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Report finds troubling health trends in state’s Asian, Pacific communities A report by UCLA researchers reveals higher-thanaverage rates of cancer, childhood obesity and diabetes, and an alarmingly high population of the uninsured, among California’s Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities. Co-authored by Paul Ong, UCLA professor of urban planning, social welfare and Asian American studies, and Ninez Ponce, UCLA professor of health services, “The State of Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health in California Report” is the first to use statewide health data on this population broken down by ethnic subgroups, providing a comprehensive public health snapshot of one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. Ong and Ponce led the research for the University of California Asian American and Pacific Islander Policy Multi-Campus Research Program. The report was commissioned and released by the California Asian Pacific Islander Joint Legislative Caucus. Collectively, California’s Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) population numbers more than 5 million and accounts for more than 14 percent of the state’s total population. “This data is essential to creating policies and programs that effectively address health disparities in the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities,” said California Assemblyman Mike Eng (D-El Monte), who led the effort to create the report. “By providing disaggregated data, it provides necessary insight for policymakers and health care providers to design and implement programs that will improve the health of this vital population.” Among the report’s findings are that AANHPI groups have the highest rates of cancer deaths among ethnic groups, especially liver cancer rates, which are unmatched in the U.S., and high rates of noncompliance with recommended cervical cancer and prostate cancer screenings. The report was funded by the California Program on Access to Care, the California Program on Opportunity and Equity, the University of California Center Sacramento and Kaiser Permanente. The complete report can be downloaded at www.asm.ca.gov/eng. �

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UCLA report finds volunteerism up, revenues down at Los Angeles nonprofits Nonprofit organizations in Los Angeles are facing difficult fiscal challenges in the economic downturn, but many have fared better than expected in preserving staffing, programs and expenditures and have seen an increase in volunteers, according to a new report by the Center for Civil Socity at the UCLA School of Public Affairs. “Resilience and Vulnerability: The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Los Angeles 2009,” co-authored by David Howard and Hyeon Jong Kil of the Social Welfare doctoral program, reveals a sector struggling with declining resources and increasing service demands while facing increased expenditures due to a steady rise in fixed costs, including health insurance. “Nonprofits across the country are coping with the same challenges: government funding has been cut, private foundations have lost significant portions of their endowments and individual giving is down,” said Bill Parent, interim director of the Center for Civil Society. “In Los Angeles, the situation is more severe due to the state’s budget crisis and high unemployment rate. More people, cut from government assistance, are turning to nonprofits for basic needs like food, health care and shelter.” “Resilience and Vulnerability: The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Los Angeles 2009” is published by the Center for Civil Society at the UCLA School of Public Affairs and is available online at http://bit.ly/nonprofit09. �

“Nonprofits across the country are coping with the same challenges: Government funding has been cut, private foundations have lost significant portions of their endowments and individual giving is down.”

NEWSFORUM | SPRING 2010

5/14/10 12:02 PM

Newsforum  

The magazine of the UCLA School of Public Affairs

Newsforum  

The magazine of the UCLA School of Public Affairs