Page 1

Invest Responsibly. Strengthen Ministry.

2016 ANNUAL REPORT

1


Established in 1909 to administer the Pilgrim Memorial Fund for the benefit of retired pastors, United Church Funds has evolved into a full-service investment manager with over $750 million of assets under management. Alongside some of the historic endowments of the United Church of Christ (UCC), the assets entrusted to United Church Funds (UCF) include the savings, gifts and endowments of local churches, associations, conferences and faith-based organizations. For generations, UCC organizations have chosen to invest with UCF not only because of its affiliation with the denomination but also for the advantages it offers to clients:

• Faith-Based investing and endowment solutions • Diversified funds that span the spectrum of risk and return • Competitive performance and attractive fee structures • More than 100 years of supporting the mission of our clients • Non-profit, values-aligned and committed to improving the world


Table of Contents 3

Invest Responsibly. Strengthen Ministry.

4

President’s Letter

5

Investment Commentary

7

Investment Performance

9

2016 Major Financial Events

11

Socially Responsible Investing

13

Clients

14

New Clients

15

Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion

17

Selected Financial Information

18

Board of Directors and Staff


Invest Responsibly. Strengthen Ministry. United Church Funds supports the missions of faith-based organizations with competitive, socially responsible investment performance and endowment solutions that reflect their values. For more than 100 years, our performance has been measured by our clients’ success in managing their resources and improving the world.

3


President’s Letter United Church Funds (UCF) is pleased to report on another positive year for our clients and partners. A strong dollar, Brexit and the US presidential election were just a few of the events that wreaked havoc with domestic and international markets in 2016. Investors, analysts and pundits often predicted incorrectly as to the outcomes of these events and how the markets would respond. Our balanced approach to asset allocation and the sharp analytical tools of our fund managers enabled the UCF family of funds to weather a volatile year and continued to provide investors with competitive investment performance to support their missions. The year also marked several notable UCF achievements. Twenty-nine additional faith-based organizations selected UCF to manage their endowments or long-term savings. Our recent initiative to cast our investment services beyond churches and organizations of the United Church of Christ gained traction, as witnessed by our selection by a multi-denominational campus ministry, a Baptist organization and our first Living Legacy Program account, created by a church to continue its mission in the community through proceeds received from the sale of its building. During 2016, UCF also selected a planned giving specialist to assist in revamping its planned giving program. This will enable UCF to offer donors and churches a robust platform to provide the ongoing education and technology to either implement a new or enhance an existing planned giving program. UCF will introduce its new platform during the second quarter of 2017. Finally, the Beyond Fossil Fuels Fund celebrated its 2nd anniversary in November 2016. The fund beat its benchmark for one year and two years as of December 31, 2016. The Beyond Fossil Fuels Fund is ideal for investors that seek global equity exposure in a fund that excludes companies that explore or produce fossil fuels. This Fund, along with the Beyond Fossil Fuels Balanced Fund, complements the work conducted by individuals, churches and communities to address climate change. United Church Funds is proud to serve the churches and ministries of the United Church of Christ and other faith-based organizations. We remain grateful for the trust and confidence you place in us. Please let us know how we may be of service to you in the coming year. Sincerely,

Donald G. Hart President

4


Investment Commentary Versatility in a Volatile Year 2016 was anything but dull! The equity markets started off poorly in early 2016. Following a 10% decline, the Standard & Poor’s (S&P) 500 index rebounded in the Spring, along with global equities. Markets were then buffeted by “Brexit,” the June vote by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. Finally, the US election catalyzed the idea that US stocks, especially small-cap stocks, would be winners under President Trump’s Americafirst policies and US markets rallied strongly. For 2016, all equity regions were positive, led by the US. Emerging markets performed very well for the year, but gave up ground as the US election played out. Returns for core US bonds, as represented by the Barclays Capital US Government/Credit Index, started strong but were halved in the second half of the year, particularly after the election. Expectations for gradual interest rate increases in the US were finally realized as the US Federal Reserve made its first interest rate hike and guided towards three more gradual hikes in 2017. The Bond market also suffered in the face of optimism for growth, a return of inflation and fiscal stimulus through reduced taxes and infrastructure. Despite these crosscurrents, 2016 fixed-income total returns were positive.

