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Winter Quarter

Center for Jewish Studies

12 pm • Monday, January 10, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

To the End of the Land Alan Mintz (Jewish Theological Seminary) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Annual Calendar of Events 2010 - 2011

The Israeli author David Grossman was in the midst of writing a novel about the anxieties of parents of soldiers when his own son was killed at the end of the Second Lebanon War. To the End of the Land balances a sobering dissection of the pervasive effects of trauma with an empathic meditation on the love and sacrifice that bind families together. Prof. Mintz will discuss how Grossman offers Americans, insulated from the dangers faced by Israeli families, a key insight into an existential situation often glimpsed from afar. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Fall Quarter 3:30 pm • Tuesday, October 5, 2010 • 306 ROYCE HALL

4 pm • Wednesday, November 10, 2010 • FACULTY CENTER

Jewish Studies Open House

Elias Bickerman as a Historian of the Jews, A Twentieth Century Tale Albert Baumgarten (Bar-Ilan University)

For Jewish Studies majors, minors, faculty and alumni

12 pm • Tuesday, October 12, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Who Serves Whom in Medieval Jewish-Christian Relations? Anna Sapir Abulafia (University of Cambridge) Viterbi Seminar in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

Dr. Abulafia, author of Jews in the Service of Medieval Christendom (forthcoming) will analyze the myriad of ambiguities and paradoxes underlying Christian-Jewish relations in 1000-1300. She argues that service to Christendom is the key to gaining a better understanding of the changing political, socio-economic, cultural and religious positions of European Jews of the period. Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion, the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies, the UCLA Department of History, and the UCLA Department of Spanish & Portuguese

4 pm • Thursday, October 21, 2010 • FACULTY CENTER

Counter Intelligence: Searching out the Real Los Angeles Jonathan Gold (Food Critic, LA Weekly) Series on ‘Jews and Food’

Jonathan Gold started his “Counter Intelligence” column in 1986 as a way of exploring Los Angeles’ diverse ethnic neighborhoods. In 2007 he became the first food critic to win the Pulitzer Prize. Sponsored by the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies and the UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

12 pm • Thursday, October 28, 2010 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

From ‘Death’ to ‘Beauty’: Fascinating Etymologies of Hebrew Words Yona Sabar (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

4 pm • Thursday, November 4, 2010 • FACULTY CENTER

A Moment in Time: Understanding the Holocaust in the Context of Jewish History David Engel (New York University) The Arnold Band Distinguished Lecture in Jewish Studies and The “1939” Club Lecture in Holocaust Studies Why did the Nazi murder campaign succeed to such an extraordinary degree? Prof. Engel will examine the reasons why the Nazi murder campaign ultimately achieved the precise degree of success that it did have still not been fully fathomed. He’ll look at the ways in which those reasons may be connected to developments in the history of the Jews during the half century before the Nazi rise to power. Sponsored by Sheila & Milton Hyman and the “1939” Club

5 pm • Monday, November 8, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Walther Rathenau: The Dangers of Race Theory Shulamit Volkov (Tel Aviv University)

Inaugural Sady and Ludwig Kahn Lecture in German Jewish Studies

The powerful industrialist and Jewish banker Walther Rathenau is best known for being Germany’s foreign minister and for having been murdered by enemies of the Weimar Republic in the summer of 1922. Prof. Volkov analyzes Rathenau’s career and evaluates his success as well as his failures, thus also throwing some light on the history of Germany and of its Jews.

