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film & tv | muse

tory workers to be patient and not start a revolution. A scientist named Rotwang decides to build a robotic gynoid with the appearance of Maria, and uses it to fool the workers and betray their trust in Maria, ushering them into a full-scale rebellion. Many other films followed suit, with a similar view on how AI could be the end of humanity. In the last decade or so, films have begun to take a more positive look at AI. This shift has been accompanied by a more positive attitude towards AI from the public at large. Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, WALL-E, Her, The Machine and most recently, Interstellar, all show how humans can work together with AI to form a better, more efficient world, solving global issues that humans alone have not been able to.

We need to look at embracing AI as another technological leap With all these futuristic, sci-fi films, it’s easy to forget the ways in which AI has already help us in our daily lives. General AI is the working force behind the spell-checker that helped me write this article, the infamous chess-playing application Deep Blue, and Siri on Apple’s iPhones. Siri is a form of general intelligence, yet Apple users never complain about their fears of Siri taking over their life or the planet. The next stage in achieving super AI is as large a step, technologically speaking, as

when we first introduced computers in 1947. At that time, the public was scared, because the technology was new and unknown, and the same is happening with AI. This situation is not being helped by the films that make the public think that any kind of robot would destroy their homes and take over their lives (think of films such as Blade Runner or Terminator). We need to look at embracing AI as another technological leap, just like the smartphones of the early 2000s. AI is slowly creeping into everyday life for commercial purposes, whether the public is aware of it or not. This was seen in the run-up to the release of Ex-Machina, a story about a genius who is testing his AI bot to see if it can pass the Turing test, a test of a machine’s ability to exhibit intelligent behaviour indistinguishable from that of a human. The film’s promotional team decided to place a robot on Tinder, creating a profile for a fictitious 24-year-old woman named Ava (the name of the AI robot in the film). The film focuses on the implications for romance in the era of AI, with the lead male falling in love with Ava, which eventually leads to his demise. This Chabot fooled thousands of male users into thinking they were speaking to a real woman. They asked emotional questions which you would not expect from a robot, like,“Have you ever been in love?” and, “What makes you human?” This test shows how even basic AI can fool humans, as well as men on Tinder. The whole point is that the robots can be indistinguishable from humans themselves. As we get ever closer to the age of super AI, there will undoubtedly be more films with negative views of AI and its potential to end the human race. At the same time, though, there will also be films focussing on how the super intelligence of super AI can help fix the major issues we have yet to solve ourselves.

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Profile for Pi Media, UCLU

Pi Magazine, Issue 713 - Re:Generation  

Our third issue of 2015-16 explores our generation of millennial, and our collective identity. Why is our generation the way it is - what ex...

Pi Magazine, Issue 713 - Re:Generation  

Our third issue of 2015-16 explores our generation of millennial, and our collective identity. Why is our generation the way it is - what ex...

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