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winter 2008, issue no. 21

Intracellular Drug Trafficking Applications in Cancer Drug Delivery


from the dean

A few months ago, we surveyed our alumni to find out what you wanted to see in this magazine. Your responses had great ideas and I think you will enjoy it even more. This issue features more stories on the students and alumni who are carrying on the school’s tradition of excellence. And we have continued to highlight the cutting-edge research of our faculty. This new issue of UCLA Engineer includes stories on biomedical technology advances, innovations in advanced materials, computer security, and technology that will help monitor the environment at several scales. This issue also profiles our alumni in computer gaming, the aerospace and defense industry, and in space exploration. In August, we received wonderful news that Leonard Kleinrock, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, was selected to receive the National Medal of Science. We are doubly proud that our alumnus Paul Baran has been selected to receive the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. These highest of honors recognized Len and Paul for their pioneering contributions in laying the foundation for the Internet, and they are each featured in this issue. Here at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, we take great pride in our research that will address the great challenges ahead; in our educational efforts to train the next generation of engineers; and in our many alumni, who each day are making important contributions to a brighter future. This issue includes only a small sample of these stories, but I hope they will reaffirm your pride as a member of the UCLA Engineering community. Sincerely,

UCLA E Dean Vijay K. Dhir

Associate Deans Richard D. Wesel Academic and Student Affairs Gregory Pottie Research and Physical Resources Assistant Dean Mary Okino Chief Financial Officer Department Chairs Timothy J. Deming Bioengineering Harold G. Monbouquette Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Jiun-Shyan (J.S.) Chen Civil and Environmental Engineering Jason Cong Computer Science Ali H. Sayed Electrical Engineering Mark S. Goorsky Materials Science and Engineering Adrienne Lavine Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering UCLA Engineer Advisoy Board Timothy J. Deming Vijay K. Dhir William Goodin Mark S. Goorsky Adrienne Lavine Mary Okino Richard D. Wesel External Affairs Communications Matthew Chin Communications Manager

Vijay K. Dhir Dean

Wileen Wong Kromhout Director of Media Relations and Marketing Office of Exteral Affairs 310.206.0678 www.engineer.ucla.edu uclaengineering@support.ucla.edu front and back cover photos: Phil Channing design: Leslie Baker Graphic Design


ngineer 6

Intracellular Drug Trafficking

8

C ENS Unveils Personal Environmental Impact Report

10 12 14

26 2

Improving Water Resource Characterization through Remote Sensing The Bruins Behind Blizzard

NASA Astronaut K. Megan McArthur ’93

8 6

Research Summaries

16

School News

20

Alumni News

26

Faculty News

32

Student News

38

2007-08 Annual Report


research Summaries

Researchers develop A method

to rapidly identify optimal drug cocktails Wileen Wong Kromhout

U

CLA researchers have developed a feedback con-

the virus occurred at much lower drug doses than would be

trol scheme that can search for the most effective

necessary if the drugs were used alone.

drug combinations to treat a variety of conditions,

“With the development of this optimization method,

including cancers and infections. Often, drugs that might

we’ve overcome a major roadblock,” said study author

not be effective in combating diseases individually do much

Chih-Ming Ho, UCLA’s Ben Rich-Lockheed Martin

better in combination. The discovery could play a signifi-

Professor and a member of the National Academy of

cant role in facilitating new clinical drug-cocktail trials.

Engineering.

With the development of this optimization method, we’ve overcome a major roadblock With the use of the new closed-loop system control

The research team also included Genhong Cheng, of the

scheme, an approach guided by a stochastic search algo-

Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center; Ren Sun, UCLA

rithm, researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School

professor of molecular and medical pharmacology; and Pak

of Engineering and Applied Science and UCLA’s Jonsson

Wong, a former UCLA Engineering graduate student who

Comprehensive Cancer Center have devised an invaluable

is now an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at

means of identifying potent drug combinations fast and

the University of Arizona.

efficiently. In one test case, the research team examined how to best prevent a viral infection of host cells. Using the closed-

The study was funded and supported by the NIH Center for Cell Control and the NASA Institute for Cell Mimetic Space Exploration.

loop optimization scheme, they were able to identify, out of 100,000 possible combinations, the drug cocktails that

The full release is available online at: http://

completely inhibited viral infection after only about a

www.engineer.ucla.edu/news/2008/drug_cocktails.htm

dozen trials. In addition, they found that total inhibition of

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Researchers Discover a Theoretical Model to Predict Jamming that Could

Provide New Avenues in Materials Innovation and Medicine Wileen Wong Kromhout

R

esearchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have come up with a theoretical model to predict when granular

materials become jammed. This advancement not only broadens fundamental knowledge, it also provides new avenues to a number of practical areas that ranges from materials innovation to medicine. This new theoretical framework, the authors believe, can be applied to many different areas. For example, pharmaceutical companies can use the new equation to decide the size and quantities of pills that may or may not fit through a shoot that fills containers. Also, from knowing the fundamentals of jamming, scientists can now engineer materials that are both durable and strong. Instead of working with composites or alloys, the jamming theory provides a roadmap to tune material properties from pure substances. “We started this research by looking at the behavior of dry powders as solid lubricants as well as the behavior of a powdered rock in fault zones called gouge during an earthquake. What we found led us to a model that can accurately predict the behavior of dense granular flows. What we realized soon after was that the granular particles interact similarly to that of molecules in materials that jam, such as colloids and foam,” said study’s author Pirouz Kavehpour, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the Complex Fluids & Interfacial Physics Laboratory at UCLA. “From there, we were able to find a universal law that can predict the jamming behavior for the first time.”

Professor Pirouz Kavehpour and graduate student Kevin Lu. photo: Don Liebig, ASUCLA Photography

“It can also help us to better understand certain diseases in medicine. In sickle cell anemia, for example, the abnormal blood cells are long and skinny, resulting in the obstruction of blood flow to various organs. Now we can do more to reduce the likeliness of death-threatening implications to benefit the medical community,” said graduate student Kevin Lu, a co-author of the article. The study, which was partially funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, was published in the journal Nature Physics in May. To see the full release: http://www.engineer.ucla. edu/news/2008/granular_jamming.htm

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ucla Engineer

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research Summaries

New Method for protecting Private Data Wileen Wong Kromhout

A

mit Sahai, an associate professor of computer sci-

ers but will also allow access to the data in an intuitive

ence at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engi-

way, making it much harder for hackers to gain access to

neering and Applied Science, and his colleagues

sensitive information but much easier for programmers to

have devised a new data-protection method they hope will put Internet criminals out of business.

secure it. “Imagine current encryption technology as a lock and key — the data is locked, and to allow different people access, many copies of the key need to be made,” Sahai said. “One record might need to be accessed by 10,000 people, so you make 10,000 copies of that key. With millions of documents and thousands of keys per document, you can imagine how very, very complicated it gets.” The study authors’ new functional encryption method allows a programmer to simply plug in his criteria for the information. The mathematical system will then produce an encrypted record that only people matching the criteria can decrypt. The complex system of managing many keys is now simplified, and servers hold encrypted data that the servers themselves can’t read. The information looks like gibberish to hackers. In addition, the new mathematical system allows for keys to be personalized — only one key is needed to unlock all the information that is available to that person. Sahai and Waters are considered the founders of the area of functional encryption. Sahai recently won a

Professor Amit Sahai photo: Matthew Chin

Along with co-authors Brent Waters, a UCLA computer science alumnus, and Jonathan Katz of the University of Maryland, Sahai has come up with a mathematical system — known as functional encryption — that will not only help to simplify the encryption of data in serv-

prestigious Okawa Research Grant Award from Japan’s Okawa Foundation for his work in this area. The authors’ study was chosen as one of the top four papers at Eurocrypt 2008 — one of two flagship international conferences in cryptography. The full release is available at: http://www.engineer.ucla. edu/news/2008/computersecurity_sahai.htm

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Circular strain test measuring the expansion of a type of electroactive polymer. In A, no voltage is applied. In B, 5 kV is applied. The scale bar is at 10 nm.

A

B

Advances in Electroactive Polymers could lead to Self-Healing Artificial Muscles Cynthia Lee

U

CLA researchers, led by materials science and en-

developing a wave energy generator that will use the force

gineering professor Qibing Pei, have been making

of water to push against the “muscle” to generate electric-

advances on electroactive polymers – a rubber-

ity. Theoretically, shoes with polymer soles could generate

like material that could lead to artificial muscles. These

electricity when you walk to power your iPod or other

artificial muscles could be used in industrial applications

personal electronic devices.

in many areas. They could one day power small, energy-efficient robots, turn your shoes into power generators that

Until recently, there was one serious hitch. The constant expanding and contracting caused the material to fatigue

Theoretically, shoes with polymer soles could generate electricity when you walk to power your iPod or other personal electronic devices can keep your cell phone going, power your car windows,

and short out. “Once the material shorted,” Pei explains,

and even help keep a weak heart pumping.

“the whole device was dead. That made it very unpredict-

And an added bonus is that when the artificial muscle tears, it can, in effect, heal itself. The research was published in the journal Advanced Materials in February. When electricity is run through a thin film of the poly-

able.” But Pei has overcome that problem by making the artificial muscle self-healing. Using carbon nanotubes as electrodes, Pei and his team, which includes Wei Yuan, a graduate student in Pei’s

mer, it expands. When the voltage stops, it contracts. Even

research group, recently demonstrated that when a defect

better, it also works in reverse: If some mechanical force is

occurs in the material, it can be electrically isolated. The

applied to change the shape of the material, it unleashes a

high electrical field, in effect, destroys the conducting

small current of electricity.

material around the defect. The area in which the defect

Paul Brochu, a graduate student on Pei’s team, is look-

is located does become isolated, and function is affected a

ing into how a flag made of the material might generate

little bit. But the rest of the muscle still works — in effect,

electricity as it flaps in the wind. Scientists in Japan are

it heals itself.

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ucla Engineer

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Cover Feature

In bioengineering professor Daniel T. Kamei’s laboratory. Left to right: Kamei, undergraduate Sophia Lin, bioengineering professor and department chair Timothy Deming, graduate students Victor Sun and Dennis Yoon. photo: Phil Channing

Intracellular Drug Trafficking Applications in Cancer Drug Delivery Matthew Chin

I

n the treatment of cancer, chemotherapeutics are administered to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, these drugs can also exert toxic effects on normal cells. To reduce these side effects, cancer cells may be selectively targeted by conjugating chemotherapeutics to a protein that specifically binds to a receptor (a cell-surface protein) that is

research to improve upon these general approaches. Scientifically, his research group is interested in the transport, or trafficking, of proteins and particles inside cells. With the knowledge gained from studying these trafficking pathways, his research group is striving to engineer new pathways that may improve the delivery and efficacy of chemotherapeutics.