CJS Cosponsored Events

Elias Bickerman (1897-1981) was one of the foremost historians of Graeco-Roman antiquity. Prof. Baumgarten will explore the connections between Bickerman’s extraordinary life and his scholarly work on the Jews in its different cultural and academic contexts (Russian, German, French, and American). Sponsored by the NEH Jewish Civilization Endowment Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion

Bloch and Kronfeld will illustrate the inseparability of poetics and politics, particularly when translating from a language like Hebrew to a global language like English. They will discuss their collaborative process, which involved a negotiation between their two very different cultures, and provide an introduction to the feminist and anti-war poetry of Dahlia Ravikovitch, Israel’s foremost woman poet. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

12 pm • Monday, November 15, 2010 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

Imre Kertész’s Art of Healing Susan Derwin (UC Santa Barbara) “1939” Club Seminar in Holocaust Studies

12 pm • Tuesday, January 18, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Jewish Apostasy from Paul to Simone Weil Eleanor Kaufman (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

At the age of fourteen, the Hungarian author Imre Kertész was deported to the Nazi concentration camps. The Nobel Prize winner’s masterpiece, Fatelessness, is an elusive fictional account of the year he spent as a prisoner. Prof. Derwin will discuss how the novel offers insight into the role of the imagination in helping the survivor recover from trauma. Sponsored by the NEH Jewish Civilization Endowment

Against the current tendency to view figures such as the Apostle Paul, Spinoza, or Freud as quintessentially Jewish despite their alienation from Judaism, this presentation will attempt to take that alienation and its theological implications at face value. Prof. Kaufman will focus on twentieth-century Jewish literary and philosophical figures, particularly Simone Weil, who embraced Christianity in radical fashion, so much so that their form of apostasy extends to both religions. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

7:30 pm • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • FACULTY CENTER

Kabbalah in Italy: Past and Present Moshe Idel (Hebrew University) & Fabrizio Lelli (University of Salento) Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

4 pm • Thursday, January 20, 2011 • FACULTY CENTER

Leo and His Circle: The Life of Leo Castelli Annie Cohen-Solal (New York University) Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

In the summer of 1280, the Kabbalist Abraham Abulafia attempted to meet Pope Nicholaus III in Rome. Lelli and Idel will discuss the history of the reception and the reformulation of various Kabbalistic currents in Italy from the 13th through the 16th century. Cosponsored by the Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies

Leo Castelli reigned for decades as America’s most influential art dealer. Prof. Cohen-Solal was a friend of Castelli’s, and she presents a detailed picture of him and traces a family whose fortunes rose and fell for centuries before the Castellis fled Italian fascism.

Modern Hebrew Creativity in Babylon, 1735 -1950 Lev Hakak (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Pictures (from top) 1. Anna Sapir Abulafia 2. Albert Baumgarten 3. Imre Kertész 4. Susan Derwin 5. Counter Intelligence book cover 6. Yona Sabar 7. Lev Hakak 8. David Engel 9. Anti-Pogrom Demonstration, London (1919) 10. Walther Rathenau 11. Shulamit Volkov 12. To the End of the Land book cover 13. Alan Mintz

Thursday - Friday, November 18 - 19, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Visions and Delight: 15th Century Jewish Philosophy and the Spanish Literary Tradition Michelle Hamilton (University of Minnesota)

Leone Ebreo and His Times

Friday, October 22, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Sexual Politics and Legal Culture in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire Marc Baer (UC Irvine)

Jews & Judaism in the Work and Biography of Franz Werfel An International and Interdisciplinary Conference

Pre-Conference Screening on October 20th of Eine blassblaue Frauenshrift (1984)

Sponsored by the UCLA Department of Germanic Languages and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Gershichte und Theorie der Biographie (Vienna) Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, the UCLA Center for European and Eurasean Studies, the Austrian Consulate General of Los Angeles, the “1939” Club, and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) For additional information, please email clennon@humnet.ucla.edu

The Politics of Sentimentality: On Fiddler, Film, Photography, and Philanthropy Ari Y. Kelman (UC Davis) Naftulin Family Lecture on Studies in Jewish Identity

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please email cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu

Fiddler on the Roof is one of the most beloved artifacts of American Jewish culture. This talk will take a closer look at the roots of this deeply sentimental portrayal of shtetl life to reveal a series of political investments that continue to shape American Jewish communal life.

