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Choreography & Direction | Brandon Whited/B Scott Dance Lighting & Production Design | Michael Klaers Featuring | Sergio Barrientos Andrew Bauer Guillermo Castro Colin Sneddon Hahn Elijah Hahn-Smith EzraNolan Spencer

BOYS LIKE US Hatlen Theater, UCSB October 24 - 26, 2019, 8:00 pm

Opening Night Pre-show Panel Discussion and Reception | Oct 24 Post-show Q&A with the artists | Oct 25 Tickets: theaterdance.ucsb.edu


BOYS LIKE US Concept, Direction & Choreography / BRANDON WHITED | B SCOTT DANCE Production/Lighting Design / MICHAEL KLAERS Projection Design / YOU-JIN KIM Costume Design / BRANDON WHITED Music / MICHAEL WALL, GERRY RAFFERTY, KYLE DIXON & MICHAEL STEIN, NILS FRAHM, TALKING HEADS Dancers / SERGIO BARRIENTOS, ANDREW BAUER, GUILLERMO CASTRO, ELIJAH HAHN-SMITH, COLIN SNEDDON, EZRANOLAN SPENCER Boys Like Us is an expansion of a duet featuring Sam Wentz and Ryan Walker Page that premiered at Highways Performance Space (Santa Monica) in August 2018, co-produced by Leo Garcia and Patrick Kennelly. This premiere performance is made possible by funding from the UCSB Academic Senate Faculty Research Grant. Boys Like Us is offered via co-sponsorship from Tristan Bridges and his 2019-2020 Critical Issues in America Speaker Series: Masculinity in America.


CHOREOGRAPHER’S NOTE: As dance artists, we mine the inner spaces of our hearts and minds, and bolster those perceived realities with imagined landscapes, kinetic poetics, and tactile, visceral human interaction. As queer artists, we see the world not only for what it is, and what it has always been, but what it could be—if only we could learn to embrace one another and hold up those around us. Queering considerations of gender, race, politics, sexuality, (etc.) requires a curious and creative mind continuously questioning the status quo, and pushing back against the barriers and confines of conformity and complacency. Continuing a line of choreographic inquiry into the diversity of expressions of masculinities, and questioning gender, sexuality and identity more broadly, Boys Like Us takes up this mantel and resonates on process of embracing one’s identity and coming-of-age as a gay/ queer person. Through pedestrian movement, improvisation and intimate/physical interaction, the dance resonates on a human need for touch, the exploration of new and burgeoning sexual expression, and the process of forming and evolving identity. The inspiration for the dance began with my memory of reading the eponymous book Boys Like Us: Gay Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories (1996) when I was just fifteen and beginning to figure myself out. This volume of personal essays, edited by Patrick Merla, organizes the many authors’ accounts of self-discovery and coming out in chronological order from 1949 through 1995. Featuring renowned authors such as Edmund White, Samuel R. Delaney, and Andrew Holleran (who span generations, represent multiple races, ethnicities and cultures, and hail from all corners of the United States) the collection builds a critical mass of understanding, personal liberation, and pride against the odds of religion, tradition, intolerance and even unabashed hatred. The chronological framing of the essays provides a glimpse into the progress that the LGBTQ community achieved over those decades, and reveals how much further we have come since. Yet, as I sit here writing this note, the highest court in the land is adjudicating the rights and freedoms of LGBTQ Americans in relation to job security, and non-discrimination policies. Stuck in this endless loop, legislators, judges and voters are continually questioning, considering and reconsidering our civil rights and freedoms yet again. It is clear there is so much more work to be done! Aligning significantly with the feminist rallying call, “the personal is political,” Boys Like Us offers an honest, yet abstract look at how we develop relationships to others, and perhaps even more importantly, strengthening the relationships we have with ourselves. Brandon Whited, Assistant Professor of Dance, Department of Theater/Dance


ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES BRANDON WHITED (DIRECTOR/CHOREOGRAPHER, HE/HIM/HIS) - born in Poughkeepsie, NY -

began dancing at the age of ten after his family moved to North Carolina, with early training in tap, jazz, ballet, lyrical, clogging and Hip-Hop. He received his High School diploma and BFA from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts under a brilliant and inspiring faculty. In addition to training based in the Cunningham, Limón and Nikolais techniques, Brandon was exposed to a strong supplement of guest teacher-choreographers, which informed his eclectic approach to contemporary dance technique - grounded in traditional modern dance. Returning to his roots in New York City, Brandon danced professionally with STEELEDANCE (Teri and Oliver Steele), Randy James Dance Works, Daniel Gwirtzman Dance Company, danscores by Ofelia Loret de Mola, and as a specialized supernumerary with the Metropolitan Opera for six years. In 2008 he joined Shen Wei Dance Arts as an apprentice and became a core member from 2009-2014. During that period, Brandon toured Shen Wei’s rich repertory, domestically and internationally, and originated roles in four works - Re-III (2009), Limited States (2010), Undivided/Divided (2011) and Collective Measures (2013).

Following his professional career, Brandon received his MFA as a Distinguished University Fellow from The Ohio State University. His research there considered the intersection of masculinities studies/queer theory, dance studies and contemporary dance choreography. Cipher XY (2015), his MFA Thesis Project, examined a range of male/masculine gender identity, expression and representation through collaborative choreographic process, interview and discussion with the dancers. Prof. Whited’s choreography has been presented domestically in New York, Maryland, Ohio, Texas, Washington and California, and internationally in Italy. Recent projects include the duet version of Boys Like Us (2018) which premiered at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, CA. Structure of Us (2017) - presented in both the Rochester Fringe Festival, and the Charm City (Baltimore) Fringe - was a collaborative, interdisciplinary improvisation-based installation performance with Tammy Carrasco (Asst. Prof. of Dance, SUNY Brockport), and Fulbright scholar and visual artist/photographer Kitty Hubbard (Assoc. Prof. of Photography/Visual Art). Loro Sono Loro/They are Them, a collaboration with Sarah Lisette Chiesa was presented in December of 2017 in galleries in both Parma and Castiglione delle Stiviere, Italy. Locally, Prof. Whited has created two works,


Petit Pas (2017), and 95 North (2019) for Santa Barbara Dance Theater, and both dances were presented this fall in Dance Gallery Festival in Texas and New York City, respectively.

MICHAEL KLAERS (PRODUCTION/LIGHTING DESIGN, HE/HIM/HIS) has

lit several recent LAUNCH PAD and SBDT productions. His regional theatre credits include Indiana Repertory Theatre, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Great Lakes Theater Festival, Shakespeare Festival of St. Louis, Shakespeare Santa Cruz, Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts, Florida Studio Theatre, and Missouri Repertory Theatre.

DANCER BIOGRAPHIES SERGIO BARRIENTOS (DANCER, HE/HIM/HIS), from Simi

Valley, CA, began his dance training at the age of 15 and graduated from UCSB with a BFA in Dance in Spring 2019. During his time here he was fortunate enough to work with many faculty and guest artists, including Monica Bill Barnes, Jacqulyn Buglisi, Doug Elkins, Ephrat Asherie, and works by José Limón reconstructed by Alice Condodina. He is currently dancing his third consecutive year with the UCSB Dance Company.

ANDREW BAUER (DANCER, HE/HIM/HIS) is a second-

year student at UCSB double majoring in dance and linguistics. Andrew comes from a quaint peninsula in southern California named Palos Verdes, where he spent most of his teen years working and refining his technique at the Peninsula School of Performing Arts. He furthered his dance training by joining his high school’s dance team, where he competed in contemporary, jazz, and hip hop styles. This love for dance team performance transitioned into college, where you can now see him getting down and dirty, at basketball and soccer games representing the UCSB Dance Team! This is Andrew’s first big show on the Hatlen stage, and he’s beyond thrilled to get to share the space with such driven and inspirational artists.

GUILLERMO CASTRO (DANCER, HE/HIM/HIS), originally

from San Diego, is a fourth year BFA student at UCSB. He began his formal dance training at the age of 13 and since has performed with Unity Dance Ensemble, San Diego Dance Theater, Selah Dance Collective, Nebula Dance Lab, and Santa Barbara Dance Theater as an apprentice. He is excited to perform and tour with the UCSB Dance Company for the 10-year anniversary tour.


