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ABOUT US The Cross-Cultural Center is committed to supporting the needs of UCSD’s campus communities by creating a welcoming and holistic learning environment for everyone. Our vision at the Cross-Cultural Center is to empower UCSD to recognize, challenge, and take proactive approaches to diversity for campus as a whole. As part of the UC San Diego Campus Community Centers, we value differences and building relationships at all levels of the university and experience community and diversity through a broad lens.

Cross-Cultural Center A Unit of the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion UC San Diego 9500 Gilman Dr MC 0053 La Jolla, CA 92093 858.534.9689 cccenter@ucsd.edu ccc.ucsd.edu Facebook.com/ucsdccc Instagram.com/ucsdcrossculturalcenter

Ucsdcrossculturalcenter.tumblr.com Twitter.com/UCSD_CCC

Vimeo.com/crossculturalcenter Issuu.com/ucsd.ccc

UC San Diego Cross-Cultural Center 2015-2016 Annual Report A Unit of the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion


Table of Contents 1

Executive and Data Summary

2

Vision, Mission, and Philosophy

3

Acknowledgements 2015-2016

5

Social Justice Leadership Academy

6

Community and Inclusion

7

Academic and Faculty Engagement

8

Staff Engagement

9

Internship Program

Volunteer Program

11

Student-Centered Programming

13

Affiliates Program and Leadership

17

Cross-Cultural Center Staff Impact Data

19

Gallery and Art Programs

21

Marketing and Social Media

22

Social Justice Educator Workshops

23

Center Usage Data

25


Table of Contents 1

Executive and Data Summary

2

Vision, Mission, and Philosophy

3

Acknowledgements 2015-2016

5

Social Justice Leadership Academy

6

Community and Inclusion

7

Academic and Faculty Engagement

8

Staff Engagement

9

Internship Program

Volunteer Program

11

Student-Centered Programming

13

Affiliates Program and Leadership

17

Cross-Cultural Center Staff Impact Data

19

Gallery and Art Programs

21

Marketing and Social Media

22

Social Justice Educator Workshops

23

Center Usage Data

25


Vision, Mission, and Philosophy

Executive and Data Summary With an eye toward meeting Campus Strategic Goal 2- Cultivating a diverse and inclusive University community that encourages respectful open dialogue and challenges itself to take bold actions that will ensure learning is accessible and affordable for all-the Cross-Cultural Center implemented a series of assessments, programs, and events to support campus equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts. Our 2015-2016 highlights include:

Our Mission

The UCSD Cross-Cultural Center is dedicated to supporting the needs of UCSD’s diverse student, staff, faculty, and San Diego community. Our mission is to create a learning environment in which the entire campus community feels welcome. Within this charge, and in collaboration with existing campus programs, the Cross-Cultural Center's priority is to: *Facilitate the academic, professional and personal development of students, staff and faculty who are members of historically under-represented groups. *Provide programs and services to foster discussions on issues related to the creation of a multi-ethnic, culturally conscious university.

• The staff implemented improved assessment measures including collecting ad-hoc counseling data, foot traffic reports, program surveys, and impact data from our social justice trainings. • The CCC took the lead, in partnership with other Campus Community Centers, for Triton Day where 400 underrepresented/underserved prospective students and families attended planned yield activities.

Our Vision

To empower UCSD to recognize, challenge, and take proactive approaches to diversity for the campus and the San Diego community.

• There was an increase in the student volunteer program from 4 to 28 students. The cohort this year was 58% first year and 24% transfer students, making this program a gateway for new students to get involved and connect to UC San Diego.

Cross-Cultural Center 2015-16 Statistics at a Glance

• A six-session Social Justice Leadership Academy (SJLA) as a pathway for all majors to learn about issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion was piloted. • On behalf of the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, the Campus Community Center directors developed and launched Leaders for Equity Advancement and Diversity (LEAD) Fellows Pilot Program, which brought together MSP-A Managers across all Vice Chancellor areas. The LEAD Fellows work to advance education and build capacity for a more inclusive university.

1

CCC Intern Retreat

Area

Counts

Notes

Lobby Drop In (Students)

8961 (Scan)

Ad Hoc Advising

352 Advising and referral hours

Students study, eat lunch, and gather between classes. Students seek out advice and referral from CCC staff.

Campus and Community Consultations

78 Requests for consultation

The CCC is contacted to share best practices with campus departments and other institutions.

Staff Training and Workshops

25 Workshops with over 550 participants

CCC staff build cultural competency across campus and the community.

Faculty and Teaching Assistant Office Hours

3 Faculty and 7 Teaching Assistants conducted 85 hours of student advising

New students are introduced to the Center through office hours.

P. L. A. C. E. S. Philosophy Promoting respectful dialogues Leadership Affirmation of identities Community building Empowerment Social justice lens

2


Vision, Mission, and Philosophy

Executive and Data Summary With an eye toward meeting Campus Strategic Goal 2- Cultivating a diverse and inclusive University community that encourages respectful open dialogue and challenges itself to take bold actions that will ensure learning is accessible and affordable for all-the Cross-Cultural Center implemented a series of assessments, programs, and events to support campus equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts. Our 2015-2016 highlights include:

Our Mission

The UCSD Cross-Cultural Center is dedicated to supporting the needs of UCSD’s diverse student, staff, faculty, and San Diego community. Our mission is to create a learning environment in which the entire campus community feels welcome. Within this charge, and in collaboration with existing campus programs, the Cross-Cultural Center's priority is to: *Facilitate the academic, professional and personal development of students, staff and faculty who are members of historically under-represented groups. *Provide programs and services to foster discussions on issues related to the creation of a multi-ethnic, culturally conscious university.

• The staff implemented improved assessment measures including collecting ad-hoc counseling data, foot traffic reports, program surveys, and impact data from our social justice trainings. • The CCC took the lead, in partnership with other Campus Community Centers, for Triton Day where 400 underrepresented/underserved prospective students and families attended planned yield activities.

Our Vision

To empower UCSD to recognize, challenge, and take proactive approaches to diversity for the campus and the San Diego community.

• There was an increase in the student volunteer program from 4 to 28 students. The cohort this year was 58% first year and 24% transfer students, making this program a gateway for new students to get involved and connect to UC San Diego.

Cross-Cultural Center 2015-16 Statistics at a Glance

• A six-session Social Justice Leadership Academy (SJLA) as a pathway for all majors to learn about issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion was piloted. • On behalf of the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, the Campus Community Center directors developed and launched Leaders for Equity Advancement and Diversity (LEAD) Fellows Pilot Program, which brought together MSP-A Managers across all Vice Chancellor areas. The LEAD Fellows work to advance education and build capacity for a more inclusive university.

1

CCC Intern Retreat

Area

Counts

Notes

Lobby Drop In (Students)

8961 (Scan)

Ad Hoc Advising

352 Advising and referral hours

Students study, eat lunch, and gather between classes. Students seek out advice and referral from CCC staff.

Campus and Community Consultations

78 Requests for consultation

The CCC is contacted to share best practices with campus departments and other institutions.

Staff Training and Workshops

25 Workshops with over 550 participants

CCC staff build cultural competency across campus and the community.

Faculty and Teaching Assistant Office Hours

3 Faculty and 7 Teaching Assistants conducted 85 hours of student advising

New students are introduced to the Center through office hours.

P. L. A. C. E. S. Philosophy Promoting respectful dialogues Leadership Affirmation of identities Community building Empowerment Social justice lens

2


Acknowledgements 2015-2016

Cross-Cultural Center Undergraduate Intern Cohort 2015-2016

The Center is only as impactful as the staff and interns who work tirelessly to create programs and services that critically engage and build community at UC San Diego. Thank you to the 2015-16 intern cohort for your work and dedication.

