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* MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS


MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS


CONTENTS 02

Introduction

04

Section 1: Value of a CLAS Education

10

Section 2: Learn About Yourself

16

Section 3: Explore Majors and Careers

22

Section 4: Gain Relevant Experience

30

Section 5: Implement Plan

35

Conclusion

MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS


INTRODUCTION “The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences provides you with the educational foundation to pursue careers across industry lines. Having so many options is exciting, but can also be overwhelming. Career Services is waiting to assist you in making well-informed career decisions. Of the students who have met with a Career Services professional, over 90 percent report being satisfied with their experience. So yes, read through this guidebook and yes, apply to one of the hundreds of internships, co-ops, and full-time jobs that Career Services posts, but also take the time to meet with a Career Services professional. CLAS and Career Services are thrilled to promote your career success.� -Cynthia F. Jones, Ed.D. Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Director for Career Services and -Jeremy Teitelbaum, Ph.D. Dean and Professor of Mathematics College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

02 | MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS


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SECTION 1: Value of a CLAS Education Profile Insights from UConn Alumni What Employers Are Looking For Action Steps Picture yourself in a job interview. You sit down and the interviewer says, “Tell me how the coursework you’ve completed at UConn will add value to this company.” How would you reply? When reading this chapter, think not only about the valuable skills you are gaining through your coursework, but also about how you are going to market your major to an employer or graduate school admissions committee. The world of work has changed. Professionals now go through an average of seven jobs in their twenties and switch jobs every five years thereafter. The switches will not only be from one employer to another, but also from one industry to another. Do you see the importance of having a broad education that is transferable? In this section you will hear employers’ stance on the value of a liberal arts and sciences education, and be exposed to information that will help you confidently articulate the value of your major the next time an employer, friend, or parent asks, “How is your coursework going to help you in the world of work?”

04 | MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS


JOAN LUISE HILL Author Joan Luise Hill exemplifies the transferral of skills to multiple positions throughout a career. She has conducted research, managed hospitals, written grants, reported to 13 CEOs, served as a consultant, and recently published the book The Miracle Chase, which has been praised by authors and academics across the country. Hill credits a liberal arts and sciences education with providing the skills necessary to be successful in both entry-level positions and upper-level management.

Boston College Bachelor of Science in Biology and Psychology ’75 University of Connecticut Master of Arts in Human Development and Family Studies ’77

“You would think with some of the positions I’ve held that I would have an MBA, but part of being a good manager is knowing how to utilize people and get them to work together toward a common goal. These are the mindsets that come with exposure to a breadth of education.” Completing a wide range of courses positioned Hill to develop transferable skills valued across industries. When Hill accepted a position as a grant writer to enhance communication between hospitals and ambulances, she connected her experience with writing college papers to writing grants. “If you can write a thesis, you can write a grant. You are organizing your thoughts and the information in an appropriate way, just as you would do for a thesis.” Another skill Hill touts as valued by employers is the ability to identify and solve problems. “The good news about science majors is that through the scientific lab process, you ingrain a very logical way of thinking. Being able to apply the scientific method is a very transferable skill in any kind of business because you need to know where you’ve started, where you are going, and what did and didn’t work.” Hill used this framework when she researched and wrote The Miracle Chase. She credits her application of the scientific method, a skill she developed as a liberal arts and sciences major, to the book’s success.

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INSIGHTS FROM UCONN ALUMNI

CLAS Advisory Board members Robert Makuch ’72, Denise Hall ’82, and Tim Nguyen.

Larissa Chapin, Director at Beach Point Capital B.A. in French and English ’93; M.B.A. in Finance ’95 “There is no substitute for an open mind, the ability to write well, and the chance to meet and befriend people from diverse backgrounds. My liberal arts education gave me the tools—transferring them to finance gave me a career.”

Gary Gladstein, Senior Consultant at Soros Fund Management, LLC B.A. in Economics ’66; M.B.A. in Finance and Accounting (Columbia University) “My liberal arts education changed my life. While I was initially unsure what I wanted to major in, I was exposed to the introductory courses in economics. I quickly knew economics was both my interest and strength, and fortunately, had great professors. It provided a strong foundation for my professional career in business and investing. I feel very fortunate to have been provided this opportunity.”

Anita Sathe, Senior Consultant at Deloitte, LLP M.S. in Mathematics and Actuarial Science ’03 “My experience at UConn’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences went beyond teaching me the technical skills required to be successful in my career. It refined my creative thinking skills, made me a broader thinker, and taught me how to consider a myriad of factors before making a decision. My experience at the CLAS was very rewarding, and I cannot thank the faculty and staff at UConn enough for the great time I had here!”

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INSIGHTS FROM UCONN ALUMNI

Myles Martel, President at Martel & Associates B.A. in Communication ’65; M.A. in Communication (Temple); Ph.D. in Communication (Temple) “For the past 32 years I have served as founder and CEO of an international leadership consulting practice. In this role, I have served the president of the United States, as well as prominent leaders from business and academia. I attribute much of my success to the broad base of knowledge I acquired through my excellent liberal arts education at UConn, especially coursework in communication, psychology, sociology, history, and political science. This foundation helps provide my clients with well-grounded and richer insights to enhance their growth as leaders and to strengthen the organizations they serve.”

Denise Hall, Senior Vice President and Manager of the Treasury Services Group at Webster Bank B.A. in Psychology ’82; M.B.A. in Finance (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) “My career in banking and finance brings me into contact with every spectrum of the business world, and my volunteer work in the not-for-profit human services sector and as an elected official provides me with opportunities to meet and help people from all walks of life. My degree in psychology has been an excellent foundation that has enabled me to relate to people, problem-solve, and continue to learn and grow every day.”

William E. Trueheart, President and CEO of Achieving the Dream, Inc. B.A. in Political Science ’66; M.P.A. (Harvard University); Ed.D. in Education (Harvard University) “My liberal arts education truly opened my eyes and mind to a world—to universes—that were unknown to me as I grew up in a poor household with limited opportunity to know the richness, of learning resources all around me. CLAS faculty helped me discover that richness and it has served me well throughout my career. They helped me to think critically, to write well, and to carefully seek and use solid evidence to make informed decisions about life’s options. I am deeply grateful for having taken the liberal arts learning journey.”

