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MA


Contents Introduction ‘Outliers’ Exhibition Venue Map Teaching Staff Fine Art Research Course Information

Fine Art


The UCLan postgraduates of 2018 have successfully undertaken the MA Fine Art course, with the aim of gaining a greater understanding of their respective creative practice. The course is focused on re-defining the boundaries of contemporary art, interweaving practice with critical theory, to produce creative thinkers and strategists, and to generate and develop debates around the ever-changing cultural landscape. The course is designed to facilitate creative practitioners whilst encouraging a critical analysis of the specialist areas of their enquiry. The teaching strategy enables participants to define, develop, and sustain a high level of professional practice, and to complement an array of experimental approaches to making work. The social aspect of being an active member of any profession is valued here on the MA Fine Art course. Students are encouraged to extend and engage in their professional network to include organisations, individuals, galleries, funders and companies that may offer future opportunities to support the sustainability of their art practice. Our postgraduates continue to strengthen the regions creative economy and cultural capital through self-initiated creative enterprise; forming collectives, establishing affordable studio spaces, running artist led galleries, and/or setting up their own public programmes and delivering educational workshops. Other activities include curating, carrying out residencies, and teaching the next generation of artists. UCLan Fine Art students continue to voice their gratitude via The National Student Survey and we are proud of the positive impact that they have on the UK’s arts ecology.

MA


I would like to thank the external organisations and individuals for helping our UCLan students with their case study module, your open-door policy continues to support the artists of the future, and the regions creative infrastructure. Finally, I would like to thank the graduating students, and the academic and the technical staff for all of their hard work and support, without which there would be no cause to celebrate. As students and professionals, we question and seek answers to the critical debates and creative challenges of our time, and this year’s catalogue is a celebration of those shared experiences on the journey of becoming a Master of Fine Arts. MA Fine Art Course Leader: William Titley

Introduction


MA


Lianne Agius Lucy J. Ashley Mark Aston Johnny Berthol Heather J. Fell Brian Fish Jason M. Graham Andrew Horne Jodie Lee Janet Pickering Samantha Pickett Michelle Rowley Stephanie Shipley Shonagh Short Mark Smith


Lianne Agius What are corals? How do they create life, and why are they important to us? These are all themes I wanted to explore throughout my work. As part of my artwork, I chose to start my research based on the scientific facts of coral reefs and the impacts we are having on them. Coral reefs are among the ocean’s most wondrous achievements, they cover just 1% of ocean floor, yet these diverse ecosystems provide habitats to 25% of all ocean life. These are environments which are essential to the survival of ocean life. They also provide the earth with a third of all oxygen, we must help preserve these locations if we want to continue to thrive. As an artist and aquarium enthusiast, I felt that I had to use my platform to help promote awareness on our current environmental crisis and promote changes. MOTE Laboratory in Florida Keys is one of the main organisations providing coral reef restoration. Through intense research and hard work they are growing thousands of corals and reintroducing them back into the ocean. This work is necessary worldwide and work that I wanted to promote through my artwork. When viewing my work, I want the audience to think about changes that they could make daily and I want the viewer to feel fully immersed in the imagery. The environment I want to create is one of relaxation, where my audience can reflect on the impact that modern life is having on the planet.

Lianne


Acropora

Agius


Euphyllia Ancora

Lianne


Pulsing Xenia

Agius


Lucy J. Ashley Humans have been changing the environment around them since the dawn of time, the ‘diverge from other forms of life only in the power with which they reshape their world and in their usually conscious intent to do so.’ Through my work I aim to bring to light these changes we have on the Earth and what they mean when defining the term nature. When humans are so involved in the ecology of a habitat the line between the natural world and the man-made becomes blurred. Bickerton Hill is a lowland heath situated on the sandstone ridge of Cheshire and is currently in the process of a restoration project to conserve the heathland. Practices such as tree felling and bracken rolling are being used to bring back the heath and to prevent a forest from seeding which if left to its own devices is what would happen. ‘Under Close Control’ looks at the management of this landscape framing views of the Hill that have been carefully considered and choreographed by the National Trust Rangers through conversation activities. I want to question the importance of preserving and freezing habitats in the past; it’s impossible to stop the ebb and flow of natural process so constant management is crucial if the heathland is to prosper. Bickerton Hill may appear to be a natural site but by preventing nature from taking hold by intervention from institutions on the Hill does it not resemble more like a museum or glorified garden?

Lucy J.


Under close control

Ashley


Under close control

Lucy J.