Preuss High School Intern Cohort 2015-2016

Cross-Cultural Center Faculty in Residence Dr. Robert Castro

Cross-Cultural Center Undergraduate Intern Team Special Operations: Jolena Vergara Collas Kevin Le Edward Nadurata Hye Young Choi Social Justice Educators: Veronica Sanchez Natalie Lai Fatima Kamil Alexis Buz

Joy de la Cruz Art and Activism Campus Outreach and Engagement Affiliates and Leadership Common Ground Newsletter and Marketing Programming Assistants: Maurx Salcedo Peña Whitney La

Preuss Interns: Carl De Leon Lilian Robles Gabby Ramos

Faculty in Residence: Also, we would like to thank Dr. Robert Castro for your dedication and work with the Center this year. 3

“Everyone says this, but this internship really was transformative for myself. In regards to my overall UCSD experience, it definitely just strengthens my sense of belonging here and a sense of community and support that I struggled too much to find during my first year.” -Student intern

4


Acknowledgements 2015-2016

Cross-Cultural Center Undergraduate Intern Cohort 2015-2016

The Center is only as impactful as the staff and interns who work tirelessly to create programs and services that critically engage and build community at UC San Diego. Thank you to the 2015-16 intern cohort for your work and dedication.

Preuss High School Intern Cohort 2015-2016

Cross-Cultural Center Faculty in Residence Dr. Robert Castro

Cross-Cultural Center Undergraduate Intern Team Special Operations: Jolena Vergara Collas Kevin Le Edward Nadurata Hye Young Choi Social Justice Educators: Veronica Sanchez Natalie Lai Fatima Kamil Alexis Buz

Joy de la Cruz Art and Activism Campus Outreach and Engagement Affiliates and Leadership Common Ground Newsletter and Marketing Programming Assistants: Maurx Salcedo Peña Whitney La

Preuss Interns: Carl De Leon Lilian Robles Gabby Ramos

Faculty in Residence: Also, we would like to thank Dr. Robert Castro for your dedication and work with the Center this year. 3

“Everyone says this, but this internship really was transformative for myself. In regards to my overall UCSD experience, it definitely just strengthens my sense of belonging here and a sense of community and support that I struggled too much to find during my first year.” -Student intern

4


Community and Inclusion, K-12 Outreach

Social Justice Leadership Academy The successful launch of the Cross-Cultural Center Social Justice Leadership Academy occurred in winter quarter with a cohort of eight undergraduate students. At the conclusion of the six sessions held during winter and spring quarters. Students presentated on a topic of their choosing based on content covered in class. Students completed a self assessment survey at the beginning of instruction and again at the conclusion of the class; assessment results show that 88% of the SJLA participants increased their overall rating in the category of Social Justice Knowledge and Awareness at the conclusion of the program.

SOCIAL JUSTICE LEADERSHIP ACADEMY GOALS: * Increase awareness of the intersections of identities across power, position, privilege, process, and perspective * Create opportunities to self-reflect and build community * Develop professional skills and tools in facilitating conversation relating to social justice and diversity approaches for critical thinking, leadership, and pedagogy

2015-2016 connected the Cross-Cultural Center with members of campus and Visitors School/Group surrounding communities to include: K-12 groups, community-based schools, La Clase Mágica 2 college-bound students, professional staff, and international professional staff. The Mira Costa College Visit 60 Cross-Cultural Center provided educational consultation and workshops for each of these groups to emphasize inclusive practices within the organization and in Triton Transfer Day 30 outreach and recruitment. Los Angeles Harbor College 35 K-12 Outreach and Yield Palomar College Teaching & Learning Center 50 K-12 visits to the Cross-Cultural Center occurred throughout the 2015-2016 year Mesa, Miramar SD City ASG Retreat 60 through several channels, most of which are based on existing partnerships and made possible with alumni outreach, the Financial Aid Office, TRiO Programs, Keiller Leadership Academy 60 student organizations' high school conferences, and personal referrals. Comienza con un Sueño 50

“This workshop helped me move past the white guilt stage I was at when I first entered, to one of allyship. The more personalized structure of this workshop has helped me to gain a better understand of not just where my narrative fits into the cycle of socialization and institutions of power, but where the narratives of others fit and cross over with mine; the privileges my positions afford and the lived experiences of others.” -SJLA participant

5

Social Justice Leadership Academy first session

K-12 student tour and panel

EjE School Visit

25

SPACES Overnight Program

15

Esparto High School Visit

6

Triton Day Community Yield Activity

375+

AVID Wilson High School

48

AVID Hilltop High School

65

Garrison Elementary 5th Grade

72

Logan School 6th-8th Grade

38

Mission Middle School 7th and 8th Grade

150

Total

1131+

6


Community and Inclusion, K-12 Outreach

Social Justice Leadership Academy The successful launch of the Cross-Cultural Center Social Justice Leadership Academy occurred in winter quarter with a cohort of eight undergraduate students. At the conclusion of the six sessions held during winter and spring quarters. Students presentated on a topic of their choosing based on content covered in class. Students completed a self assessment survey at the beginning of instruction and again at the conclusion of the class; assessment results show that 88% of the SJLA participants increased their overall rating in the category of Social Justice Knowledge and Awareness at the conclusion of the program.

SOCIAL JUSTICE LEADERSHIP ACADEMY GOALS: * Increase awareness of the intersections of identities across power, position, privilege, process, and perspective * Create opportunities to self-reflect and build community * Develop professional skills and tools in facilitating conversation relating to social justice and diversity approaches for critical thinking, leadership, and pedagogy

2015-2016 connected the Cross-Cultural Center with members of campus and Visitors School/Group surrounding communities to include: K-12 groups, community-based schools, La Clase Mágica 2 college-bound students, professional staff, and international professional staff. The Mira Costa College Visit 60 Cross-Cultural Center provided educational consultation and workshops for each of these groups to emphasize inclusive practices within the organization and in Triton Transfer Day 30 outreach and recruitment. Los Angeles Harbor College 35 K-12 Outreach and Yield Palomar College Teaching & Learning Center 50 K-12 visits to the Cross-Cultural Center occurred throughout the 2015-2016 year Mesa, Miramar SD City ASG Retreat 60 through several channels, most of which are based on existing partnerships and made possible with alumni outreach, the Financial Aid Office, TRiO Programs, Keiller Leadership Academy 60 student organizations' high school conferences, and personal referrals. Comienza con un Sueño 50

“This workshop helped me move past the white guilt stage I was at when I first entered, to one of allyship. The more personalized structure of this workshop has helped me to gain a better understand of not just where my narrative fits into the cycle of socialization and institutions of power, but where the narratives of others fit and cross over with mine; the privileges my positions afford and the lived experiences of others.” -SJLA participant

5

Social Justice Leadership Academy first session

K-12 student tour and panel

EjE School Visit

25

SPACES Overnight Program

15

Esparto High School Visit

6

Triton Day Community Yield Activity

375+

AVID Wilson High School

48

AVID Hilltop High School

65

Garrison Elementary 5th Grade

72

Logan School 6th-8th Grade

38

Mission Middle School 7th and 8th Grade

150

Total

1131+

6


Staff Engagement

Academic and Faculty Engagement Academic and faculty engagement at the Cross-Cultural Center occurs in several ways: networking and community mixers, graduate student thesis defenses, committee work, academic and book presentations, and annual signature programs, such as Women of Color in the Academy and the Faculty in Residence Program. This year, the Cross-Cultural Center held sessions for a new networking support group for graduate students, Grad Chats, in the spring. The Faculty in Residence Program is an annual invitation for resident faculty to work with the Cross-Cultural Center and engage the campus community in educational awareness. Dr. Robert Castro, a Theater and Dance Department professor, held classes at the Cross-Cultural Center and invited members from Homeboy Industries, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing job skills for the formerly incarcerated, to share their narratives at the Cross-Cultural Center.