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WHAT EMPLOYERS ARE LOOKING FOR We have recruited students from all majors, each of whom have a drive to succeed and a strong work ethic. With the coursework and experiences they are exposed to with a liberal arts degree, students are prepared to face challenges and can approach situations with an open mind. They think outside the box and provide creativity in the workforce. -New York Post Our employment exam does not test applicants on their knowledge of finance or the insurance business, but it does require them to demonstrate critical thinking skills and the ability to calculate and think logically. These skills plus the ability to read for information, to communicate and write effectively, and to have an understanding of global integration need to be demonstrated. This isn’t just what employers want; it’s also what employees need if they are to be successful in navigating the workplace. -Edward B. Rust, Jr., Chairman and CEO, State Farm Insurance Companies

Top 10 Skills/Qualities Employers Value Most When reading the quotes about what employers look for, are you surprised that the New York Post didn’t mention journalism majors or that State Farm Insurance didn’t mention business majors? Employers are not looking for a specific major, because a major doesn’t lead to a certain career in most cases. Employers are looking to answer two basic questions when making hiring decisions: 1) What skills have you gained? 2) How are those skills applicable to this position? Each year the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) surveys companies across industry lines to determine the skills/qualities most valued by employers. You will notice commonalities between the employer quotes and the top ten skills/qualities. Remember how Joan Luise Hill transferred her knowledge of the scientific method to solve problems in the world of work? The skills you are acquiring from your coursework and outof-classroom experiences are transferable to a variety of industries. Think of some examples of how you are gaining the skills listed below. Skill/Quality

Weighted average rating*

We seek individuals with the traits found in our most successful corps members—strong leadership, achievement, perseverance, critical thinking, organizational and motivational skills, and respect for and ability to work effectively with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Many of these traits are the same characteristics that define great leaders in any context.

Ability to work in a team structure

4.60

Ability to verbally communicate with persons inside and outside the organization

4.59

Ability to make decisions and solve problems

4.49

Ability to obtain and process information

4.46

Ability to plan, organize, and prioritize work

4.45

-Teach for America

Ability to analyze quantitative data

4.23

Technical knowledge related to the job

4.23

Proficiency with computer software programs

4.04

Ability to create and/or edit written reports

3.65

Ability to sell or influence others

3.51

We look for people who have taken the lead, whether it’s an internship or a community activity. We like people who are versatile, who can use technology, yes, but who perform well in front of the client. We train new graduates. We don’t expect them to come in knowing advanced software. What we want is people with a hunger for learning—people who can understand client problems and come up with ways to solve them that are creative, focused and goal-driven. -Keturah Akida Henderson, Deloitte 08 | MAJOR MAJOR TO TO CAREER: CAREER: AA GUIDE GUIDE FOR FOR CLAS CLAS STUDENTS STUDENTS

* 5-point scale, where 1=Not important; 2=Not very important; 3=Somewhat important; 4=Very important; and 5=Extremely important Source: Job Outlook 2012, National Association of Colleges and Employers


ACTION STEPS

1. View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills: You now know that in most cases employers are “skill focused,”not “major focused.” Your ability to articulate your skill set is of paramount importance when it comes to landing a job or gaining acceptance to graduate school. Think of how your experiences in the classroom have provided you with some of the skills listed in the NACE sidebar. Remember Joan Luise Hill’s example of how the scientific method has helped her hone her problemsolving ability. 2. Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major: It’s always beneficial to go straight to the source. Find a professional who shares your major and find out how they have transferred the skills they acquired from their liberal arts and sciences education into the world of work. To find a professional to interview, sign up for CareerNet. CareerNet serves as a resource for locating alumni job postings, mentor connections, career advice, and more. Get started today by visiting uconnalumni.com/han.

Action Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major Engage in Self-Assessment Discuss Your Skills, Interests, and Values with a Career Counselor Research Majors Research Careers Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor Network with Alumni Find an Internship Assess Your Experiences Have Your Résumé Critiqued Complete a Practice Interview Set Big Picture and Short Term Goals Create a Timeline

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SECTION 2: Learn About Yourself Profile Conducting a Self-Assessment Action Steps Visualize a path. The end of the path represents a significant career decision such as choosing a major or a career. You see the finish line, and know you need to make a strategic decision, but how do you get there? Learning about yourself is the first step in career planning. Knowing your skills (what you do well), your interests (what you find enjoyable), and your values (what is important to you) will help you choose a major or career that will be fulfilling. Assessing yourself in these areas, identifying significant themes, and feeding forward what you’ve learned to make a major or career decision sets you up for success. In this chapter you will see how Mark, a sophomore at UConn, evaluated his life experiences through the lens of skills, interests, and values in order to identify themes and trends to help him make strategic major and career decisions. Lastly, you will find out how career counselors in the Department of Career Services can help you navigate the “learn about yourself” phase of the career development process.

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LIZ SCOTT Co-Executive Director Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation Growing up, Liz Scott dreamed of making a difference in the lives of others by counseling clients. Although Scott did not directly enter the field of counseling, her experiences of working for a large insurance company, owning a small business, and founding a nationally recognized foundation have centered on a value Scott has held since childhood— helping others.

University of Connecticut Bachelor of Arts in Psychology ’91

Scott’s driving value, interest in working with people, and skill of building relationships led to her success in diverse positions. After landing a position at Travelers Insurance upon graduation, Scott’s ability to relate to others led to her appointment to an upper-level management position, where she oversaw sales in Connecticut and Rhode Island. She then moved on to open a coffee shop, Java Joints, with her husband on UConn’s campus, where she enjoyed building relationships with her customers. The birth of Scott’s daughter Alex, and Alex’s diagnosis of cancer at the age of one, changed Scott’s life and led to a new calling. Today, Liz and Jay Scott carry on their daughter’s legacy as Co-Executive Directors at Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. Their organization has raised over $50 million and has been featured on programs from The Today Show to The Oprah Winfrey Show. “I am back to my original plan of helping people. I just didn’t know how I would get here.” “I am involved in so many different aspects of the foundation, which keeps work interesting. I do everything from working on the website to public relations. I speak at schools, plan special events, and talk to researchers and families about how our foundation can help.” Scott encourages students to find organizations that align with their values and gain experience. “Nonprofits regularly take people on as volunteers, and you are able to work in their environment and observe what the CEO, CFO, and other company leaders are doing. Work experience, paid or unpaid, will get you a leg up and allow you to learn more about yourself.”