Under close control

Ashley


Mark Aston We have evolved to think and walk over many millenia. Our very busy, crowded modern lives means a necessity to escape sometimes. To be able to think clearly and laterally we find some solace through walking, finding our own paths, our own destiny, one not governed by the many laws that surround us. By escaping, seeking a space to do this, we find and inhabit our own places. This “sense of place” is subjective to each of us, with each life having its own experiences. Each town and city has parks and recreational areas but these can be restrictive to some wanting or seeking a need to escape and explore. By walking many find solace from the multitude of questions we are inundated with each day. We seek breathing space. As an artist there is a philosophical need to understand and express this, but also bring some tangible answers. From childhood we grow and learn, escape our surroundings through daydreams and imagination. But do we lose this ability through conditioning and education? For some there is always a need to escape and explore, walk and think. To be an artist who is a walker and thinker, then there is always a need to engage with others, to clarify an intersubjective space, understand and express our sense of place. By engaging with people and a place over a period of time, an understanding of this need to escape, daydream and think brings about a realisation of the need to find breathing spaces. This then allows the fruition of this project and ultimately this exhibition of work entitled “into the elsewhere”.

Mark


Into the elsewhere

Aston


Mark Into the elsewhere


Into the elsewhere

Aston


Johnny Berthol I have created my very own phantasmagoric barren land, it will be a place of transcendental treasures, unearthed anomalies, and obfuscated monstrosities. A nonexistent place, dipped in quixotic and mythical metaphors. It’s my belief, that the uncharted coppice is a clandestine of precipitousness. It is inhabited by many heteromorphic anomalies. There is an abominable omnipresence, that lurks impetuously, it waits. The befouled barren land, lachrymose and dead, insidiously adumbrates its existence. a puissant cabalistic inhuman creature. That stumbled from its own obfuscation of deranged detestation, to roam and crave. My creativity is my interpretation of my inner angst inspired paracosm of such a barren land.  Artistic inventiveness is focused on creating the imaginary abhorrent creature that exists. In my exhibition, I have created a short media production, that manifests and creates the realism of the creature. I have accumulated a diversity of wooden debris while researching the coppice barren lands. I have sculpted and constructed the ideology of the creature. A ferocious heinous arched creature, that feeds on the fear of us mere mortals. A solitude, listless path I wander. Consumed with an inner wretchedness, that tore deep into my tormented soul. My once joyous halcyon consciousness, no longer exists. Replaced by an overwhelming angst, that suffocates with every breath I take. Deep rooted and rancorously incurable, the angst spreads like a vicious cancerous growth; consumptive of all things healthy and good. My forlornness and contempt for being; existing in a world of barbarous selfishness and stagnated ‘immoral ethics’. My sanity insidiously polluted, dipped in vexation. I was physically drowning in a disconcerted dysphoria; it was totally inexorable and torturous. 

Johnny


An unimaginable paracosm of astonishing anomalies

Berthol


An unimaginable paracosm of astonishing anomalies

Johnny


An unimaginable paracosm of astonishing anomalies

Berthol


Heather J. Fell Inspired by the complexities of motherhood, this work looks at the day-to-day struggles with achieving a sense of normality. Physically and emotionally stretched, torn, weighted down, choked, shackled, unravelling, hold it together: feeling as if everything is going to cave in. This project acted as an outlet for my worries about being a divorced single parent, living back with mum and dad and having no financial stability or space to call my own. I’ve experienced this sense of loss of home, marriage and independence and find myself struggling to make sense of it all – my work attempts to create certainty where there is none. My work is created using a variety of media, including drawing, textiles, film, photography and sculpture. Most of my work has been developed and created within a set of restrictions. My house, and the objects that lay within, are important tools and provide a constant seamless thread that runs through my work. My work uses the ordinary to express something deeply personal; softly merging that which is both private and public whereby suggesting that these zones are intimately connected. My need for space, privacy, freedom and agency became paramount themes of my work. I felt it necessary to build myself a world that didn’t exist. I want my work to provide me with the space in which to enact things that I can’t enact in my personal space – exploring the archaic viewpoint that a room only belongs to you if you are a certain gender. There is the importance of space for sanities sake; a place to call your own. A room that can be used for the purpose for which it was designed: A MOTHER’S ROOM.

Heather J.


The mother’s room

Fell


Prison wallpaper #1

Heather J.