7

Date Academic and Faculty Engagement Activity

Guests

10/02 Faculty Outreach Mixer

17

10/07 Dr. Gary Fields, Art Reception

40

Date

36

10/03

CANADAY Kick-off Luncheon*

150

11/03

Jessica Muñoz, Introduction to Undocumented Student Services

11

11/18

Veterans Staff Association, Voice for Children

24

11/19

Annual Staff Associations Diversity at Work Luncheon

160

2/24

Jose Antonio Vargas Staff Program

27

11/18 1/04 3/02 4/07 4/19 4/30

Dr. Julie Burelle, The Activist Film with C. Tonantzin Graduate Student Fellowship Mixer Dr. Daphne Taylor-Garcia, Dr. Angela Booker, Dr. Olivia Graeve, Women of Color in The Academy

18 27

Dr. Yen Le Espiritu, Eric Tang, Book Presentation, Reception, 70 Unsettled: The Refugee in the Hyperghetto Dr. Jim Lin, Dr. Roshanak Kheshti, Breaking Barriers 7 Committee Dr. Gabriel Mendes, Under the Strain of Color 26

Staff Program/Activity

Guests

5/03

Dr. Evelyn Rodriguez, Coming of Age: Debuts and Quinceañeras

14

2/27

Black Staff Association Scholarship Brunch Danny Glover Reception

12

5/05

Dr. Robert Castro, Homeboy Industries Presentation

17

4/04

César E. Chávez Celebration Kick-Off Luncheon*

200

5/20

Dr. Agusto Espiritu, Dr. Jody Blanco, Dr. Dylan Rodriguez, 45 Filipino Studies Palimpsests Dr. JoAnna Poblete Presentation Islanders in the Empire: 21 Filipino and Puerto Rican Laborers in Hawai’i

4/05

César E. Chávez Celebration stand up comedy with John Leguizamo

15

4/21

Hot Topics: Chalk Talks

18

Soul Vang, MFA Presentation How Do I Begin?

5/02

Asian and Pacific Islander American Celebration Kick-Off Luncheon

150

5/23 5/26

Spring Grad Chats graduate student community mixers

24 7-12

* Events co-sponsored with other on-campus units.

The Cross-Cultural Center connects with staff through committee work, staff associations, social networking, community educational development, workshops, and annual cultural heritage programs, such as California Native Day Celebration, Black History Month, César E. Chávez Celebration, and Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Celebrations. Staff are also active participants in students and faculty mixers that occur throughout the year.

8


Staff Engagement

Academic and Faculty Engagement Academic and faculty engagement at the Cross-Cultural Center occurs in several ways: networking and community mixers, graduate student thesis defenses, committee work, academic and book presentations, and annual signature programs, such as Women of Color in the Academy and the Faculty in Residence Program. This year, the Cross-Cultural Center held sessions for a new networking support group for graduate students, Grad Chats, in the spring. The Faculty in Residence Program is an annual invitation for resident faculty to work with the Cross-Cultural Center and engage the campus community in educational awareness. Dr. Robert Castro, a Theater and Dance Department professor, held classes at the Cross-Cultural Center and invited members from Homeboy Industries, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing job skills for the formerly incarcerated, to share their narratives at the Cross-Cultural Center.

7

Date Academic and Faculty Engagement Activity

Guests

10/02 Faculty Outreach Mixer

17

10/07 Dr. Gary Fields, Art Reception

40

Date

36

10/03

CANADAY Kick-off Luncheon*

150

11/03

Jessica Muñoz, Introduction to Undocumented Student Services

11

11/18

Veterans Staff Association, Voice for Children

24

11/19

Annual Staff Associations Diversity at Work Luncheon

160

2/24

Jose Antonio Vargas Staff Program

27

11/18 1/04 3/02 4/07 4/19 4/30

Dr. Julie Burelle, The Activist Film with C. Tonantzin Graduate Student Fellowship Mixer Dr. Daphne Taylor-Garcia, Dr. Angela Booker, Dr. Olivia Graeve, Women of Color in The Academy

18 27

Dr. Yen Le Espiritu, Eric Tang, Book Presentation, Reception, 70 Unsettled: The Refugee in the Hyperghetto Dr. Jim Lin, Dr. Roshanak Kheshti, Breaking Barriers 7 Committee Dr. Gabriel Mendes, Under the Strain of Color 26

Staff Program/Activity

Guests

5/03

Dr. Evelyn Rodriguez, Coming of Age: Debuts and Quinceañeras

14

2/27

Black Staff Association Scholarship Brunch Danny Glover Reception

12

5/05

Dr. Robert Castro, Homeboy Industries Presentation

17

4/04

César E. Chávez Celebration Kick-Off Luncheon*

200

5/20

Dr. Agusto Espiritu, Dr. Jody Blanco, Dr. Dylan Rodriguez, 45 Filipino Studies Palimpsests Dr. JoAnna Poblete Presentation Islanders in the Empire: 21 Filipino and Puerto Rican Laborers in Hawai’i

4/05

César E. Chávez Celebration stand up comedy with John Leguizamo

15

4/21

Hot Topics: Chalk Talks

18

Soul Vang, MFA Presentation How Do I Begin?

5/02

Asian and Pacific Islander American Celebration Kick-Off Luncheon

150

5/23 5/26

Spring Grad Chats graduate student community mixers

24 7-12

* Events co-sponsored with other on-campus units.

The Cross-Cultural Center connects with staff through committee work, staff associations, social networking, community educational development, workshops, and annual cultural heritage programs, such as California Native Day Celebration, Black History Month, César E. Chávez Celebration, and Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Celebrations. Staff are also active participants in students and faculty mixers that occur throughout the year.

8


Internship Program The internship program is the most comprehensive undergraduate developmental core CCC program. Every facet of the internship program is interwoven into all aspects of the Cross-Cultural Center’s mission, philosophy, and services. Each position has its unique job specific roles, however, intentional learning outcomes are the foundation of the program. These outcomes focus on developing professional, personal, and practical skills. The internship has been the most valuable and rewarding experience for UCSD CCC undergraduate student interns and the Cross-Cultural Center as a whole.

All interns are responsible for a capstone project and/or program known as a Self-Initiated Project (SIP). The development of the SIP begins with an exploration of their passions in the beginning of their internship. During this process they develop a sense of self, as well as recognize the importance of giving back to the CCC community through their shared insights and learnings.

One example of a capstone SIP was the “Baggage Claims and Checks: Sharing Our Immigration Stories” program. It provided participants an inside look into the varied student panelists’ personal and family immigration stories. This program was coupled with an art exhibit that visually displayed the struggle of being an immigrant in the U.S., along with how these identities and immigration statuses empowered the student panelists.

“What I came to admire about my SIP is knowing and remembering that my SIP was something for myself and my community. For me, it was really important that I felt like I was empowering the community through narratives, interviews and images. Looking back and after the many meaningful conversations of people and affirmations, it was clear to see that the work of my SIP is valuable. I plan to take this realization with me in every single future project or research that I hope to do and it is something that I feel I have grown in through my SIP.” -Student intern

The self-initiated project engagement facilitates personal development and growth while exercising the professional skills they have learned over the course of their internship, such as intellectual growth, public speaking, critical thinking, innovation, community engagement, identify solutions and resources, etc. They hold themselves accountable to the creation and follow-through of their project with the scaffolding support of the full-time staff.

9

10


Internship Program The internship program is the most comprehensive undergraduate developmental core CCC program. Every facet of the internship program is interwoven into all aspects of the Cross-Cultural Center’s mission, philosophy, and services. Each position has its unique job specific roles, however, intentional learning outcomes are the foundation of the program. These outcomes focus on developing professional, personal, and practical skills. The internship has been the most valuable and rewarding experience for UCSD CCC undergraduate student interns and the Cross-Cultural Center as a whole.

All interns are responsible for a capstone project and/or program known as a Self-Initiated Project (SIP). The development of the SIP begins with an exploration of their passions in the beginning of their internship. During this process they develop a sense of self, as well as recognize the importance of giving back to the CCC community through their shared insights and learnings.

One example of a capstone SIP was the “Baggage Claims and Checks: Sharing Our Immigration Stories” program. It provided participants an inside look into the varied student panelists’ personal and family immigration stories. This program was coupled with an art exhibit that visually displayed the struggle of being an immigrant in the U.S., along with how these identities and immigration statuses empowered the student panelists.

