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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

314 ROYCE HALL • 4 PM

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Open House

Learn about the Center’s projects and programs and find out about Jewish studies classes. Meet our majors, minors, faculty, and alumni. Open to the public.

306 ROYCE HALL • 12 PM

306 ROYCE HALL • 12 PM

Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies

Ladino’s Controversial History Olga Borovaya (Stanford) For more than a century, everything related to the history and use of Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) has been a matter of disagreement among scholars. In this talk on the Ibero-Romance language used by Sephardi Jews in the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean in the 16th through mid-20th centuries, Borovaya will offer a history of the Sephardi vernacular and elucidate some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding the language. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

Book Launch

How to Accept German Reparations

It Did Happen Here: Anti-Nazi Activism in Los Angeles

The original “A Bintel Brief” (“A Bundle of Letters”) was an advice column for Jews fresh off the boat in The Jewish Daily Forward, a.k.a. The Forverts, a feature regarded by many as the prototype for “Dear Abby.” This seminar will discuss Liana Finck’s new, widely acclaimed graphic novel, A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York (Ecco, 2014), which brings a selection of these letters to life and includes an imaginative conversation with the paper’s editor, Abraham Cahan. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Germanic Languages Forward HarperCollins

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2014

Transforming 20 Century Culture into 21st Century Idioms: Israeli Art and the Work of Marc Chagall

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Anthropology’s “Culture, Power, Social Change” Group

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014

UCLA HILLEL • 7 PM

It Started in Sighet Photography by Louis Davidson This amazing exhibit presents a sample of the more than 300 synagogues documented in 360° virtual reality at www.Synagogues360.org. The project began with a visit to Sighet, Romania in 2003 by architect-photographer, Louis Davidson, and his wife Ronnie. Seeing that magnificent relics of their Jewish heritage were deteriorating after the Holocaust and dwindling Jewish population, the Davidsons decided to photographically preserve European synagogues for posterity. The project soon expanded globally and now represents buildings in 36 countries. Sponsored by UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information and to RSVP visit www.uclahillel.org

11360 CHARLES E. YOUNG RESEARCH LIBRARY • 4 PM

Book Launch

HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities describes the ethics of mapping the past and present. The authors examine the time-layers of Jewish Berlin, the media archaeology of Google Earth, the cultural–historical meaning of map projections, and explore recent events—such as the “Arab Spring” and the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster—through social media mapping that incorporates data visualizations, photographic documents, and Twitter streams. http://thebook.hypercities.com Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Digital Humanities Program UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education UCLA Library UCLA Department of Comparative Literature UCLA Department of Germanic Languages

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014

Democratic and Jewish? Religion and State in Israel Today Yuval Sinai (Bar-Ilan University/ Yale) Sinai will explore the way Judaism, as a religion and culture, and its legal tradition–the halakhah–is incorporated into the secular legal system of the state of Israel and, more broadly, the role of Judaism and Jewish values in Israel. Whereas most other ancient legal systems are no longer relevant, Jewish law continues to have great vitality and adaptability, allowing it to contribute to the solution of contemporary legal problems. Sponsored by the UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information contact mkresnick@international.ucla.edu

Twenty years ago, the International Auschwitz Council confronted this harsh reality: the ravages of time were devouring every barrack, building, shoe and suitcase remaining from the twisted world that was Auschwitz-Birkenau under the Nazis. Join Piotr Cywiński, a historian with a background in inter-religious dialogue, for a stimulating and provocative presentation of how the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Museum, a pilgrimage destination for 1.5 million annual visitors from around the world, functions in contemporary Poland, and what is needed to maintain it. Sponsored by UCLA Center for Jewish Studies UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

International Workshop on the Digital Geniza

Languages of Everyday Writing in the Medieval Islamic World: History, Methodology, Digital Prospects

306 ROYCE HALL

In conjunction with the workshop, Marnina Rustow (Johns Hopkins) will give a public talk on her research on the medieval Jews of the Fatimid Caliphate using documentary texts from the Cairo Geniza. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies UCLA Viterbi Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies UCLA History Department UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies

TUESDAY, JANUARY 13, 2015

The Book of Genesis in the Western Imagination

Was Ancient Israel a Patriarchal Society? Carol Meyers (Duke)