Imminent threat from the bulge in the ceiling

Fell


Brian Fish Through my work I explore concepts of contemporary subjectivity and how these subjective states are susceptible to change and manipulation within the complex postmodern terrain of consumption, competition, alienation and the struggle for identity. It is my view that the contemporary human subject is continually manipulated and corrupted by the relentless demands of digitalised information-saturated forms of living within the PostFordist economy of semiocapitalism. Here the focus is not now on the exploitation of labour power, but on the capture and commodification of our inner resources to produce new forms of subjectivation. It is my view that these subjective complexities lead to negative relational outcomes such as aggression, volatility and recklessness. This is an ongoing concern for me where I see the erosion of human potential and creativity increasingly overwhelmed by cultures of narcissism, exclusion and objectification. My work interrogates this precariousness of contemporary subjectivity through sculpture, digital imaging and drawing. My latest charcoal and pastel work centres around an improvisational approach of expressive and gestural markmaking. There is no specific or pre-imagined image apart from a compulsion to reveal the precariousness of contemporary subjectivity. The visual field builds in complexity through line, tone and developing form. The approximations have to appear rapidly; this has to be immediate and expressive to instantly transform emotion to communication through the constant flow of mark-making to communicative image. The resulting images arise out of the improvisation: of responding to the flows of marks and volumes with further marks and volumes toward an approximation of the ambiguities and precariousness of contemporary subjectivity.

Brian


Fragments # 4

Fish


Brian Delusions # 1


Fragments # 3

Fish


Jason M. Graham BSc (hons) No ‘thing’ ness is an exploration and examination into the impermanent, empty nature of our reality. My creations are a tool to demonstrate the ephemeral knife edge that the passage of “now” balances on, as it travels through relative time. To me creating a piece of art which truly embodies impermanence, emptiness and No ‘thing’ ness means that it has to be ephemeral, fleeting and momentary, something that the viewer can’t accurately take away with them, something that has to be enjoyed in the “Now”. No ‘thing’ ness has a dualistic nature to it. A thing is a thing because we have given it a label and that helps us to describe and perceive it, but that is all it is, a label. The other way in which we all experience No ‘thing’ ness is in our physical view of it, it is an illusion. The solid object we see before us, is merely the echo from a combination of atoms made up of particles which are constantly in a state of flux, containing more space than solid matter. All we see is an echo, what we touch is empty, our thoughts are tainted, this is just a journey.

Jason M.


Sand mandala

Graham


Ephemeration

Jason M.


Bubble

Graham


Andrew Horne Sound is an important figure in my artistic practice; natural sounds and my own relationship with them in certain surroundings has lead me to start creating work that shows an empathetic communication with one another. The birds use their voice, and I use mine to relay emotional connections that appear when I listen back to recordings of soundscapes. Anthrophony; any sounds that humans make, from frequencies we cannot hear, to the audible explosions of mechanical and technological sounds also feature, recognising the apparent interruptions we as human beings have on natural soundscapes. My documentation processes within my practice are heavily focussed on sound mapping, creating sonic scores that represent sound walks helping me gain a visual perspective through the world of sound. Audience participation is key to me achieving pieces of work as my work aims to create installations that become a place where people can have intimate sonic experiences. Sound from my perspective and positioning is such a unique medium within the artistic landscape; it challenges participatory perceptions and can improve interpersonal relatedness between the self and the environment. In this fast-paced society that we live in today I believe that Sound Scape and Sound Art Practice is becoming an important vehicle to create more awareness, empathy within our internal climate and our external world.

Andrew


On site

Horne


Dent Fell sound mapping

Andrew


Memories of a walk

Horne


Jodie Lee My work comprises of many themes, blending them into a fictitious place which parallels reality in many ways. The room you enter is a physical representation of obsession, an obsession with a fantasy creature and its possibility at being something which is in fact a reality. The room belongs to one person, a once sceptic which has become overridden with an obsessive compulsion at the very idea of defining what is real, in this case, the mermaid. This as a fantasy lies side by side with its original and more real ideology, that of social media. Diving deeper into the world where many have become reliant on social media as an outlet, where it has taken over many forms of social interaction, and has become a space where the masses are able to portray their own lives, exactly as they want their viewers to see it. Using this idea of fantasy to portray elements of reality has a strong standing within all my work, blending and fusing the two together to create a fantastical representation of what things really are, enabling the viewers to ponder further into the reasoning, or merely to accept things as they are.

Jodie


Where is Chris Malcolm?

Lee


Back to the scene

Jodie


The creature

Lee


Janet Pickering Throughout my life, I have found escape from trauma and sadness through the medium of children’s literature, immersing myself in illustrated stories, via paperback books and comics. I now use the artwork of these genres to tell the story of my life. In a previous existence, I was a teacher. I loved nurturing enthusiastic learners, particularly introducing them to the joys of Literature and Art. Older children often expressed disappointment that the best illustrations, the loveliest colours, seemed to be reserved for the younger readers. A reminder that even competent readers enjoy visual elements that are beautiful, amusing, enriching. I now illustrate children’s books, interpreting and giving form to the characters and adventures found within. Viewing my life as a story, I re-create scenes and events allegorically for my own art. A shape-shifting, nameless creature lumbers through a series of quests and journeys; shadows gather within snapshots of another life. My artwork is egocentric, deeply personal, revelatory. It is a story, an explanation, a catharsis. It allows me a means to confront, address and disarm spectres from darker times. I do not include descriptions for these pieces; in visual terms, they describe themselves. The images I create are my language. Affirmation, for me, is about visibility, authenticity and autonomy. My artwork is my story. But it is not only my story; it is everyone’s story.