“What I came to admire about my SIP is knowing and remembering that my SIP was something for myself and my community. For me, it was really important that I felt like I was empowering the community through narratives, interviews and images. Looking back and after the many meaningful conversations of people and affirmations, it was clear to see that the work of my SIP is valuable. I plan to take this realization with me in every single future project or research that I hope to do and it is something that I feel I have grown in through my SIP.” -Student intern

The self-initiated project engagement facilitates personal development and growth while exercising the professional skills they have learned over the course of their internship, such as intellectual growth, public speaking, critical thinking, innovation, community engagement, identify solutions and resources, etc. They hold themselves accountable to the creation and follow-through of their project with the scaffolding support of the full-time staff.

9

10


Volunteer Program

Volunteer Cohort 2015-2016

The Volunteer Program, now in its second year, has expanded the level of engagement that undergraduate students have with the Cross-Cultural Center. Volunteers worked closely with the Community Outreach and Engagement Intern to increase their leadership skills. During the academic year, the Volunteer Program expanded from 4 volunteers to 28 volunteers. Due to this substantial increase, two tiers of volunteer cohorts were created (a short-term cohort and long-term cohort). The Campus Outreach and Engagement Intern worked with the volunteers to provide opportunities for critical engagement with social justice theory and praxis.

Volunteer Statistics at a Glance

11

Volunteers

28

Total volunteer hours

302

Average hours per month per volunteer

4

Average total hours per volunteer

16

The primary function of the Volunteer Program was to increase support to the CCC staff during programmatic events, as well as provide front desk coverage during staff meetings. The volunteers also had the opportunity to facilitate their own wellness-themed program during the winter quarter. It provided volunteers the opportunity to develop their skills in various areas, such as teamwork, event logistics, and office reception.

Volunteer Team: Aathirai Parthiban Kitty He Alexis Eubanks Kate Pham Anh Vo Laura Valenzuela Arianna Silva-Torres Manny Gutierrez Aubrey Frio Mari Martinez Christina Huynh Manykoth Thosy Christina Mendez Megan Visaya Daisy Olivarez Shara Natividad Diana Doan Stephanie Garcia-Silva Gary Huang Stephanie Vargas Haixin Chen Quyen Nguyen Felicia Leung Thuy Tien Nguyen Irene Kwangaba Toni Tran Izzy Narvaez Vickie Truong Jennifer Alcalde

Based on survey responses, 70% of the volunteers stated that they were very likely to continue working with the Cross-Cultural Center in the future.

12


Volunteer Program

Volunteer Cohort 2015-2016

The Volunteer Program, now in its second year, has expanded the level of engagement that undergraduate students have with the Cross-Cultural Center. Volunteers worked closely with the Community Outreach and Engagement Intern to increase their leadership skills. During the academic year, the Volunteer Program expanded from 4 volunteers to 28 volunteers. Due to this substantial increase, two tiers of volunteer cohorts were created (a short-term cohort and long-term cohort). The Campus Outreach and Engagement Intern worked with the volunteers to provide opportunities for critical engagement with social justice theory and praxis.

Volunteer Statistics at a Glance

11

Volunteers

28

Total volunteer hours

302

Average hours per month per volunteer

4

Average total hours per volunteer

16

The primary function of the Volunteer Program was to increase support to the CCC staff during programmatic events, as well as provide front desk coverage during staff meetings. The volunteers also had the opportunity to facilitate their own wellness-themed program during the winter quarter. It provided volunteers the opportunity to develop their skills in various areas, such as teamwork, event logistics, and office reception.

Volunteer Team: Aathirai Parthiban Kitty He Alexis Eubanks Kate Pham Anh Vo Laura Valenzuela Arianna Silva-Torres Manny Gutierrez Aubrey Frio Mari Martinez Christina Huynh Manykoth Thosy Christina Mendez Megan Visaya Daisy Olivarez Shara Natividad Diana Doan Stephanie Garcia-Silva Gary Huang Stephanie Vargas Haixin Chen Quyen Nguyen Felicia Leung Thuy Tien Nguyen Irene Kwangaba Toni Tran Izzy Narvaez Vickie Truong Jennifer Alcalde

Based on survey responses, 70% of the volunteers stated that they were very likely to continue working with the Cross-Cultural Center in the future.

12


Breather Series: Therapy Fluffies

Student-Centered Programs Data Snapshot

Life Skills Series: Become a Mind Jedi

Student-centered programming is essential to the Cross-Cultural Center’s work. The student population is our largest target, although all are welcome to attend. Programs are inspired by students’ passions, personal interests, campus climate, campus-wide programming, wellness needs, and personal and professional skill-set aspirations. The Cross-Cultural Center executed 31 student-centered programs including student-initiated and staff-led programs, whereby impacting a total of approximately 3,546 participants. Overall Social Justice/Intellectual Post-Program Intentions for Further Personal Development Social Justice/Intellectual programs provide space for open and respectful dialogues where all opinions can be valued and heard.

Community building programs provide interactive programs and retention spaces to create new connections, strengthen existing relationships, and encourage cross collaborations.

13

n= 106 total respondents of 148 total participants

Overall Community Building Program Participation Experience

n= 78 total respondents of 281 total participants

14


Breather Series: Therapy Fluffies

Student-Centered Programs Data Snapshot

Life Skills Series: Become a Mind Jedi

Student-centered programming is essential to the Cross-Cultural Center’s work. The student population is our largest target, although all are welcome to attend. Programs are inspired by students’ passions, personal interests, campus climate, campus-wide programming, wellness needs, and personal and professional skill-set aspirations. The Cross-Cultural Center executed 31 student-centered programs including student-initiated and staff-led programs, whereby impacting a total of approximately 3,546 participants. Overall Social Justice/Intellectual Post-Program Intentions for Further Personal Development Social Justice/Intellectual programs provide space for open and respectful dialogues where all opinions can be valued and heard.

Community building programs provide interactive programs and retention spaces to create new connections, strengthen existing relationships, and encourage cross collaborations.

13

n= 106 total respondents of 148 total participants

Overall Community Building Program Participation Experience

n= 78 total respondents of 281 total participants

14


Student-Centered Programming Data

Event List

This year’s programmatic theme was “Immigration in the U.S.” as a response and proactive approach to addressing the nation’s political climate. We offered opportunities to engage in the topic through providing various forms of participation; active programs, workshops, narrative sharing, learning about access to scholarships for undocumented students, a film screening, and a passive programming board display. A total of 430+ participants explored understanding immigration in the U.S. See chart below for a full list of these engagements:

“Immigration in the U.S.” Thematic Program for 2015-16

15

Hot Topics: Chalk Talks (*Social Justice Educators Workshop) Hot Topics: “Documented” Film Screening (*Social Justice Educators Workshop) Baggage Claim and Checks: Sharing Our Immigration Stories (*Intern Self-Initiated Program) Race, Privilege, and Immigration in the U.S.: A Night with Jose Antonio Vargas Student Workshop and Mixer with Jose Antonio Vargas Undocumented in the U.S. passive programming board display Chalking on Campus Community Conversations (*Campus Community Centers collaboration) Quetzal Mama’s Scholarship and Internship Essay Strategies Workshop for Undocumented Students (*Intern Self-Intiated program)

Participants

21 17 47 200 15 100+ 21 9

2015-2016 Student-Centered Programming List

Attendance

Welcome Week Block Party

350

First Friday

271

Life Skills Series: Financial Literacy for College Students

21

Volunteer and First Year Student Mixer

25

Real World Career Series: Networking

60

Alumni Roots: Activism in the Real World- A Conversation with Andre Bolinder and Noel Salunga