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CONDUCTING A SELF-ASSESSMENT Using Self-Assessment to Inform Career Decision Making: During your time at UConn you will spend hundreds of hours attending classes, preparing for tests, and doing homework. The average person spends more than 30 percent of his or her waking hours at work. Do you see the importance of having a major and choosing a career that aligns with your skills, interests, and values? Leadership guru John Maxwell said in his book, Thinking for a Change, that “creativity is connecting the unconnected.” You have likely had several hobbies, taken some interesting classes, and participated in unique activities throughout the course of your lifetime. Now, it is just a matter of making connections.

Visual Mapping as a Self-Assessment Tool: The career counselors in Career Services have an arsenal of tools ranging from questionnaires to assessments to assist you in self-exploration. For the purposes of this guidebook, let’s go over an activity that you can complete individually.We will use Mark, a sophomore at UConn, as an example. Mark used visual mapping to: 1. Determine significant life experiences 2. Connect and make meaning of these experiences by identifying significant life themes 3. Identify skills, interests, and values that stem from his life experiences Mark chose a creative environment, set a timer for 20 minutes, and began mapping his significant life events: interesting jobs, rewarding classes, childhood experiences, hobbies, and accomplishments. He included events from his childhood (acting/drama class) as well as experiences he did not view as being career-related (ran cross-country in high school). After mapping significant experiences and life events, Mark identified themes to organize the events, along with the skills, interests, and values that fall under each theme. Let’s explore Mark’s findings. 12 | MAJOR MAJOR TO TO CAREER: CAREER: AA GUIDE GUIDE FOR FOR CLAS CLAS STUDENTS STUDENTS


Mark’s Visual Map: Finding Connections Public Speaking:

From taking acting/drama classes as a child to being on his high school debate team, and enjoying giving class presentations in his communications class, Mark realized that he has a knack for public speaking. Skills:

Analyzing: Before debates, Mark excelled in critically examining, organizing, and deciding how to present information

Creativity: When presenting to his communications class, Mark did not follow the norm and make a PowerPoint presentation. He took a different approach

Interests:

Persuasion: Mark enjoyed persuading the judges that his debate team won the argument

Performing: As a child, Mark was eager to perform with his acting/drama class Values:

Public Speaking Enjoyed communications class presentations

Acting/drama class

Debate team

Leadership Orientation leader Captain of high school tennis team

Sports editor for high school newspaper

Autonomy: Rather than being told what to do, Mark enjoys choosing his class presentation topic

Leadership:

From his experiences as an orientation leader and as the captain of his high school tennis team, Mark discovered his passion for leading others. Skills:

Communication: When serving as an orientation leader, Mark expressed information in a clear and concise manner

Collaboration: Mark and his teammates worked together to achieve a shared goal— winning the conference championship

Interests:

Inspiring others: Mark ceated positive energy at practice, and his teammates followed his lead

Values:

Challenge: The constant challenges Mark faced as an orientation leader kept him engaged

MARK

Relatedness: Developing close relationships with his teammates and fellow orientation leaders was extremely rewarding

Sports:

Running cross-country, playing tennis, being a sports writer in high school, and enjoying his sports psychology class made Mark realize that sports have played a significant role in his life: Skills:

Dealing with pressure: Performing in conference championship matches and meeting tight deadlines for his high school newspaper helped Mark learn to work under pressure

Teamwork: Mark improved his ability to work well with others through communicating with his doubles partner in tennis and co-authoring pieces in his high school paper

Interests:

Athletics: Mark enjoys playing and watching sports and studying the psychology behind sports

Values:

Competition: Mark values competition in sports, the classroom, and even at work

Sports

Ran cross-country

Interest in sports psychology

Leisure: Having the ability to make time for leisure activities,

such as sports, is important to Mark

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Personal Mission Statement Organizations from universities to technology companies have mission statements that guide their efforts. Whether or not Mark has declared a major or visualized a career path is irrelevant. Creating a personal mission statement that synthesizes Mark’s skills, interests, and values will help him make intentional career decisions. Just as organizations use their mission statements as a navigational tool, Mark’s mission statement will serve as his career compass. Mark’s Mission Statement: My mission is to use my communication, analytical, and creative skills to work in a team-oriented and collegial environment where I can help and inspire others.

Utilizing Your Mission Statement as a Career Compass If Mark is in the process of deciding upon a major, he can use his mission statement to evaluate possible majors. Maybe Mark’s positive high school debate team experience, where he critically examined information, organized content, and constructed an argument, would lead him to enjoy majoring in American Studies, where he could use his analytical mind-set to explore cultural, political, and economic structures throughout the history of America. Or maybe Mark would enjoy studying interpersonal, nonverbal, intercultural, and international communication by majoring in communications. From a career standpoint, Mark believes any position that involves working in a team-oriented environment to help and inspire others interests him. He recognizes that his life theme of being interested in sports is significant. For this reason, Mark will consider looking into careers in the sports industry. However, if his career does not fall in this arena, he knows that he can pursue sports activities away from work. Now that Mark has a better understanding of his skills, interests, and values, it is time for Mark to gain relevant experience.

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ACTION STEPS 3. Engage in Self-Exploration: Now that you know the importance of understanding your skills, interests, and values and how to use this information when choosing a major or career, it is important to reflect. If you liked Mark’s use of visual mapping, theme identification, and constructing a mission statement, you can follow his approach. 4. Apply Self-Knowledge to Career Decision-Making A career counselor can not only be useful in helping you identify your skills, interests, and values, but can also guide you in processing the information and applying what you have learned to career-related decisions such as choosing a major or a career. The career counselors at UConn have an array of tools ranging from informal questionnaires to formal assessments to assist you in self-exploration.

Action Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major Engage in Self-Exploration Apply Self-Knowledge to Career Decision-Making Research Majors Research Careers Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor Network with Alumni Find an Internship Assess Your Experiences Have Your Résumé Critiqued Complete a Practice Interview Set Big Picture and Short-Term Goals Create a Timeline

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SECTION 3: Explore Majors and Careers Profile What Can I Do with My Major? Action Steps What is your major? What are you going to do with that? It probably seems like you’re asked these two questions everywhere you go. It’s possible that the last person who asked you “the questions” is a family member, your roommate, or even a classmate you just met. Regardless, both questions may come across as intimidating. From learning about the value of a liberal arts and sciences education in the first section you understand that the transferable skills gained from a CLAS education are valued across industry lines. In this chapter you will find out what UConn CLAS graduates are doing in the world of work. Furthermore, you will gain a better understanding of how career counselors in Career Services can assist you in the major and career exploration process.