Janet


Notice to improve

Pickering


Janet Dark street


Light in the dark

Pickering


Samantha Pickett

Winner of ‘The Steele Prize for Art’. Positioned within the everlasting present, my work examines the cultural underbelly that defines the current Age of the Anthropocene. Prioritizing process over outcome and transition over permanence, I investigate the nature of materials and artefacts, both organic and human-made, and their influence within the patterns of everyday behaviour. By combining the principal themes of myth, ritual, materiality and function my practice has evolved into an environmentally sensitive body of work that includes installations, sculptural work, digital film and interventions. Demonstrating a nonhierarchical approach to enquiry in which I am both in and part of the landscape that surrounds me just as I am in and part of the matter and processes I’m exploring – my work is inter-relational and transformative within my environment.

Samantha


Travelling apothecary of poisonous berries

Pickett


A life worth living

Samantha


Hug bag

Pickett


Michelle Rowley My neighbourhood has recently undergone a period of disruptive development. This experience of intrusive change to our local environment has developed my interest in the impact of planning and the urban spatial aspirations of the city of Liverpool specifically, and national city regions generally. The physical changes have unearthed ideas about locational identity and raised Yi-Fu Tuan’s question of how places become visible to us when they are under threat. For my investigative project I identified two connected business parks in my neighbourhood, the Wavertree Technology and Innovation Parks. Though sites of business they are named as ‘parks’ and my initial investigations involved looking for their ‘parkness’ asking, “What is this quality?”. The question of the implicit relationship they reveal between business and nature, as Lefebvre noted, required greater scrutiny. The park as a site of play, or transgressive behaviour, especially related to Tim Edensor’s writings on abandoned sites, and prompted questions of who was playing in these parks, what were they playing at, and what behaviours could I enact to challenge and enhance this improvised public realm? The theorists Henri Lefebvre, David Harvey, and Richard Sennett, whose writings on cities and social and political effects of spatial design, have shaped my critical focus on the institutional structures that hold an agenda on place that the public can potentially overwrite. As Harvey says, our right to the city “is a right to change and reinvent the city more after our hearts’ desire”.

Michelle


The platform and the seer

Rowley


Running rituals

Michelle


Transformation

Rowley


Stephanie Shipley Winner of the ‘ArtLab Fellowship Award’. Treading lightly: on sites of heterotopia Treading lightly is a means of negotiating time and space, of navigating loss and of performing what remains of the complex landscape of a local heritage site on the outskirts of Bolton in Lancashire. I am interested in what remains and calls me back; in the vestiges of its once elegant Ballroom, the mournful Japanese Lake and overgrown Italian Gardens. Melancholy weighs heavily within such sites of heterotopia; those places that exist physically within our culture but are often set aside or transitory; they reflect and disturb what surrounds them and sometimes hold a personal or collective memory or intrigue or attachment. I tread a cautious path through their offerings, mindful of my own fragility in matters of nostalgia. Mine is a tentative cross-disciplinary approach, the surfaces where these things meet being of significant yield beyond the deep excavation of one. I find an uncertain yo-yoing between the capricious analogue and abundant digital that speaks of past and present, of obsolescence and the contemporary. Still and moving images co-exist, reflecting the gravitas of the site and my transient relationship with it. Experimental screen prints and solar plate etchings are embodied with the place as I have experienced it through the changing seasons. Treading lightly promises far more than the surfaces I have scratched and the traces I have left behind.

Stephanie


Treading lightly

Shipley


Treading lightly

Stephanie


Treading lightly

Shipley


Shonagh Short I am interested in the language of dirt and how it is used to other people and places. The focus of my project is the Johnson Fold estate in Bolton, a place that is regularly described using this kind of metaphorical language – a ‘sink’ estate, cesspit, dump, overflowing with filth and scum, the dregs of society – descriptions at odds with my experience of the warmth, generosity and resilience of this community. Over the last eighteen months I have worked collaboratively with a women’s group from Johnson Fold on a series of creative interventions using the concepts of ‘clean’ and ‘dirty’ as a prism to explore class, gender and place. The Care Instructions project represents an attempt to make visible some of the characteristics of Johnson Fold, and in particular the work of women on Johnson Fold, that disturb or challenge a mainstream narrative which paints people and place as dirty, by swapping the language of dirt for the language of cleaning.