It is our hope that we can obtain very good preclinical data so that we may get closer to using these conjugates in brain cancer patients present at a high concentration (overexpressed) on the surfaces of cancer cells relative to normal cells. Moreover, these toxic side effects can also be minimized by encapsulating the chemotherapeutics inside

In one study, published in the Journal of Controlled Release in 2007, Kamei and his students Bert Lao, Wen-Lin Tsai, Foad Mashayekhi and Edward Pham, along with his collaborator Anne Mason, focused on

particles to reduce contact between the drugs and normal cells. The laboratory of Daniel T. Kamei, assistant professor of bioengineering, has been conducting

engineering the protein transferrin (Tf). Researchers have conjugated chemotherapeutics to Tf in the past, since its receptor is overexpressed on the surfaces of

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cancer cells. However, Tf only spends a short period of time inside the cell, and therefore has a limited timeframe in which to release the drug. To increase this timeframe, Kamei and coworkers implemented a novel three-step approach. A mathematical model was first derived with a systems analysis of the intracellular trafficking processes. This model was used to identify a molecular design criterion by which to engineer a Tf variant. One variant that satisfied the design criterion was subsequently generated by replacing carbonate with oxalate as the salt ion that is associated with the protein. Lastly, this Tf variant was shown to associate with cancer cells for a greater period of time using radioactively labeled versions of the Tf variant and native Tf. To test if this increase in cellular association would correspond to an increase in cell killing, the drug diphtheria toxin was conjugated to both the Tf variant and native Tf. The Tf variant conjugate was shown to be two- to four-fold more potent than the native Tf conjugate. Dennis Yoon, a student in the Kamei research group, is currently extending this work by investigating Tf mutants generated with site-directed mutagenesis. “We intend to send our best candidates to our collaborator at UC San Francisco to test our Tf-drug conjugates in mouse models for brain cancer,” Kamei said. “It is our hope that we can obtain very good preclinical data so that we may get closer to eventually using these conjugates in brain cancer patients.” In another study, published in the journal Nature Materials in 2007, Kamei teamed up with Timothy J. Deming, chair and professor of bioengineering, to investigate vesicles (nano- to microscale encapsulants with an aqueous interior) for delivering drugs.

Normal Cell

Tumor Cell

Transferrin receptor

Transferrin

Iron

The receptor for the protein transferrin is overexpressed on tumor cells. This system makes it a good candidate for intracellular drug delivery.

continued on page 37

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Feature

CENS Unveils

Personal Environmental Impact Report Matthew Chin

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Left: CENS Researcher Vinayak Naik holds a Nokia cell phone used in PEIR. photo: Phil Channing

I

n June, UCLA researchers unveiled a new tool to help people understand their relationship with the environment. The Personal Environmental Impact Report (PEIR) lets users see online how their daily choices affect the environment and how the environment affects them, by providing personalized, daily estimates of measures like particulate matter exposure on roadways and carbon emissions due to driving. “You can think of PEIR as a tool for self-reflection,” said Mark Hansen, UCLA associate professor of statistics and a faculty member on the CENS

Participatory sensing foregrounds the involvement of citizens and community groups

The Center for Embedded Networked Sensing The Center for Embedded Networked Sensing is a major research enterprise that develops wireless sensing systems and applies this revolutionary technology to critical scientific and societal applications. Expanding on the concept of the Internet, these distributed systems, composed of stationary and robotic smart sensors, reveal otherwise unobservable phenomena and provide new insights into the physical world. With major funding from

PEIR project team. “With it, you can evaluate certain kinds of transportation choices, either in isolation (absolute impacts) or by comparison to people in your social network (relative impacts).” PEIR was developed by the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science in collaboration with the Nokia Research Center, Palo Alto. PEIR estimates impact and exposure using the actual travel patterns of its users, as uploaded from their GPS-equipped mobile phones. Accepted scientific models, like the California Air Resources Board’s Emissions FACtors (EMFAC) vehicle emissions and Southern California Association of Governments traffic models, are used to calculate estimates specific to the user’s travel. On the PEIR site, users can compare values for different trips and see how lifestyle changes affect their impact and exposure. They can also compare their averages with other PEIR participants in their Facebook social network.

the National Science Foundation’s Science and Technology Center program, CENS is housed in the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and is made up of researchers from UCLA, UC Riverside, UC Merced, USC and the California Institute of Technology. The director of CENS is Deborah Estrin, UCLA professor of computer science and electrical engineering, and holder of the Jon Postel Chair in Computer Networks.

continued on page 37

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feature

The availability of water has always been a critical issue in semi-arid regions, such as the Western U.S. and particularly in California. In this large region, water must be conveyed hundreds of miles from its source to fulfill the needs of people, agriculture, hydroelectric power and industrial uses. In the past, increases in water demand were filled by new infrastructure. However, rising population coupled with effects of climate change will put even more strain on limited water resources.

Improving Water Resource Characteri

through Remote Sensing Matthew Chin

For water resource managers, a better picture of what’s

this data collection method has its faults, including that

available could lead to informed future decisions on sustain-

measurement sites are sparse, and that there are spatial

able and more efficient use of water.

variations, such as topography and vegetation that can

Steven Margulis, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and Noah Molotch, assistant researcher,

greatly influence the distribution of snow. Physically based models are also used to track snow-

have been working on several projects to improve the

pack, but those too have drawbacks. These include the lack

characterization of water resources, including using satellites

of precipitation data along with a reliance on historical

in Earth orbit to estimate hydrological states through use

records, which due to climate change, can become increas-

of remote sensing measurements across the electromagnetic

ingly unreliable.

spectrum. Satellite-based remote sensing technology can allow for

“Remote sensing provides the potential for major new insight into hydrological processes due to its ability to pro-

mapping large areas with more frequency than traditional

vide maps of hydrologic variables on global scales,” Mar-

in situ measurement methods. Used in combination with

gulis said. “The key challenge is being able to transform

traditional methods of physical modeling and on-site survey-

the electromagnetic measurements into the hydrologic

ing, remote sensing can help give a more detailed and higher

states on the ground and being able to optimally combine

resolution picture of the water supply.

this information with models and other traditional mea-

A big part of the West’s water supply lies in mountain snowpacks, which store it during the winter, then release it in spring and summer.

surements to provide a complete real-time picture of the evolving hydrologic cycle.” To test if remote sensing can be an important tool in

Traditionally, characterizing the amount of water in a

water resource characterization, Margulis was awarded

snowpack involves monthly snow survey treks. However,

a NASA New Investigator Award to conduct feasibility

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Danielle Perrot, an undergraduate environmental science major, and Keith Musselman, a PhD student in civil and environmental engineering, measure snow density and snow temperature at a remote site in Sequoia National Park. photo: Noah Molotch

zation

experiments using measurements taken at a NASA test

ter of our water supply,” said Molotch, who serves as prin-

equivalent, or SWE, which is how much water is in the

cipal investigator for the new projects. Projected changes

snowpack. The work showed that remote sensing observa-

in climate may dramatically deplete this important water

tions combined with snowpack models can effectively map

source. Thus, our efforts aim to improve understanding of

large areas, in this case about 625 square kilometers, and

the processes that control snow distribution.

a)

Elev., km

3.5

b) 3.5

c)

3

3

3

2.5

2.5

2

2

2

40.6

40.6

40.6

106.6

40.4 106.8

106.6

40.4 40.2

0.25 0.2

3.5

2.5

40.2

“In California the Sierra snowpack is the bread and but-

site in the Colorado Rockies to estimate the snow water

0.15 0.1 0.05 106.6

40.4

106.8

40.2

106.8

0

Maps of SWE accumulation from traditional (b) and newly developed (c) methods compared to true field (a) at test site. Methods will next be applied across the Sierras over multiple years. has the potential to come within six percent of the actual conditions of the snowpack water equivalent. Margulis and Molotch have been extending these techniques to reconstruct snow water equivalent maps of the large basins in the Rio Grande headwaters region. This has resulted in several new projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey, and NASA to apply these same techniques to identify inter-annual precipitation and snow accumulation patterns in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, whose snowpack is critical to California’s future water supply.

This will provide water managers with better information for real-time management and will reduce uncertainty in the decadal-scale projections needed for long term planning of infrastructure. The bottom line is a more efficient system of water management which translates directly to the price of water and food.” For more details on Margulis’ and Molotch’s work on improving water resource management from space, visit: http://cee.ucla.edu/news/Newsletter_Fall_07.pdf

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feature

Allen Adham ’90 had already been writing video games for established gaming companies since he was in high school. Then, in his sophomore year at UCLA, Adham decided to go out on a limb and publish his own product.

The Bruins

Behind Blizzard Leti McNeill

“I remember sitting there at a table, 19 years old with my little briefcase, wearing my best

Morhaime, on the other hand, was a tougher sell. “The

clothes, negotiating with top executives at a

pitch Allen gave was, ‘It’s okay if you don’t know how to

local publisher,” he said. “Everything they said

do this right now. It’s not that complicated. You’re smart.

sounded great. Of course now I know it was a

We’re smart. We can do this,’” Morhaime said.

horrible, horrible deal, but it was a great learning experience.” Adham made $5,000 from that deal, but

With Adham as the nexus of the group, the trio came together to form what would eventually be Blizzard Entertainment. It was originally called Silicon & Synapse.

gained much more in life experience. Ten

But Adham noted that, “By the hundredth time we had

years later, with partners and fellow UCLA

to spell it out or hear people say, ‘Silicon what? Isn’t that

Engineering alumni Mike Morhaime ’90 and

what women put in their…’ we realized we had to come

Frank Pearce ’90, the trio would sell their

up with a new name.”

company, Blizzard Entertainment for nearly $10 million. They took their love for games a step further than most. They wanted to contribute to the top: Allen Adham ’90 middle: Mike Morhaime ’90 bottom: Frank Pearce ’90

‘What’s the harm? Let’s do it,’” Pearce said.

Blizzard is best known for its three main franchises: World of Warcraft, Diablo, and Starcraft, each cutting edge in its own way. Warcraft was one of the first real-time strategy PC

gaming industry in their own way, on their

games, in which players could compete against each other

own terms.

in the same playing space. Other games were based on

“We were young, had good engineering degrees from UCLA to fall back on and I thought,

turn-by-turn strategy, or real-time racing, etc., but Warcraft utilized all three: real time, strategy and multiplayer.

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Screenshots from Blizzard’s video game franchises: World of Warcraft, Starcraft and Diablo. photos: Blizzard Entertainment

They broke the mold with Diablo, in which a player

forward thinking were rewarded earlier this year when

takes on a single role in the first-person perspective.

Blizzard received a Technology and Engineering Emmy

Both Warcraft and Diablo provide addictive fun,

Award for the creation of World of Warcraft, the compa-

but in radically different ways. And Starcraft is an

ny’s signature product.

evolution of the two as a real-time strategy game with three different races to choose from. Blizzard has constantly been ahead of its time, pushing the boundaries of the computer gaming

For example, in 2006, Morhaime was approached by the producers of “South Park” to do an episode based on World of Warcraft. Both he and Pearce made guest appearances in the episode “Make Love, Not Warcraft.” Now

When you’re young, take risks and don’t talk yourself out of cool ideas. industry. Adham, Morhaime and Pearce had the

they are working with Legendary Pictures — whose hits

vision to connect players over a newly developing

include the 2008 blockbuster “The Dark Knight” — to

Internet before it became ubiquitous in households

bring World of Warcraft to the big screen.

across America, and throughout the world, as it is today. When Microsoft started to transition from DOS

For budding entrepreneurs, Adham says: “When you’re young, take risks and don’t talk yourself out of cool ideas. Things don’t always go the way you planned, but you

to Windows, they knew they had to defy the advice

learn a lot, and if you go into it with the right attitude,

of their salespeople and start making games for

you’ll work hard but you’ll have a lot of fun, too. Just

this new platform. Their constant innovation and

go for it.”

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feature

NASA Astronaut

K. Megan McArtHu Matthew Chin

In October, Space Shuttle Atlantis will lift off for the last shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. Aboard the shuttle, will be Mission Specialist K. Megan McArthur. McArthur earned her bachelor’s degree at UCLA in aerospace engineering. Following graduation, she earned her PhD from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Her graduate research was in nearshore underwater acoustic propagation and digital signal processing. McArthur joined NASA in 2000 and has worked in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, as well as the Space Station and Space Shuttle Mission Control Centers as a Capsule Communicator. STS-125 will be her first space flight.