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JEREMY PINCUS, PH.D. Principal Forbes Consulting Group More than twenty five years later, the conversation remains vivid in Jeremy’s mind. He was in the process of exploring majors and careers when his Mom provided some words of wisdom. “Don’t think about what sounds good or what other people expect,” she said. “Think about what excites you.” Jeremy pondered his Mom’s advice and later came to a realization. “I liked understanding how people tick, but I also like advertising, marketing, consumer issues, technology, and statistics. When I put all the pieces together it seemed like the best career to pursue was one in consumer research and consumer behavior.” University of Connecticut Bachelor of Arts in Psychology ’87 Master of Arts in Social Psychology ’90 Ph.D. in Social Psychology ’93

Fast-forward to today, and Jeremy has not only followed the path that he set out to pursue, but he has become a leader in the field of marketing research. During his tenure as Principal at Forbes Consulting, Jeremy has been named the Marketing Researcher of the Year by the Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Group, listed on the Power List by Senior Market Advisor magazine, and has presented his work to three Congressional committees. Jeremy says his 20 plus years of marketing research experience in pharmaceuticals, financial services, and consumer packaged goods center on helping clients understand which constituent groups impact their success and what is going to motivate those groups to take actions that will be beneficial to the client. Jeremy advises students not to get too caught up in thinking about their major, but rather to think about what they want from their careers and to make sure they gain relevant experience outside of academia. “The most important thing is to do an internship or job shadowing experience in your field of interest to see what it’s really like—there is no substitute for that. The type of people who work in that field and the atmosphere of that work environment will be a major component in your life; make sure it’s right for you.” MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE CLAS STUDENTS| 17 MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FORFOR CLAS STUDENTS


WHAT CAN I DO WITH MY MAJOR? Below is a snapshot of what University of Connecticut CLAS alumni are doing in the world of work. You will find that you can go into a seemingly linear career, like a psychology major becoming a counselor at Stuart Middle School, or that you can go into a career that may not seem directly connected to your major. Your career possibilities are endless. The transferable skills you gain through your coursework are valued across industry lines.

UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR

WHERE THEY WORK

WHAT THEY DO

African American Studies

Albany Law School

Civil Rights and Disabilities Law Clinic

African American Studies

The Hospital of Central Connecticut

Nurse Technician

American Studies

Webb-Dean-Stevens Museum

Museum Educator

American Studies

Robinson & Cole, LLP

Associate Lobbyist

Anthropology

Geo-Marine, Inc.

Project Archaeologist

Anthropology

Reliant Energy, Inc.

Energy Marketing Manager

Biological Sciences

Pfizer

Associate Scientist

Biological Sciences

MetLife Insurance Company

Director of Planning and Development

Chemistry

Proctor and Gamble

Senior Scientist

Chemistry

Pazdar Beverage Company

Winery Owner

Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Williamsburg Charter High School

Latin Teacher

Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Argonne National Laboratory

Coordinator of Writing and Editing

Cognitive Science

The Travelers Companies Inc.

Senior Systems Specialist

Cognitive Science

Boston University

Educational Resource Center Fellow

Communication Disorders

St. Joseph Medical Center

Speech Pathologist

Communication Disorders

Europe by Car, Inc.

Travel Consultant

Communication Sciences

City of Waterbury

Speech Pathologist

Communication Sciences

Puma

Global Media Director

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Research Scientist

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Microsoft Corporation

Project Manager

Economics

ING Group

Economic Consultant

Economics

U.S. Congressman

Assistant Communications Director

English

Travelers

Advertising & Public Relations Director

English

Umpire

Major League Baseball

Environmental Science

Apex Environmental

Environmental Technician

Environmental Science

Infinity Pharmaceutical

Cancer Researcher

French

Chichester DuPont Foundation

Trustee

French

Peace Corps

Teacher in Ukraine

Geography

Regional Water Authority, LLC

Environmental Compliance Analyst

Geography

ANYStreams, Inc.

Accountant

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UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR

WHERE THEY WORK

WHAT THEY DO

Geoscience

TRC Environmental

Staff Geologist

Geoscience

Navel Underwater Warfare Center

Electronics Engineer

German

Mansfield Middle School

German Teacher

German

UTC Aerospace

Mechanical Design Engineer

History

University of Michigan

Professor of History

History

Department of Interior

Program Analyst

Human Development & Family Studies

YMCA

Site Coordinator

Human Development & Family Studies

University of Connecticut

Internship Resources Consultant

Italian

Sigma

International Liaison

UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR Italian

WHERE THEY WORK The Gillette Company

WHAT Manager THEY DO Sales

Journalism

NBCUniversal, Inc.

Television News Producer

Journalism

Northeast Utilities

Director, Economic & Business Development

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp

Controller

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Bracewell & Guiliani, LLP

Attorney/Partner

Linguistics

University of London

Lecturer

Linguistics

Hewlett Packard Company

Technology Editor

Maritime Studies

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Laboratory Specialist

Maritime Studies

Mystic Seaport

Educational/Historical Programming

Mathematics

Texas Instruments, Inc.

Manufacturing Consultant

Mathematics

American Express Company, Inc.

Lead Web Developer

Mathematics: Actuarial Science

Deloitte, LLP

Actuarial Consultant

Mathematics: Actuarial Science

MacMillan McGraw-Hill

Quality Assurance Specialist

Molecular & Cell Biology

SphynKx Therapeutics, LLC

Founder & Chief Executive Officer

Molecular & Cell Biology

Reliance House, Inc.

Case Manager

Philosophy

Federal Reserve

Economist

Philosophy

AMERIGROUP, Corp.

Executive Vice President, Support Operations

Physics

Measurex Corporation

Physicist

Physics

Federal Communications Commission

Policy Analyst

Physiology & Neurobiology

Johnson Memorial Hospital

Director, Emergency

Physiology & Neurobiology

Yale University

Lab Manager

Political Science

Massachusetts Republican Party

Executive Director

Political Science

State of Connecticut

Child Support Investigator

Psychology

Stuart Middle School

Counselor

Psychology

Hands to Hearts International

Founder/Executive Director

Sociology

Massachusetts General Hospital

Social Worker

Sociology

U.S. Department of State

Human Resource Assistant

Spanish

Hartford Board of Education

School Counselor

Spanish

MasterCard Worldwide

Director of Product Management

Statistics

Department of Defense

Mathematician

Statistics

Time, Inc.