Shonagh


Down and dirty dinner party

Short


I wish my wife was this dirty

Shonagh


Dirt is a social construct

Short


Mark Smith My work is about the space between words, the sense of self that is so often missed and that which lies behind the image; the reality behind the imagined. It’s an attempt to convey the real beneath the superficial, through the trace, the shared sense of what is and what is not that surrounds us all, and communicate something words cannot. Because they blur and are pre-loaded with the presumed. Specifically this is about Anorexia Nervosa. Not the words you’ve heard or the preconceived which accompanies this illness so much. Yet nor is it an attempt to argue with that. Rather it’s an attempt to say how it feels without any implicit or explicit interperative agendum. It is an attempt to say this is, and remove the obstacle of words, the preconceptions and misconceptions and pejoratives. An attempt to say throughout shared outline and common trace and border, our sense of self, this is. This is how it feels.

Mark


Image #1

Smith


Mark Image #2


Image #3

Smith


Teaching


In 2018 the MA Fine Art course has a number of professional artists, curators and researchers teaching across both pathways. They value cross-disciplinary collaboration with international partners and local networks, and are actively pushing the boundaries of their respective fields of enquiry through exhibitions, publications, residencies, community engagement and conferences.

Christine Eyene Tracy Hill Prof. Lubaina Himid CBE Prof. Charles Quick Heather Ross Magda Stawarska-Beavan Elaine Speight Deborah Stevenson William Titley

staff


Christine Eyene As an art historian, Christine Eyene has been researching modern and contemporary South African art since the late 1990s, specialising in the story of artists in exile during Apartheid and their cultural interactions with the Black Diaspora in France and England. Her essays on this topic have examined the art of South African pioneering modernists Ernest Mancoba and Gerard Sekoto, as well as Dumile Feni, Gavin Jantjes and George Hallett. She was appointed the curator of the 4th International Biennial of Casablanca in 2018. Her other exhibitions and collaborations include: ‘Gideon Mendel: Drowning World’, Tiwani Contemporary, London (7 June - 27 July 2013); ‘Thierry Geoffroy: Mobile Emergency Room’, Zimbabwe Pavilion, 55th Venice Biennale (1 June - 30 Sept. 2013); ‘Roma-Sinti-Kale-Manush’, Autograph ABP, Rivington Place, London (28 May - 28 July 2012); Dak’Art 2012 – Biennale of Contemporary African Art (11 May - 10 June 2012); Photoquai 2011 – Biennial of World Images, Paris (13 Sept. -11 Nov. 2011). She has contributed to various international art journals including Third Text, Art South Africa, Manifesta Journal, as well as exhibition catalogues and art books. She has been visual arts co-editor of the journal Africultures since 2002.

Christine


ceyene@uclan.ac.uk

Eyene


Tracy Hill The Intersection between our digital and aesthetic worlds is where Hill situates her art works: a hybrid space where technological control meets emotion and memory of a human experience. Hill utilises commercial digital 3D mapping instruments, seeking to change our perceptions and challenge our understanding of post-industrial landscape. This current research brings together the worlds of Fine Art, Environmental conservation, Ecology, Environmental science as well as Industrial and commercial surveying offering new ideas and ways of seeing. Environmental impact and awareness of post-industrial spaces especially wetlands over the last few years has led to increased interest in re-engaging with and the protection of these unique locations. Hill’s artworks acknowledge a modern obsession for locating; ordering and controlling abstracted experiences of landscape whilst reconnecting with the human emotion and experience and memory of place only achieved through direct engagement with the land. Working with combinations of installation and printed paper works imagery is informed by data collected through digital mapping technology whilst walking. This data offers an analysis of the physical location while the hand drawn and traditionally printed mark allows a reconnection to the aesthetic. Images presented create an opportunity to explore what is beyond the 2D surface becoming a visualisation of the point where our physical and digital worlds overlap, the edge between location and how we feel to be part of it.

Tracy


thill@uclan.ac.uk

Hill


Prof. Lubaina Himid CBE As a painter, writer and curator, Professor Lubaina Himid has participated at an international level in exhibitions conferences books and films on the visual art of the Black Diaspora since the early 1980’s. Winning the prestigious Turner Prize in 2017, and being honoured in the Queens Birthday list in 2018, Lubaina investigates effective ways for artists to broaden relationships with museums. Using the often hidden or neglected objects in collections, she works with curators to broker conversations between these objects, museums and audiences, bridging the gaps between the histories and contemporary life. Current and forthcoming exhibitions include solo shows at the Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Preston, and at the Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem and group shows at the Berlin Biennale, Germany, at the BALTIC, Gateshead and at the Sharjah Biennial, Sharjah, UEA.