How did your interest in space start? My dad was a career Naval Aviator, so I was always around airplanes growing up. As a teenager, we lived at Moffett Field Naval Air Station, which is on the same base as NASA’s Ames Research Center. I used to see astronauts flying in to do their training in one of the simulators there, and that is when I first started to think seriously about a career in aerospace. I knew that becoming an astronaut was a long shot, but I wanted to study aerospace engineering and pursue a career with NASA in some capacity.

Did you have an experience at UCLA Engineering that you think helped you on your career to becoming an astronaut? One of my good friends in Aerospace Engineering, Derek Leek, was going to be a Navy Submarine

Hubble floating above space, taken in 2002. photos: NASA

Officer after graduation. He read about a compe-

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ur ’93

right: K. Megan McArthur left: McArthur training

tition called the Human Powered Submarine Races, and

celebrating with my crewmates after the successful comple-

put together a small team of aero engineers to compete.

tion of five spacewalks. I am also looking forward to any

With the support of the engineering school, we designed,

free time that I can use to look at our beautiful blue planet

built, and raced a two-person flooded submersible at

going by below.

the International Submarine Races in Fort Lauderdale,

What advice could you give engineering students who

Florida. The experience of designing, building, and operating real hardware was a crucial part of my education.

What will your specific tasks on the mission be? I am Mission Specialist #2 for this flight, which means I am the Flight Deck Engineer during the launch and entry of the space shuttle. I help the Shuttle Commander and Pilot monitor the Shuttle systems and I direct activities on the flight deck during any malfunctions. I also assist during the rendezvous with the Hubble Space Telescope, and I operate the Shuttle’s robotic arm to capture the telescope and berth it in the Shuttle’s payload bay. During the spacewalks, I will operate the robotic arm to move crew and equipment in and around the telescope.

What are you most looking forward to during your space flight? I am looking forward to the moment just after I capture

are considering careers in space exploration? When I was between my junior and senior year at UCLA, I had the opportunity to meet astronaut Kathy Sullivan, and I think she gave me very good advice on that topic. She told me that rather than trying to choose a career path based on what I thought NASA might be looking for, I should focus on finding something I loved to do, and then work to excel at it. She pointed out that getting selected as an astronaut is a real long shot, so you should choose something you’d like to do as a career even if you never get selected. And of course, it is hard to really excel at something if you don’t love it! For information on STS 125: www.nasa.gov/mission_ pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/hst_sm4/

the Hubble Space Telescope! I am looking forward to

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school news

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering’s third annual Technology Forum took place in May with the school’s first L.M.K. Boelter Lecture, delivered by U.S. Under Secretary for Science Raymond L. Orbach. During his lecture, Orbach discussed the challenges and opportunities for basic research in the nation’s energy portfolio and addressed current projects of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

U.S Under Secretary for Science

Raymond L. Orbach Following his keynote, Orbach sat down with editor of UCLA Today, Cynthia Lee, for a candid conversation regarding the future of science and technology in this country, the importance of research funding, how we will solve our energy problems, and what role engineering schools across the country will play in all of this. The following is an excerpt.

CL: With the price of gas going up so rapidly and economic turmoil everywhere, do you think that’s going to give your argument for more funding for basic research a lift? RO: Yes, I think both basic and applied. I think you are going to see in the next Congress a very substantial investment in energy research. It needs to be in both areas, both at the basic and at the applied because ultimately we wanted to get these ideas into the marketplace. And you have, as I mentioned this morning, opportunities over a wide spectrum of aspects that will deal with energy production, energy storage and energy delivery.

And then the next step is to pilot plant that so that you can actually see what is economical, what can make a difference. Then ultimately the private sector will invest in performance in the marketplace. UCLA has a particular advantage in that respect because of its connection to industry, which was emphasized this morning by a number of speakers. So if you look at the continuum between what I called “grand challenge science,” opportunities of the 21st century, and the opportunities to develop new mechanisms for energy production, and then actually put them into place, that is what we are looking for.

CL: And it is not just going to be one form of energy production that you think will solve our energy problems. You think it’s going to be a combination of… RO: Yes, all of the above. Part of it is due to geographic distribution. There is no silver bullet that is going to solve all our energy problems. In transportation you want an energy source that is mobile. For grid electricity, for base load, you want a stationary source. And then there is also a distribution geographically of your energy usage. So you want to optimize the energy with the use and with the distribution.

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photos: Glenn Cratty

CL: In all of this, what role do you hope engineering schools across the country will play? RO: Engineering schools are our future. It is where students receive their training. The engineering program is a way to do basic research. It is also a way to move into these new fields and get that information and excitement into students’ minds. Hopefully this will encourage them to stay with science and engineering and be productive for our country. The engineering programs are the essential pipeline for competitiveness for our country. You cannot survive as a service economy only. It is just not possible. Somebody has to manufacture something. Somebody has to make things work and that is what engineers do and this School is critical in that regard.

Also, you heard today the combination of the engineering school (the Chancellor talked about it), the physical sciences, and the medical sciences… There’s a special relationship, not just at UCLA, but especially at UCLA, that takes engineering across the campus. It is not just an isolated entity. It is part of the full campus life. Engineering in my view is the glue that holds together various disciplines and produces results that are immediate for our competitiveness. The complete text of the interview can be viewed here: http://www.engineer.ucla.edu/news/2008/techforum_ orbach_qanda.htm Also, the slides from his keynote presentation can be viewed here: http://www.er.doe.gov/News_Information/speeches/ speeches/08/LMK_Boelter/index.htm

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2008 Excellence in Corporate Philanthropy Awards The top three corporate contributors for the past year were recognized and honored for their commitment to education and research at UCLA Engineering. This year, the winners were: Wintek Corporation, Intel and Microsoft. 1 Eric Gayles, director of external programs at Intel Research. 2 Hyley Huang, chairman of Wintek Corporation. 3 Sam Stokes, academic developer evengelist at Microsoft.

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school news

UCLA Engineering

2008 Commencement

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4

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5

1-7 scenes from commencement

photos: Bob Knight Photography

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6

UCLA Engineering 2008 Commencement Speaker Charles M. Vest receives UCLA Medal Charles M. Vest, president of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), vice chair of the National Research Council, the principle operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences

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and Engineering, and President Emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, received the UCLA Medal, the university’s highest honor, at the 2008 UCLA Engineering commencement ceremony, held on June 14, at Pauley Pavilion. Chancellor Gene Block presented the medal to Vest before the commencement address. In his address, Vest encouraged the new graduates to use their skills to solve the most pressing problems and build a better society. “You understand the enormity of its challenges, but you also have the new tools to resolve them,” Vest said in his remarks. “In the end, I believe that knowledge and skill trump ignorance,

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and that optimism trumps pessimism.” The UCLA Medal was established in 1979 as a highlight of UCLA’s “Golden Year” celebration, which marked the 50th anniversary of the campus. Past recipients include former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton; former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres; actors Laurence Olivier, Carol Burnett and Anthony Hopkins; composers Henry Mancini and Quincy Jones; writers Isaac Bashevis Singer and Neil Simon; and business and civic leaders Eli and Edythe Broad. Vest served as President of MIT from 1990 – 2004 and during his 14-year tenure as MIT’s president, he added a strong international dimension to the school’s education and research

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8 UCLA Engineering Dean Vijay K. Dhir with student award winners. 9 NAE president Charles Vest and UCLA Chancellor Gene Block with a few of the school’s faculty who are also NAE members: William W-G Yeh, Yahya Rahmat-Samii, Vijay K. Dhir, Chih-Ming Ho and M.C. Frank Chang.

programs, strengthened relations with industry, increased racial and cultural diversity, and built public understanding and support for higher education and research. Vest has also worked to bring issues concerning education and research to broader public attention and to strengthen national policy on science, engineering and education.

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alumni news

Coretta Harris ’83

President, UCLA Engineering Alumni Association Dear Friends, I am excited to serve as your president and I hope to meet many of you this year and in the years to come. All graduates of the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science are automatically lifetime members of the Engineering Alumni Association (EAA). The association helps promote communication between alumni and students, fosters continued alumni involvement, and helps the school through supporting engineering education and research. There are many opportunities to become involved with your alma mater, and it is my hope that you would consider doing so this school year. When was your last visit to campus? Have you ever thought about speaking to one of the student groups? Have you considered making a donation to the school through your company’s matching gifts program? I hope that you will return to UCLA Engineering to participate in programs that advance the school’s mission. If you would like to know how you can become involved with the UCLA Engineering Alumni Association, please contact me at: coretta83@UCLAlumni.net. Sincerely, Coretta Harris ’83 President, UCLA Engineering Alumni Association

photo: Todd Cheney, ASUCLA Photography

Master of Science in Engineering, an online program

Online by the SEAS Areas

• Advanced Structural Materials (New for Fall ’08) • Computer Networking • Electronic Materials (New for Fall ’08) • Integrated Circuits (New for Fall ’08) • Manufacturing and Design • Mechanics of Structures • Signal Processing and Communications Distinctive Features of the Program

The primary purpose of this Program is to enable employed engineers and computer scientists to enhance their technical education beyond the Bachelor of Science level, and to enhance their value to the technical organizations in which they are employed. Additional Information and Online Applications Available at www.msengrol.seas.ucla.edu

• Each course is fully equivalent to the corresponding on-campus course and taught by the faculty members who teach the on-campus course. • T he online lectures are carefully prepared for the online student.

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PAUL BARAN MS ’59 Selected to Receive National Medal of Technology and Innovation Matthew Chin

U

CLA Engineering alumnus Paul Baran MS ’59

sembled at their destination. This idea would become

has been selected to receive the National Medal

known as packet switching. These concepts would

of Technology and Innovation for his pioneering

later be incorporated in the ARPANET, the predeces-

work on packet switching, which provided the underlying technology that made the Internet possible. The medal is the country’s highest honor for technological achievement. It was established in 1980 to recog-

sor of the Internet. Baran will receive the medal at a White House ceremony at the end of September. “There are maybe 1,000 people who have contrib-

nize lasting contributions to the United States through

uted to the technology of the Internet,” said Baran,

technological innovation.

who was humbled by his selection. “In my view, this is

Baran did his seminal work on packet switching in the early 1960s while he was at the RAND Corporation. During the height of the Cold War, Baran became

not just an award to me, but a token of recognition to all the others. I only did a little piece.” Baran earned his bachelor’s in electrical engineer-

interested in keeping the country’s communications

ing from Drexel University in Philadelphia in 1949. In

systems functional after a first-strike nuclear attack.

the 1950s, he moved to Los Angeles to work for the

He knew that the U.S. had to be able to launch a

Hughes Aircraft Company. At that same time, he did

counterattack.

graduate research at UCLA and received his MS in

Rather than a vulnerable system with a single switch or a small handful of switches that data had to be routed through, Baran envisioned a distributed network

Engineering in 1959, under the supervision of his advisor Gerald Estrin. Baran has received many honors for his work,

with many redundant routes — something that looks

including the Marconi Prize and the Bower Award and

like a fishing net.