ELIJAH HAHN-SMITH (DANCER, HE/HIM/HIS) is

currently a second year dance major at UCSB. He began dancing at the age of six with acrobatic and tap classes and later ventured into other styles including contemporary, jazz, and modern. In high school he participated on the advanced dance team and began his classical ballet training where he performed roles including Albrecht and Cavalier with Benicia Ballet. Elijah is currently an apprentice with Santa Barbara Dance Theatre and worked this past summer with the Male Dance Conference in New York. When he’s not dancing, Elijah loves to spend his time backpacking, skiing, and eating as much food as possible.

COLIN SNEDDON (DANCER, HE/HIM/HIS) began

dancing at the age of fourteen with the nationally-ranked Glendale High School Dance Team. Over four years, he won six national titles and performed in nationally televised engagements such as the 126th Tournament of Roses Parade. While dancing with the UCSB Dance Company in his sophomore year, Colin performed works by José Limón, Anna Halprin, and Andrea Miller. Since graduating with his B.F.A. in Dance, he has continued to study with Miller’s Gallim Dance (NY) to enrich his approaches to choreography and performance.

EZRANOLAN SPENCER (DANCER, THEY/THEM/THEIRS) is

a junior here at UC Santa Barbara. Ezra began their serious dance training at the age of fifteen. In the spring of 2018, they toured six European with the UCSB Dance Company, performing works by Jose Limon, Monica Bill Barnes and others. They also just returned from NYC performing at the Dance Gallery Festival with Santa Barbara Dance Theatre. Ezra would like to thank their friends and Brandon for their continual support throughout this process.

A heartfelt Thank You to the dancers for their courage grace and hard work, Dean Mijewski for his support, The Department of Theater and Dance, Irwin Appel and Christina McCarthy, Tristan Bridges, Kip Fulbeck, Jamie Birkett, Una Mladenovic, Valerie Huston for the incredible support and publicity design, Christene Seda and Austin Elliot, and to Sam Wentz and Ryan Walker Page for their contribution to the genesis of the work


BIBLIOGRAPHY & FURTHER READING Banes, Sally. Dancing Women: Female Bodies on Stage. London: Routledge, 1998. Print. Bremser, Martha. Fifty Contemporary Choreographers. London: Routledge, 1999. Print. Burt, Ramsay. The Male Dancer: Bodies, Spectacle, Sexualities (second edition). New York: Routledge, 2007. Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, 1990. Connell, R.W. Masculinities. Berkley: U of California P, 1995. Desmond, Jane C., ed. Dancing Desires. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 2001. Fisher, Jennifer and Anthony Shay, eds. When Men Dance: Choreographing Masculinities Across Borders. New York: Oxford UP, 2009. Foster, Susan Leigh. “Closets Full of Dances,” Dancing Desires: Choreographing Sexualities On & Off the Stage. Ed. Jane C. Desmond. Madison: U. of Wisconsin P., 2001. 147-207. Gormley, Scott K. nuarts productions, 2017. http://danseurmovie. com/. Viewed June 2017, NDEO Men in Dance Symposium, West Virginia university, Morgantown, WV. Macaulay, Alastair and Matthew Bourne. Matthew Bourne and his Adventures in Dance. Ed. Alastair Macaulay. London: Faber and Faber, 2011. Print. Merla, Patrick, ed. Boys Like Us: Gay Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories. New York: HarperCollins, 1996. Morgenroth, Joyce. Speaking of Dance: Twelve Contemporary Choreographers on Their Craft. New York: Routledge, 2004. Novack, Cynthia J. Sharing the Dance. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1990. Pascoe, C.J. and Tristan Bridges. Exploring Masculinities: Identity, Inequality, Continuity & Change. New York: Oxford UP, 2016. Whited, Brandon. “Masculine Exposure: Transgressive Representations of the Male Nude in Contemporary Dance and High Fashion Photography.” Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture, Volume 3, Number 2, 1 June 2018, pp. 213-226(14)