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2015

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015

TBA • 6PM

Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies

THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 2015

Fabrizio Lelli (University of Lecce, Italy) At the end of WWII, more than 250,000 Jewish refugees lived in DP camps in Germany, Austria and Italy which were set up under the aegis of the UN and the Allied Forces, with the support of international Jewish organizations. Since 2000, Fabrizio Lelli has been collecting documents and personal testimonies from former refugees in the Apulia region of southern Italy. Traumatized, unable or unwilling to return to their former homes, many were stuck in a Mediterranean limbo, trying to recover from the war but without knowing where they would—or could—go next. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Italian Cultural Institute Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Italian

Jewish Life in Germany Today

314 ROYCE HALL • 4PM

Sponsored by UCLA Hillel Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies With the generous support of E. Randol Schoenberg For more information and to RSVP visit www.uclahillel.org

Alan Mintz (JTS) During the fifteen years before his death in 1970, S. Y. Agnon wrote an epic cycle of stories about Buczacz, the Galician town in which he grew up. This project represents a unique response to the Holocaust and an unprecedented effort to re-imagine the inner life of Polish Jewry during its golden age. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Comparative Literature With the generous support of Milt & Sheila Hyman

306 ROYCE HALL • 12PM

Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series

David’s Divided Heart Rabbi David Wolpe (Sinai Temple)

They Were Promised the Sea They Were Promised the Sea is an intimate journey shot in Morocco, Israel-Palestine, and New York about Arab Jews struggling with a hybrid identity. Kathy Wazana’s research into her family origins in Morocco unleashes a complex web of questions about dual identity, political opportunism, and the challenges faced by those torn between Homeland and Promised Land. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the Maurice Amado Program in Sephardic Studies UCLA Department of History

Of all the figures in the Bible, David arguably stands out as the most perplexing and enigmatic. He was many things: a warrior who subdued Goliath and the Philistines; a king who united a nation; a poet who created beautiful, sensitive verse; a loyal servant of God who proposed the great Temple and founded the Messianic line; a schemer, deceiver, and adulterer. Rabbi Wolpe takes a fresh look at David in an attempt to find coherence in these contradictions. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2015

6275 BUNCHE HALL • 12PM

Book Launch 314 ROYCE HALL • 4PM

A play reading by 10 actors from Theater Dybbuk

Through photos, text, audio clips and videos, the exhibition explores the varied experiences of Jews living in modern Germany, including stories of survivors, entertainers, educators, journalists, business people, teenagers, entrepreneurs, and rabbis who are reshaping Jewish life.

Arnold Band Distinguished Lecture in Jewish Studies

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2015

A Dybbuk UCLA HILLEL • 7PM

314 ROYCE HALL • 4PM

The Late Agnon and the Re-Imagining of Galician Jewry

Jewish Refugees in Apulia

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History UCLA Department of Germanic Languages

The answer to this question, surprisingly, is not an automatic “yes.” This presentation will examine the origins of this designation, which assumes a hierarchical male-dominated structure for Israelite society. Recent research using archaeological and ethnographic data in addition to biblical texts challenges the patriarchal-hierarchical model and proposes another one that may be more appropriate for the complexities of Israelite society. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures

Kathy Wazana (Film Director), Alma Heckman (UCLA), Gil Hochberg (UCLA)

The Holocaust has not been taught in schools in Iran since the 1979 Islamic revolution. Indeed, in recent years, some Holocaust revisionist history and even neo-Nazi ideology has been offered to university-level students. Holocaust, the first Farsi-language nonfiction work on the subject, describes the rise of Nazism in Germany to the final days of World War II in three volumes, featuring graphic photographs from the era as well as U.S. and European government documents. The fourth volume chronicles other 20th century genocides.

306 ROYCE HALL • 12PM

Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series

Film Screening 306 ROYCE HALL • 12 PM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2015

Bible and Its Interpreters Seminar Series

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015

Ari Babaknia (Author)

For the Good of Tomorrow, Preserve Yesterday 10383 BUNCHE HALL • 4:30 PM

314 ROYCE HALL

The Holocaust in Farsi

UCLA HILLEL • 7 PM

306 ROYCE HALL • 12PM

The book of Genesis has had a surprising and momentous life in Western culture, from its birth in the ancient Middle East to current controversies about sex and science. The ways that people read Genesis and the ways that they understand the world have long been intertwined. Hendel will explore some of these byways, including Genesis as apocalypse, allegory, mysticism, and literature.