Prize for Achievement in Science from the Franklin

In this type of network, data would automatically

Institute. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, Fellow of

find a way through the system, even if many switches

the AAAS and a member of the National Academy

had been destroyed. Also, data being sent would also

of Engineering.

be spliced up into smaller message blocks, then reas-

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careers

Trajectory for Success Leti McNeill

Imagination, Intensity, Integrity. Ronald D. Sugar ’68, MS ’69, PhD ’71, Chairman and CEO of Northrop Grumman Corporation, shares the keys to a winning career. What were your most influential classes at UCLA?

that one class, Engineering Economics — in fact I think I

Sugar: One was called Engineering Economics, which

still have the book — was very, very helpful. I really enjoyed

taught you the basic idea of investment and return. It was

what I did, utilizing the significant amount of engineering

not just pure science, it was not just economics. It was the

background I had developed at UCLA but building some

ability to do things which were practical and economical.

management skills along the way.

The other was a course in which your grade was based

What kinds of characteristics is Northrop Grumman looking for in its employees?

on building a truss bridge with nothing but balsa wood and glue. It was a great microcosm of engineering. It was a lot like real world teams of people designing a product, competing with each other to see who’s got the best performance airplane, who’s got the best performance car, who’s got the best software.

Sugar: The three “I’s”. We’re looking for people with imagination. They’ve got to have a light on behind their eyes. Second, intensity. We really want people who are committed to the importance of what we do. We do national security work, and that is life and death for the soldiers and

What was your first job out of UCLA?

for the homeland and people we’re defending. And the third

Sugar: My first full-time job was at The Aerospace Corpo-

“I” is integrity. We have to have people who have high

ration in El Segundo. I was really fascinated by space. So

integrity, who’ll do things the right way.

I started doing analysis of space flight trajectories. At the

What is your advice for young engineers looking to have a successful career?

same time, I decided I would get my master’s and my PhD. — working and going to school, both full time. Each one helped the other, but it was a lot of work. How did you transition to TRW/Northrop Grumman? Sugar: In those days, young aerospace engineers had many opportunities to move and change companies. I eventually ended up at TRW in 1981. Over about twenty years, I worked my way through spacecraft and electronics work, designing spacecraft, designing space systems. Then I had a career opportunity to become the chief financial officer, which was a very strange opportunity particularly for a rocket scientist. But that worked very well, and I will tell you that my fundamental analytical training at UCLA and

Sugar: Take on challenging assignments. Stretch yourself out of your comfort zone because when you do that, you really do learn. And occasionally, you’ll fail. Even though it’s painful, particularly early in your career, you will learn more from a failure than from several successes. Also, manage your career for upward mobility. Spend time thinking about what the most important things are that the organization above you needs to have done right. You can put your energy into all kinds of things, but put your best energy into things that will move the organization ahead. Then you’ll be very highly rewarded.

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ALUMNI CLASS NOTES 1940s John Kemper ’49, MS ’59, former dean and namesake of the John D. Kemper Hall of Engineering at UC Davis, is retired and living in Oregon.

1950s Roger B. Sperling ’56 is fully retired and his new hobbies include acrylic painting and leading a group of senior men called Writing Life Stories.

1960s

John W. Bell ’68, currently the road program manager in the Forest Service National headquarters, was selected as the U.S. Forest Service’s Technical Engineer of the Year for 2007. Charles Kohlhase MS ’68 is presently the NASA/JPL coordinator for a major 3D-IMAX production scheduled for release in late 2009. Azad M. Madni ‘68, MS ’71, PhD ’78, chairman and CEO of Intelligent Systems Technology Inc., received the prestigious President’s Award from the Society of Design and

Stuart Schweitzer ’61, professor of health services at the

Process Science at the 11th Biennial World Conference on

UCLA School of Public Health, recently published an

Integrated Systems, Designs and Process Science. He was

article in The New England Journal of Medicine on the

honored for visionary leadership as the society’s president

problem of contaminated heparin coming to the United

for the last three years and for spearheading its thrust in

States from China; Oxford Press has published the second

transdisciplinary research and education. Madni currently

edition of his book, Pharmaceutical Economics and

serves as the editor-in-chief of the society’s journal.

Policy; and he has just received a contract from the Eli

Asad M. Madni ’69, MS ’72, was appointed to the position

Lilly Corporation to study making pharmaceuticals afford-

of Distinguished College Professor of Electronics

able to populations in developing countries.

Engineering by TCI College of Technology, the institute’s

Rolland D Winter ’61 was selected as a Democratic Elector

first appointment.

from Virginia.

Michael V. Frank ’69, PhD ’78 had his book, Choosing

Bernard Beskind ’62, MS ’66 was elected to the Advisory

Safety, published by RFF Press in August 2008.

Board of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center.

1970s

Averill J. Strasser ’64, MS ’69 founded Water Charity, a

California, has retired from the Los Angeles County

nonprofit organization that implements practical solutions

Department of Public Works, Building and Safety Division

to provide safe water, effective sanitation, and meaningful

after 37 years.

health education to communities in need.

Peter Lee ’70, a registered civil engineer in the State of

David A. Patterson ’69 (Mathematics), MS ’70, PhD ’76 has

Jiunn Carl Hsu MS ’66, PhD ’71 has been appointed to the

received the Distinguished Service Award from the Asso-

board of Trident Microsystems.

ciation of Computing Machinery for distinguished service

James D. Plummer ’66 dean of Stanford Engineering, was

to ACM and the computing community. Patterson also re-

elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

ceived the 2008 ACM – IEEE CS Eckert-Mauchly Award,

Hiro P. Mizue ’67 retired in September 2007 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Honolulu after 34 years of

which recognizes his contributions to computer and digital systems architecture.

service as chief of civil works planning and project man-

Walter F. Laredo ’73 wrote Engineering Projects for the

agement for the Pacific Ocean area.

21st Century, which includes conceptual and preliminary designs for several engineering projects. The illustrated book is published by Trafford Publications.

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alumni news

Kevin Daniel Conway ’76 was named Southwest Regional

Gene Golovchinsky ’87 co-authored a paper titled “Algo-

Manager for the national consulting engineering firm,

rithmic Mediation for Collaborative Exploratory Search”

Greeley and Hansen.

that received the Best Paper award at the Association of

Stuart T. Newman ’76 retired from the Navy Reserve and was awarded his second Meritorious Service Medal. Ron Cates ’78, MS ’82 has been appointed senior vice president and general manager of the Wide Area Networks

Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval’s 2008 conference. Haro Hartounian MS ’88 has been appointed president of Vyteris, Inc.

Communications Business Unit at Mindspeed Technolo-

Daniel Maldonado ’89, a senior associate at Kunz Plitt,

gies, Inc. of Newport Beach, Calif.

Hyland, Demlong and Kleifield, P.C. in Phoenix, is an

Daniel A. Menasce PhD ’78 was promoted to senior associate dean of the Volgenau School of Information Technology & Engineering at George Mason University. Jeff Lawrence ’79 has started a new business, the Common Grant Application, and also joined the board of Guidance Software. Catherine J. Steele ’79, MS ’81 was promoted in May 2008 to Vice President, Space Operations, Requirements and Technology at The Aerospace Corporation.

1980s

associate editor of a 20+ volume treatise on insurance law entitled Couch on Insurance, Third Edition. He is also a contributing author for a recent book from Thomas West Publishing entitled CAT Claims: Insurance Claims for Natural and Man-Made Disasters. Frank Romero ’89 has been promoted to senior vice president of sales and market development of Medis Technologies Ltd. Michael A Zeitzew ’89 (Math-Computer Science), MS ’90, MA ’92 (Mathematics), PhD ’95 (Mathematics) was appointed Engineering Lead, Smart Machines department,

Rick Steiner ’80 co-authored the critically acclaimed

at NavCom Technology, Inc., a John Deere Company.

textbook, A Practical Guide to SysML: The Systems

1990s

Modeling Language.

Rex Black ’90, president of Rex Black Consulting Services,

Byeong Gi Lee PhD ’82 has been appointed president-elect

has completed his fifth book, Advanced Software Test-

of the IEEE Communications Society. His term will begin

ing: Guide to the ISTQB Advanced Certification as an

January 1, 2009.

Advanced Test Analyst.

Harry Tarnof f ’8 3 designed and operated the custom

George Gin-Chong Tseng ’91, an intellectual property

“mob” voting system seen on NBC’s “1 vs. 100”

attorney, has been awarded the title of Counsel at the Los

television game show.

Angeles office of the law firm of Arent Fox.

Dale Uyeda ’84 was selected for promotion to Captain in

Kerop Janoyan ’93, MS ’95, ENG ’99, PhD ’01 had research

the United States Navy, and was assigned to support the

work featured in New York Times article Health Care for

Joint Chiefs of Staff as the Team Chief, Joint Staff Reac-

Bridges: A Search for Diagnostic Tools, by Matthew L.

tion Cell in the Pentagon.

Wald, published Nov. 1, 2007.

Long To ’85 became a NAVAIR Associate Fellow in Septem-

Andrew J. Putnam ’94 has received a faculty early career

ber 2007, and an IEEE Senior Member in January 2007.

award and a $400,000 grant from the National Science

Herbert Hoppe ’86 moved to Northern Virginia to continue

Foundation. He is an associate professor of chemical

a mathematics tutoring service started six months ago that is similar to one started in Los Angeles 12 years ago. William Newman ’86 is a senior associate with the firm

engineering and materials science at the UC Irvine Henry Samueli School of Engineering. John Sun ’94 MS ’01 married Wanyu Law ’95, MS ’95

Booz & Company focusing on enterprise systems program

in October 2007.

value realization in the firm’s Automotive, Transportation

Joel Elad ’95 is publishing his fifth book, LinkedIn for

& Industrials practice based in Troy, Michigan.

Dummies, in October 2008.

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Robert G. Trazo ’95 was named principal engineer at

Thomas Rau ’03 is currently at University of Colorado,

Southern California Geotechnical, Inc. in Yorba Linda,

Denver Health Sciences Center doing his residency in

Calif. Robert’s wife, Viengxong Gimo Chanphianamvong

radiology.

’94 (Art), gave birth to their son, Grant Luke Trazo, on September 1, 2007. Cedric Westphal MS ’95 PhD ’00 became a senior member of the IEEE. Pam (Hafer) Perga ’96 completed her doctorate in physical therapy from Washington University in St. Louis, May 2007. She and her husband, Mike, also celebrated the birth of their daughter Isabella in March of the same year. Rodney Rodriguez ’97 has been a part of the management team for the St. Anthony Falls/I-35W Bridge Rebuild project in Minneapolis, Minn.

Iris Javaherian Sooferi ’03 is currently working as a banking attorney in a law firm in downtown Los Angeles. Peter Durojaiye ’06 has recently been promoted to senior associate after completing two years as a consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers in their technology sector. C.K. Lin PhD ’06 launched a networking platform for academic and industry researchers to speed up the process of innovation. Adam Razak ’06 is currently working towards his graduate degree at UCLA. He is a communications engineer with the City of Los Angeles, and has passed the Engineer in Train-

Alon S. Barlevy MS ’93, ENG ’96, PhD ’98 was appointed parks

ing (E.I.T.) written exam administered by the National

and recreation commissioner for the City of Cerritos.

Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying.

Bernard Chu ’98 is the project controls manager for Turner

Jian Liu PhD ’07 celebrated the birth of her first child, Joy,

International on the design and construction of the Bitexco

in November 2007.

Financial Tower project in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, which will be the country’s tallest building at 259 meters. Guogen Zhang PhD ’98, a senior technical staff member at IBM Silicon Valley Lab in San Jose, Calif., was part of a team of six colleagues that was given an IBM Corporate Award for outstanding contributions to pureXML technology in DB2 in May 2008.