14. Chana Bloch & Chana Kronfeld 15. Moshe Idel 16. Image of Kabbalist Abraham Abulafia 17. Fabrizio Lelli 18. Annie Cohen-Solal 19. Image of Worms Mahzor (Germany, 1272), Jerusalem, NLI 20. David M. Stern 21. Vincent Brook 22. Ari Y. Kelman 23. Delegates to the Czernowitz Conference (1908) on the Yiddish Language 24. Image of Rishon Colonists 25. Image of “Territorialism”

3:30 pm • Monday, October 25, 2010 • 306 ROYCE HALL

3:30 pm • Monday, October 18, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

4 pm • Thursday, January 27, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Brook will explore the seminal influence of German-speaking Jewish film directors on the dark American crime genre known as film noir. Although the repercussions of exile and German expressionist aesthetics of filmmakers such as Fritz Lang, Billy Wilder, Robert Siodmak, Otto Preminger, and Max Ophuls have been noted as contributing to film noir’s evolution, no one has yet examined how these directors’ Jewishness crucially factors into the equation. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Finding God in the ‘City of Angels’ Sponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Religion Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please email boustan@history.ucla.edu

Recent scholarship on the history of the book as a material object holds special relevance for the study of Jewish literature, and particularly the “Jewishness” of Jewish books. Prof. Stern will discuss methodological ramifications of his recent work on the history of the Jewish book, and will present the history of the layout of the Talmud as an example of the complications of “Jewishness” when one speaks about Jewish books. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Driven to Darkness: Jewish Émigré Directors and the Rise of Film Noir Vincent Brook (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

7 pm • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Vincent L. Wimbush (Claremont Graduate University)

Reading the Whole Jewish Book David M. Stern (University of Pennsylvania) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

12 pm • Thursday, December 2, 2010 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

Writing the History of the Mediterranean David Abulafia (Cambridge University)

A Film Screening and Discussion

12 pm • Monday, January 24, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Modern Hebrew creativity of Babylonian Jews was largely unknown to scholars, and therefore excluded from the history of Modern Hebrew literature. In the latest of Prof. Hakak’s books, he focuses on the years 1735-1950 and analyzes secular Hebrew poetry written in Babylon at that time, as well as folktales, journalistic articles, epistles, literary scholarship, a story, a play and Hebrew periodicals. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

3:30 pm • Monday, October 11, 2010 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please email cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu

The Poetics and Politics of Translation on ‘Hovering at a Low Altitude’: The Collected Poetry of Dahlia Ravikovitch Chana Bloch (Poet/Scholar) & Chana Kronfeld (UC Berkeley)

12 pm • Tuesday, November 30, 2010 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Looking at the semantic connection between Hebrew and Arabic words such as “Beauty” and “Death,” or “City Wall” and “Lawyer,” Prof. Sabar will demonstrate how Hebrew etymologies often become clearer by comparison with Arabic and other Semitic languages. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please email cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu

4 pm • Tuesday, January 11, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

The CMRS Ahmanson Conference Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies With the generous grant from the Ahmanson Foundation Cosponsored by the UCLA Vice Chancellor of Research, the Humanities Division of the UCLA College of L&S, and the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For additional information, please email cmrs@humnet.ucla.edu

Sunday - Monday, January 30 - 31, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Rethinking the History of Jewish Nationalism

An International Symposium Convened by David N. Myers (UCLA) & Arieh Saposnik (UCLA) The aim of the symposium is to acknowledge an accumulation of recent scholarship that challenges, enhances, and complements prior research on the history of Jewish nationalism. In particular, this new scholarship seeks to recover the crowded marketplace of Jewish nationalist ideas and ideologies in the early to mid-twentieth century and their place in the making of modern Jewish life. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund Cosponsored by the UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies

Center for Jewish Studies Box 951485, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485

Phone: (310) 825-5387 • RSVP line: (310) 267-5327

www.cjs.ucla.edu

Business hours: Mon - Thur 9am - 12pm, 1pm - 5pm

cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu • cjs@humnet.ucla.edu 7:30 pm • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Artists at Work: The New Berlin Renata Stih (Artist) & Frieder Schnock (Artist)

Cosponsored by the Goethe-Institute Los Angeles, the UCLA Department of

Germanic Languages, the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, and Villa Aurora For additional information, please email clennon@humnet.ucla.edu

Events are free and open to the public. ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To RSVP please call (310) 267-5327 or email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu. Parking is available, all day for $10 and metered spaces are available in lots 2, 3, and 4. For maps and parking information visit www.transportation.ucla.edu. The parking kiosk at the corner of Hilgard and Westholme closes at 7:30pm on weekdays and is closed on weekends. Please note that events may be subject to change without notice. For an up to date schedule, please visit www.cjs.ucla.edu.