Lubaina


Photo by Dr Ingrid Pollard Lhimid@uclan.ac.uk

Himid


Prof. Charles Quick Charles Quick is a Professor of Public Art Practice at the University of Central Lancashire and has over 40 years’ experience of working as a teacher, artist/researcher and curator in the public realm. He has contributed permanent and temporary projects for cities across the United Kingdom. In 2003 he co-founded the curatorial project ’In Certain Places’ which since then has worked with regional, national and international artists to develop works for the City, revealing, critiquing and provoking new understandings of a place and its peoples. Quick was co editor and contributor to ‘Subplots to a City’ a publication which marked the first ten years of In Certain Places work in Preston. The Henry Moore Institute and Leeds City Art Gallery hold this work in their collections and he has recorded his artistic life through the British Library sound archive Artist’s Lives project. The Guardian, The Daily Telegraphy, Art and Architecture Journal, Arts Professional, A-N Magazine and the Sculpture Magazine, amongst others, have written about his projects. Over the years, he has won awards from Arts Council England, the British Council, and HEFCE. Recently he became the Chair of the Arts and Place national consortium, as well as sitting on a number of boards of regional arts organisation in the North West.

Charles


cquick@uclan.ac.uk

Quick


Heather Ross Heather Ross works within and across a number of disciplines which include moving image, painting, print and performance. These are often combined to generate work which is performative in nature; encouraging the viewer to cross-reference and negotiate different kinds of imagery and/or information or presenting a subject which is examined through performative methods such as re-enactment or re-construction. Often positioned in relation to specific archival documents and texts, Ross is concerned with how these can be mined for their interpretative possibilities, rethought and experienced sensorially. Primarily her focus is how we come to know through making. Ross is currently a PhD candidate at Newcastle University, working in conjunction with the Hatton Gallery. Her current research focusses on the avant garde German artist Kurt Schwitters (1887-48) and his final artwork The Merzbarn Wall (1947) situated in the Hatton Gallery, Newcastle. Her practicebased PhD project seeks to activate material relating to Kurt Schwitters’ Merz Barn Wall (1947) to provide a multi-sensory understanding of the circumstances and experience that led to its construction. Her most recent project has involved the implementation of performative methods to research Kurt Schwitters’ experience of internment and relationship to materials and site. Recent Projects include: Exploding Collage (2018) Hatton Gallery, Newcastle; Merz Women and The Daughters of Dada (2018) Vallum Gallery, University of Cumbria, Carlisle; Making Visible The Archive of Gwyneth Alban Davis (2017) Florence Mine, Cumbria (the project was also documented as a hardback book); All The Better To Hear You With (2017) Merz Barn, Cumbria.

Heather


hross1@uclan.ac.uk

Ross


Elaine Speight Elaine Speight lectures on the MA Fine Art Projects for Places pathway and is a research fellow in the School of Art, Design and Fashion, where she co-curates In Certain Places. Her curatorial practice is concerned with the capacity of art to interrogate, mediate and critique the connections between people and place, and the relationship between art practice and research. As a curator, artist and lecturer, she has worked for organisations including Liverpool Biennial, Birkbeck, University of London, UP Projects London and Creative Partnerships. Elaine has written about public art for various books and professional journals including Engage (2015), Public Art Dialogue (2017), The Everyday Practice of Public Art (Routledge, 2015) and Sub Plots to a City (In Certain Places, 2014), and presented at conferences such as On Space and Sound (Tate Britain, 2016), Cerrando CĂ­rculos. Abriendo Horizontes (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, 2016) and Responsible Geographies (University of Iceland, 2013). She is currently editing a book about art practice and place, which will be published in autumn 2018 by Art Editions North. Elaine is a trustee of the arts organisation Art Gene and cochair of the Lancashire and Cumbria branch of the national Contemporary Visual Arts Network (CVAN).

Elaine


espeight@uclan.ac.uk

Speight


Magda Stawarska-Beavan Magda Stawarska-Beavan is a multi-disciplinary artist primarily concerned with the evocative, immersive qualities of sound, while combining a moving image and printmaking practice. She is interested in how soundscape orients us and subconsciously embeds itself in our memories of place, enabling us to construct personal recollections and offering the possibility of conveying narrative to listeners who have never experienced a location. Her outdoor public installations were shown as part of the TONSPUR programme in MFRU, Foundation Son:DA, Maribor Old Town hall, Slovenia (2017); Kapelica Gallery Ljubljana, Slovenia (2016); 28th Exposition of New Music Brno Festival (2015) and in MQ21 TONSPUR_passage / Q21 MQ, Vienna (2013). In 2011 she was commissioned to produce a sound installation in Preston City Centre, UK by In Certain Places (The Arcade). Recent Exhibitions and Performances: Sounds Like Her, New Art Exchange, Nottingham and UK touring (2017-2018); TIES, Toronto Electroacoustic Symposium (2017); Guanlan International Print Biennial in Shenzhen, China (2017, 2015); 10th International Biennial of Contemporary Print at Liege’s Museum of Fine Art, Belgium; Modern Histories vol. III, Bury Museum and Art Gallery, Manchester UK (2015); International Print Triennial, Bunkier Sztuki, Kraków, Poland (2015); Project AfterBirth, White Moose, Barnstaple, UK (2015); Circuit Bridges New York Concert (2015); Kinokophonography Night at The New York Public Library for Performing Arts (2015, 2014).