2000s Sierin Lim ’00, PhD ’05 is an assistant professor of the Bioengineering Division at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

Brian Sanders ’07 was awarded the position of project engineer/lead designer for a new attraction for Universal Studios Singapore. Jin Sung Kang ’08, is currently pursuing his PhD at UCLA and has became a TA for MAE 157. Anthony Lawrenz ’08 is currently in the graduate program at the University of Washington working on materials research in health, energy, and the environment. Jamila Saifee ’08 is currently pursuing a Masters of Science in Chemical Engineering at MIT.

Fotios-Jossif Kokotos MS ’00 works as a specialist engi-

In Memoriam

neering consultant in Greece, with an emphasis on sustain-

Arthur William Riley ’51

able tourism and spa design.

James E. Arthur ’58

Chad Pittman ’02 co-founded a real estate investment com-

Elwain “Wayne” B. Martson ’69 (Economics), ’70 (Engineering)

pany in 2007, which is currently raising a private equity fund aimed at solving the housing crisis. Erwin Taganas MS ’02, who braved a 450-foot bungee

Do you have an update to share? If so, please e-mail

jump in New Zealand in 2007, currently works as a senior

Grace Coopman, director of alumni relations, at

electrical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories. He

gcoopman@support.ucla.edu.

also recently married Andrelee Garcia, MD. Tae H. Han MS ’00, PhD ’03 was promoted from senior research pharmacokineticist to research fellow at Merck & Co. Inc.

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faculty news

Leonard Kleinrock

to receive National Medal of

Internet pioneer recognized with nation’s highest scientific honor Elizabeth Kivowitz Boatright-Simon

P

resident George W. Bush announced in August that UCLA Distinguished Professor of Computer Science Leonard Kleinrock has been selected to receive the prestigious National Medal of Science. Established by Congress in 1959 and administered by the National Science Foundation, the medal is the nation’s highest scientific honor. Seven other distinguished scientists will also receive the medal. “I am thrilled and greatly honored,” said Kleinrock, a member of UCLA’s faculty since 1963, the year he received his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Kleinrock created the basic principles of packet switching, the technology underpinning the Internet. He developed the mathematical theory of data networks a decade before the Internet’s birth, which occurred when his host computer at UCLA became the first node of what was then known as the ARPANET in September 1969. He wrote the first paper and published the first book on the subject, and directed the transmission of the first message to pass over the Internet. He was also responsible for setting up and running the Network Measurement Center, which tested the limits of the early Internet to evaluate its performance and behavior and improve its operation. “Leonard Kleinrock is an outstanding scholar and a highly influential pioneer of the Internet,” said UCLA Chancellor Gene Block. “His groundbreaking research has been instrumental in improving society and the way we live our lives. This honor is richly deserved.”

Front panel of the Interface Message Processor at UCLA, the first node of the Internet. “Leonard Kleinrock’s contributions in laying the foundation of the Internet have helped change the very fabric of society for the better,” UCLA Engineering Dean Vijay K.” Dhir said. “Len’s achievements have brought great distinction to the school and to UCLA, and he is very deserving of this grand honor.” Kleinrock is receiving the National Medal of Science for “fundamental contributions to the mathematical theory of modern data networks, for the functional specification of packet switching which is the foundation of Internet Technology, for mentoring generations of students and for

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Science photos: Don Liebig, ASUCLA Photography

leading the commercialization of technologies that have transformed the world.” UCLA became the first node of what was known as the ARPANET on Sept. 2, 1969, when Kleinrock led a team of engineers in establishing the first network connection between two computers, ushering in a new method of global communication. The first network switch, known as an Interface Message Processor (IMP), arrived at UCLA on Labor Day weekend, 1969. The UCLA team led by Kleinrock had to connect the first host

By December 1969, four sites were connected: UCLA; the Stanford Research Institute; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the University of Utah. UCLA was in charge of conducting a series of extensive tests to debug the network. Under Kleinrock’s supervision, UCLA served for many years as the ARPANET Network Measurement Center. Kleinrock, the former chair of UCLA’s computer science department, has supervised the research of 47 doctoral graduates and is the recipient of many honors and awards.

We knew we were creating an important new technology... but we had no idea how truly momentous an event it was. computer to the IMP. This was a challenging task, as no such connection had ever been attempted before. However, by the end of the first day, bits began moving between the UCLA computer and the IMP. By the next day, researchers had messages moving between the machines. A month later, a second node was added at the Stanford Research Institute, and on Oct. 29, 1969, the first host-to-host message was launched from UCLA. “When we sent that first message, there weren’t any reporters, cameras, tape recorders or scribes to document that major event,” Kleinrock said. “We knew we were creating an important new technology that we expected would be of use to a seg-

In 1980, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. In 2003, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. UCLA faculty members who have received the National Medal of Science include geography professor and biological scientist Jared Diamond (2000), engineer and physicist C. Kumar Patel (1996), biochemist Elizabeth Neufeld (1994), Nobel Prize–winning chemist Donald Cram (1993), chemist Richard Bernstein (1989), chemist Saul Winstein (1970), meteorologist Jacob Bjerknes (1966), geophysicist William Rubey (1965) and

ment of the population, but we had no idea how truly momentous an event it was.” The ARPANET, which later became the Internet, was funded by the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency, created in 1958 to support scientific research in the United States.

To view videos of Leonard Kleinrock explaining packet switch-

physicist Julian Schwinger (1964).

ing and the early Internet, visit: www.engineer.ucla.edu/ news/2008/kleinrock_videos.htm

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faculty news

photo: Todd Cheney, ASUCLA Photography

Electrical Engineering Professor

awarded National Security Research Fellowship Matthew Chin

D

iana Huffaker, associate professor of electrical

Imagine making a 10x10x10 cube, using only golf balls

engineering, has been selected for the Depart-

and glue. As the golf balls are all the same size, each one

ment of Defense’s inaugural class of National

will line up neatly on top of, and right next to other golf

Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellows. The prestigious fellowship offers up to $3 million of

balls. Now, instead of only golf balls, can one still make a smooth cube with layers of golf balls followed by tennis

direct research support to conduct long-term, unclassified,

balls? The task is much more difficult as the larger tennis

basic research of strategic importance to the Department

balls won’t fit as neatly against the layer of golf balls.

of Defense. Huffaker, who is also the director of the Integrated

At the nanoscale level, this is a way to think of the challenge in creating ultra-smooth surfaces and layers

NanoMaterials Core Lab at the California NanoSys-

when using molecules that don’t easily match up perfectly

tems Institute, was selected for her work on “Exploring

and could cause stress on the materials.

Dissimilar and Nanomaterials Integration as a Plat-

Huffaker was one of only six fellows selected in the in-

form for New Medium and Long Wave Infrared Device

augural class. Nearly 150 academic institutions submitted

Functionality.”

more than 500 nominations in response to the Depart-

Compounds of the metal Gallium and metalloids Arsenic or Antimony, as well as other III-V compounds (so

ment of Defense’s call for proposals. The NSSEFF program provides grants to top-tier

named for their column designation in the periodic table)

researchers from U.S. universities to conduct long-term,

hold great potential as materials for new semi-conductor

unclassified, basic research of strategic importance to the

devices.

Department of Defense. These grants engage the next

However, because of the different physical properties of the two compounds, getting these nanoscale materials to self-assemble in a very smooth matter is one of Huffaker’s

generation of outstanding scientists and engineers in the most challenging technical issues facing the department. This basic research is crucial to applications such as

research interests and is what the NSSEFF-funded re-

sensors, surveillance, information security, cyber and

search will focus on.

force protection, and power projection.

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UCLA Engineering

adds New Faculty

This year, four talented researchers and teachers have joined the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. These new faculty members bring a diverse range of expertise in several emerging fields. Bioengineering Assistant Professor Dino Di Carlo PhD — University of California, Berkeley, 2006 Dino Di Carlo’s research is focused on improved methods to manipulate cells utilizing microfluidic systems and environments. This is to enable novel applications in basic biology, diagnostics, and cell engineering. Prior to UCLA, Di Carlo was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Engineering in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Rob N. Candler PhD — Stanford Univeristy, 2006 Rob Candler’s research interests are in the design, modeling, and technology development of micro/nanosystems, fundamental limitations of N/MEMS, and the interface of microsystems with biology. Prior to joining UCLA, Candler was a senior MEMS research engineer at Bosch Research and Technology Center in Palo Alto, Calif. and a consulting assistant professor at Stanford University.

Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Jin Hyung Lee PhD — Stanford University, 2004 Jin Hyung Lee’s research interests are in neural information processing, advanced imaging techniques for biomedical applications, neurosciences and neural-engineering; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the development of novel image contrast strategies. Prior to joining UCLA, Lee was an engineering research associate at Stanford’s Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Laboratory. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor Richard E. Wirz PhD — Caltech, 2005 Richard E. Wirz’s research interests are in advanced propulsion concepts; including Ion, Hall, Colloid, and Field Emission Electric Propulsion thrusters, new cathode technologies, spacecraft integration and mission design. His research also includes alternative energy technologies. Prior to joining UCLA, Wirz was a senior engineer in the Advanced Propulsion Technologies Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he was also the lead for solar thermal energy technologies. He developed the world’s first miniature noble gas ion thruster (MiXI) which is now an enabling technology for a wide range of new missions. He also developed the first self-consistent, multi-dimensional plasma discharge model for ion thrusters.

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faculty news

Faculty Awards 2007 – 2008 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award: Tatiana Segura, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Eric Pei-Yu Chiou and William Klug, both assistant professors of mechanical and aerospace engineering. The award, among the highest of honors for young faculty, recognizes the dual commitment of scholarship and education.

4 Three UCLA Engineering faculty members have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, among the highest professional distinctions awarded to an engineer. M.C. Frank Chang, professor of electrical engineering, Yahya Rahmat-Samii, distinguished professor of electrical engineering and William W-G Yeh, distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering were among 65 U.S. members and nine foreign associates who were elected in 2008.

4 Electrical engineering assistant professor and Samueli Fellow Benjamin Williams was selected to receive a Young Faculty Award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The program supports revolutionary research ideas proposed by young non-tenured faculty members.

4 Two young faculty members of the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science — Eddie Kohler, assistant professor of computer science, and Yi Tang, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering — received the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The award is considered the country’s highest honor for engineers and scientists who are in the early part of their careers.

4 P irouz Kavehpour, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the prestigious Young Investigator Award from the U.S. Army. The objective of the program is to attract outstanding young university faculty members to Army research, to support their research, and to encourage their teaching and research careers.

4 In October 2007, Yi Tang was one of 20 young scholars to receive the Packard Fellowship. The fellowship program funded by the David and Lucille Packard Foundation supports unusually creative researchers early in their careers in the hopes of developing scientific leaders. And Tang was also awarded the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. Given by the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, this awards program supports talented young faculty in the chemical sciences who demonstrate leadership in research and education.

4 Three faculty members have won the highly competitive and prestigious National Science Foundation’s 2008

4 Chris Niemman, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Award from the Department of Energy to fund his research on ultra-bright laser-based X-ray sources.

4

J udea Pearl, professor of computer science and director of the Cognitive Science Laboratory, has won the 2008 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science. The Medal was presented in recognition of Pearl’s work in creating the first general algorithms for

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computing and reasoning with uncertain evidence, allowing computers to uncover associations and causal connections hidden within millions of observations. In May, Pearl received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Chapman University. Pearl also served as Chapman’s keynote speaker at its undergraduate commencement ceremony.

4

M.C. Frank Chang was awarded the 2008 Pan Wen-Yuen Award, considered the most prestigious technical award in Taiwan. Chang was honored for his “fundamental contributions to the heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) device and integrated circuits development for wireless communications.

