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Photo Credit: Helen Dickman

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said there are work exchange programmes like WWOOF, Helpx, and Workaway that allow you to work abroad in exchange for food and shelter, reducing the costs involved in traveling.

wasn’t at the beginning for Julie, setting aside time to work on the blog is essential. She would wake up an hour early every day before going to work to spend time on her blog.

Identity is important in blogging, and Falconer said it’s important to find a niche and stay true to it: “I recommend finding something you are really passionate about because you will be stuck with it for a long time.”

“It was the only time I could consistently find to actually work on it,” she said. “Other people say they will work on it every Wednesday night or Sunday morning, but I always ended up having something planned for the evening or the weekend.”

The most difficult aspect of the job is getting the blog to take off, as the amount of time and effort needed to promote it can be draining – especially when no one seems to be interested. “One of the hardest things at the beginning is asking yourself: Why am I doing this, no one is reading it anyway?” said Falconer.

Even after gaining a significant number of followers, there are still more hurdles along the way. In order to make travel blogging sustainable (i.e. monetise it), Falconer said she had to seek out and build relationships with sponsors. Tourism groups and hotels partner with travel bloggers and sponsor their trips, but the itineraries on those trips are fully laid out for the bloggers. They have a full schedule, giving them little flexibility to explore on their own.

When barely anyone seems to be reading your posts, it’s easy to put off writing. If blogging is not your full-time job, like it

According to Julie, finding a sponsor is about finding the right fit. “Only if something really fits with my audience will I take the partnership,” she said, “If it doesn’t, I won’t take it even if it’s a well-known tourism board or a hotel.” At the end of our interview, I had a newfound respect for travel blogging as a career – it’s not always as glamorous as Instagram may suggest. One picture of a Mai Tai on the beach in Phuket belies a life consumed by writing, promoting, and working around the clock. Falconer doesn’t regret giving up her day job to live a life of constantly crossing borders, though: “I loved the Maldives for its beaches. I loved Chile and Namibia for their natural landscapes. I loved Thailand for its food. You can ask me tomorrow and I can tell you a completely different list.” Read more about Julie Falconer’s travels on her blog: aladyinlondon.com

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Profile for Pi Media, UCLU

Pi Magazine, Issue 713 - Re:Generation  

Our third issue of 2015-16 explores our generation of millennial, and our collective identity. Why is our generation the way it is - what ex...

Pi Magazine, Issue 713 - Re:Generation  

Our third issue of 2015-16 explores our generation of millennial, and our collective identity. Why is our generation the way it is - what ex...

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