13

Hot Topic: The Many Forms of Microaggressions

13

(Un)Spoken Words

16

The ‘In’ in Feminism

27

Need a Place to Process Recent Events? Open Community Space

2

Fall Breather Series: Arts and Crafts

79

Fall Stress-Less: 24 Hour Study Jam

288

Transfer Student Info Session

32

Beyond La Jolla: History and Hair Story: 400 Years Without a Comb Excursion

13

Art with Community: Narrating Our Story

12

DisChords of Self-Love

24

Breather Series: Therapy Fluffies

200

Real World Career Series: Resume Workshop and Art Portfolio Critique Session

57

GEM-dered Identities

52

Race, Privilege, and Immigration in the U.S.- A Night with Jose Antonio Vargas

200

Student Mixer with Jose Antonio Vargas

15

Winter Wellness: Wii Fit

39

Winter Breather Series: Arts & Crafts

93

Winter Stress-Less

342

DesignxCommunity Graphic Design Workshop

59

Chalking on Campus Community Conversations

21

Droughtful Waters

30

Real World Career Series: Acing the Interview

53

Life Skills Series: Become a Mind Jedi

28

All People's 2016 Celebration: After Party

117

Spring Breather Series: Arts & Crafts

69

Spring Stress-Less

428

Total Attendance: 3,546

16


Student-Centered Programming Data

Event List

This year’s programmatic theme was “Immigration in the U.S.” as a response and proactive approach to addressing the nation’s political climate. We offered opportunities to engage in the topic through providing various forms of participation; active programs, workshops, narrative sharing, learning about access to scholarships for undocumented students, a film screening, and a passive programming board display. A total of 430+ participants explored understanding immigration in the U.S. See chart below for a full list of these engagements:

“Immigration in the U.S.” Thematic Program for 2015-16

15

Hot Topics: Chalk Talks (*Social Justice Educators Workshop) Hot Topics: “Documented” Film Screening (*Social Justice Educators Workshop) Baggage Claim and Checks: Sharing Our Immigration Stories (*Intern Self-Initiated Program) Race, Privilege, and Immigration in the U.S.: A Night with Jose Antonio Vargas Student Workshop and Mixer with Jose Antonio Vargas Undocumented in the U.S. passive programming board display Chalking on Campus Community Conversations (*Campus Community Centers collaboration) Quetzal Mama’s Scholarship and Internship Essay Strategies Workshop for Undocumented Students (*Intern Self-Intiated program)

Participants

21 17 47 200 15 100+ 21 9

2015-2016 Student-Centered Programming List

Attendance

Welcome Week Block Party

350

First Friday

271

Life Skills Series: Financial Literacy for College Students

21

Volunteer and First Year Student Mixer

25

Real World Career Series: Networking

60

Alumni Roots: Activism in the Real World- A Conversation with Andre Bolinder and Noel Salunga

13

Hot Topic: The Many Forms of Microaggressions

13

(Un)Spoken Words

16

The ‘In’ in Feminism

27

Need a Place to Process Recent Events? Open Community Space

2

Fall Breather Series: Arts and Crafts

79

Fall Stress-Less: 24 Hour Study Jam

288

Transfer Student Info Session

32

Beyond La Jolla: History and Hair Story: 400 Years Without a Comb Excursion

13

Art with Community: Narrating Our Story

12

DisChords of Self-Love

24

Breather Series: Therapy Fluffies

200

Real World Career Series: Resume Workshop and Art Portfolio Critique Session

57

GEM-dered Identities

52

Race, Privilege, and Immigration in the U.S.- A Night with Jose Antonio Vargas

200

Student Mixer with Jose Antonio Vargas

15

Winter Wellness: Wii Fit

39

Winter Breather Series: Arts & Crafts

93

Winter Stress-Less

342

DesignxCommunity Graphic Design Workshop

59

Chalking on Campus Community Conversations

21

Droughtful Waters

30

Real World Career Series: Acing the Interview

53

Life Skills Series: Become a Mind Jedi

28

All People's 2016 Celebration: After Party

117

Spring Breather Series: Arts & Crafts

69

Spring Stress-Less

428

Total Attendance: 3,546

16


Affiliates Program and Student Leadership

Affiliate Student Organization Center Usage

The Student Affirmative Action Committee (SAAC) Leadership Retreat was a three day program that took place before the start of fall quarter that brought together student leaders from each of the SAAC organizations. The focus of the retreat was to foster peer group interaction, develop leadership practices, and create knowledge building around administrative processes (fundraising, event planning, policies, procedures, etc.).

The Cross-Cultural Center’s Affiliates Program seeks to foster a relationship with student organizations and its leaders that are intended to further the growth and development of student leaders both within their organization and outside of the university. Intentional programs, workshops, and advising facilitated by staff throughout the year strived to enhance the leadership and personal development of affiliated organizations and their members.

• The 2015 SAAC Retreat took place on Friday, September 11th through Sunday, September 13th and was a collaborative effort among the Cross-Cultural Center, Office of Academic Support & Instructional Services (OASIS), and the Center for Student Involvement (CSI).

• The Cross-Cultural Center supported 21 affiliate student organizations via staff outreach to groups, quarterly leadership activities, and a yearly retreat. • The CCC Director, Affiliates Program Coordinator, and Affiliates and Leadership Intern worked closely with organizations by hosting quarterly organizational meetings and conducted one-on-one meetings with chairs and other members of the organizations. • The Center supported affiliate organizations’ annual high school conferences by providing logistical consultations, facility usage, and workshops led by Social Justice Peer Educators for participating high school students.

17

2015 SAAC Leadership Retreat

• During the retreat we had approximately 41 undergraduate students and 8 staff members in attendance.

Board/Planning Meeting Conferences General Body Meeting (GBM) Lecture/Speaker Other Event/Programming Student Organization Event Training Workshops *Based on Event Management Scheduling (EMS) Usage Data. Disaggregated data set can be viewed on pages 25-26

"I really enjoyed being able to connect with other student leaders. I wanted to go to other SAAC organization events, but I felt scared that I didn't know many people. It was also super great to see the faces of staff members who want to support me." -SAAC Leadership Retreat participant

18


Affiliates Program and Student Leadership

Affiliate Student Organization Center Usage

The Student Affirmative Action Committee (SAAC) Leadership Retreat was a three day program that took place before the start of fall quarter that brought together student leaders from each of the SAAC organizations. The focus of the retreat was to foster peer group interaction, develop leadership practices, and create knowledge building around administrative processes (fundraising, event planning, policies, procedures, etc.).

The Cross-Cultural Center’s Affiliates Program seeks to foster a relationship with student organizations and its leaders that are intended to further the growth and development of student leaders both within their organization and outside of the university. Intentional programs, workshops, and advising facilitated by staff throughout the year strived to enhance the leadership and personal development of affiliated organizations and their members.

• The 2015 SAAC Retreat took place on Friday, September 11th through Sunday, September 13th and was a collaborative effort among the Cross-Cultural Center, Office of Academic Support & Instructional Services (OASIS), and the Center for Student Involvement (CSI).

• The Cross-Cultural Center supported 21 affiliate student organizations via staff outreach to groups, quarterly leadership activities, and a yearly retreat. • The CCC Director, Affiliates Program Coordinator, and Affiliates and Leadership Intern worked closely with organizations by hosting quarterly organizational meetings and conducted one-on-one meetings with chairs and other members of the organizations. • The Center supported affiliate organizations’ annual high school conferences by providing logistical consultations, facility usage, and workshops led by Social Justice Peer Educators for participating high school students.

17

2015 SAAC Leadership Retreat

• During the retreat we had approximately 41 undergraduate students and 8 staff members in attendance.

Board/Planning Meeting Conferences General Body Meeting (GBM) Lecture/Speaker Other Event/Programming Student Organization Event Training Workshops *Based on Event Management Scheduling (EMS) Usage Data. Disaggregated data set can be viewed on pages 25-26

"I really enjoyed being able to connect with other student leaders. I wanted to go to other SAAC organization events, but I felt scared that I didn't know many people. It was also super great to see the faces of staff members who want to support me." -SAAC Leadership Retreat participant

18


Cross-Cultural Center Staff Impact Data

This year, one area of note was our new data collection strategy concerning ad-hoc advising meetings. Each quarter, staff spent 100+ hours talking with students and alumni on a variety of topics and concerns. These ‘drop in’ sessions allowed students and alumni to have intimate conversations and build relationships with the staff.