Equity Funds The UCF Total Equity Fund (includes Domestic Core, Small Cap and International Equity Funds) saw strong gains for 2016 as global equity market indices produced positive returns across most regions. The small-cap US index (Russell 2000) had the best absolute return (over 20%) while US large companies (S&P 500) achieved nearly 12% returns. Emerging markets equities were just behind, gaining slightly over 11%. International developed equities rebounded after mid-year and finished the year up 1%. As to relative performance, the 2016 return of 8.83% for the Total Equity Fund was ahead of its benchmark, net of fees. An overweight to emerging market equities was additive to returns, which were also buoyed by fairly widespread manager outperformance versus benchmarks, although in the UCF Small Cap Equity Fund, managers struggled to keep pace with very robust returns. As for UCF managers, LSV Asset Management, an international value manager and Oaktree, an emerging markets manager, both outperformed their respective benchmark in 2016. Fiduciary Management, a US large-cap manager, returned 14.51% gross of fees versus 11.96% for the S&P 500. The largest shortfalls were by Dimensional Fund Advisors Small Cap Value strategy (+28.01%) and Baillie Gifford International (+0.77%), which underperformed their respective indices by an identical 3.73%. Baillie Gifford is still ahead of its index since inception by 3.01%.

Beyond Fossil Fuels Equity Fund The Beyond Fossil Fuels (BFF) Equity Fund outperformed its benchmark (9.80% net of fees compared to 8.25% for the custom benchmark and 8.36% for the MSCI ACWI IMI). The Fund transitioned to a global portfolio from a domestic portfolio in the second quarter. International markets rebounded sharply after Brexit worries and US equities were particularly strong after the election. Quantitative Management Associates (QMA), the BFF Equity manager, outpaced the global benchmark by a considerable margin for 2016. Although fossil fuel exclusions have recently been a detriment to performance as energy prices have risen, the QMA portfolio management approach has more than overcome that headwind.

5


Fixed Income Fund The Fixed Income Fund achieved positive returns for 2016 of 3.72% but sold off in the second half of the year as rates rose sharply. The Fund’s performance was slightly behind its benchmark, but ahead of the Barclay’s Government/ Credit index return of 2.65%. Allocations to diversifying assets were helpful to returns. Emerging market debt had a particularly strong first half of the year and finished up over 9% for 2016. Bank loans performed very well, with returns of just over 10%. The Pension Boards core fixed-income manager nicely outperformed its index, but the impact investment firm, Community Capital, lagged its index. The bank loan manager, Western Asset Management, was essentially even compared to its benchmark while the emerging markets debt manager, Lazard Asset Management, was slightly below benchmark. The slight performance shortfall after fees is primarily due to Community Capital Management.

Balanced Funds For 2016, performance for the UCF balanced funds was positive and inline with respective benchmarks, net of fees. Returns ranged from 5.50% to 7.57%, depending on the mix of equities and fixed income. Performance was more volatile than in recent years, across all global regions, as political surprises caused volatility in equity markets. Manager outperformance was broadly positive, with limited disappointments balanced with a few very strong outperformers. A small allocation to cash was mildly detractive as both equities and fixed income had positive returns.

Alternatives Balanced Fund The Alternatives Fund component of the Alternatives Balanced Fund underperformed in 2016. Longer-term, three and five-year, performance is still above benchmark net of fees. A strong year by the real estate manager, Heitman, with an 11.62% return, was offset by modest, single-digit declines by Abbey Capital with -4.81%, Magnitude International -2.10% and Weatherlow Offshore Fund -1.52%, net of fees, as hedge funds struggled in 2016. These managers, over three years, are very comfortably ahead of benchmarks net of fees, but 2016 was tough for hedge funds industry-wide.

Outlook Investors began 2017 with a positive outlook for the global economy. Economic improvement continues in the US, but markets may be subject to disappointment if the pace of implementation lags the promise. While we believe interest rate rises will be contained, the pace will be key. Finally, while global equities are attractive, divergences in global growth have caused the US dollar to remain strong compared to most currencies and this could continue to complicate matters for US investors. We remain a believer in diversification because valuation ultimately matters and we believe that 2016 has begun to illustrate these benefits. We are maintaining positive performance momentum, but know that when we select active managers on your behalf, they must overcome fees. Finally, we remain aligned with UCF’s mission, determined to continue our focus on environmental, social and governance factors in our selection and scrutiny of managers. We look forward to continuing our hard work on your behalf in 2017 and thank you for your continued confidence in us.