4 Women in Technology International (WITI) selected computer science professor Deborah Estrin, holder of the Jon Postel Chair in Computer Networks and director of the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing, as one of its five recipients of the organization’s 2008 Hall of Fame award. The award is designed to honor the outstanding contributions women make to the scientific and technological communities that improve our society.

4 The Society for Industrial Microbiology (SIM) selected James Liao, Chancellor’s Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, to receive its 2008 Charles Thom Award. The award recognizes “individuals who have made one or more outstanding research contributions in industrial microbiology and/or biotechnology.”

4 Yoram Cohen, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, was named a 2008 recipient of the Ann C. Rosenfield Distinguished Community Partnership Prize. The program honors outstanding examples of engaged scholarship in which UCLA faculty or staff have collaborated with Los Angeles non-profit organizations to address issues of community concern.

4 ASME selected Vijay K. Dhir, dean and professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, to receive the 2008 Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award. He was recognized for “seminal and path-breaking contributions to science and engineering of phase-change heat and mass transfer with boiling and multiple flows, which have had a long-lasting and significant impact on a diverse set of critical applications.”

4

 uo-Nan Liou, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric K Sciences and director of UCLA’s Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering, was recognized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for his substantial contributions to the 2007 report that led to the IPCC being awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize with former Vice President Al Gore. Liou holds a joint appointment in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

continued on page 36

in memoriam

Gerald J. Popek Gerald J. Popek, an Internet pioneer and a world-class technology leader who played a key role in software development and networking, passed away on July 20 at his home in Bel Air after a courageous battle with stomach cancer. He was 61 years old. Popek was a faculty member in the UCLA Department of Computer Science throughout most of his professional career. He specialized in computer security, distributed Unix systems, file replication and mobile computing. Popek is survived by his wife, Paulene; two children, Sarah and Darren; daughter-in-law, Lauren; brother, Tom; two sisters, Marianne and Beverly; and mother, Sophie. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the Gerald J. Popek Scholarship Fund at UCLA Engineering. Please contact jerryrsvp@support.ucla.edu for information about the scholarship fund. http://www.engineer.ucla.edu/news/2008/popek_memoriam.htm

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Student News

2008

senior dinner

1

2

6

7

8

1 Peter Jonna, 2008 Senior Class Campaign Chair. 2 Mechanical and aerospace engineering professor Anthony Mills, who was selected as Professor of the Year by the Engineering Society of UCLA.

3 Patrick Ho ’05 (civil engineering and economics), MS ’06, ASCE Alumni Advisory Board Chair.

3

9

10

4 Asad M. Madni ’68, MS ’72, president of the UCLA Engineering Alumni Association, 2007-08.

5 Subhan Ali ’07 6-10 UCLA students performed at the senior dinner including: Halie Lane, Diana Salier, Drew Kirkpatrick, Sarkis Khachatryan and Nick Paredes

photos: David Savinski

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4

5

This could be your UCLA Engineering Scholar Imagine making a permanent gift of an educational opportunity for deserving students in need. With a gift of $25,000 you can establish an endowed scholarship at UCLA Engineering that the School will match for a total $50,000 endowment. Due to the generosity of an anonymous donor, a matching gift fund of $1.3 million has been established to fund scholarships for undergraduate students. By leveraging this gift, the School is providing the opportunity for you to create a permanently endowed scholarship at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. Now is the time to create a legacy at UCLA Engineering showing your vision of access to higher education. For information on how you can take advantage of this opportunity, please contact Leti McNeill, Director of Development, in the Office of External Affairs at UCLA Engineering: (310) 206-0678 or hsseasgiving@support.ucla.edu.

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Student News

Student Profile:

Drew Kirkpatrick

D

rew Kirkpatrick started at UCLA as a biochemis-

talk about medicine this fervently? I decided that I needed

try major, with designs on a career path in medi-

to find what I was truly passionate about.”

cine. But thanks in part to a freshman music class,

By the end of the summer prior to his sophomore year,

Kirkpatrick graduated in 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in

he decided to switch to civil engineering — which would

civil engineering, with a UCLA master’s soon to follow.

combine problem-solving with the study of how societies

Along the way, he emerged as a student leader, a scholar-

are physically created and function.

ship recipient and an award winner. His switch to civil engineering came during a freshman year performing arts class, where music professor

Once in engineering, Kirkpatrick quickly found himself involved in several student groups, including the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 2006-07, Kirkpatrick oversaw the ASCE concrete canoe project. He came away impressed by the group’s collaborative spirit and how that could translate into realworld engineering projects. “I was hooked,” he said. “From that point on all I have wanted to do is understand, design, and build.” In 2008, Kirkpatrick was honored with the Departmental Scholar Award and the Richard B. Nelson Memorial Scholarship. This past summer, he interned at MKA, a Seattle-based structural engineering firm. His career goals are to continue to learn how to design safe and economic buildings/ infrastructure that have a positive aesthetic and environmental impact on their communities. “Every day I am learning something new and doing something I have never done before, which is wonderful and I thank UCLA for giving me the confidence and skills necessary to see problems as opportunities.”

Drew Kirkpatrick photo: David Savinski

And while he has set his sights high Kirkpatrick does have an escape from his engineering career. He has played music and sung since he was in high school. Currently, he’s

Robert Winter’s lecture mixed the booming notes of a Franz

in a band called Streets on Fire. The group has already

Schubert piano composition with his discussion of what

earned gigs at Hollywood clubs and performed at the

made the classic work timeless.

UCLA Engineering 2008 Senior Dinner. They plan to

“I remember thinking that he loves what he does.” Kirk-

record an album.

patrick recalled. “Did I love medicine this much? Could I

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L: Margaret, Campbell and Franklin on top of Uhuru Peak, the highest point on Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. R: The Chiang siblings with their parents Della and Johnson at the 2008 UCLA Engineering commencement. photos: The Chiang Family

Three Siblings, One Alma Mater:

Campbell, Margaret and Franklin Chiang Sukhie Bal and Matthew Chin

F

or siblings Campbell, Margaret and Franklin Chi-

working in the Photonics Research Lab under electrical

ang, UCLA Engineering had the perfect combina-

engineering professor Jia-Ming Liu. She earned her PhD

tion of strong academics and career opportunities.

this past spring.

“Education and following one’s passions have always

been encouraged in the family,” Margaret said. Supported by a strong sense of team unity, the Chiangs left Taiwan to pursue their passion for learning. Oldest brother Campbell ’01 was attracted to UCLA’s

Margaret is currently at Northrop Grumman participating in the company’s competitive Future Technical Leaders Program, a three-year technical leadership-track program that offers training throughout different areas of the company. Franklin ’04 expects to receive his PhD this fall.

computer science and engineering program for its academ-

Working under electrical engineering professor Jack Judy,

ic strength and successful alumni. After graduating magna

he is developing micrometer-scale sensors used to explore

cum laude, he went on to Duke University, School of Law.

high-density plasmas.

“UCLA Engineering’s national reputation greatly im-

“UCLA is moving in the right direction with their multi-

proved my competitiveness both in the law school and job

disciplinary approach to the engineering curriculum,” he

applicant pools,” he said.

said. “The majority of challenges we face today cannot

Campbell practiced patent law in New York for three

be solved by a single field of thought alone, and I think

years. He relocated back to California in 2007 and now

exposing students to project-based, team-oriented learning

practices at Perkins Coie LLP in Menlo Park, Calif., where he

is very helpful.”

specializes in the electrical, electronic and software fields. Margaret ’02, PhD ’08, entered UCLA as an undeclared major. During freshman year, she discovered an interest for math and physics and decided to transfer into electrical

When asked about what kind of advice they would give to current UCLA Engineering students, all three Chiangs had a similar answer. “Study hard, but also take advantage of extracurricu-

engineering. Campbell’s presence at UCLA Engineering

lar activities,” said Campbell, echoing the sentiments of

influenced her both to come to UCLA and then to switch

Margaret and Franklin “Expand your horizons and make

to engineering. She continued at UCLA in graduate school,

lifelong friends.”

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Student News

Faculty Awards 2007 – 2008 continued from page 31

4 The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) awarded the 2008 Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer to Laurent Pilon, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering. Pilon was recognized for “significant contributions to heat, mass and radiation transfer in foams, nanocomposite materials and biological systems.”

4 Tom Sabol, adjunct associate professor of civil and environmental engineering has received the 2008 George Winter Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He was recognized for his contributions as a practitioner, code developer and educator in the area of seismic design of steel structures and his effort to improve the community through church activities.

4 Demetri Terzopoulos, Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science, received the inaugural IEEE Computer Vision Significant Researcher Award for “his pioneering and sustained research on deformable models and their applications.” This prize was introduced as the definitive mid-career achievement award in the computer vision field. In 2007, Terzopoulos was elected as a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for “contributions to computer graphics and vision.” The ACM fellows program celebrates the exceptional contributions of the leading members in the computing field.

4

J onathan P. Stewart, professor and vice chair of civil and environmental engineering has been awarded the 2008 Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize. Stewart was recognized for his research in geotechnical earthquake engineering, with emphasis on soil-structure interaction, site effects on earthquake ground motions, and seismic ground failure of unsaturated soil.

was elected for “contributions to speech perception and production modeling and their applications.” Diana Huffaker was elected for “development of optoelectronic materials and processing.” Jia-Ming Liu was elected for “contributions to the control and applications of nonlinear dynamics of lasers. Mani B. Srivastava was elected for “contributions to energy-aware wireless communications and sensor networking.”

4 Tony Chan, the assistant director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the National Science Foundation, was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Chan, the former dean of physical sciences at UCLA, holds joint appointments in biomedical engineering and computer science. Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.

4 The June 2008 issue of Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry magazine named bioengineering professor Warren Grundfest as one of the 100 notable people in the medical device industry. Grundfest was recognized for his pioneering work on pulse ultraviolet excimer lasers for biomedical applications.

4 Todd Millstein, assistant professor of computer science, and Mihaela van der Schaar, associate professor of electrical engineering, are among the recipients of the 2008 IBM Faculty Awards. The competitive worldwide program is intended to foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities worldwide and those in IBM research, development and services organizations.

4 Daniel Yang, professor of mechanical and aerospace 4 Four electrical engineering faculty members have been elected as fellows of IEEE. The grade of fellow recognizes persons with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Abeer Alwan

engineering has been elected as a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Yang has made significant contributions to the advances of manufacturing automation and mechanical design.

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Intracellular Drug Trafficking continued from page 7

Three of PEIR’s team members: Computer science graduate student Nicolai Petersen, information studies graduate student Katie Shilton and CENS researcher Vinayak Naik. photos: Phil Channing

CENS unveils Personal Environmental Impact Report continued from page 9 By employing only the increasingly common location sensing capabilities of modern phones, CENS wants PEIR and projects like it to work on the devices that people already own and use. The project is part of the CENS urban and participatory sensing research program, which aims to make everyday mobile phones act as sensors and collect data for their owners. Applications for participatory sensing range from community “case-making” to systems like PEIR, which promote personal engagement and reflection. “At its core, participatory sensing is data collection; well, data collection and analysis,” Hansen said. “The motivations for these activities, the social processes that govern how they evolve in time, and the eventual uses of the data are all quite different than the data collection you will encounter, say, in a lab class. Instead, participatory sensing foregrounds the involvement of citizens and community groups in “sensing,” or documenting, life in their neighborhoods and cities. It can range from personal observations that are not meant to be shared, to the combination of data from hundreds or even thousands

Deming’s research group, which had pioneered a new method for synthesizing well-defined polypeptides (polymers of amino acids) on a large scale, recently demonstrated that polypeptides comprised of the amino acids lysine and leucine could self-assemble into vesicles with favorable properties. These vesicles were stable up to 80°C, could encapsulate polar molecules with negligible leakage, and could be prepared with controllable diameters ranging from 50 nm to 1 mm. These vesicles, however, were unable to enter cells. Since previously reported studies have shown that short polymers of the amino acid arginine could transport cargo into cells, Deming, Kamei and two of their students, Eric Holowka and Victor Sun, replaced lysine with arginine in the polypeptides. The hypothesis was that this replacement would not disrupt the formation of the vesicles, since lysine and arginine have the same charge, while imparting to the vesicle the arginine property of entering cells. The Deming and Kamei research groups were indeed able to “kill two birds with one stone”, as they demonstrated that these new polypeptides with arginine could easily form vesicles, and that they were able to transport hydrophilic cargo into both endothelial and epithelial cells. They are currently investigating the trafficking properties of these vesicles and their ability to deliver therapeutics to cells.

that reveal patterns across an entire city.” For more information on PEIR, visit the website: http://peir.cens.ucla.edu/ CENS has also released an explanatory video on the participatory sensing concept, available at: http://youtube.com/user/CENSVideo.

