish (Pisaster ochraceus), measure off a 100-by-50-meter area of the beach, and place the starfish in the center of the rectangle, called a transect. Then Alli waited to see whether glaucouswinged gulls (Larus glaucescens) would attack. Gulls could attack starfish anywhere on the beach, but Alli’s transect helped her focus her observations. Some days were action-packed, with gulls fighting over the starfish. Other days, no shorebirds arrived. But those days weren’t wasted. If no birds appeared, they could think about why the birds weren’t there. Alli’s summer field research project contributed to a larger ecological study Ferrer is doing to see how paralytic shellfish toxin — a naturally occurring chemical caused by algal blooms — affects starfish in the rocky intertidal areas of Puget Sound. Previous research shows that shorebirds avoid eating toxic shellfish. So, would birds avoid eating starfish on beaches where shellfish were toxic? Alli doesn’t know the answer for sure — more research is needed. But the experience, designed in collaboration with her professor, confirmed her love for field work. Ferrer encourages his students toward research opportunities that suit their particular interests. “I knew Alli enough to know that she loved the outdoors, so to stick her in a lab with a microscope for hours on end didn’t seem to suit her,” he says. He helped Alli set up the experiment, and encouraged her to strike out on her own, even as he worked on the same beaches, collecting data for another starfishrelated project. Running her own experiment made Alli “a bit nervous at first,” she says. But she also believes it built confidence. “It made me feel like a scientist.”


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LEFT: EVEN THOUGH DOCTORS HAVE CALLED DAVID’S RECOVERY A MIRACLE, IT’S BEEN SLOW. HE RECENTLY STARTED A 20-HOUR-PER-MONTH JOB BUILDING A JOB-TRAINING CURRICULUM FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. RIGHT: HUDSON ORDERED “TEAM DAVID” BRACELETS TO HELP SUPPORT DAVID AND HIS FAMILY AFTER HE SUFFERED A BRAIN BLEED. HUDSON STILL WEARS HER BRACELET REGULARLY.

Cheering for team david In October 2012, it looked like Seattle Pacific University senior David Murahashi might not graduate in the spring as planned. But that was the least of his family’s worries. “We were just hoping he would live,” says his mother, Cathy Murahashi. David, a special education major, developed a debilitating headache while at his internship at Ballard High School in the beginning of Autumn Quarter. The school nurse called an ambulance after he came stumbling into her office and collapsed on the floor. David had suffered a severe brain bleed caused by an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) that occurred in the communication center of his brain. That day his SPU advisor, Debby Hudson, assistant professor of special education, emailed about 40 students, faculty, and staff asking for prayer. “Everyone was dumbfounded,” Hudson says. “He only had 20 weeks left in the program.” Hudson visited David in the hospital and organized for special education majors to bring games, crafts, and food for David’s older sister Holly, who has Down syndrome. When David returned home, Hudson gave the family “Team David” bracelets to give to nurses, therapists, doctors, and prayer supporters. The next year included hours of physical, occupational, and speech therapy. David was in and out of Harborview Medical Center five times for a total of 50 days, and had eight surgeries. “It was like starting from scratch,” David’s mother, Cathy, says. “He had to learn how to walk, talk, and read. Everything was a gift.” Hudson believed it was important that David graduate last spring. She helped the family change his major to a special education general emphasis degree, since he hadn’t been able to complete the internship to receive a teaching certificate. Attending commencement at Century Link Field in June 2013 was tiring for David, but Hudson made sure he had a chair to sit on while other students were standing, and that a close friend could sit by him. “It was a happy and sad day,” David says. “I hadn’t finished exactly what I wanted, but I was proud that I had finished.” David’s prognosis is still unknown as it usually takes at least two years for an AVM to shrink. But the family is hopeful as his progress continues to exceed expectations. LEFT: DEBBY HUDSON, SPU ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, AND DAVID MURAHASHI ’13 LOOK AT A PHOTO OF THEMSELVES AT GRADUATION.

DAVID’S FAMILY LEFT TO RIGHT: KENT, CATHY, DAVID, HOLLY, AND LAURA MURAHASHI. “WE’VE SAID SO MANY TIMES HOW GRATEFUL WE ARE THAT HE WAS AT SPU,” CATHY SAYS. “IF HE WERE SOMEWHERE ELSE, I THINK HE WOULD HAVE JUST DISAPPEARED.”

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Moore opportunities

ITS KIND IN WASHINGTON STATE — AFTER LISTENING TO THE REQUESTS OF SPU STUDENTS.

“ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE 007THS DEFINITELY CONSIDER DR. BROWN A MENTOR,” SENIOR SCOTT NELLESSEN SAYS. “OUR GROUP IS STUDENT FOUNDED AND STUDENT DIRECTED, BUT DR. BROWN HAS BEEN A HUGE ENCOURAGEMENT OVER THIS PAST YEAR.”

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RIGHT: SCOTT’S A CAPELLA VERSION OF LADY GAGA’S “EDGE OF GLORY” MADE THE 007THS A HUGE HIT AT SPU’S ANNUAL HOMECOMING TALENT SHOW.

Did you know? THE NAME 007THS IS PART JAMES BOND REFERENCE, PART MUSIC PUN. IT REFERS TO SEVENTH INTERVALS, USED IN MUSIC COMPOSITION.