Vice President of Global Compensation

Urban & Community Studies

The Trust for Public Land

Associate Director of Philanthropy

Urban & Community Studies

Massachusetts Chemistry & Technology Alliance

Chief Executive Officer

Women’s Studies

The Permanent Commission on the Status of Women

Legislative Director

Women’s Studies

General Electric

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The Decision-Making Process When making a major or career decision begin by assessing which major and career decision-making mindset resonates with you. There is no “best mindset.” Reading the mindests below will simply help you understand how you are aproaching your decision. Major A = Career A: You chose a specific major to attain a particular career. Example: an actuarial science major who wants to become an actuary. Major A = Career A, B, or C: You chose a major without a career in mind, but are open to exploring career options. Example: an English major who may pursue public relations or law.

Career Counseling Checklist Below is a list of ways to prepare fore your initial appointment with a Career Services professional. Whether or not you bring these items is completely up to you and is by no means required. Visual Map of Experiences: Remember the visual map that Mark created to make meaning of his significant life events? If you created your own visual map, consider sharing it with your career counselor. Résumé: Bringing your résumé will provide your career counselor with an overview of your life experiences, which play a significant role in your major/career decisions. List of Completed Coursework: If you are deciding upon a

Major A, B, or C = Career A: You have chosen a career, but can choose from a variety of majors to get there. Example: a student who wants to go to medical school who may select biology or chemistry.

major, you will likely be asked to talk about the coursework

Major A, B, or C = Career A, B, or C: You are open to multiple majors and multiple careers. You may have diverse interests and are unsure which interest to pursue.

what you hope to accomplish through career counseling will

Meeting with a Career Counselor Prepare for the Meeting: What do you hope to accomplish through career counseling? If you have a goal, share it with your counselor. If you don’t have a goal, that is also fine. Schedule the Meeting: Visit career.uconn.edu to view Career Services’ walk-in hours. When you come into the office, you will sign up for a 15-minute appointment. During the Meeting: The goal of the initial consultation is for the counselor to get to know you and learn what you hope to accomplish. At the conclusion, a follow-up appointment will likely be scheduled. After the Meeting: You may recieve a customized assignment that will lay the foundation for a successful follow-up appointment.

you have taken. Some students find it useful to have a list to reference. Know Your End Goal: Being able to communicate exactly be beneficial to both you and the career counselor. List of Majors/Careers That You’re Considering: If you have narrowed your decision to a couple of majors/careers, consider bringing this list to your appointment. If you are still exploring and don’t have a list, that’s okay too. Have Realistic Expectations: A career counselor can’t tell you what to major in or which career you should pursue. Rather, career counselors provide tools and resources and share strategies that empower you to make a strategic decision. Depending on your decision-making style and where you are in the process, multiple appointments may be needed before you reach a decision. Bring Your Planner: After your initial 15-minute consultation you will likely schedule a follow-up appointment. Having your calendar will allow you to pick a time that works with your schedule. Have a Pen and Paper: During your appointment, your career counselor may share resources and tools, many of which are on the internet. Having pen and paper at hand to jot down web addresses and other information may be helpful.

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ACTION STEPS 5. Research Majors: Visiting the “What Can I Do with My Major?” section of the Career Services website, career.uconn.edu, to research majors and learn about career opportunities. This resource will provide you with valuable information, including descriptions of major, nature of work, sample job titles, potential employment opportunities, useful skills, opportunities to gain relevant experience, and links to professional associations and other valuable resources. 6. Research Careers: The Career Services website provides links to several tools that will help you research different careers. One link, ONE*T Online, is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor and provides an overview of hundreds of occupations as well as educational requirements and wage and employment trends for each occupation. You can use this tool with the “What Can I Do with My Major?” section of the Career Services website. Simply look at the sample job titles section of a particular major and plug these titles into ONE*T Online to learn what these occupations entail.

Action Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major Engage in Self-Exploration Apply Self-Knowledge to Career Decision-Making Research Majors Research Careers Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor Network with Alumni Find an Internship Assess Your Experiences Have Your Résumé Critiqued Complete a Practice Interview Set Big Picture and Short-Term Goals Create a Timeline

7. Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor: Exploring majors and careers can be both exciting and overwhelming. A career counselor can serve as a guide through this process. By helping you look at occupations through the lens of your skills, interests, and values, and coaching you on the process of decision making, a career counselor will help you be better equipped to make an intentional and strategic major and career decision. Students often leave appointments feeling confident and excited to move forward in their career journey. 8. Network with Alumni: Networking within our UConn family means access to 225,000 alumni worldwide and is made possible through our free, online Career Net within the Husky Alumni Network. CareerNet serves as a resource for locating alumni job postings, mentor connections, career advice, and more. Get started today by visiting uconnalumni.com/han. MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE CLAS STUDENTS| 21 MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FORFOR CLAS STUDENTS


SECTION 4: Gain Relevant Experience Profile Pursuing Opportunities Action Steps Think about “the decision makers,” human resource professionals or graduate school admissions staff who have the arduous task of reviewing hundreds of résumés in search of the best candidates. Whether your résumé makes it to the “yes,” “maybe,” or “no” stack depends on the experiences you have gained. In the thirty seconds or less that “the decision maker” spends reviewing your résumé, he or she will make assumptions about you based on your experiences. For example, a student who has completed an internship and has held leadership positions in campus organizations, all the while maintaining a high GPA, is viewed as a motivated applicant with strong interpersonal, leadership, and time management skills. To the contrary, a student who only goes to class and decides not to get involved, hold a job, or even volunteer sends a strong message that he or she lacks motivation and work ethic. In this section, you will learn the top seven out-of-the-classroom experiences that employers and graduate schools value most and you will find out how you can seek out these experiences during your time at UConn. Additionally, you will hear what employers look for in applicants and see how the skills gained through these “top seven experiences” align with the skills and qualities most valued by employers.