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annual report 2007-08

2007-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Enrollment 2007-08 Undergraduate 2,783 Master’s 606 PhD 782 Total 4,171

Dollars by Purpose 2007-08 Programs/Research 53% Discretionary 6% Faculty 6%

Degrees Awarded (2008 projections) Undergraduate 454 Master’s 361 PhD 152 Total 967

Students 10%

Full-Time Faculty: 158 Capital 25%

Phd:Faculty ratio: 4.9:1 Gifts to UCLA Engineering by Purpose 2007-08: $19,583,920

Publications: U  CLA Engineering faculty published 7 books, 29 chapters, 280 journal articles and 331 articles in conference proceedings. Editorial Postions: UCLA Engineering faculty held 39 editorships at professional journals and 46 associate editor positions. Contracts and Grants Received: $74,480,842

Faculty Patents 2007-08 Mario Gerla, professor of computer science, Scott Seongwook Lee, and M. Yahya Sanadidi were awarded a patent for a method and apparatus for TCP with faster recovery.

Ali Sayed, professor of electrical engineering, and Mansour Aldajani, were awarded a patent for Adaptive multi-bit delta and sigma-delta modulation

Robert Hicks, professor chemical and biomolecular engineering, and Steven Babayan were awarded a patent on a method of processing a substrate.

John Villasenor, professor of electrical engineering, and Christopher Jones, were awarded a patent for decoding low density parity codes.

Chih-Ming Ho, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, Jun Huang and Tza-Huei Wang, were awarded a patent for electrochemical detection of mismatch nucleic acids.

Kang Wang, professor of electrical engieering, and Alexander Khitun were awarded a patent for Power consumption minimization in magnetic random access memory by using the effect of hole-mediated ferromagnetism.

Tatsuo Itoh, professor of electrical engineering, Christophe Caloz and Atsushi Sanada were awarded a patent for a Zeroeth-order resonator. Behzad Rahzavi, professor of elecetrical engineering, was awarded a patent for high-speed clock and data recovery circuit.

Wang, Khitun and Prakash Koonath were awarded a patent for Method and apparatus for stability control using fast excitation in circuits having elements with negative differential resistance Ming C. Wu, adjunct professor mechanical and aerospace engineering and professor at UC Berkeley, was awarded a patent for compact

wavelength-selective optical crossconnect. Wu and Jui Che Tsai, were awarded a patent for Wavelength-selective 1×N2 switches with twodimensional input/output fiber arrays. Ya Hong Xie, professor of materials science, was awarded a patent for a method for producing dislocation-free strained crystalline films. Xie and Jianyong Ouyang were awarded a patent for a method for chemical vapor deposition in high aspect ratio spaces. Yang Yang, professor of materials science, along with Jri Lee, were awarded a patent for memory devices based on electric field programmable films. Kung Yao, professor of electrical engineering, and Aliazam Abbasfar were awarded a patent for ARA type protograph codes.

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Alumni Academic Appointments Halil Berberoglu PhD ’08 Mechanical Engineering University of Texas at Austin (Advisor: Laurent Pilon) Haibo Dong PhD ‘02 Mechanical and Materials Engineering Wright State University, Ohio (Advisor: Xiaolin Zhong) Stevan Dubljevic PhD ’05 Chemical and Materials Engineering University of Alberta, Canada (Advisor: Panagiotis D. Christofides) Gunes Ercal-Ozakya PhD ’08 Computer Science University of Kansas at Lawrence (Advisor: Adam Meyerson)

Chi-Ying Lin PhD ’08 Department of Mechanical Engineering National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Advisor Tsu-Chin Tsao) Thomas Selerland PhD ’97 Mechanical Engineering American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (Advisor: Ann R. Karagozian)

Other Academic Appointments Yiannis Andreopoulos Electronic and Electrical Engineering University College London, United Kingdom (Post-Doctoral Advisor: Mihaela van der Schaar)

Erik Menke Natural Sciences Christine Goulet PhD ’04 UC Merced Lecturer and Researcher (Post-Doctoral Advisor: Bruce Civil and Environmental Engineering Dunn) UCLA Ganesh Siriam (Advisor: Jonathan P. Stewart) Chemical and Biomolecular Naser Hamdi PhD ‘03 Engineering Biomedical Engineering University of Maryland, College Jordan University of Science and Park Technology (Post-Doctoral Advisor: James C. (Advisor: Harold G. Liao) Monbouquette) Eran Socher Ming-Tsung Hung PhD ’07 Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Department Tel Aviv University, Israel National Central University, (Post-Doctoral Advisor: M.C. Taiwan Frank Chang) (Advisor: Y. Sungtaek Ju)

Endowed Chair Holders

Jongsun Kim PhD ‘06 Electronic and Electrical Engineering Hongik University, South Korea Norman E. Friedmann Chair (advisor: M.C. Frank Chang) in Knowledge Sciences — Carlo Zaniolo Kristina Jameson PhD ’08 Aerospace Engineering Ben Rich Lockheed Martin Chair Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in Aeronautics — Chih-Ming Ho (Advisor: Adrienne Lavine) Nippon Sheet Glass Company Na Li PhD ’08 Chair in Materials Science — Mechanical and Aerospace Bruce Dunn Engineering University of Miami (Florida) Northrop Grumman Opto— (Advisor: Chih-Ming Ho) Electronics Chair in Electrical Engineering — Eli Yablonovitch Sierin Lim PhD ’05 Bioengineering Northrop Grumman Chair in Nanyang Technological University, Microwave and Millimeter Wave Singapore Electronics — Tatsuo Itoh (Advisor: Harold G. Monbouquette) Northrop Grumman Chair in Electro— Magnetics — Yahya Ramat—Samii

Jonathan B. Postel Chair in Networking — Deborah Estrin Raytheon Chair in Physical Electronics — Kang Wang Raytheon Company Chair in Manufacturing Engineering — H. Thomas Hahn Rockwell International Chair in Engineering — J. John Kim William Frederick Seyer Chair in Materials Electrochemistry — Jane Chang

UCLA Engineering Dean’s Advisory Council CO-CHAIRS Mr. Sam Iacobellis ’63 Deputy Chairman (Ret.) Rockwell International Dr. Henry Samueli ’76, MS ’76, PhD ’80 Co-founder Broadcom Corporation MEMBERS Dr. Madhavan Balachandran Amgen Inc. Dr. William F. Ballhaus President & CEO (Ret.) The Aerospace Corporation Ms. Janice Chaffin ’78, MBA ’81 Group President Consumer Business Unit Symantec Corporation Dr. Frank Chang Professor Electrical Engineering UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Dr. Derek Cheung Director Institute for Technology Advancement UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science

Dr. Vijay K. Dhir Dean UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Dr. Roy Doumani ’57 Professor Molecular & Medical Pharmacology UCLA Mr. James L. Easton ’59 Chairman & CEO Jas D. Easton, Inc. Dr. Matthew Ganz President Boeing Phantom Works Dr. B. John Garrick MS ’62, PhD ’68 President & CEO (Ret.) PLG, Inc. Dr. Eugene Gritton ’63, MS ’65, PhD ’67 Vice President & Director RAND Corporation Mr. Jon Jones ’83 President Space & Airborne Systems Raytheon Dr. Leonard Kleinrock Distinguished Professor Computer Science UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Dr. Leslie Lackman Director Industrial Relations UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Mr. Jeff Lawrence ’79 President & CEO Clivia Systems Dr. Steve Liedle ’87 Deputy Director Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mr. Rajeev Madhavan Chairman & CEO Magma Design Automation

Mr. Aaron Cohen ’58 Vice Chairman & Founder National Technical Systems

Dr. Alfred E. Mann ’49 Chairman & CEO Advanced Bionics Corporation

Mr. Lucien “Al” Couvillon, Jr. ’62, MS ’66 President & CEO Serpentis Corporation

Dr. Ray Milano CEO Xindium Technologies, Inc.

Mr. Richard Croxall CERT ’90 Vice Preisdent (Ret.) Northrop Grumman Corporation

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annual report 2007-08

Dr. Pankaj Patel Senior Vice President & General Manager Service Provider Group Cisco Systems, Inc. Dr. Gregory Pottie Professor & Associate Dean Electrical Engineering UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Mr. Harold Ray ’63 Executive Vice President Power Systems Southern California Edison Company Dr. Rami Razouk Senior Vice President Engineering & Technology The Aerospace Corporation Mr. Edward K. Rice ’53 Chairman CTS Cement Manufacturing Company Dr. Kevin Riley President Teledyne Scientific & Imaging, LLC Dr. Dwight Streit MS ’83, PhD ’86 Vice President Microelectronics Technology Northrop Grumman Corporation Dr. Ronald Sugar ’68, MS ’69, PhD ’71 Chairman and CEO Northrop Grumman Corporation Mr. Lawrence E. Tannas, Jr. ’59, MS ’61 President Tannas Electronics Mr. Murli Tolaney Chairman MWH Global, Inc. Mr. Steve Trilling CERT ’00 Vice President Symantec Research Labs Symantec Corporation

Boelter Society 2007—2008 The Boelter Society recognizes those who show vision and leadership in enhancing engineering excellence at UCLA. Alumni, parents, and friends who make an annual gift of $1,000 or more demonstrate their support of the future of UCLA Engineering and serve as an inspiration to others. This Honor Roll gratefully acknowledges gifts made to the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. Dean’s Visionaries — $1,000,000 or more Anonymous Henry ’76, MS ’76, PhD ’80 & Susan Samueli

’86, MBA ’90 Burdorf

Elliot PhD ’66 & Barbara Axelband

Ajit Choudhury MS ’67, PhD ’69

Mark MS ’92, PhD ’95 & Sharon Berman ’91

Michael ’78, MS ’80 & Elena Deutsch

Dorothea Frederking

Edsel ME ’73 & Lorie Dunford

Marjorie Friedlander

Ferdinand ’77 & Lennie Fam

Rodney MS ’66, PhD ’69 & Nancy Gibson

Ken Friedman ’61

Kevin Hall Linda Katehi MS ’81, PhD ’84 & Spyros Tseregounis MS ’82, PhD ’84 Francis Kishi ’53, MS ’58, PhD ’63 Sandro ’75 & Eleanor Lee

Navin & Pratima Doshi

Stephen ’55 & Suzanne Gilbert William Goodin MS ’71, PhD ’75 & Caroline Dockrell Guy Gregoris Paul ’53 & Gloria ’61 Griffin