CARLENE BROWN CREATED SEATTLE PACIFIC’S MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM — THE FIRST UNDERGRAD PROGRAM OF

Ever stood on stage in front of 1,500 people, performing a song you arranged while a 10-time Grammy-nominated artist sings alongside you? It’s not something that happens every day. But it happened for Seattle Pacific University senior Scott Nellessen. Watching Scott and his SPU a capella men’s group, the 007ths, take the stage is what Carlene Brown, associate professor of music, calls “one of those teary-eyed moments.” She is a talent scout for Seattle Theatre Group, and it’s because of her mentorship and encouragement that the 007ths got this chance to perform. Brown helps with talent scouting and production for More Music @ The Moore, an annual concert at downtown Seattle’s Moore Theatre. “When I saw the level of talent in the 007ths, I encouraged them to audition,” she says. The 2013 concert honored Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Meshell Ndegeocello. More than 100 groups tried out, and the 007ths were one of 10 chosen to perform. But they did more than just sing a few songs. Brown’s style of mentoring is all about empowering her students. “She was very clear about letting us know, ‘This is your thing,’” Scott says. That attitude pushed him to take a risk. When Scott heard Meshell’s song “Oysters,” he thought it would be fun to arrange an a capella version. Meshell listened to Scott’s take on her song, and asked the 007ths if they could perform it onstage — and she even agreed to sing with them. Brown is bursting with pride over the 007ths’ success. Most of the men are music majors, many are involved in other choirs, but all are part of SPU’s Music Department. Now their world is expanding beyond the University. They’ve developed a relationship with Seattle Theatre Group, and they have been asked to sing at more events. “Being asked to perform at professional venues regularly is an unusual experience for a young performer,” Brown says. For the 007ths, there will hopefully be many more big performances to come.


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Big Ideas

Reconciliation

A B R O

Story and photos by senior Rubi Diaz

Linguistics and Cultural Studies and English Literature Double Major

The scent of permanent markers wafted into the cold September air as we left messages on the Peace Wall in Belfast, Northern Ireland. I was studying Celtic Literature in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland with 26 Seattle Pacific University students and three professors. The 800 years of war between the Nationalists (Catholics) and the Unionists (Protestants) are depicted in the three-mile, 25-foot-high wall. It was not until Good Friday of 1998 that a peace treaty was signed. People here live in the shadow of this wall; this is their backyard, and their barrier from each other. Everything I had read to prepare for the trip from Seamus Heaney, W.B. Yeats, Roddy Doyle, and Brian Friel came alive in that moment. I thought of Heaney’s words in the poem “Act of Union”. “No treaty / I foresee will salve completely your tracked / And stretchmarked body, the big pain / That leaves you raw, like opened ground, again.” I knew that knocking down the walls alone won’t bring reconciliation. It will take forgiveness, and letting go of revenge in order to seek healing.

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4. 3.


2.

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A D

6. 5. 2. 1. Sister Phil wove this St. Brigid’s cross in Kildare, Ireland. 2. A random telephone booth in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, is a sign of past British rule. 3. The Long Room in the Trinity College Library in Dublin, Ireland, was built in the early 1700s and houses 200,000 of the library’s oldest books. 4. Our group prepared to descend the scary Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge in Country Antrim, Northern Ireland. 5. The Peace Wall in Belfast, Northern Ireland, holds thousands of hopeful messages from around the world. 6. This is the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic at the Navan Centre and Fort in County Armagh, Northern Ireland.

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Big Ideas

With my camera in hand, I experienced the land through multiple perspectives. When we were in the Corrymeela Community in Belfast, I would wake up at 5 a.m., put on my headphones, and walk down to the beach to watch the sun rise. Almost 50 years old, Corrymeela is a Christian community committed to reconciliation and peace-building among Protestants and Catholics. At the center, we met two former activists from each side named Jerry and Alistair. They were once enemies who planned massive violence, but now are friends who bring reconciliation to their broken communities. In Belfast, we also met a Catholic priest who chose to live in a Protestant area called Shankill Road, despite potential safety concerns. He told us, “As a Catholic, I ask myself, ‘What is my place with my Protestant brothers and sisters? How can we work together to make a better community?’” As our study tour ended, we visited Solas Bhride, a small Christian center in Kildare, Ireland, where people from all faith backgrounds come and learn about Celtic spirituality. It provided us a moment of peace to discern and reflect on the past

8. 20 days. Sister Phil led us in prayer and worship through an Irish hymn, and then began to weave a Brigid’s cross. The cross is traditionally made of rushes and originated in Kildare, the home of Saint Brigid. Sister Phil gently bent the rush, and told us that the first one represented SPU. Then she asked us to name each of the subsequent rushes with what our group desired. As I watched the grass cross come together, I knew that 20 words of hope, peace, and healing will not solve problems. However, I sensed that God’s power can bring change as we all took part in this active prayer.

7. 7. This is our group from SPU and the loving staff at the Corrymeela Community in Ballycastle, Northern Ireland. 8. About 40,000 interlocking basalt columns make up Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland. Legends say these are the stepping stones where giants crossed between Scotland and Ireland.

PHOTO BY LUKE RUTAN

Prof Quiz At Seattle Pacific University, we have 203 full-time faculty members who are experts in their respective fields. Each issue, we’ll introduce you to one, and maybe you’ll learn something new — we always do.

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Lawrence Gulberg Assistant Professor of Chemistry EDUCATION:

PhD in analytical chemistry, University of Washington HOMETOWN:

Bremerton, Washington WHY CHEMISTRY?

THIS BUNSEN BURNER HELPS MAKE A LOT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS HAPPEN IN LAWRENCE GULBERG’S CLASSES.

