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This article is about finding balance. It is about finding the delicate, and ever shifting, balance that unceasingly exists between the fundamental creative abilities inherent in the primal God and primal Goddess aspects. Creative energies, aptly signified by the yin-yang symbol of duality in equilibrium, often regarded as the driving force that enables growth and continued evolution, are a kaleidoscopic mix of masculine and feminine energies, forever evolving within a dynamic dance of creative activity. For, as we honor and integrate the unique gifts offered by the divine masculine and feminine which encompass, yet transcends the traditional roles associated with men and women, female and male, we are assisting in creating an atmosphere of unity, equality and harmony within ourselves and our world. Recently, after millennia of repressive patriarchy, there has been a welcome re-emergence of women's spirituality, an honoring of the divine feminine within creation. It was during the dark and tortuous Middle Ages that religious intolerance and persecution reached its zenith. Backed by the full authority of the church fathers, who, fearing wild nature as unruly, a realm whose laws clashed with ordered society, not only demonized Pan, the Greek fertility god, but denounced the wild, earthy, sensual half of the spiritual journey, as evil and wicked, tainted and inherently dangerous, a sure bet for a one way ticket to hell! Myths and comparative mythologies, much exemplified by the masterful literary works of Joseph Campbell, in particular the seminal classic, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, help us to better grasp the obscure relevance of esoteric symbolism associated with humanities' rich cultural heritage, Jungian archetypes and shared collective consciousness. Moreover, prior to the Christian era, the gods were often envisaged as anthropomorphic beings that embodied a raw, ancient and primordial force, which from a shamanic perspective, were essentially vital to the well being of the tribe or village. Therefore it becomes entirely plausible, that meaningful rituals closely linked to the rhythms of nature, would have been an integral element of both, hunter-gatherer and agrarian farming communities. In this article I purpose to focus on one specific area, namely, some of the roles associated with the elemental nature of the divine masculine.

Minister Steve Waites became a UCM Minster on Sept 10th 1997 and graduated with his Bachelor of Theology Degree during the UCM conference in 2004. Steve graduated this year with his Master of Theology with UCM. Minister Waites is in the UCM Doctor of Divinity Program

In Celtic mythology, vegetative deities such as The Green Man, by enacting the timeless themes of death and resurrection, the ebb and flow of life, and the turning of the seasons, were seen as the primary source of fertility, both within the land and within the people who worked that land. Frequently found as decorative architectural ornaments and carvings in medieval European churches, the Green Man is a sculpture, drawing, or other representation of a face surrounded by or made from leaves, with branches or vines which may sprout from the nose, mouth, nostrils or other parts of

In Service To Humanity 1908 - Present

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Profile for UCM

UCM Spring 2011 Edition 7  

Sacred Rituals from around the Globe.

UCM Spring 2011 Edition 7  

Sacred Rituals from around the Globe.

Profile for ucmmag
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