Rosita Mal

Eugene ’63, MS ’65, PhD ’67 & Gwendolyn Gritton

George ’63, MS ’68, PhD ’90 & Jo Ann ’63 Rebane

Ernest Harris ’49

David Sabih MS ’62, JD ’73 Eve Schooler MS ’88 & Robert Felderman MS ’86, PhD ’91 Justin Sobaje ’99, MS ’00, JD ’04

Carl Hess & Tracy Pirnack Robin ’89, MS ’91, PhD ’95 & Celia Joshi John MS ’67, PhD ’69 & Elouise Junkins

Dean’s Ambassadors — $100,000 to $999,999

Eugene ’68 & Marilyn Stein

Sheldon & Miriam Adelson

Boelter Sponsors — $5,000 to $9,999

Kevin ’83, MS ’84, ENG ’87 & Susie Chan

Paul Baran MS ’59

James ’59 & Phyllis Easton Christopher Ferguson ’86, PhD ’99

James Barrie ’83, MS ’85, PhD ’88 & Leslie Momoda ’85, MS ’87, PhD ’90

Jau-Hsiung Huang MS ’85, PhD ’88 & Alice Chang MBA ’88

Josephine Cheng ’75, MS ’77 & Michael Pong

Henry Nicholas ’82, MS ’85, PhD ’98

Alan Cutter ’61, MBA ’64

James O’Donohue & Beverly Sarver

Stacey Nicholas ’85, MS ’87

Dennis MS ’69, PhD ’82 & Leslie Drag

Donald O’Neal ’82

Charles MS ’80, ENG ’82, PhD ’85 & Deborah Reames

Eric & Margaret Johnson

Thomas MS ’82, ENG ’84 & Carrie ’82 Sabol

Edward & Linda Rice Shioupyn Shen PhD ’91 & Waishan Wu

William Kingsley ’72, MS ’73, PhD ’79

Shiva Shivakumar ’94

Carey Nachenberg ’95, MS ’95

Akira Shinoda ’67

Tien-Tsai PhD ’68 & Jane Yang PhD ’71

Jerry Ogawa ’69

Tom ’50, MS ’60 & Nobuko Shiokari

Dean’s Scholars — $50,000 to $99,999

John MS ’66, PhD ’68 & Pat Peller

Julia Sizto

Marvin Rubinstein ’53

Ning & Minda Sizto

Jacquelyn Schoell

William & Judy Snow

Lee ’67 & Sue Stewart

Jay Stegman MS ’59

Lawrence ’59, MS ’61 & Carol Tannas

Ronald ’68, MS ’69, PhD ’71 & Valerie ’71 Sugar

Benton & Wanlyn Bejach Thomas Kwon ’92, MS ’95, PhD ’98 Boelter Investors — $25,000 to $49,999

Mr. Nick Uros ME ’84, CERT ’93 Vice President Advanced Concepts & Technology Space & Airborne Systems Raytheon

Raymond Beggs

Dr. John H. Warner ’63, MS ’65, PhD ’67 Venture Partner Limestone Ventures

B. John Garrick MS ’62, PhD ’68

Dr. David Whelan MS ’78, PhD ’83 Vice President & General Manager Deputy to the President Boeing Corporation

Boelter Fellows — $10,000 to $24,999

Per & Eva Borgstrom Aaron ’58 & Nancy Cohen Ralph ’50 & Marjorie ’46 Crump Jack ’63 & Rhodine Gifford Nhan & Hoai Levan Marek Przystupa & Barbara Cudzillo-Szafranska

Monte ’60 & Ruthellen Toole

Melvin Kappler

David ’80 & Sandra Triolo Charles Weber PhD ’64 John PhD ’87 & Marilyn Wiles Karlson Yuen Boelter Associates — $2,500 to $4,999 David Banks ’80, MS ’81 & Judith Blaski-Banks John MS ’70, PhD ’78 & Mary Barr

Benjamin Wang ’90 & Diana Tran Wang

Stevan Birnbaum ’65

Feng Wang MA ’65

Lesley Brey & Randall Kam ’80

Anne ’89 & Russell Yee

Gary ’87, MS ’89, PhD ’93 & Sherry

Michael & Linda Boggeri

Don MS ’85, PhD ’89 & Jacqueline Kendall David & Michele Kerchman Michael Kopp Jeff Lawrence ’79 & Diane Troth ’80, MS ’81 Letia Lewis & Todd King Craig MS ’89 & Nancy Moles

Rhonda Sakaida ’81, MS ’84 Peter & Haya Sender

James & Kathy Terranova John & Ann Wasson Kenneth & Elaine Wolfe Boelter Contributors — $1,000 to $2,499 John ’62 & Arlene Adams Darren ’89 & Angela Aghabeg Song-Haur MS ’81, PhD ’86 & Agnes An Anonymous Ethan PhD ’71 & Barbara Aronoff

415926535 8979 323846 2643383279 5028841971 6939937510 5820974944 5923078164 0628620899 8628034825 3421170679 8214808651 3282306647 0938446095 5058223172 5359408128 4811174502 8410270193 8521105559 6446229489 5493038

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Lisa Barker ’84

Gagandeep Grewal ’93 Jacob ’54 & Wanda Grossman

Keith ’84, MBA ’95 & Nanette Leonard ’84

Amit Patel MS ’84 & Neeta Saheba

Richard PhD ’70 & Linda Baty Tricia Bell

L.C. ’48 & Maryann Guthrie

Marshall Lerner & Jacqueline Fabe

Jack PhD ’71 & Rebecca Pearson

Glen ’60 & Jean Boe

Arnold Hackett ’87

Yao Li

Daniel ’80 & Lisa ’81 Peterson Gregory Pottie

Charles Brallier ’47

William PhD ’70 & Myrna Hant ’64, PhD ’87

Margaret Lin David Lo & Michelle Wang

Steven Powell ’00

Earl ’52 & Beverly Butcher

Frank Hanzel ’79, MS ’81

Mark ’77 & Terry Lupfer

Paul MS ’74 & Kathleen Chandler

Adam Harmetz ’05

Nancy ’78 & Kenneth Privitt ’77, MS ’80

Nan-Rong MS ’85, PhD ’90 & Ming Chen

Wai ’78, MS ’79 & Sou Ho

Kenneth ’83, MS ’84 & Linda Ma ’84

Louis MS ’71 & Geraldine Cheng

Vincent ’90 & Amanda Hoenigman ’90

Gary MacDougal ’58 & Charlene Gehm

Alfonso ’51, MS ’63, PhD ’70 & Dolores Ratcliffe

Abraham Chuang ’97

Linden Hsu ’91

Joseph Rice ’88

John Cooke

William Huber ME ’75

Michael PhD ’83 & Donna Mackay ’80

Nancy & John Cooke

Andrew ’75 & Helen ’77 Hyman

Janis Salin ’76

Douglas ’73 & Lisa Corbett

Sam MS ’63 & Helene Iacobellis

Asad ’69, MS ’72 & Gowhartaj Madni

James & Elizabeth Cox

Mary ’70 & Kenneth ME ’78 Iliff

Stephen ’68 & Beth Crocker

Stephen Ishmael MS ’76

Bovornrat & Qing Darakananda

Reginald MS ’80 & Kathryn Jue

Vincent PhD ’73 & Jeannette Darcy

Stefan Kampe ’84 & Rita Crabtree-Kampe

Robert MS ’60, PhD ’65 & Helen ’60 Dell-Imagine

Garfield MS ’63, PhD ’68 & Mary Kang

Patrick Dennis ’76, MBA ’82, JD ’82 & Nancy Dunaetz ’79

Andrew Katz ’69, JD ’72

Richard & Liz Bordow

Ping—Woon Man MS ’88, ENG ’92 Roxann Marumoto ’85, MS ’87 & David Julifs John & Cindy McCauley Joseph ’67, MS ’69, PhD ’72 & Gail Mills

James Payne MS ’62, PhD ’65

Robert Rankine PhD ’70

Phillip Rosengard ’73 Van ’74, MS ’75 & Susan ’75 Schultz Ernest-Joachim Selzer ’61 Takashi ’69 & Leslie Shiozaki Michael ’73, MS ’75, PhD ’80 & Charlene Sievers Yet ’53 & Marion Siu

Terry Montgomery MS ’79

David Smith MS ’68

Thomas ENG ’82 & Elaine Kennedy

James Murray ’70, MS ’71 & Carol Donald

Bart Sokolow ’70, MS ’73, DEnv ’77 & Harriet Scharf

Douglas Dethlefsen PhD ’73

James ’57 & Cynthia Killackey

Don ’64 & Deborah Myers

Paul Eggert MS ’77, PhD ’80 & Stacey Byrnes

Sheung PhD ’82 & Chin Kim

Mas ’53 & Dorothy Nagami

Craig Somerton ’76, MS ’79, PhD ’82

Yong Kim MS ’83, PhD ’87

Thomas ’58, PhD ’68 & Heidi Fong

Jonathan MS ’88 & Michelle Kong

Richard ’58, MS ’60, PhD ’63 & Rose Nesbit ’57

Michael Fontaine ’70 Vincent Gau MS ’98, PhD ’01

George ’62, MS ’68 & Eulalia Kunkel

Arnold Gaunt ’86

John PhD ’77 & Yuen Lai

John & Christa Gerretsen

Simon MS ’70, PhD ’74 & Amy Lam

Thomas Goebel PhD ’69 Odell ’61, MS ’67, PhD ’76 & Loretta Graham

Robert ’70 & Patricia ’70 Leamy Byeong Lee PhD ’82

Bob ’72, JD ’75 & Judy Green

Andrew Newman MS ’95, PhD ’05 & Amy Lam ’94 Robert ’84 & Renee Nunn Howard ’71, MS ’72, PhD ’76 & Deborah Nussbaum Robert Oshiro ’81 William ’73, PhD ’81 & Rita Overman

Giuseppe & Maria Staffaroni Peter Staudhammer ’55, MS ’56, PhD ’57 Dwight MS ’83, PhD ’86 & Deborah Streit Jeremy ’98, MBA ’07 & Midco Switzer Winny Tan MS ’04, PhD ’07 Damian Toohey ’01 Steven MBA ’77 & Deborah Umphreys Frank Vernese MS ’75 Charles Waespy PhD ’67

UCLA Engineering Fall 2008 Calendar October 17-19 Parents’ Weekend UCLA Campus October 22 CENS 6th Annual Research Review Tom Bradley International Center Engineering Alumni Reception at Yahoo! Sunnyvale, Calif.

November 7 Engineering Awards Dinner The Beverly WilshireA Four Seasons Hotel NOVEMBER 10 Infosys Technologies campus visit Kerckhoff Grand Salon

For details: http://www.engineer.ucla.edu/events/

Richard & Ellen Wesel Lonnie Wilson MS ’69, PhD ’73

December 12-13 Water Resources Systems Analysis: The Contributions of William Yeh CNSI Conference Facility

Ben and Betty Wu Shigeru Yoshida Michael MS ’95 & Theresa MA ’94 Young Chen MS ’71, PhD ’74 & Amy ’74 Yu We have made every effort to ensure the completeness and accuracy of this Honor Roll. If you discover an error or omission, please call our Office of External Affairs at (310) 206—0678 or email hsseasgiving@support.ucla.edu.

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Office of External Affairs 7256 Boelter Hall, Box 951600 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600

E n g i n ee r i n g Awa r d s d i n n e r Friday, November 7, 2008 | The Be verly Wilshire

Inquiries: 310-206-0678, hsseasevents@suppor t.ucla.edu


UCLA Engineer Fall 2008