When I was a kid, I wanted to understand why stuff happens. To me, chemistry is finding out things like “Why is there air?” and “Why does this piece of paper burn?”


9. After a 45-minute hike to the top of Arthur’s Seat, we watched the sun set on Edinburgh, Scotland. 10. The outside architecture of Trinity College Library in Dublin, Ireland, is just as stunning as what’s inside.

10. 9.

11.

12.

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO SOMEONE WHO THINKS CHEMISTRY IS BORING?

I’d say you don’t quite understand it. The more you understand chemistry, the more interesting it becomes. Part of my job is to make it interesting to students. HOW DO YOU DO THAT?

I like to show every chemical reaction we talk about. HOW OFTEN DO YOU DO EXPERIMENTS IN CLASS?

I try to find something each day that applies to what we’re doing. I want students to see and to feel. I hand out test tubes, and

ask “How does this feel?” Then they feel them again after an experiment and the test tubes give off a bunch of heat. That's how we talk about exothermic reactions. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE CHEMICAL AND WHY?

Potassium chlorate (KCLO3). When I melt a little and add a gumdrop, it looks like rocket fuel and shoots out flames. It’s a very reactive oxidizing agent, and it’s dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing.

WHAT HAS CHEMISTRY TAUGHT YOU ABOUT GOD?

I learned a lot about the chemistry/God relationship from Ben McFarland, professor of biochemistry at SPU. He talks about chemistry and the periodic table, and how God made life from these elements at the right time in the age of the history of the Earth. It was a scientific explanation of the chemistry of how life came to be. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR NON-CHEMISTRY MAJORS TO TAKE SOME CHEMISTRY?

In CHM 1110, for example, I want students to understand the purpose of the ozone layer.

11. The Northern Irish shoreline was refreshing on such a busy and emotional trip. 12. A favorite memory was watching the Shamrock Rovers play in Dublin. My Mexican soccer roots came alive as I jumped and screamed in Spanish, “Vamos Rovers, Si Se Puede!” The Rovers beat Drogheda United 2-0.

Why is it in jeopardy? Chemically and physically, what’s happening in the stratosphere? Students will start to understand what is fact and what is hype. YOU’RE IN A BAND?

Yes, N2O. We play covers. Our website is n2oseattle.com. I also sing in the church choir. WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE MAD SCIENTIST IN FILM?

Gene Wilder in “Young Frankenstein.” My favorite real-life mad scientist is physicist Richard Feynman.

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Real Life

By Holly Harris Wood '07 | Photos by Luke Rutan

New students await instructions, while returners peer through the windows with eager anticipation.

The men huddle up.

Shoe flinging ensues.

BURGERS AND BFFs:

New Students Jump in Feet First

It’s hard to say exactly when Dickerellas first started.

Alumni remember it as a back-to-school roommate outing born at least 30 years ago. No matter how it began, it’s become one of Seattle Pacific University’s unforgettable Welcome Week traditions. It’s a little bit retro and a great way to make new friends during your first days on campus. Every year on freshman move-in day, the hall council of one of the residence halls invites new students to the lounge for some major pomp and circumstance: an evening of adventure called Dickerellas. “My first thought was, ‘What is going on “Dickerellas is an immediate getting-tohere? Dickerellas? What is that?’” says freshknow-you event,” says Annabell DuMez, SPU man Jeb English. Then he realized the whole residence life coordinator. “It’s like a giganexperience was an “allegory for college” — tic mixer, and the theme is ‘Embrace the a blur of fresh faces, fast conversations, a awkwardness.’” The returning students gather chance to connect with people you might not around the outside of the room ready to cheer otherwise meet, and a spontaneous outing to a and build up the group’s energy. The goal is to new part of the city. create as much zany fun as possible.

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Destination: Dick’s. Burgers and fries like you wouldn’t believe.

Dress is casual, but if you can rock a bow tie, you should.

It’s a mad dash to claim a shoe!

The rules: All first-year women remove one shoe and throw it into a giant pile in the middle of the hall lounge. All first-year men step forward and pick a shoe from the mountain of boots and running shoes. Then it’s time to find the matching shoe — and your compadre for the evening. Sometimes the gents end up with two shoes, and a trio is formed. Either way, you may find your first friends on campus. Once every shoe has found its mate, all 250 SPU students pile into cars chauffeured by sophomores and head to Dick’s Drive-in. Dick’s is Seattle’s favorite no-frills hamburger joint — kind of like the Pacific Northwest version of In-N-Out Burger. It’s so iconic, you may have seen it in Macklemore’s “White Walls” video.

Hall Council members work with the restaurant to prep for the herd of hungry Falcons before they arrive, and the restaurant becomes a swarm of students for the entire night. Freshmen and returning students alike get out of their comfort zones to meet new faces and swap summer stories. Sophomore Myra Franzone is still friends with her Dickerellas date. “After you experience it, you’re more open to get out and meet new people,” she says. There’s no better way to kick off the first day of college than with new friends and hot fries — Dickerellas does the trick.

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Real Life

“What item could y live without at MARIAH CONLEY EVERETT, WASHINGTON FLUTE “I’ll be in choir, so I don’t have enough time to play flute in a band. I need it so I can practice.”

OLIVIA WALLACE VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON KEEPSAKES FOR HER BULLETIN BOARD

SEAN FERRILL STANWOOD, WASHINGTON FOOTBALL HELMET LAMP After Sean injured his medial collateral ligament (MCL) and continued to come to football practices to encourage his teammates, his high school football coach gave him this custom lamp.