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MIKE SOLTYS Vice President of U.S. Network Communications ESPN Mike Soltys arrived at UConn with a love for sports and an interest in the media and public relations, and he left with a full-time position at ESPN—an accomplishment he credits to the relevant experience he gained while in school. A chance conversation that Soltys had with ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen in a parking lot on campus led to his appointment as an intern at ESPN. During the conversation, Soltys pitched an idea to Rasmussen, stating, “I would work hard and for free, can write, and love sports.” Rasmussen replied with, “You said you’d work for free?” and with that Soltys’ 32-plusyear career with ESPN began. University of Connecticut Bachelor of Arts in Communications ’81 Master of Arts in Communications ’94

Since serving as ESPN’s first intern and working out of a trailer with a typewriter and few resources, Soltys has come a long way. Today, he serves as the Vice President of U.S. Network Communications for ESPN, where he is responsible for strategic planning for publicity for ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN Classic, ESPNEWS and ESPNU, and ESPN on ABC. In 2005, Soltys was named the Media Relations Professional of the Year by PR News. By taking advantage of on-campus opportunities, Soltys gained the skills necessary to convince Rasmussen to hire him as an intern. As a student, he opted to work as a freelance writer for the UConn Sports Information Department, keep game statistics for ESPN telecasts, and work in the UConn Public Information office over the summer. Soltys advises students to gain relevant experience through internships and other opportunities, to be open to possibilities, to network with professionals, and to focus on becoming better writers. He also counsels students to make the most of their internship experience. “Make a point of saying hello and sitting down with as many people that will do that with you. Come in with enthusiasm and have your eyes wide open to whatever opportunity that gets presented your way and jump at it.”

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Seven Most Valued Experiences OUT-OF-CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE

WHAT IT MEANS FOR YOU

WHAT IT MEANS TO YOUR EMPLOYER OR GRAD SCHOOL

Internships

Gain relevant experience. Immersion in work environment. Assess whether the field aligns with your skills, interests, and values. Acquire recommendations.

Experience in field reiterates interest and demonstrates commitment. Shows initiative. Displays relevant transferable skills for job.

Career Services’ online recruiting system, HuskyCareerLink, lists hundreds of internships relevant to students of all majors. Additionally, the department hosts career/ internship fairs to connect students with employers.

Student Employment

Acquire transferable skills. Broaden your network. Acquire recommendations. May be given professional duties, seek these out.

Manages time well. Hard worker who shows initiative. May acquire relevant skills, depending on job.

There are well over 5,000 students employed in almost every department on campus. Students are a vital part of the university’s workforce.

Leadership in Student Organizations

Experience motivating and leading others. Develop ability to handle time and social pressures. Acquire recommendations. Be recognized on campus. Gain new skills, especially communication and interpersonal.

Future management potential as someone who can motivate others. Takes initiative and demonstrates teamwork skills. Able to handle time and social pressures.

UConn has over 400 registered student organizations, as well as six cultural centers and a range of clubs and intramural sports.

Study Abroad

See new places. Experience new Comfortable in new environments. The University of Connecticut offers perspectives. Build language skills. Active and quick learner. Lanover 300 study abroad programs in Solve problems. Stretch comfort guage and cultural skills. Shows 65 countries on six continents. zone. initiative.

Summer Jobs

Earn money for short-term and long-term goals. May acquire skills related to career interests. Learn your workplace interests and dislikes.

Demonstrates initiative and hard work. May show relevant transferable skills depending on job.

If interested in staying at UConn for the summer, consider applying to be a tour guide, a summer conference staff member, or an orientation leader.

Volunteering/ Service Learning

Good feeling knowing you are helping others. May acquire career-related skills. Fun way to apply your interests and passions. Provides understanding of nonprofit organizations.

Demonstrates character. May have acquired relevant career-related skills. Shows passion for specific interests. Shows you will represent the organization well in the community.

Through Community Outreach alone, 2,854 UConn students performed 67,268 hours of community service in 2010-2011.

Undergraduate Research

Apply classroom skills to real-world issues. Develop career-related skills. May have opportunities for getting published or presenting at a conference. Acquire recommendations.

Demonstrates initiative. Evidence of commitment to the field. Shows career-related skills. Able to think critically and handle time pressures.

In 2010-2011, 175 students received funding for undergraduate research. Students from all majors and colleges are eligible.

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WHAT UCONN HAS TO OFFER


PURSUING OPPORTUNITIES Employer Viewpoint Organizations across industry lines and graduate schools of various disciplines value the seven experiences highlighted on the previous page. Organizations such as Enterprise RentA-Car, Target, and Northeast Utilities recognize how these experiences translate to the world of work. “As a Management Trainee Intern at Enterprise Rent-A-Car, you will be exposed to every aspect of our business, and asked to perform many of the same tasks as our Management Trainees who are learning to run our business. We find that the most prepared students are the most actively involved students, having not only employment experience, but also participating in student clubs and organizations, and showing other leadership initiatives. This involvement often demonstrates that the student has the experience in networking and creative time management that would make them successful as an intern with any company.” “Northeast Utilities is always interested in the well-rounded candidate. College students who take advantage of the many opportunities available to them throughout college life demonstrate the ability to add leadership, team-building, and time management skills to their résumés—while at the same time presenting themselves as creative and motivated individuals. These are the qualities that set candidates apart in the eyes of any recruiter.” “At Target, we are seeking candidates with strong leadership skills and experience. We have found that those students that are actively involved in extracurricular activities are able to provide us with those skills and experiences necessary for our needs. Not only are they better suited for these roles, we find that their interviewing skills are far more advanced than those students that are less involved. We typically ask behavioralbased questions in our interview process; therefore, the students with leadership experience find it much easier to draw examples for these questions due to their broad range of experiences on campus.”

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Skills Employers Value Most Employers across industries value transferable skills that can be acquired through coursework and out-of-classroom experiences. Use the definitions, examples, and faculty insights to reflect on ways you have developed these skills.

Communication and Writing:

Ability to clearly and concisely articulate information in an oral and written format • Research Paper: develop a thesis, find evidence, clarify and organize thoughts into words, present findings to reader • In-Class Presentation: communicate information to a specific audience, utilize multimedia and other strategies to spur engagement, respond to questions and critiques in a respectful and thoughtful manner

“In today’s business world, technical skills will only take you so far. It’s the ability to communicate the technical knowledge that you have that will determine how far you go. Take those math and science courses and develop your technical know-how. But also take full advantage of the diversity of courses designed to improve your writing skills and your communication capabilities.” –Michael Braunstein, Professor of Mathematics

Critical Thinking:

Ability to analyze and synthesize information in innovative ways • General Education Requirements: find connection between divergent topics in order to create a diverse web of knowledge • Peer-Reviewed Articles: read, analyze, and summarize scientific information and apply to the context of the course

“Being able to think critically goes back to what Plato gave us: you have to learn to read, to write, to think before you have a hope of making a difference and leaving something behind in your chosen field. A liberal arts and sciences education provides this broad skill set that enables one to make a difference in any field from classics to biotechnology.” –Dr. Roger Travis, Professor of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Problem Solving:

Ability to independently assess problems, determine possible solutions, and decide on an appropriate course of action • Preparation for Multiple Tests: prioritize time effectively to prepare for examinations in multiple courses while meeting other course demands • Variety of Courses: think outside the box and broaden your perspective in order to solve realworld problems