12 pm • Monday, February 7, 2011 • 193 HUMANITIES

12 pm • Thursday, March 10, 2011 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

From Destruction to Rebirth: The Holocaust and the Creation of the State of Israel, a Reassessment Avinoam J. Patt (University of Hartford) “1939” Club Seminar in Holocaust Studies

Narrating Migration around the Table: The Frenchification of North African Jewish Palates Joëlle Bahloul (Indiana University) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

5 pm • Thursday, February 10, 2011 • FACULTY CENTER

Not by Bialys Alone: Iconic Foods of Ashkenazic Jews Mimi Sheraton (Author & Food Critic) Series on ‘Jews and Food’

Recent path-breaking scholarship on modern Sephardic culture has emphasized the porous nature of the boundary that delineated (or that continues to delineate) “Sephardic” as a cultural or historical category, emphasizing, instead, the many cultural, material, and quotidian ties that linked Sephardim to non-Jews, and Jews of other backgrounds. This workshop will bring together junior scholars engaged with crossing, rethinking, and perhaps even redrawing the borders thought to delineate Sephardic culture and history.

K

Using sophisticated genetic analysis, research has discovered that Jews are widely dispersed people with a common ancestry. It has been demonstrated that Jews from different regions of the world were found to share much genetic information that is distinct from other groups and that dates back to ancient times. Prof. Atzmon will discuss the first detailed genetic maps of major Jewish subpopulations, and how researchers use it as a resource to study the genetic origins of disease. Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Society and Genetics

BY INVITATION ONLY

S./C. Africa

6

PC1 (22.6)

N. Africa

5

Israel – non-Jew

Jewish

4

Europe

3

Global

Pakistan PC3 (4.4)

2

E. Asia PC2 (15.2)

Native American

12 pm • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Partners in Profit: The Legal and Practical Implications of Muslim-Jewish Collaborations in Trans-Saharan Trade Ghislaine Lydon (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Center for Jewish Studies

Prof. Lydon will present material from her research that seeks to better understand the dynamics of the interfaith trade between Muslims and Jews in northwestern Africa. Due to the scholarly divide between N. Africa and so-called SubSaharan Africa, the history of trans-continental exchange in the caravan trade system has not been adequately explored. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

12 pm • Thursday, February 17, 2011 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

Two Concepts of ‘The Decree of the Scripture’ (Gezerat Ha-Katuv): A Chapter in Maimonides’ Philosophy of Law and Halakhah Yair Lorberbaum (Bar Ilan University) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

Box 951485, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1485

Phone: (310) 825-5387 • RSVP line: (310) 267-5327

www.cjs.ucla.edu

Business hours: Mon - Thur 9am - 12pm, 1pm - 5pm

cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu • cjs@humnet.ucla.edu

4 pm • Thursday, April 14, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

Aromas of Aleppo: The Legendary Cuisine of Syrian Jews Poopa Dweck (Author) Series on ‘Jews and Food’

The term gezerat ha-katuv designates halakhic rules and institutions that have no reason. Maimonides uses it in his great legal code, the Mishneh Torah, yet it seems to contradict his position that all mitzvot have a reason and a rationale. Combining theology, philosophy of law and halakhah, Prof. Lorberbaum argues that gezerat ha-katuv have two different meanings—theological and legal-jurisprudential. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Poopa Dweck is the preeminent authority on the food and customs of the Jews of Aleppo, one of the largest and most flourishing communities of Sephardic Jews. Dweck will discuss the research behind her lavishly illustrated cookbook, Aromas of Aleppo, which documents the culinary traditions, history and customs of the Aleppian Jewish community. Sponsored by the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies and the UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