Olivia has spent six years collecting the things for her bulletin board. The collection includes handwritten letters from her boyfriend (who’s going to college in New York), a postcard from the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles, band letters, a bookmark from Costa Rica, and more.

DAVID SALGUERO ASPEN, COLORADO IPHONE 5

ZOË WOLF FEDERAL WAY, WASHINGTON MR. DARCY THE GOLDFISH “It’s my little bit of family that I brought with me.” MARLEY TAYLOR PUYALLUP, WASHINGTON SQUIRREL MUG Why couldn’t she leave her squirrel mug in her parents’ kitchen cupboard? “Just look at it,” Marley says. The mug is from her best friend and incorporates two of her favorite things: hot chocolate and this furry woodland creature.

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David says he’s not sure could have found their w without the help of his ph things on here,” he says. cate with everyone.”


It

was chilly on the last Thursday in September, but new students at Seattle Pacific University were working up a sweat. Freshmen, parents, and student volunteers schlepped mini fridges, duvets, and lamps up the stairs to freshly painted

you not Seattle Pacific?”

he and his parents way to Seattle Pacific hone. “I do so many . “It’s how I communi-

rooms. Amidst all of the commotion, an etc magazine photographer and editor wandered Emerson Residence Hall asking students what item they couldn’t bear to leave at home. Here’s what freshmen said.

PHOTOS BY LUKE RUTAN

ELISHIA CHUN HONOLULU, HAWAII RICE AND MINI RICE COOKER Older Hawaiian students warned Elishia that rice on the mainland is not cooked the same as rice on the islands. So she came prepared. “I grew up with rice, and I feel like it’s part of me,” she says. “I need to have it.” GRAHAM LANDIES NOVATO, CALIFORNIA ORTHODOXY BY G.K. CHESTERTON, TOTAL TRUTH BY NANCY PEARCEY, MERE CHRISTIANITY BY C.S. LEWIS Can you tell that Graham plans to be a philosophy or theology major? His recent favorite of the three is Mere Christianity. “I find myself referencing it all of the time.”

BRAD CHALLIS PARKER, COLORADO BASKETBALL ELIZABETH BARTHOLOMEW SALEM, OREGON ZEBRA PILLOW PET “It will help me sleep better at night.” DAVID KIMN WOODINVILLE, WASHINGTON SPEAKERS

Brad plans to play intramural basketball and to shoot hoops with his friends. “It’s a good way to release stress,” he says. Brad also vowed to be at all of the NCAA Division II Falcon home games, and has the schedule in his room to prove it.

How loud will David’s room be? “It depends on if I get in trouble,” he says.

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Heart & Soul

Expressive, reflective night worship in which the whole service teaches the Scripture selection for the week.

group

Did You Know? Seattle Pacific University was founded by Free Methodists, but today our students and faculty represent more than 60 different Christian denominations. While faculty members are all professing Christians, students do not have to be Christians to be admitted to the University.

Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.

Here’s a look at the

top 13 Christian traditions represented in this year’s freshman class.

Non-Denominational/Independent

9% Catholic 7% Presbyterian 7%

24%

Baptist

Contemplative 30-minute service focused on Communion.

Evangelical Covenant Church Assemblies of God

3%

International Church of the Foursquare Gospel

Calvary Chapel Lutheran

2%

2%

Friday, 12:30 p.m.

3%

Christian and Missionary Alliance Free Methodist Church

2%

2%

Evangelical Free Church of America Church of the Nazarene

1%

SOURCE: SPU’S OFFICE OF INFORMATION AND DATA MANAGEMENT

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grace

3%

2%


B

Y

C

L

I

N

T

K

E

L

L

3 Gs

Y

the A late morning worship space to explore Scripture and the Christian faith through songs, readings, prayer, and short sermons/ testimonies.

gather

Tuesday, 11:10 a.m.

Worship Services at SPU

How do you worship? Do you sit, stand, kneel, dance, pray, draw, or journal? Do you sing hymns or choruses, or a combination of both? Do you feel closer to God in a service that is traditional or contemporary; one that is loud and expressive; or one that is quiet and contemplative? At Seattle Pacific University, you can find all of the above. The variety of worship services offered provides diverse and sacred places to slow down, refocus, and mature in your faith no matter what your Christian tradition or church background. The three main worship services each week are gather, a blend of Scripture, music, and a featured speaker; group, an amalgam of songs, prayers, readings, art, and other forms of expression; and grace, an intimate and contemplative service that follows a liturgy of prayer, confession, and the Lord’s Supper. “This is a time that you can begin taking responsibility for your own life and faith journey,” says Bob Zurinsky, assistant director of University Ministries and a 2002 Seattle Pacific graduate. “SPU provides a broad vision for expressing Christian worship.”

}

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Heart & Soul

gather Tuesday, 11:10 a.m. First Free Methodist Church (adjacent to campus) A late morning worship space to explore Scripture and the Christian faith through songs, readings, prayer, and short sermons/testimonies. Senior music major Samantha Hoshin thinks of gather as a breath of fresh air. “I really enjoy the music — it is contemporary, but also brings fresh life into the hymns of Christian tradition.” Designed for the entire campus, including faculty and staff, gather incorporates prayer, music, and scriptural engagement. It is led each week by students and guest speakers from the campus community or various churches throughout Seattle. “Our Christian traditions and denominations sometimes tend to divide us,” says Zawadi Morrow, minister of worship and production assistant. “This service intention-

group Wednesday, 8:30 p.m. Upper Gwinn Commons Expressive, reflective night worship in which the whole service teaches the Scripture selection for the week. For hundreds of students, group is a weekly passion. No sermons here; instead this is a sanctuary of music and art, a mix of song, poetry, Scripture, prayer, and other activities that speak to the heart as well as the mind. Theology major and senior Nolan Kurtz plays electric guitar in the worship band and calls group his “healthy discipline.” “It’s Scripture-based and helps me better understand the captivating biblical story centered on God’s promise to make life out of death,” he says. “God intends to restore all creation, and group is a place where you can come as you are and immerse yourself in the Christian story.”