PHOTO MONTAGE CREDITS Hujar, Peter Greenwich Pier, New York City. Photo by Peter Hujar. Maiman, Rick First Pride Parade. New York City, NY. June 28, 1970. Photo by Rick Maiman (Sygma/Getty Images). McDarrah, Fred W. After pouring their drinks, a bartender in Julius’ refuses to serve John Timmons, Dick Leitsch, Craig Rodwell and Randy Wicker, who were protesting New York liquor laws that prevented serving gay customers. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah (Getty Images). McDarrah, Fred W. Outside the boarded-up Stonewall Inn following the Stonewall riots, June 1969. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah (Getty Images). McDarrah, Fred W. An unidentified group of young people celebrate on a building stoop near the boarded-up Stonewall Inn after riots over the weekend of June 27, 1969. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah. McDarrah, Fred W. Back view of pair of shirtless men as they walk, arm in arm, during the first Stonewall anniversary march, then known as Gay Liberation Day (and later Gay Pride Day), New York, New York, June 28, 1970. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah (Getty Images). Newell II, Lee A. Banner marking the beginning of the 18th Annual Gay and Lesbian Pride Parade in Boystown. Courtesy Chicago History Museum. Photo by Lee A. Newell II. Nicoletta, Daniel LGBT Pride March, San Francisco, CA. June 1977. Pictured (from left) are Angels of Light Gregory Cruickshank, Rodney Price and Joe Morocco. Photo by Daniel Nicoletta. O’Neal, Hank Gay Pride, New York City, 1974. Photo by Hank O’Neal. Otter, Robert Café Figaro (detail), on the corner of MacDougal and Bleecker. Photo by Robert Otter. Sakuma, Paul The president of the 1979 Gay Freedom Day Parade Sabrina Soujourn leads the parade procession holding her companion by the hand. The parade celebrated the tenth anniversary of the


birth of the homosexual rights movement. Photo by Paul Sakuma. Schmitt, Terry A view of Supervisor Harvey Milk with the Ferry Building in the background during the Gay Freedom Day Parade June 25, 1978. Photo by Terry Schmitt, The Chronicle. Sterzing, Andreas Group Portrait of Artists, Pier 34, 1983. Photo by Andreas Sterzing. Unknown The Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) holds the first AIDS Walk New York in 1986 in Manhattan, New York. Photo courtesy of GMHC. Photographer unknown. Unknown Whitney Elite, Ira Ebony, Stewart and Chris LaBeija, Ian and Jamal Adonis, Ronald Revlon, House of Jourdan Ball, New Jersey, 1989. Photo courtesy of Museum of the City of New York. Photographer unknown. Unknown Charley Inside Ramrod by Leonard Fink Courtesy Philip Aarons and Shelley Fox Aarons collection. Photographer unknown. Unknown Pride March, New York City, NY. November 1969. Photographer unknown. Unknown Gay Liberation Day on Christopher Street, 1970. Photographer unknown. Video Credit: Wolf, Alice Space & Time, 1:16 - 1:18 (1.6 second of use) Production of Dirty Hit, RCA Records) – Used under educational fair use


Department of Theater and Dance Donors The Department of Theater and Dance at UC Santa Barbara is honored to recognize Jody and John Arnhold ‘75 whose lifetime giving makes a profound impact on our students, faculty, and community. We also recognize donors whose lifetime giving to the Department of Theater and Dance is $100,000 and above. We are deeply grateful for their longtime visionary support and for believing that theater, dance, and the arts are vital to our lives. Thank you for making an extraordinary difference in our program. Recognition is based on cumulative, lifetime giving to the department. Anonymous Jody and John Arnhold ‘75 Richard A. Auhll Jill and John C. Bishop, Jr. Michael K. Douglas ’68 Dorcas* and Dr. Theodore W.* Hatlen H’93 Lillian and Jon* Lovelace Jan and Don O’Dowd Dianne and Dr. Daniel Vapnek

Donors Anonymous Bari And Marc Adelman Barbara And Lane Albanese Susan Alexander Christine Anderson David Anderson Jody And John Arnhold ‘75 Dinah And Jerome Baumgartner ‘69 Jill And Arnold Bellowe Jill And John C. Bishop Laurel Blair Diane Boss Constance Brainin Risa Brainin Eric Bushard

Kristina And Adam Cipriano Marcia And John Mike Cohen Alicia Corella Marianne Corgorno Toni And Bruce Corwin H’97 Paige Dunbar Yussef El Guindi Lorrie And Michael Epling Carolyn And James Flanigan Allyn Fleming Mark Flick Dennis Freedman Cecily Freedson Susan And Mark Frink Jill And Leonard Fromer