CCC Staff Engagement

Staff of the Cross-Cultural Center support campus-wide equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts in a variety of ways. The chart below shows hours of engagement work (in addition to running the CCC) that support campus climate initiatives.

2015-2016 CCC FTS AdHoc Meetings

CCC Participation and Traffic Data

Staff Engagement Hours 2015-16

Conflict Resolution

20%

Wellness/Balance Org/&, or Leadership Academic Financial/$

17% 63% Student Leadership Program Participation Ad Hoc Advising

Committees

Outreach

Networking

Training*

Student Consulting Org Advising

Based on Events Management Software- EMS, *Includes Campus Community Center joint training.

Center Visit Data

Foot Traffic Based on 14,000+ Total Scans (does not reflect all activity or multiple uses of the CCC per visit/per day)

For the first time this year, the CCC collected usage data for the Center and its programs, and student leadership activities. Along with our Event Management Software (EMS) system, collection of this enhanced data helped us see who was accessing the Center, the frequency of this access, and how they were using the site. In the coming months, a more detailed analysis of programmatic activity will occur with this new data set. Particular attention will be paid to community use by demographic background and frequency within each 19 group. Analyzing this data will help us make informed program and service decisions.

Mental Health

Fall 15 Winter 16 Spring 16

Current work/job Peers Family Career

n=664

*Table does not include the approximate tours and visits experienced by full-time staff throughout the academic year.

Staff tracked data on these areas for the first time this year. Students and alumni outreached most to us in three broad areas: wellness/ balance, current work/job situations, and conflict resolution. On average, students and alumni covered three topics per visit and it was not unusual to move from talking about conflict with a peer to career planning and graduate school preparation. CCC staff were uniquely positioned to address these ‘intangible’ campus climates issues and have been able to share what we are seeing more broadly 20 to our campus partners.


Cross-Cultural Center Staff Impact Data

This year, one area of note was our new data collection strategy concerning ad-hoc advising meetings. Each quarter, staff spent 100+ hours talking with students and alumni on a variety of topics and concerns. These ‘drop in’ sessions allowed students and alumni to have intimate conversations and build relationships with the staff.

CCC Staff Engagement

Staff of the Cross-Cultural Center support campus-wide equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts in a variety of ways. The chart below shows hours of engagement work (in addition to running the CCC) that support campus climate initiatives.

2015-2016 CCC FTS AdHoc Meetings

CCC Participation and Traffic Data

Staff Engagement Hours 2015-16

Conflict Resolution

20%

Wellness/Balance Org/&, or Leadership Academic Financial/$

17% 63% Student Leadership Program Participation Ad Hoc Advising

Committees

Outreach

Networking

Training*

Student Consulting Org Advising

Based on Events Management Software- EMS, *Includes Campus Community Center joint training.

Center Visit Data

Foot Traffic Based on 14,000+ Total Scans (does not reflect all activity or multiple uses of the CCC per visit/per day)

For the first time this year, the CCC collected usage data for the Center and its programs, and student leadership activities. Along with our Event Management Software (EMS) system, collection of this enhanced data helped us see who was accessing the Center, the frequency of this access, and how they were using the site. In the coming months, a more detailed analysis of programmatic activity will occur with this new data set. Particular attention will be paid to community use by demographic background and frequency within each 19 group. Analyzing this data will help us make informed program and service decisions.

Mental Health

Fall 15 Winter 16 Spring 16

Current work/job Peers Family Career

n=664

*Table does not include the approximate tours and visits experienced by full-time staff throughout the academic year.

Staff tracked data on these areas for the first time this year. Students and alumni outreached most to us in three broad areas: wellness/ balance, current work/job situations, and conflict resolution. On average, students and alumni covered three topics per visit and it was not unusual to move from talking about conflict with a peer to career planning and graduate school preparation. CCC staff were uniquely positioned to address these ‘intangible’ campus climates issues and have been able to share what we are seeing more broadly 20 to our campus partners.


Marketing and Social Media

Gallery and Art Programs This year, the Cross-Cultural Center was honored to exhibit the collections of esteemed faculty and alumni of UC San Diego. In the fall quarter, Dr. Gary Fields of the Communication Department, exhibited his photography collection on the Gaza Strip. During the winter quarter, the Cross-Cultural Center exhibited the works of a San Diego-based artist, Anya Hall-Flores, entitled Afro-centricities: Dreams of Blended Black Cultures. This gallery focused primarily on exploring the intersections of Black identity through mixed media and recycled materials. In spring quarter, we were able to exhibit a collection of photographs documenting the experiences of Igorots in California. This collection was provided by Joseph Ruanto Ramirez, an alumnus of UC San Diego, and will be a component of a future publication documenting the diasporic history of the Igorot indigenous community that immigrated to the United States from the Philippines.

The Cross-Cultural Center continues to explore the uses of social media marketing as an expanded means of building personal relationships and making connections to a growing audience. The CCC e-news has been redesigned to disseminate information more effectively and encourage deeper interactions that are monitored via the “Click-through Statistics” (which monitors visitor interaction with digital content). This data helps us understand what information is most popular amongst our readers.

Over 200 students, staff, faculty, and community members attended the six art receptions held by the Cross-Cultural Center.

The e-news is an essential marketing tool because it connects our recipients to all of our social media outlets, which increases the activity of each of those marketing tools. This is supplemented by multiple social media outlets including: Facebook, Instagram, Issuu, Tumblr, Twitter, Vimeo, Youtube, and our printed media. In an effort to enhance our services for students at UC San Diego, the Cross-Cultural Center is investigating the relationship social media platforms have with the success of our programming.

The CCC displayed 16 art exhibits, hosted five art receptions, and embarked on one art excursion in San Diego.

As the arena of social media platform continues to change and evolve, the Cross-Cultural Center adopts new methods of marketing to students. Storify, Snapchat, and Vine have been added to the repertoire for event marketing purposes.

21

Beyond La Jolla Art Excurstion: The History and the Hair Story: 400 Years Without A Comb

Gaza Steadfast Reception with faculty artist, Dr. Gary Fields

The Cross-Cultural Center’s social media footprint has 18,327 subscribers with an annual reach of 440,898 impressions.

22


Marketing and Social Media

Gallery and Art Programs This year, the Cross-Cultural Center was honored to exhibit the collections of esteemed faculty and alumni of UC San Diego. In the fall quarter, Dr. Gary Fields of the Communication Department, exhibited his photography collection on the Gaza Strip. During the winter quarter, the Cross-Cultural Center exhibited the works of a San Diego-based artist, Anya Hall-Flores, entitled Afro-centricities: Dreams of Blended Black Cultures. This gallery focused primarily on exploring the intersections of Black identity through mixed media and recycled materials. In spring quarter, we were able to exhibit a collection of photographs documenting the experiences of Igorots in California. This collection was provided by Joseph Ruanto Ramirez, an alumnus of UC San Diego, and will be a component of a future publication documenting the diasporic history of the Igorot indigenous community that immigrated to the United States from the Philippines.

The Cross-Cultural Center continues to explore the uses of social media marketing as an expanded means of building personal relationships and making connections to a growing audience. The CCC e-news has been redesigned to disseminate information more effectively and encourage deeper interactions that are monitored via the “Click-through Statistics” (which monitors visitor interaction with digital content). This data helps us understand what information is most popular amongst our readers.

Over 200 students, staff, faculty, and community members attended the six art receptions held by the Cross-Cultural Center.

The e-news is an essential marketing tool because it connects our recipients to all of our social media outlets, which increases the activity of each of those marketing tools. This is supplemented by multiple social media outlets including: Facebook, Instagram, Issuu, Tumblr, Twitter, Vimeo, Youtube, and our printed media. In an effort to enhance our services for students at UC San Diego, the Cross-Cultural Center is investigating the relationship social media platforms have with the success of our programming.