For political science major and senior Camille Lampert, it is an opportunity to simply “be” and rest in the presence of God with fellow friends and students. Camille is the acoustic guitarist and a vocalist for the service. She says, “I may be playing or singing, but I’m worshipping along with the congregation.” It is her time to step back from the rhythm of sleep, class, and homework to a worryfree zone, a place to replenish “that definitely helps me get through those late-night study sessions.”

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{

DID YOU KNOW? UNIVERSITY MINISTRIES STAFF AND STUDENT LEADERS RECEIVE PRAYER REQUESTS AND PRAY AS A TEAM FOR SPU STUDENTS, STAFF, AND FACULTY.


ally ‘gathers’ faculty, staff, and students from many different faith backgrounds to celebrate the unity we share in Christ.” For Instructor of Voice Julie Sigars, it is a time “when I can put that (teaching) role down for a while and be a part of the assembly gathered.”

grace

To senior and Vice President of Campus Ministries Scott Jackson, grace is “a hidden gem” that is a more intimate reminder of God’s love. It connects him to believers globally and across time. Assistant Professor of Theology, Discipleship, and Ministry Michael Langford finds much to like in a number of worship styles, including traditional, liturgical, contemporary, and charismatic. He likes grace because the liturgy is ecumenical and “we are all on equal footing before God. The common experience is powerful.” He hopes that students without a wide range of worship experiences will see their college years as a chance to broaden not only their intellectual life, but also their worship life. He thinks grace is a prime example of what they might otherwise miss: “It provides a more receptive posture before God and produces a greater degree of intimacy among the worshipers, and between the worshipers and God.”

Friday, 12:30 p.m. Demaray Chapel, First Free Methodist Church (adjacent to campus) Contemplative 30-minute service focused on Communion.

To learn more about University Ministries at Seattle Pacific, visit spu.edu/um.

Grace is the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, a simple, small, candlelit service centered around a loaf of bread and a cup of juice. It is a time of prayers of confession and recommitment followed by the Eucharist, and it is essential to the students, staff, and faculty who attend.

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Urban Adventure By senior ASHLEY BOUCHER Photos by LUKE RUTAN

Seattle: The Left to right: Freshman Cody Duoos, junior Grace Park, junior Meranda Clausen, senior Matthew Schueller, and junior John Jarman take selfies at Gas Works Park. #classic

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Pier 59 is home to the Seattle Aquarium, the ninth largest in the United States by attendance.

SPU View

Say, “Space Needle!�

Where students take their visitors

Seattle Pacific University students

love to rep Seattle. With so many neighborhoods, quirky shops, and interesting people, the Emerald City is the perfect place to show off. Nestled on the northern side of Queen Anne Hill, mere minutes from downtown and the Space Needle, SPU is in a prime location to walk, bike, or bus to favorite locales. Whether you peoplewatch, nosh on distinctive food, or admire one of many views of the Puget Sound, your guests will get a little taste of living the Seattle Pacific life. Last spring, we surveyed SPU students on their favorite places to take visitors, and here are their top picks:

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Urban Adventure Seattle’s Great Wheel is the largest Ferris wheel on the West Coast at 175-feet tall.

Quack, quack. Bark, bark. Ducks and seals abound near the Argosy Cruise dock.

The Crab Pot was featured in season one of the Travel Channel’s “Man v. Food.”

The Waterfront A sprawling 2.8 miles makes a beautiful, easygoing bike ride from Smith Cove in Magnolia to the Olympic Sculpture Park at Broad Street and Alaskan Street. After your ride, lock up your bike and meander along the piers. Grab some salmon fish and chips at Ivar’s ($8.59), take a ride on Seattle’s Great Wheel ($13 for an adult ticket), and watch the ferry boats come and go. Stick around till sunset to see the distant Olympic Mountains turn purple. Junior Natalie Pimblett says that Ye Olde Curiosity Shop, which features Native American artwork and other sundries, and the old arcade on Pier 54 are two of her favorite spots because they highlight Seattle’s quirkiness. “There’s a mix of so many types of people [at the waterfront],” Natalie explains, “from business people to street artists and musicians.” 26

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Ivar’s was named for its “flounder,” Ivar Haglund, who also opened the first Seattle aquarium on Pier 54.

Gas Works Park Just a 30-minute walk from campus, Gas Works Park is anything but ordinary. You’ll pass a sign as you cross the Fremont Bridge that welcomes you to the “Center of the Universe,” demonstrating why Fremont is arguably Seattle’s most eccentric neighborhood. Take a quick detour to snag a photo with the legendary Fremont Troll under the Aurora Bridge on your way to the iconic park. Once you’re there, play Frisbee or fly a kite while you Running free at Gas Works — I’ll race you to the bottom!