Magda


mstawarska-beavan@uclan.ac.uk

StawarskaBeavan


Deborah Stevenson Deborah Stevenson is a writer and artist concerned with the interconnectedness of architecture, memory and narrative. As a PhD student, the focus of her study is the early 20th century World Heritage buildings of Liverpool’s Waterfront in counterpoint to the adjacent millennial glass structures of Mann Island. Returning to the city of her birth after an absence of twenty years and confronted with a place that is changed utterly, her work seeks to address questions of where and how, in the face of displacement and changing urban topographies, we can retain a notion of home through the histories and memories that define us and how the architecture of our cities functions as an archive and backdrop for such narratives. She is particularly interested in the materiality of buildings and is affected by the ascent of a new globalised architectural style. Given the predominance of glass used as a construction material in our cities, she mourns a decline in the vernacular and the rise in prominence of an architecture of everywhere and nowhere. Her work ponders the future for our place memories as they are increasingly framed in buildings which mirror our own image and that of the surrounding cityscape from without and through which we can see only the outside from within.

Deborah


deb@debstevenson.co.uk

Stevenson


William Titley William Titley is a Senior Lecturer and MA Fine Art Course Leader with experience of international exhibitions and residencies in the USA, Pakistan, India, and Europe, with work held in Museum Collections. He was a founding director of In-Situ, a not-for-profit arts organisation in East Lancashire. Today, he sits on the board of this socially engaged art project as it continues to push the boundaries of social arts practice. The organisation won ACE National Portfolio status in 2018, and is set to launch a permanent artists residential and activity centre in the heart of the community. As a PhD candidate at MMU William’s research into social processes is ethnographic in focus, with an emphasis on his role as participant observer. Exploring the relationship between two aesthetic ideals: one developed around spectatorship and the other around participation. As a researcher using audio-visual media, he is a participant, an artist and a member of the local community, and by adopting artistic research methods, and specifically, by making work in the place where he lives, the research analyses social artistic processes from the perspective of the artist, adding to debates around what social arts practice is, and what its limits are in its original social context and within the gallery and documentary systems of dissemination.

William


wdtitley@uclan.ac.uk

Titley


Research Within the School of Art, Design + Fashion the department of Fine Art’s research centres on themes that: reveal hidden histories, challenge public space, champion transdisciplinary representation, and significantly add to current discourse on feminism and identity, and health and well-being. Well-established research groups In Certain Places and Making Histories Visible contribute greatly to the profile of the department and beyond, as too does Artlab, our unique contemporary print studios. The focus of research in Fine Art is largely practice-based and carried out in collaboration with other creative disciplines and conversations with particular demographics, the public and broader society. These approaches result in a rich and multifarious set of methodologies, discussions and outputs, which in turn support our research-informed teaching agenda. All staff in Fine Art are engaged in various forms of personal research which are drawn upon to inform their teaching. The research profile in Fine Art is very much regional, transnational and international where projects at various locations inform others, and recently staff have experienced great success from Prof. Lubaina Himid CBE’s winning of the Turner Prize 2017 to Tracy Hill’s 2018 European Printmaking Award by the Executive Board of the International Print Triennial Society in Krakow. Many of our staff are working within international and transcontinental contexts, including Research Fellow Christine Eyene’s prestigious appointment as curator of the 4th International Biennial of Casablanca which opens in October this year. Adam de Paor-Evans: School Lead for Research & Innovation

Research


There are currently three international research hubs located in the Victoria Building. ‘Art Lab Contemporary Print Studios’ ‘In Certain Places’ ‘Making Histories Visible’

hubs


Artlab Contemporary Print Studios Artlab Contemporary Print Studios is a practice based research unit where printmaking connects with other creative disciplines and discourses. The focus of the research unit is contemporary printmaking through expanded practice, where international partnerships, collaborations and experimentation are at the core. Artlab’s creative approach into processes and developing technologies underpins the production of high quality artworks and artistic excellence. Two experienced researchers, Tracy Hill and Magda Stawarska-Beavan, who both use printmaking as a significant element of their own international research practice, lead the unit. The long-term vision of the studios is to promote contemporary print through an ethos of exploration and crossdisciplinary research approaches linking tradition and innovation. Artlab is currently engaged with multiple studios and research units both nationally and internationally contributing to a global conversation and repositioning of contemporary printmaking through academic writing and practice based research. Housed within the University of Central Lancashire’s Victoria Building our specialist printmaking facilities sit at the centre of the campus amongst multi-disciplinary studios, research units, exhibition spaces and extensive creative workshops. The unique facility provides a creative space and professional expertise for artists to develop projects where printmaking is an essential element within expanded practice. Website: www.artlabcontemporaryprint.org.uk Facebook: Artlab Contemporary Printmaking Studio Twitter: @ArtlabCPS