The CCC displayed 16 art exhibits, hosted five art receptions, and embarked on one art excursion in San Diego.

As the arena of social media platform continues to change and evolve, the Cross-Cultural Center adopts new methods of marketing to students. Storify, Snapchat, and Vine have been added to the repertoire for event marketing purposes.

21

Beyond La Jolla Art Excurstion: The History and the Hair Story: 400 Years Without A Comb

Gaza Steadfast Reception with faculty artist, Dr. Gary Fields

The Cross-Cultural Center’s social media footprint has 18,327 subscribers with an annual reach of 440,898 impressions.

22


Social Justice Educator Programming and Workshops

The Social Justice Educators (SJE) are a team of four undergraduate student leaders trained in facilitating workshops and presentations pertaining to social equity, diversity, inclusion, and cross-cultural representation. Utilizing a social justice framework and an intersectional approach of social and cultural identities, the SJE team consults, plans, and implements activities with campus students, staff, and educators within and beyond San Diego. These populations include residential life staff, emerging leaders, student organizations, Greek Life, as well as K-12 youth, transfer students, and community college populations. The SJE team averages 10-15 activities per quarter, often times hosting outreach visits as Cross-Cultural Center representatives, tour guides, or panel presenters, as well as meeting with elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, and community colleges. This year, the SJEs consulted with their peers and hosted “Hot Topics,” a space created for the campus community to address and discuss matters impacting student life. Cultural appropriation, microaggressions, campus chalkings, climate, and white privilege were among the topics discussed. A list of Social Justice Educator programs are included on the following page.

23

“I’ve learned from other students about the issues that affect them, but don’t necessarily happen to me. It was eye-opening to listen to their narratives and how I can change how I treat others. I’ve learned that I am in positions of power and that it’s important to be an ally to marginalized groups. “

2015-2016 Social Justice Educator Workshop List Date September 30, 2015 October 8, 2015 October 12, 2015 October 15, 2015 October 19, 2015 October 21, 2015 October 28, 2015 November 13, 2015 November 21, 2015 November 21, 2015 December 2, 2015 January 21, 2016 January 28, 2016 January 30, 2016 February 11, 2016 February 13, 2016 February 16, 2016 February 23, 2016 February 24, 2016 March 2, 2016 March 4, 2016 March 12, 2016 April 5, 2016 April 8, 2016 April 15, 2016 April 18, 2016 April 21, 2016 April 25, 2016 April 27, 2016 May 3, 2016 May 11, 2016 May 19, 2016 May 20, 2016 May 25, 2016 May 25, 2016

Program Name Greek Life Inclusivity Engineering Workshop APSA Board Communication SJE Hot Topics Sigma Kappa Theta Center for Student Invovlement Associated Students SD City College Leadership Summit APSA High School Conference BSU High School Conference Family Medicine Public Health PI/SJE Hot Topics SPACES Kaibigang Pilipin@ High School Conference SJE Hot Topics MEChA High School Conference Musicians’ Club “Documented” Screening Social Justice Leaders Academy Women of Color in the Academy College Ambassadors Comienza Con Un Sueño SPACES Overnight Program AVID Program Wilson High School Revelle College Res Life SJE Hot Topics: Chalk Talks Delta Delta Delta Phi Alpha Delta APSA AVID Hilltop High School Garrison Elementary School “Zootopia” Screen and Talk Logan School Revelle College Orientation Leaders

Description Inclusivity and Privilege Workshop Diverse Learning Keirsey Temperament Survey Cultural Appropriation: Presentation of Popular Uses of Cultural Appropriation Inclusivity Connect.the.Dots. Power and Privilege Keirsey Temperament Survey Power, Privilege, and Leadership Leadership Workshop Leadership Workshop Latinx Identity and Outreach “Documented,” Jose Antonio Vargas Documentary Intro to Black Lives Matter Introduction to Social Justice “White People,” Jose Antonio Vargas Documentary United Farmworkers Movement and Solidarity Workshop Cultural Appropriation in Music Film Discussion Target and Agent Identities Faculty Women Narratives Microaggressions and Privilege Leadership Workshop Social Justice Privilege Workshop Name 5 Workshop Student Panel Presentation College Transition Power and Privilege Workshop Campus Chalking Privilege Workshop Social Justice Workshop Anti-Blackness Workshop Student Panel Workshop Student Panel Presentation Film Discussion Introduction to Social Justice Workshop Consult

Participants 33 10 14 15 34 9 40 92 15 12 14 15 30 15 14 16 12 9 8 16 100 60 25 16 48 12 30 70 30 24 65 72 12 38 15

Total Attendance: 1,040

24


Social Justice Educator Programming and Workshops

The Social Justice Educators (SJE) are a team of four undergraduate student leaders trained in facilitating workshops and presentations pertaining to social equity, diversity, inclusion, and cross-cultural representation. Utilizing a social justice framework and an intersectional approach of social and cultural identities, the SJE team consults, plans, and implements activities with campus students, staff, and educators within and beyond San Diego. These populations include residential life staff, emerging leaders, student organizations, Greek Life, as well as K-12 youth, transfer students, and community college populations. The SJE team averages 10-15 activities per quarter, often times hosting outreach visits as Cross-Cultural Center representatives, tour guides, or panel presenters, as well as meeting with elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, and community colleges. This year, the SJEs consulted with their peers and hosted “Hot Topics,” a space created for the campus community to address and discuss matters impacting student life. Cultural appropriation, microaggressions, campus chalkings, climate, and white privilege were among the topics discussed. A list of Social Justice Educator programs are included on the following page.

23

“I’ve learned from other students about the issues that affect them, but don’t necessarily happen to me. It was eye-opening to listen to their narratives and how I can change how I treat others. I’ve learned that I am in positions of power and that it’s important to be an ally to marginalized groups. “

2015-2016 Social Justice Educator Workshop List Date September 30, 2015 October 8, 2015 October 12, 2015 October 15, 2015 October 19, 2015 October 21, 2015 October 28, 2015 November 13, 2015 November 21, 2015 November 21, 2015 December 2, 2015 January 21, 2016 January 28, 2016 January 30, 2016 February 11, 2016 February 13, 2016 February 16, 2016 February 23, 2016 February 24, 2016 March 2, 2016 March 4, 2016 March 12, 2016 April 5, 2016 April 8, 2016 April 15, 2016 April 18, 2016 April 21, 2016 April 25, 2016 April 27, 2016 May 3, 2016 May 11, 2016 May 19, 2016 May 20, 2016 May 25, 2016 May 25, 2016

Program Name Greek Life Inclusivity Engineering Workshop APSA Board Communication SJE Hot Topics Sigma Kappa Theta Center for Student Invovlement Associated Students SD City College Leadership Summit APSA High School Conference BSU High School Conference Family Medicine Public Health PI/SJE Hot Topics SPACES Kaibigang Pilipin@ High School Conference SJE Hot Topics MEChA High School Conference Musicians’ Club “Documented” Screening Social Justice Leaders Academy Women of Color in the Academy College Ambassadors Comienza Con Un Sueño SPACES Overnight Program AVID Program Wilson High School Revelle College Res Life SJE Hot Topics: Chalk Talks Delta Delta Delta Phi Alpha Delta APSA AVID Hilltop High School Garrison Elementary School “Zootopia” Screen and Talk Logan School Revelle College Orientation Leaders

Description Inclusivity and Privilege Workshop Diverse Learning Keirsey Temperament Survey Cultural Appropriation: Presentation of Popular Uses of Cultural Appropriation Inclusivity Connect.the.Dots. Power and Privilege Keirsey Temperament Survey Power, Privilege, and Leadership Leadership Workshop Leadership Workshop Latinx Identity and Outreach “Documented,” Jose Antonio Vargas Documentary Intro to Black Lives Matter Introduction to Social Justice “White People,” Jose Antonio Vargas Documentary United Farmworkers Movement and Solidarity Workshop Cultural Appropriation in Music Film Discussion Target and Agent Identities Faculty Women Narratives Microaggressions and Privilege Leadership Workshop Social Justice Privilege Workshop Name 5 Workshop Student Panel Presentation College Transition Power and Privilege Workshop Campus Chalking Privilege Workshop Social Justice Workshop Anti-Blackness Workshop Student Panel Workshop Student Panel Presentation Film Discussion Introduction to Social Justice Workshop Consult

Participants 33 10 14 15 34 9 40 92 15 12 14 15 30 15 14 16 12 9 8 16 100 60 25 16 48 12 30 70 30 24 65 72 12 38 15

Total Attendance: 1,040

24


Center Usage Data Faculty Advising 33 hours 37 attended Faculty from the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Communication, and Education Studies used the Center for their formal office hours.