Did you know? That cone-licking pup, Parker Posey, belongs to the shop’s owner, Molly Moon Neitzel.

watch the sailboats, paddleboarders, and tour boats cruise Lake Union. Junior John Jarman, a peer advisor in Hill Hall, says he likes to take visiting students to Gas Works for the impressive view of the downtown skyline. Gas Works was originally a site used for turning coal into gas, but the main boiler is now a picnic shelter. On your way back to SPU, take a pit stop at Blue Moon Burgers on 34 th Street, which has classic burgers and vegetarian and glutenfree options.

Sample the seasonal flavor! Black peppercorn crème fraîche, anyone?

Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream and Kerry Park

Everything’s better with fudge. Take a jar home for $12.95.

On top of the world at Gas Works Park. Enjoy homemade, fresh waffle cones at each of Molly Moon’s six Seattle locations.

A favorite SPU pastime is heading up Queen Anne Hill to Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream Shop to grab some ice cream and stroll to Kerry Park. Molly Moon’s is a treat for all of your senses — smell the homemade waffle cones, bop your head to the ice cream scoopers’ personal playlists, and, of course, taste Northwestinspired ice cream flavors such as Honey Lavender and Stumptown Coffee. If your visitors are sad they can’t take a to-go pint (or two or three or five) in their suitcases, the Molly Moon’s cookbook is the perfect souvenir ($21.95). Once you arrive at Kerry Park on Highland Drive, located a few minutes south of Molly Moon’s, your eyes will be dazzled with one of Seattle’s most famous views. Sophomore Dalanie Church recently took her sister to Molly Moon’s, which she frequents with friends year-round. After they walked to Kerry Park with scoops of vanilla and salted caramel, her sister was “in awe of how beautiful the park is at night.”

Students pose inside Kerry Park’s “Changing Form” sculpture.

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SPU: Nuts & Bolts

2

My

Cents’ Worth

What can I do now as a high school student to prepare for college? Take challenging courses, stay focused on what is important, and get involved in activities you care about. But make sure you find the right balance. Students have told me that they were so busy that their grades suffered. I’ve also had students with incredible grades but a blank list of activities, which makes them easy to forget. You want to strike that balance.

“My encouragement is to apply — you never know what type of aid you will receive.” — Ineliz Soto-Fuller

What’s the best way to impress your admissions counselor? Be yourself while being professional. I have had students come to my office dressed nicely and prepared with questions and knowledge of SPU, and I can also sense they are being genuine. Those are the students I remember and want to see at SPU! How have the classes of incoming students changed during your time at SPU? When I started working here seven years ago, only 13 percent of our students were students of color. In recent years, that percentage has increased to more than 30 percent! Not only is ethnic diversity increasing, but we have also seen changes in socioeconomic diversity as well. What do you think are common misconceptions about SPU? Some students think SPU is not accessible to them. They see the cost and don’t even apply. My encouragement is to apply — you never know what type of aid you will receive, and there is a reason why SPU is ranked as No. 2 for “Best Value” in the West by U.S News & World Report. Ineliz Soto-Fuller Assistant Director of Admission and Multicultural Outreach

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Did you know? Last academic year, 58,284 books were checked out of SPU’s library. Plus, Seattle Pacific is part of the 37-university-strong Orbis Cascade Alliance book-sharing system, so you’ll always be able to get the book you need.


Academic Programs Accounting Applied Mathematics Art Art History Biochemistry Biology (Cell and Molecular, Ecology, Human, Physiology) Business Administration (Entrepreneurship, Finance, Information Systems, International Business, Management, Marketing, Social Enterprise) Chemistry Christian Scripture Christian Spirituality Christian Theology Classics Clothing and Textiles (Fashion Merchandising, Apparel Design) Coaching Science Communication Computer Science Economics Education (Elementary, Secondary, Special Education) Electrical Engineering English (Creative Writing, Literature) Engineering (Appropriate and Sustainable, Computer, Mechanical) Elementary Education (Integrated Studies) Exercise Science Family and Consumer Sciences Fashion (Apparel Design, Merchandising) Food and Nutritional Sciences (Dietetics, Sports and Exercise) French and Francophone Studies General Studies Global and Urban Ministry Global Development Studies Health and Fitness Education History Illustration/New Pictures Individual and Family Development Information Systems Interior Design International Service Certificate Journalism Latin Latin American Studies Linguistics and Cultural Studies Mathematics Music (Composition, Education, Performance, Technology, Worship Arts) Music Therapy Nursing Philosophy Physics

1 President Daniel J. Martin SPU by the Numbers 3,366 Undergraduate student

Political Science (Geopolitics, International Affairs, Leadership, Public Policy and Law) Pre-Law Pre-Professional Health Programs Professional Studies Professional Writing Psychology Reconciliation Studies Russian Sociology Spanish Student-Designed Majors Studio Arts Theatre (Performance, Production, Teaching) Visual Communication Women’s Studies Youth Ministry Off-Campus Programs SPU Study Abroad Programs: Austria/Switzerland (Interior Design), Belize (Tropical Marine Biology), British Isles, China (Business), European Quarter, Galápagos Islands (Tropical Marine Biology), Guatemala (Global Development, Physics, or Spanish), Guatemala (Transcultural Nursing), Ireland/Scotland (English and Theology), Morocco (English), Paris (Film Studies or French), Philippines (Family and Consumer Sciences), Rome (Arts and English), South Africa (History, Literature, and Theatre). Programs Through the CCCU: American Studies (Washington, D.C.), Australia Studies, China Studies, Contemporary Music Center (New York), Film Studies (Los Angeles), India Studies, Latin American Studies, Middle East Studies, Oxford Honors Program, Oxford Summer School, Washington, D.C., Journalism Center, Uganda Studies