“CLAS courses teach students the skills necessary to solve problems and to critically evaluate scientific research and science in the media. Graduating CLAS students then apply these skills as lifelong learners and contributing members of the state, national, and world communities.” – Dr. Adam Fry, Lecturer in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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Work in Diverse and Global Workplaces:

Ability to maintain openness to differences in culture, attitudes, and opinions, and adaptability to changing business practices and organization structures • General Education Requirements: interact with a wide variety of individuals from different academic areas, learning styles, and career focuses • Volunteering: talk to individuals whose life experiences may differ from your own and learn from your similarities and differences

“Imagine that you’re going on a business trip to a country you know little about. How do you prepare? The best preparation is the only one available: become really good at learning, thinking, and communicating! These are the necessary ingredients of a liberal arts and sciences education. Mastering them puts you in a position to efficiently and effectively adapt—anywhere, anytime.” –Dr. JC Beall, Professor of Philosophy and Director of UConn Logic Group

Work Independently and with Others:

Ability to complete tasks without instruction or oversight and to work collaboratively to accomplish shared goals • Group Project: delegate tasks effectively so that all are contributing a fair amount toward creating a cohesive end product • Internship: assume responsibility and work independently in fulfilling an aspect of an organization’s mission; collaborate with colleagues

“Through discussion, research, and writing, students in CLAS engage in collaborative and individualized learning. Whether working on artistic, philosophical, social, or scientific questions, and whether alone or in groups, students interact with people from diverse backgrounds, engage new ideas, and discover different perspectives. In the process, they broaden and deepen their understanding of the richness of human experience.” –Dr. Margaret Sönser Breen, Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Quantitative Reasoning:

Ability to apply mathematical concepts and skills to solve real-world problems • Undergraduate Research: collaborate with an academic professor, collect and analyze statistics, connect findings with additional research and make meaning of results • Treasurer of a Student Organization: balance a budget, develop cost-effective methods for achieving organization goals

“The ability to conduct effective research and analyze results is a skill that students can apply to almost any field they will work in. The quantitative reasoning courses at UConn prepare students to ask insightful research questions and provide them the tools they will need to answer those questions. As job markets continue to become more competitive, students who can demonstrate an understanding of quantitative reasoning skills will maintain a competitive advantage over their peers.” –Dr. Rory McGloin, Professor of Communication

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Reasons for Interning Participating in an internship is a decision to be made with your future career in mind. An internship is primarily a careerrelated work experience where a student can learn more about an occupational interest in a structured manner. It typically lasts 10 to 15 weeks over 2 to 3 months. When a student participates in an internship that has meaningful projects, that student gains perspective on what he/she will want from a career. An internship allows you to focus on what interests, values, and skills are needed for someone to be successful. Employers seek out career-related opportunities on candidate applications; internships top the list. They often see interns as future employees. Graduate schools want to see that incoming students have direct experiences which will translate to professional expertise and that students will be able to offer solid contributions both in and out of the classroom. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), which administers an annual survey to college students across the United States, the following held true in 2011: Internships had an impact both on getting an offer and the salary connected with the offer: •

A significantly higher percentage of students with internships received full-time job offers than did students who went into the job market without such experience. As a result, seniors with internships also had a significantly higher number of jobs in hand prior to graduation than did seniors without internship or co-op experience. In 2011, the differential was an offer rate of 46 percent for interns compared with 33 percent for non-interns.

Graduates with internships also tended to receive significantly higher starting salary offers. The median starting salary offer for students with internships was $44,876 compared with $37,479 for students without internships—a difference of 19.7 percent.

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ACTION STEPS 9. Find an Internship: Students who complete an internship are more likely to be hired and receive a higher salary than students who did not complete an internship. Meet with a Career Services professional to start your search. You will be introduced to UConn’s online recruiting system, HuskyCareerLink, and to a clearinghouse of internship information at internships.uconn.edu. You will also learn how to create your own internship opportunities. Consult career.uconn. edu to view the department’s walk-in appointment hours. 10. Assess Your Experiences: Revisit the chart on page 24 and assess how many of the seven most valued experiences you have completed. When an employer or graduate school admissions committee looks over your résumé, will they view you as a candidate who gained valuable experience outside of the classroom? If yes, great! If not, commit to gaining additional experience and create a plan. From student employment to serving as a leader in a campus organization, the options are plentiful.

Action Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major Engage in Self-Exploration Apply Self-Knowledge to Career Decision-Making Research Majors Research Careers Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor Network with Alumni Find an Internship Assess Your Experiences Have Your Résumé Critiqued Complete a Practice Interview Set Big Picture and Short-Term Goals Create a Timeline

11. Have Your Résumé Critiqued: You have likely spent hundreds of hours partaking in a vast array of experiences, many of which you list on your résumé. Don’t sell yourself short—make sure your résumé effectively markets the skills you will bring to a potential employer or graduate school. Career Services can provide you with the tools and strategies necessary to ensure your résumé stands out for the right reasons. Consult career.uconn.edu to view the department’s résumé critique hours. 12. Complete a Practice Interview: A well-crafted résumé leads to an interview, and a good interview performance leads to an offer. The next time you have an interview on the horizon, contact Career Services to schedule an hour-long practice interview. The interview will be tailored to the position you are applying for, and you will receive feedback at the conclusion of the interview. You will leave knowing your strengths and areas for improvement so that you are prepared when your “big day”arrives. MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE CLAS STUDENTS| 29 MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FORFOR CLAS STUDENTS


SECTION 5 Implement Plan Profile Developing a Plan Action Steps By now you have grasped the importance of assessing your interests, skills, and values to gain insight into what is important to you and to identify your strengths. Some of the items on your to-do list may include research careers of interest, talk to professionals in the field, and experience various careers through job shadowing, on-campus opportunities, and internships. You have action steps—now what? It is time for you to assess the information you’ve collected, reflect on what you have learned, and implement your personal plan that will lead you toward your career goals.

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MARILYN ALVERIO Urban Marketing Executive Ethnic Marketing Solutions When Marilyn Alverio speaks, people listen. Sometimes the audience is a boardroom of executives looking to tap into her expertise in multicultural marketing. Other times, the audience consists of professionals attending one of her many speaking engagements or conferences. Some listen because she is a leader in her field; she has over 15 years of experience developing marketing strategies for Fortune 500 companies and small businesses. Others listen because of her upbeat and engaging personality—which may explain why she was selected as the Grand Marshall of this year’s Hartford Puerto Rican Parade.