The 1939 Society Seminar in Holocaust Studies

Dr. Piotr Cywiński (Director, Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum)

MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2014

DECEMBER 7-8, 2014

MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015

Ronald Hendel (UC Berkeley)

Anti-Nazi Parade in Los Angeles, CA, Nov. 22, 1938 UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2014

Todd Presner (UCLA), David Shepard (UCLA), Yoh Kawano (UCLA)

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014

Hitler’s ascent to power in Germany in 1933 gave rise to a wave of shocking, public displays of anti-Semitism in Los Angeles and the formation of several local fascist organizations, including the German American Bund. While some responded to these developments with indifference, Jewish residents actively mobilized their community, forming new organizations to combat both Hitler’s murderous campaign abroad and his local supporters. Historians Laura Rosenzweig and Caroline Luce will discuss their forthcoming digital exhibit on this little known chapter in Los Angeles history.

The Cairo Geniza consists of over 380,000 fragments of writing composed between 870 and 1896 CE. While most are biblical, Talmudic, and rabbinic texts, the Geniza’s 8,000-18,000 ‘documentary’ fragments offer a unique window on daily Jewish life. However, since the contracts, doctors’ prescriptions, shopping lists, and business letters are written in dialects of medieval vernacular Arabic in Hebrew characters, often interspersed with Hebrew and Aramaic, very few scholars have direct access to them. This academic workshop, intended by invitation for faculty and graduate students, is part of an effort to develop a research website to make these remarkable primary sources more accessible.

Sponsored by the California Institute for Yiddish Culture and Language UCLA Department of Germanic Languages Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information and to RSVP contact miriam@yiddishinstitute.org

ANNUAL CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2014 - 2015

Caroline Luce (UCLA), Laura Rosenzweig (San Francisco State)

314 ROYCE HALL • 4 PM

th

Center for Jewish Studies

CJS Cosponsored Event

Concurrent with the Skirball Cultural Center exhibition: Light & Noir: Exiles and Émigrés in Hollywood, 1933–1950 October 23, 2014–March 1, 2015

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History

Susan Slyomovics (UCLA) In a landmark process after the Holocaust, Germany created the largest sustained redress program in history, amounting to more than $60 billion. When human rights violations are presented primarily in material terms, acknowledging an indemnity claim becomes one way for a victim to be recognized. At the same time, indemnifications provoke difficult questions about how suffering and loss can be measured. Slyomovics, daughter of a survivor, maintains that we can use the legacies of German reparations to reconsider approaches to reparations in the future.

CJS Event

A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York

This talk will discuss how Chagall’s iconic representations of Jewish weddings, music, and theater have been reimagined to create an idiosyncratic new reality for Israeli art.

306 ROYCE HALL • 12 PM

314 ROYCE HALL • 4PM

Mapping Jewish Los Angeles Lecture

Anat Gilboa (UCLA)

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2014

Ross Seminar in Yiddish Studies

Liana Finck (Author)

Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2014

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014

Telling the story of a bride possessed by the dislocated soul of a tormented former suitor, the original play by S. Ansky is a landmark work in the history of Jewish and Yiddish theatre. Filled with poetic language, passionate examples of desire and probing investigations of faith, this adaptation by Tony Kushner is a moving look at the choices we make, the beliefs we hold and the complexities inherent in human nature. Sponsored by the California Institute for Yiddish Culture and Language UCLA Department of Germanic Languages Cosponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies For more information and to RSVP contact miriam@yiddishinstitute.org

Interpreting the Family of Abraham: Political Uses and Abuses Carol Bakhos (UCLA), Diane Winston (USC) The term “Abrahamic religions” has gained considerable currency in both scholarly and ecumenical circles as a way of referring to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Bakhos steps back from this convention to ask a frequently overlooked question: What, in fact, is Abrahamic about these three faiths? Exploring diverse stories and interpretations relating to the portrayal of Abraham, she reveals how he is venerated in these different scriptural traditions and how scriptural narratives have been pressed into service for nonreligious purposes. Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures UCLA Center for the Study of Religion

ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To RSVP: call (310) 267-5327 or email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu. Please note that events are subject to change without notice. For an up-to-date schedule, please visit www.cjs.ucla.edu

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Calendar of Events 2014-2015  

UCLA Center for Jewish Studies Annual Calendar of Events for 2014-2015

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