Allan Ghitterman* And Susan Rose Nelson Gibbs Ashley And Jeffrey Gish Lisa Harris Juliane Heyman Melinda And Alexander Horwitz Laura Isham Gib Johnson And Zoe Iverson Bob Johnson And Lisa Reich Laura And Benjamin King ‘94 Michael Klaers Ada Ko Beverlie And Ronald Latimer Barbara Lebow Margaret Leonard And Clare Sheils Jason Loewith Myles Mattenson David Marshall And Candace Waid Lucinda And Thurman Newsome, Jr. Jan And Don O’dowd Vicki And Gary Olson Alissa And Doug Parrish Pauline Paulin Joanna And Mark Penner Philip Pierce Dean Pitchford Tyler Pon And Alice Youmans Albert Reid, Jr. Joanna And Charles Reisner Tanya Rice Cheryl Riggins Lisa Rock Gayle And Charles Rosenberg Rona J. Sande Santa Barbara Foundation Towbes Fund For The Performing Arts Arlene Satterlee Nancy Schlosser Bernard Seder And Lilyan Cuttler Anne Shanto Jeffry Sherbakoff And Amelia Gomez Manuel Sherbakoff Jessie Sherman

Diana And Stan Sherrill Tonia Shimin Fran And Thomas Stein Kat Sullivan Kay And Ashok Talwar Nicholas Tingle And Carol Press ‘80/’77 David A. Tufts, Jr. Katherine And John Ugoretz Dana Wayne Thomas Whitaker Dana White Laura Wilson Andre Yew Joan And Steven Young

If you are interested in making a gift to the Department of Theater and Dance please contact Leslie Gray Senior Director of Development LESLIE.GRAY@UCSB.EDU or visit us on the web at theaterdance.ucsb.edu Your support makes a difference!

This list notes gifts made between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019. We apologize for any errors or omissions. Please contact Leslie Gray, Senior Director of Development.

*In Memoriam


DEPARTMENT OF THEATER AND DANCE PRODUCTION Chair / Director of Perfomance / IRWIN APPEL Vice Chair / Director of Dance / CHRISTINA MCCARTHY Director, BFA Actor Training Program / ANNIE TORSIGLIERI Production Manager / DANIEL J HERRERA Community Relations Specialist / UNA MLADENOVIĆ Technical Director / JAMIE BIRKETT Theater Production Supervisor, Scenery+ Props/ DEVIN GEE Theater Production Supervisor, Lighting + Audio / MARK WILLIAMS Costume Shop Manager / DENISE UMLAND Cutter/Draper / LILLIAN HANNAHS Senior Scene Technician / SANDARBH TRIPATHI Office Assistant / DANIELA SHERWIN, CHRISTIAN MORGAN, EZRA ADKINS Marketing Interns / KACEY HSU, PHOEBE JIN, ISABELLE GUILLORY House Managers / KAYLY HOWELL, ASHELY DAVIS, JADYN STEAFFENS, JAYDEN SHULTZ, STEVEN SCRUGGS, TEANNEA LUCAS, SYLVIA MCMAKIN

ADMINISTRATION Chief Administrative Officer / ERIC MILLS Financial Assistant / LAUREN MARQUEZ Undergraduate Advisor / SEAN O’SHEA Graduate Program Coordinator / MARY TENCH Academic Personnel Chair’s Assistant / DEBRA VANCE Principal Musician / PATRICK WELLS LINDLEY

BOYS LIKE US SCENIC Production Supervisors/ ALISSON MCSWAIN, JUDY ZHU, GIOVANNI CASTILLO Deck Crew/ GABRIELLE PENNER, MASON TEICHERT

COSTUMES Wardrobe Supervisor/ GABRIELLE PENNER

LIGHTING Lighting Assistant/ JORDAN CURIEL Fly Op/ MASON TEICHERT

Profile for ucsbtheaterdance

Boys Like Us Program  

Boys Like Us is an evening-length dance piece that reflects on the process of coming-of-age and ‘coming out’ as a gay/queer person. Through...

Boys Like Us Program  

Boys Like Us is an evening-length dance piece that reflects on the process of coming-of-age and ‘coming out’ as a gay/queer person. Through...

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