Other Student Visit Programs: Christian College Consortium Student Visitor Program, Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (Los Angeles), Fashion Institute of Technology (New York City)

NCAA Division II

Sports: Men’s and Women’s Basketball, Crew, Cross Country, Soccer, Indoor/Outdoor Track, Women’s Gymnastics and Volleyball SPU No. 2 for “Best Value” in the West

enrollment

875 Graduate and post

baccalaureate student enrollment

1,715 Students living on campus 43% Freshmen from out of state

203 Full-time SPU faculty

3.26–3.75 Middle 50 percent GPA of entering freshmen

15:1 Student-faculty ratio 37 Inches of rain a year in

Seattle (less than Miami, Boston, New York, and Chicago)

23 Intramural sports 95% Undergraduate students

who receive scholarships and/or need-based financial aid

0 Classes taught by

graduate assistants

1050–1230 Middle 50

percent combined SAT score (critical reading and math) of entering freshmen

23–28 Middle 50 percent

ACT score of entering freshmen

32% Ethnically diverse undergraduate students

90% or more of SPU applicants

consistently accepted to pre-professional health programs, including dentistry, physical therapy, veterinary medicine, optometry, occupational therapy, and medical school

96%

2012 graduates who were employed or in graduate school one year after graduation Information based on 2013–14 statistics, unless stated otherwise.

— U.S. News & World Report 2013 College Rankings

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★ SPU: Nuts & Bolts

Come Visit.

You’ve got to see this place! spu.edu/visit

About 40,000 alumni have graduated from Seattle Pacific.

Scheduling Your Visit — Call the Office of Undergraduate Admissions toll free at 800-366-3344 to schedule a visit. Check out spu.edu/visit for details. Overnight Visit — Previews include housing in the residence halls, meals in Gwinn Commons, and classroom visits. Admitted Student Preview: April 3-4, 2014 One-Day Visits — One-day visits usually include a campus tour, a faculty and student panel, lunch, and more. SPU Fridays:

January 31, 2014 February 7, 14, 2014 April 11, 18, 25, 2014

Individual Visits — Customize your visit! We’ll help you set up a campus tour and a meeting with an admissions counselor. Give us two weeks’ notice, and we can arrange a class visit, a meeting with a faculty member, or an overnight stay.

Visit us and see if you’re meant to wear this sweatshirt.

Fine Arts Scholarship Auditions — Come to campus and show us your skills in theatre, music, or visual art. For details, visit spu.edu/fpascholarships.

Interested in applying for Autumn 2014?

November 15 Early Action Deadline

Important Dates January 1 First Day to Submit FAFSA

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SPU’s science building, Eaton Hall, contains eight undergraduate research laboratories, 11 teaching laboratories, and a greenhouse.

February 1 FAFSA Deadline

February 1 First-Year Freshman Application Deadline (in order to be considered for scholarships and the best financial aid awards)

April 1 Transfer Priority Application Deadline (in order to be considered for scholarships and the best financial aid awards)

July 1 Transfer Application Deadline

May 1 National Candidates’ Reply Date: $200 Advance Payment Due

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SPU: Nuts & Bolts

Let students take you on a tour at spu.edu/campusvid

Apply! Important things to know

if you decide to apply for admission How and When to Apply

Go to spu.edu/apply. (Simple, right?)

We use the Common Application to make things even easier. Early Action Plan This is a great choice if SPU is one of your top choices. Early Action gives you priority status in financial aid and housing. Admission Deadlines • Early Action Deadline: November 15 • First-Year Freshman Deadline: February 1 • Transfer Priority Deadline: April 1 • Transfer Deadline: July 1 Some Things We Look For Grades and Grade Trend: These are important because we want to make sure you will succeed in SPU’s challenging academic environment.

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Incoming Freshman Class Middle 50 Percent: • High School GPA: 3.26–3.75 • SAT Score (CR+M): 1050–1230 • ACT Score: 23–28 Test Scores: We accept either the SAT or the ACT. SPU’s test codes: SAT–4694, ACT–4476. Essays: Tell us about you! Be creative — but, even more important, be authentic. Recommendations: We consider the opinions of your teachers, mentors, and youth leaders essential. Interview: This is optional, but it allows us to connect a face and a personality with your admission file. A phone interview is also an option. Mission Fit: We look for students who are energized by SPU’s vision to engage the culture and change the world.


How Real Students

Pay for College

A name and a face to go with the numbers

Recipient: Sophomore Tucker Goodman, theatre major with an emphasis in production from Issaquah, Washington

Did you know? This year, the average

Scholarship: Fine Arts Scholarship (The amount awarded varies, but I get $2,000 per year.) Additional SPU scholarships: The Chela Causey Scholarship for theatre ($600 per year), Trustees’ Scholar Award (currently $17,000 per year), SPU Legacy Scholarship ($1,500 per year) Campus involvement: I’m an electrician for the Theatre Department, and I act in and stage-manage SPU theatre productions. How did you audition for the fine arts scholarship? I prepared a monologue and spruced up a stage management portfolio from a show I had already closed. Why theatre production? My ultimate goal is to own a theatre someday, and it’s important to me that I experience all aspects of theatre before I attempt to lead one on my own. The production track allows me to experience it all — from designing sets and costumes to directing and stage managing. At Seattle Pacific, we have the opportunity to work with adjunct faculty and guest artists who are designers or directors from the professional theatre world.

financial assistance per student at SPU was

Tucker Goodman is a fifth-generation Falcon.