12 pm • Thursday, February 24, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

What do Middle-Aged Orthodox Jewish Women Want?: Self-Help Audiocassettes, Language, and Ethics Ayala Fader (Fordham University) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

12 pm • Thursday, May 12, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Pledging Water: Qais, Jews and Water Ownership in Southern Moroccan Oasis Aomar Boum (University of Arizona) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Drawing on recent work in the anthropology of ethics and linguistic anthropology, Prof. Fader will examine nonliberal Jewish women’s inspirational lectures given weekly in Brooklyn, audiotaped and circulated throughout the Jewish diaspora. Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Co-Directors

Prof. David N. Myers Prof. Todd Presner

Assistant Director

Vivian Holenbeck

Financial & Administrative Coordinator

Briana Desmond

Community Affairs Coordinator

Mary Enid Pinkerson, Ph.D.

Events are free and open to the public. ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To RSVP please call (310) 267-5327 or email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu. Parking is available, all day for $10 and metered spaces are available in lots 2, 3, and 4. For maps and parking information visit www.transportation.ucla.edu. The parking kiosk at the corner of Hilgard and Westholme closes at 7:30pm on weekdays and is closed on weekends. Please note that events may be subject to change without notice. For an up to date schedule, please visit www.cjs.ucla.edu.

UCLA CJS 2010 - 2011 Annual Calendar of Events

In rural agrarian environments, such as Akka, an oasis in southeastern Morocco, ownership of land and water shares represents an important capital asset that can be pledged as security for a debt. Given the importance of water as a commodity, Jews lent money to Muslim neighbors through the sharī‘, a legal system run by a local qāi, who applied Mālikī law in matters within their jurisprudence. Prof. Boum argues that although Jewish lenders still profited from the mortgaged water shares, Mālikī law saw the transaction as a legal operation unlike regular usury where a party lends money in return for interest. Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies

12 pm • Monday, February 28, 2011 • 6275 BUNCHE HALL

Representing Jewish Legitimacy in the Medieval Mediterranean Jonathan P. Decter (Brandeis University) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Throughout the medieval period, Jewish authors in the Mediterranean offered panegyrics in Hebrew and Judeo-Arabic for leaders of different ranks that extolled the virtues of their addressees. Beyond being sycophantic expressions of loyalty or dependence upon such leaders, these panegyrics convey precious information regarding constructions of Jewish legitimacy throughout the period.

3 pm • Sunday, May 15, 2011 • Autry National Center

Los Angeles Jews of Yesterday and Today Bruce Phillips (Hebrew Union College) & Karen Wilson (UCLA) A Symposium

The symposium will explore historical and cultural aspects of Jewish life in Los Angeles from the early 1900s until today. The event will also serve as a prelude to a major upcoming exhibition at the Autry National Center on the history of the Jews of Los Angeles opening in April, 2012. Cosponsored by the USC Casden Institute for the Study of the Jewish Role in American Life and the Autry National Center

12 pm • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Arabs of the Jewish Faith: The Civilizing Mission in Colonial Algeria (Jewish Cultures of the World) Joshua Schreier (Vassar College)

4 pm • Tuesday, May 17, 2011• 314 ROYCE HALL

Book Discussion

Prof. Schreier will explore how Algerian Jews responded to and appropriated France’s newly conceived “civilizing mission” in the mid-19th century. His new book, Arabs of the Jewish Faith, shows that the ideology, while rooted in French Revolutionary ideals of regeneration, enlightenment, and emancipation, actually developed as a strategic response to the challenges of controlling the unruly and highly diverse populations of Algeria’s coastal cities. Sponsored by the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies and the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies

Italian Synagogue Music and the Politics of (Ritual) Identity Francesco Spagnolo (UC Berkeley) Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

Synagogue rituals are both structured communal performances dictated by religious authority, and arenas for the public display of variegated social issues. Since early modernity, Italian synagogues ritualized the encounter of Italian Jews with Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews through sound. Prof. Spagnolo will examine the inner dynamics of Italian “ritual identities” through a series of case studies based on diverse musical and literary sources.