University of Connecticut Bachelor of Art in Cultural Anthropology and Political Science ’75 University of Phoenix Master of Business Administration in Marketing ’06

In her early career, in sales positions at Goldman Laboratories and American Airlines, her colleagues listened not because she was a national leader in urban marketing—she wasn’t at the time—but because she knew how to build meaningful and lasting relationships. “I was successful because I respected people and understood their concerns. You want to understand people to build sincere relationships: you want to operate with trust, fairness, and honesty. People see that and they want to do business with you.” Her journey into the world of marketing started at American Airlines when she recieved a seat at the table because of her professional reputation. Her insights, knowledge, and straight forward approach resonated with the group and later led to her appointment as regional sales manager. Today, Alverio still uses her relationship-building skill set and her academic background when she develops in-culture marketing strategies for clients in a variety of industries. Alverio advises students to take advantage of hidden opportunities, hone their networking skills, and pursue their passions.“Find the organization that is doing the work that you love and then seek to understand how they operate and how they recruit employees. Find opportunities to assist them with what they’re doing and do not be afraid to volunteer in that field while you are looking for work.” MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE CLAS STUDENTS| 31 MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FORFOR CLAS STUDENTS


DEVELOPING A PLAN Whether you’ll be searching for a job, applying to graduate school, or pursuing post-graduate service or internship opportunities, your plan will involve setting manageable short-term goals, developing a timeline, being organized, and maintaining a positive attitude. Set short-term goals • If your ultimate goal is to get a full-time job, updating your résumé, completing a practice interview, and attending a networking event may be a few of your short-term goals. Each small step moves you closer to your end goal. Develop a timeline • In setting short-term goals, ensure that you do not lose sight of the big picture. If your plan is to apply to graduate school, create a timeline that extends from junior year, when you should begin preparing, to graduation. A timeline will help you meet deadlines and keep you on track for success. Be organized • Keeping track of application deadlines, contacts, and application items in addition to managing your academic schedule and other commitments can be challenging. Determine the best method to stay organized. Whether you create a spreadsheet or binder, pick organizational strategies that work for you. Maintain a positive outlook • As you pursue opportunities, you are bound to run into obstacles. This is an exciting but potentially challenging time in your life. Keep your attitude positive as you maneuver through the process, and you will leave a positive impression with people you meet through networking, interviewing, and the job search process.

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ADVICE FROM CAREER COUNSELORS

Set Short-Term Goals “Try to imagine what you want to accomplish after you graduate, not for ‘the rest of your life.’ Make a list of five short-term goals to accomplish that one larger goal. Keep it simple.” -Larry Druckenbrod, Assistant Director, Department of Career Services

Develop a Timeline “Managing the timeline will offer stability in a time that can feel overwhelming with uncertainty. Your confidence in your ability to stay on task will increase with a timeline that is realistic and effective. Remember, too, you can also adjust the timeline to suit your circumstances, which ultimately will help you stay focused and reach your goal.” -Beth S. Settje, Senior Assistant Director, Department of Career Services

Be Organized “In a stack of 100 résumés, yours may end up at the bottom of the pile, which is why following up via phone or email is so crucial. Keep employers’ contact information easily accessible so you can follow up with employers and get your résumé moved to the top of the pile.” -Jennifer Grunwald, Career Counselor, Department of Career Services

Maintain a Positive Outlook “Job searching can be a tough experience. Throughout the job search process, find something to do that makes you happy. The positive energy you develop there will be evident and make you more appealing to employers.” -Mike Petro, Assistant Director, Department of Career Services

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ACTION STEPS 13. Set Big Picture and Short-Term Goals Think of Google Earth; you can zoom out and see the entire planet, or you can zoom in and see a house. Goal setting is similar in the sense that being able to see the big picture is important, but so keeping sight of smaller details. Set big picture goals, such as receiving a full-time job in marketing, and short-term goals, such as conducting an informational interview with three marketing professionals. 14.Create a Timeline Now that you have set big picture goals as well as shortterm goals, it’s time to develop a road map that will keep you on course. Write your big picture goal at the top of the page. Next, list the short-term goals that will help you get there. Beside each short-term goal write a deadline for achieving the goal as well as the people or resources that you will need to consult. For instance, if your short-term goal is to conduct informational interviews with three marketing professionals, you may write that you need to meet with a career counselor to learn more about conducting an effective information interview before you begin reaching out to contacts

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Action Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

View Coursework Through the Lens of Transferable Skills Interview a Professional Who Shares Your Major Engage in Self-Exploration Apply Self-Knowledge to Career Decision-Making Research Majors Research Careers Discuss Possibilities with a Career Counselor Network with Alumni Find an Internship Assess Your Experiences Have Your Résumé Critiqued Complete a Practice Interview Set Big Picture and Short-Term Goals Create a Timeline


CONCLUSION You have just completed your journey through the guidebook—congratulations! From reading about the career successes of UConn CLAS alumni and reviewing positions held by alums who share your major, you know that your career story is exciting, but with so many career options it may be intimidating. This guidebook has outlined the steps in the career development process, illustrated to the right, to provide a map that you can reference as you journey through your personal career development process.

Learn about yourself

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In reviewing the diagram, you may notice that the career development process is cyclical, meaning you will move in and out of the four phases throughout your working lifetime. Completing the “implement plan” phase (maybe you decided upon a major) doesn’t mean you will not return to other phases in the career development process throughout your lifetime. In five years you may realize that your interests have changed, and as a result begin researching careers aligned with your new interests (phase two). Or you may be seeking a promotion in your current organization, but realize you need to gain more experience in an area where you are lacking (phase three).

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Know that you are not alone on your career journey. Take advantage of the people around you: your academic advisor, your professors, your mentors, UConn Alumni and career counselors in the Department of Career Services. Of the students who have met with a Career Services professional, over 90 percent reported being satisfied with their experience. So yes, follow the action steps outlined in this guidebook, and yes, apply to one of the hundreds of internships, co-ops, and full-time jobs that Career Services posts, but also take the time to meet with a Career Services professional. Best of luck with your journey!

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NOTES

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NOTES

MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS| 37


www.clas.uconn.edu

www.career.uconn.edu MAJOR TO CAREER: A GUIDE FOR CLAS STUDENTS| 38

Major to Career, A Guide for CLAS Students  

Major to Career, A Guide for CLAS Students

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