$29,857.

Financing Your

Education

All the basic things you should know about financial aid SPU Annual Costs for 2013–14 • Tuition & Fees = $33,813 • Room & Board = varies; $9,867 average • Total Direct Cost = varies; $43,680 average

school you choose. To send your results to SPU, include the SPU code (003788). fafsa.ed.gov

If those numbers look intimidating, we have good news for you. We want to help.

3. Respond Accurately and on Time. For the best scholarships and most generous financial aid packages, meet all financial aid deadlines.

How to Apply

Financial Aid Deadlines

1. Apply to SPU. Your application for admission also serves as your application for most SPU scholarships. Get your app in early for your best chance to receive merit scholarships. spu.edu/apply

Freshman SPU Scholarships and Grants Apply for admission by February 1.

2. Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The info you provide on the FAFSA is used to determine how much money your family is expected to pay (aka Expected Family Contribution). Your EFC is the same no matter what

Transfer SPU Scholarships and Grants For priority consideration, apply for admission by April 1. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) You’ll want to do this as soon as you can. Start after January 1, and complete no later than February 1.

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SPU: Nuts & Bolts What to Expect in an SPU Financial Aid Package

Eligibility: What Matters Most Scholarships: Grades, test scores, and involvement in school, church, and community are all considered important.

Several forms of aid may be included in your aid package: • • • •

SPU Scholarships Federal, State, and SPU Grants Student Employment (Work Study) Student Loans

Meet some

stellar alumni

Need-based financial aid (grants, loans, student employment): Family and student income/assets, number of family members in college, size of family household, and age of older parent are all considered. In some cases, unique financial circumstances will also be considered.

For details: spu.edu/sfs

spu.edu/scholarships Scholarship

Amount

Award Guidelines*

FRESHMAN MERIT AWARDS

SPU Scholar Awards* Full tuition Trustees’ Scholar Awards* $17,000 President’s Scholar Awards* $15,000 Deans’ Scholar Awards* $12,000 FIRST Robotics Scholarships $5,000

Apply by invitation only GPA: 3.92; SAT: 1316 or ACT: 30 GPA: 3.74; SAT: 1208 or ACT: 27 GPA: 3.49; SAT: 1106 or ACT: 24 For high school seniors who have participated on a FIRST Robotics or FIRST Tech Challenge team

Engineering Scholarships $5,000 (Deffenbaugh or Burwell) SPU National Merit Scholarships $2,000

For incoming freshmen who plan to major in an engineering discipline National Merit Corporation semifinalist or finalist

Cara Wall-Scheffler ’00 is an associate professor of biology at SPU. Her research on how men and women walk together was published in more than 200 news outlets around the world.

OTHER AWARDS (FOR FRESHMEN AND TRANSFERS)

Ames Scholarships Varies For underrepresented ethnic minority students; details at spu.edu/ames Fine Arts Scholarships Up to $3,000 Details at spu.edu/fpascholarships Free Methodist Scholarships $2,000 Affiliated with the Free Methodist Church Alumni Scholarships $1,500 Parent(s) graduated from SPU Ministry Service Awards $1,500 Parent(s) employed full-time with a Christian church, mission, or para-church organization Church Matching Scholarships Up to $500 Church must apply to participate ROTC Academic Achievement Awards

Room and board

ROTC requirements

NCAA Division II Athletic Scholarships

Varies

Contact coaches: 206-281-2085

Tim Hanstad ’85 is the president and CEO of Landesa, which has helped to secure land rights for more than 100 million of the world’s poorest families.

* Guidelines reflect an average of GPAs and SAT (CR+M) scores earned by students who entered SPU in Autumn 2013.

Amounts awarded could change for following classes. A student may receive no more than one of the awards noted with an (*) in the same academic year. Note: If you’re a transfer student, please visit spu.edu/transferscholarships to see merit awards.

Questions? Undergraduate Admissions (visits, admission information, transcript evaluations, transfer requirements) 206-281-2021 800-366-3344 Toll Free 206-281-2544 Fax* admissions@spu.edu spu.edu/admissions *Note: Faxed transcripts will not be accepted as official documents. 34

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Steve Sakanashi ’08 developed Sekai Creator, a nine-week entrepreneurship education program for Japanese exchange students.

Student Financial Services (financial aid, student employment, student accounts, payment plans) 206-281-2061 800-737-8826 Toll Free spu.edu/sfs Scholarship Information and Applications spu.edu/scholarships


My World The scent of coffee beans roasting in a popcorn popper or drum roaster often filled Alex Piasecki’s residence hall last year. He and six other friends started 6th Hill Coffee Roasters as a nonprofit, in hopes that proceeds could support farmers or ministries. “I want to use the things I learn in my educational ministry

S PU. E D U / M Y WO R L D

major and implement them in my daily life,” Alex says. The coffee business continues while he’s also taken on a bi-monthly event called Soup and Sing. Thirty college students pack into his living room to worship God and eat homemade minestrone. It appears that Alex’s ministry has a theme: It’s delicious.


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID SEATTLE, WA PERMIT NO. 1179

etc Magazine Office of Undergraduate Admissions 3307 Third Avenue West Seattle, Washington 98119-1922

Change Service Requested

WINTER 14

See if SPU is the place for you.

Visit us.

spu.edu/visit

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Winter 2014 - Professor Mentors