CJS Cosponsored Events

Cosponsored by Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, the Yitzhak Rabin Hillel Center for Jewish Life at UCLA, and the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

The Jewish quarter or mellah was the physical and symbolic center for Jewish life in Morocco for centuries. Historians, anthropologists, and architectural historians have closely studied the mellah and its people in an effort to understand the role of the Jewish quarter as a historical “stage” for Jewish survival practices in the face of dire existential threats. Prof. Miller will concentrate on the trajectory of the mellah in the early 20th century, when its inner structure unraveled under the twin pressures of a European-induced modernity and the imposition of harsh racialist policies under the fascist Vichy regime (1940-44). Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies

Maurice Amado Workshop in Sephardic Studies

7

Title to be announced Arthur Green (Hebrew College, Boston)

Between Memory and Extinction: The Moroccan Jewish Quarter in the Twentieth Century Susan Miller (UC Davis) Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Crossing Borders: New Approaches to Modern Judeo-Spanish (Sephardic) Cultures

Jews and Genes: The Jewish Genome in the Genomic Era Gil Atzmon (Yeshiva University)

Time TBA • Thursday, January 13, 2011 • HILLEL AT UCLA

12 pm • Tuesday, May 24, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Monday-Tuesday, April 4-5, 2011 • 314 ROYCE HALL

4 pm • Tuesday, February 15, 2011 • FACULTY CENTER

Cosponsored by the Sigi Ziering Institute - Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust at American Jewish University, UCLA Center for Jewish Studies, Marilyn Ziering, Lou Colen, and Leonard Nimoy For additional information, please email neal@nealbrostoff.com

Sponsored by the Joy & Jerry Monkarsh Family Fund and the Michael & Irene Ross Fund

Spring Quarter

In adapting the foods of Eastern European countries to rules of kashruth, Jews developed one of the earliest fusion cuisines. Their iconic dishes are rich in memories and sustain both body and soul. Sponsored by the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies and the UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

Celebrating Sutzkever

The Death of Moses in Judaism and Islam Carol Bakhos (UCLA) Faculty/Student Seminar Series

The massive migration of N. African Jews to France between the late 1950s and the mid-1960s, transformed their social and cultural experiences. Prof. Bahloul will discuss the adjustments in flavors and complex recipes that these migrants have made to their daily diet and festive menus to narrate their separation from their native countries. Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies

In many ways, the creation of the State of Israel in 1948 was far from a historical inevitability. Through a focus on the under-examined and under-appreciated role of Holocaust survivors and their plight after the war, Prof. Patt examines the role of Jewish Displaced Persons in the creation of the State of Israel.

3 pm • Sunday, January 9, 2011 • GINDI AUDITORIUM, AJU

12 pm • Thursday, May 19, 2011 • 306 ROYCE HALL

Annual Calendar 2010 - 2011

7 pm • Thursday, April 28, 2011 • FACULTY CENTER

Zionism in Iran: A Historical Perspective Nahid Pirnazar (UCLA) Sponsored by UCLA Program in Iranian Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

Pictures (from top) 1. Finding Home and Homeland book cover 2. Avinoam J. Patt 3. Joëlle Bahloul 4. Photo of French Jewish neighborhood 5. Eating My Words book cover 6. Mimi Sheraton 7. Gil Atzmon 8. Image of genetic map 9. Ghislaine Lydon 10. Image of Maimonides 11. Yair Lorberbaum

12. Poopa Dweck 13. Aromas of Aleppo book cover 14. Photo of street in Brooklyn by Beryl Goldberg, photojournalist 15. Aomar Boum 16. Ayala Fader 17. Jonathan P. Decter 18. Francesco Spagnolo 19. Joshua Schreier 20. Arabs of the Jewish Faith book cover 21. Carol Bakhos 22. Susan Miller

Annual Calendar 2009 - 2010

CJS Calendar (2010-11)  

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies' 2010-11 annual programming calendar.

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