Artlab


In Certain Places In Certain Places is an artistic research project, led by Professor Charles Quick and Elaine Speight, with the support of Rachel Bartholomew, in the School of Art, Design and Fashion. Established in 2003, the project seeks to generate new and creative ways of informing the future of places through an ongoing programme of artistic interventions within the City of Preston. Interdisciplinary in nature, and spanning a range of art forms, our work includes temporary public art works and architectural commissions, artist residency and research projects, and public talks, discussions and events. Collectively, these activities generate new understandings of the urban environment, enable new ideas to be tested in the city’s public spaces, and instigate ongoing collaborations between artists, academics, urban planners, activists, public institutions, businesses and other individuals and communities in the city and beyond. Our work in Preston is underpinned by and provides a focus for a wider engagement with art practice and the politics of place. By contributing to journals, books and conferences, and through our own publishing projects, we endeavour to share the methods, challenges and outcomes of our practice. Our commissions have also been presented in venues such as Modern Art Oxford, Museum of Modern Art New York, Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism / Architecture Hong Kong, and the Venice Biennial of Architecture. Current projects include Expanded City – a three year programme of artworks and events, designed to inform Preston’s City Deal programme, and Practising Place – a series of public and written conversations between artists and academics. Website: www.incertainplaces.org Twitter: @incertainplaces.org


People’s Canopy by People’s Architecture Office, commissioned by In Certain Places, 2015

ICP


Making Histories Visible An ongoing interdisciplinary research project based in Victoria Building, led by Prof. Lubaina Himid CBE and supported by international curator Christine Eyene, continues to be a sustained exploration of the contribution of black visual art to the cultural landscape. The project gives prominence to, and a platform for, creative individuals, groups and communities who are, or have been, persistently marginalised historically, presently or indeed both. www.makinghistoriesvisible.com


MHV


MA


MA Fine Art Course Information

There are two pathways at UCLan ‘Studio Practice’ ‘Projects for Places’

Fine Art


Overarching aims and philosophy The overarching aims of the course are to design and realise a ‘Studio Practice’ or a ‘Project for a Place’ that explores the relationships between artists and art processes, places and audiences in the gallery and in the public domain. Students aim to demonstrate a significant creative and contextual practice related to appropriate debates in the contemporary, the social and the historical context. They demonstrate creative ambition by the production of an advanced MA Project & Contextual Report in relation to contemporary debates in Fine Art, and develop strategies, skills and creative networks to facilitate Professional Practice and employability. The Fine Art MA programme philosophy is one that is essentially focused on re-defining the boundaries of contemporary art, interweaving the practice with the theory to produce creative thinkers and strategists who will generate and develop the debates within the cultural landscape. The course allows students to follow one of two distinct pathways while developing a questioning attitude within a general Fine Art course and encompassing a common framework for post graduate study. The course can be completed part-time over two years, or fulltime over one year.


Studio Practice The MA Fine Art Studio Practice pathway seeks to develop a learning environment in which, new technologies, historical traditions and new disciplines confront and influence each other. This pathway focuses on how artists can build a practice, develop studio processes and understand gallery conventions.

Projects for Places The MA Fine Art Projects for Places pathway seeks to develop a learning environment in which projects in the public domain are created - enabling an interaction between art and place. This pathway focuses on how artists can work using innovative approaches to mapping and understanding a place.

Key Features of both pathways Project led Research Cross-disciplinary modules Taught by members of the Fine Art Research Team International links with Contemporary Art Projects Professional networking opportunities, including residencies, commissions and collaborations The course focuses on the need for informed engagement with audiences. Please contact the course leader William Titley, to discuss an application or arrange an interview. wdtitley@uclan.ac.uk


Thank you


With thanks to all the team at UCLan David Alker Craig Atkinson Andrew Broadey Clem Crosby Adam de Paor-Evans Christine Eyene Stuart Hartley Tracy Hill Prof. Lubaina Himid CBE Nigel Lewis Victoria Lucas David Mackintosh Prof. Charles Quick Maeve Rendle Heather Ross Magda Stawarska-Beavan Elaine Speight Deborah Stevenson William Titley


Profile for MAFINEART UCLAN

MA Fine Art Catalogue 2018  

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