Conferences 332 hours 4,304 attended Student organizations working with the Student Promoted Access Center for Education & Services (SPACES) held workshops for their high school conferences. Various departments also used the Center for their academic conferences, such as the Sixth College Experiential Learning Conference and the Octavia Butler Conference.

25

Graduate Students/Teaching Assistants Advising 85 hours 141 attended Primarily used by the graduate students of the Ethnic Studies, Critical Gender Studies, and Communication Departments, for ad-hoc, formal, and group advising. Many graduate students held office hours in the Tranquility Room, Library or the Lobby. Six graduate students held office hours in the CCC.

Academic Classes 204 hours 916 attended Academic classes included courses from Theater and Dance, African-American Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Literature. The Campus Community Centers also held a class with their interns under the Critical Gender Studies Department and the Academic Success Program. At times, faculty and graduate lecturers requested to move their class for a couple of occurrences in the Center to change the classroom environment or to hold their midterm presentations.

Staff/Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Advising 169 hours 206 attended This estimated time usage and attendance was mainly used by the Campus Community Centers’ in-home psychologist and post-doctoral interns to conduct office hours, client intake appointments, and have group meetings. Career Services Center staff and graduate student interns hosted in-take mentoring and job counseling sessions.

Department Classes 41 hours 565 attended Departments from various areas of campus utilized spaces to hold courses and workshops in the Center. For example, the Center for Communication and Leadership, under the Center for Student Involvement, held workshops ranging from public speaking to resume building.

Lectures/Speakers 128 hours 1,854 attended

Board/Planning Meetings 604 hours 2,599 attended

General Meetings 478 hours 5,261 attended

Student Events 175 hours 1,419 attended

Staff and student organizations met in the Center to plan their events and programs. Over 25 student organizations and departments utilized the space for their board/planning meetings.

Affiliated student organizations like Kaibigan Pilipin@ (KP), Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán (MEChA), and the Muslim Student Association (MSA) held general body meetings that held at times more than 100 students per meeting.

These included work parties before major events or social events hosted by our student organization affiliates.

Department Events 128 hours 774 attended

Presentations 50 hours 486 attended

Trainings/Workshops 345 hours 1,842 attended

Ethnic Studies held its Honors Symposium in the Center, highlighting this year’s honors students and their research. Other events included: staff and faculty recognition, MA and PhD defenses, and a colloquium series.

Presentation topics included: “Studying Social Justice,” “Community Health and the Foster Care System,” “TRiO Leadership Development,” and numerous others by Ethnic Studies, Black Staff Association, and OASIS.

The Center for Student Involvement, IDEA Center, and the Chancellor’s Associate Scholars Program each held respective workshops series in the Center on communication, social change, and financial aid among many other topics.

These events included department, student organization, and CCC sponsored speakers that were held in the Center and open to the general public.

Total: 2,772* Hours 20,404* Attended *Based on EMS Reservation software

26


Center Usage Data Faculty Advising 33 hours 37 attended Faculty from the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Communication, and Education Studies used the Center for their formal office hours.

Conferences 332 hours 4,304 attended Student organizations working with the Student Promoted Access Center for Education & Services (SPACES) held workshops for their high school conferences. Various departments also used the Center for their academic conferences, such as the Sixth College Experiential Learning Conference and the Octavia Butler Conference.

25

Graduate Students/Teaching Assistants Advising 85 hours 141 attended Primarily used by the graduate students of the Ethnic Studies, Critical Gender Studies, and Communication Departments, for ad-hoc, formal, and group advising. Many graduate students held office hours in the Tranquility Room, Library or the Lobby. Six graduate students held office hours in the CCC.

Academic Classes 204 hours 916 attended Academic classes included courses from Theater and Dance, African-American Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Literature. The Campus Community Centers also held a class with their interns under the Critical Gender Studies Department and the Academic Success Program. At times, faculty and graduate lecturers requested to move their class for a couple of occurrences in the Center to change the classroom environment or to hold their midterm presentations.

Staff/Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Advising 169 hours 206 attended This estimated time usage and attendance was mainly used by the Campus Community Centers’ in-home psychologist and post-doctoral interns to conduct office hours, client intake appointments, and have group meetings. Career Services Center staff and graduate student interns hosted in-take mentoring and job counseling sessions.

Department Classes 41 hours 565 attended Departments from various areas of campus utilized spaces to hold courses and workshops in the Center. For example, the Center for Communication and Leadership, under the Center for Student Involvement, held workshops ranging from public speaking to resume building.

Lectures/Speakers 128 hours 1,854 attended

Board/Planning Meetings 604 hours 2,599 attended

General Meetings 478 hours 5,261 attended

Student Events 175 hours 1,419 attended

Staff and student organizations met in the Center to plan their events and programs. Over 25 student organizations and departments utilized the space for their board/planning meetings.

Affiliated student organizations like Kaibigan Pilipin@ (KP), Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán (MEChA), and the Muslim Student Association (MSA) held general body meetings that held at times more than 100 students per meeting.

These included work parties before major events or social events hosted by our student organization affiliates.

Department Events 128 hours 774 attended

Presentations 50 hours 486 attended

Trainings/Workshops 345 hours 1,842 attended

Ethnic Studies held its Honors Symposium in the Center, highlighting this year’s honors students and their research. Other events included: staff and faculty recognition, MA and PhD defenses, and a colloquium series.

Presentation topics included: “Studying Social Justice,” “Community Health and the Foster Care System,” “TRiO Leadership Development,” and numerous others by Ethnic Studies, Black Staff Association, and OASIS.

The Center for Student Involvement, IDEA Center, and the Chancellor’s Associate Scholars Program each held respective workshops series in the Center on communication, social change, and financial aid among many other topics.

These events included department, student organization, and CCC sponsored speakers that were held in the Center and open to the general public.

Total: 2,772* Hours 20,404* Attended *Based on EMS Reservation software

26


Thank you for a wonderful year!

Cross-Cultural Center full-time staff (from left to right): Edwina Welch, Director Benjamin Mendoza, Office Manager Nancy Magpusao, Educational Programs Violeta Gonzales, Assistant Director Jamez Ahmad, Operations & Marketing


Thank you for a wonderful year!

Cross-Cultural Center full-time staff (from left to right): Edwina Welch, Director Benjamin Mendoza, Office Manager Nancy Magpusao, Educational Programs Violeta Gonzales, Assistant Director Jamez Ahmad, Operations & Marketing


ABOUT US The Cross-Cultural Center is committed to supporting the needs of UCSD’s campus communities by creating a welcoming and holistic learning environment for everyone. Our vision at the Cross-Cultural Center is to empower UCSD to recognize, challenge, and take proactive approaches to diversity for campus as a whole. As part of the UC San Diego Campus Community Centers, we value differences and building relationships at all levels of the university and experience community and diversity through a broad lens.

Cross-Cultural Center A Unit of the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion UC San Diego 9500 Gilman Dr MC 0053 La Jolla, CA 92093 858.534.9689 cccenter@ucsd.edu ccc.ucsd.edu Facebook.com/ucsdccc Instagram.com/ucsdcrossculturalcenter

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UC San Diego Cross-Cultural Center 2015-2016 Annual Report A Unit of the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

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