David A. Klassen, CFA Chief Investment Strategist

6


Investment Performance As of December 31, 2016

Managed Funds Annualized

Average Total Rates of Return Returns on UCF's funds are presented net of fees

Quarter

Year To Date

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

Current Yield

Unit Value

Market Value

Fixed Income Fund

-2.84%

3.72%

3.72%

1.84%

1.83%

4.15%

2.42%

$4.76

$226.4M

Policy Index 85% Barclays US Gov't/Credit Aggregate, 5% JPM GBI- EM Global Diversified, 10% S&P LSTA Performing Loan

-2.96%

4.14%

4.14%

2.80%

2.16%

4.33%

Barclays Capital Gov't Credit Bond Index (BCGC)

-3.39%

3.05%

3.05%

3.04%

2.29%

4.40%

Domestic Core Equity Fund 1

4.14%

11.84% 11.84%

8.43%

14.68%

6.43%

1.93%

$18.34

$172.8M

S&P 500 Index

3.82%

11.96%

11.96%

8.87%

14.66%

6.95%

Beyond Fossil Fuels Fund 4

1.71%

9.80%

9.80%

N/A

N/A

N/A

2.86%

$10.98

$66.6M

S&P 500/MSCI IMI Net, Linked

1.27%

8.25%

8.25%

Small Cap Equity Fund 1

8.12%

16.69% 16.69%

5.29%

13.64%

4.09%

0.95%

$17.33

$38.6M

Russell 2000 Index

8.83%

21.31%

21.31%

6.74%

14.46%

7.07%

International Equity Fund 1

-2.89%

4.79%

4.79%

-2.25%

4.49%

0.77%

2.58%

$11.53

$168.4M

MSCI ACWI ex US net

-1.25%

4.50%

4.50%

-1.78%

5.00%

0.96%

Cash & Equivalent Fund

0.01%

0.01%

0.01%

0.01%

0.01%

N/A

0.00%

$1.00

$9.6M

Lipper Money Market Funds Index

0.07%

0.13%

0.13%

0.05%

0.04%

Alternatives Fund 3

0.04%

-0.85%

-0.85%

4.60%

5.86%

N/A

N/A

$13.56

$56.2M

Custom Index 70% HFRI Funds of Funds Composite Index, 30% NCREIF Fund Index

0.58%

2.28%

2.28%

4.17%

5.71%

Inception: October 1, 2005

1

7

2

Inception: January 1, 2006

Inception: July 1, 2010

3

4

Inception: November 1, 2014


Funds of Funds Annualized

Average Total Rates of Return Returns on UCF's funds are presented net of fees

Quarter

Year To Date

One Year

Three Years

Five Years

Ten Years

Current Yield

Unit Value

Market Value

Total Equity Fund 41% Domestic Core Equity, 11% Small Cap Equity and 48% International Equity

1.03%

8.83%

8.83%

2.91%

9.57%

3.39%

2.13%

$14.44

$337.5M

MSCI ACWI IMI net

1.27%

8.36%

8.36%

3.25%

9.61%

3.84%

Conservative Balanced Fund 2 37% Equity, 62% Fixed Income and 1% C&E

-1.41%

5.50%

5.50%

2.13%

4.61%

4.23%

2.29%

$12.28

$12.0M

Current Policy Index 35% MSCI ACWI IMI net, 65% Fixed Income Policy Index

-1.48%

5.75%

5.75%

3.13%

4.95%

4.58%

Moderate Balanced Fund 62% Equity, 37% Fixed Income and 1% C&E

-0.43%

6.76%

6.76%

2.41%

6.51%

4.02%

2.22%

$9.99

$294.0M

Current Policy Index 60% MSCI ACWI IMI net, 40% Fixed Income Policy Index

-0.42%

6.82%

6.82%

3.27%

6.88%

4.53%

Aggressive Balanced Fund 2 77% Equity, 22% Fixed Income and 1% C&E

0.14%

7.57%

7.57%

2.59%

7.72%

3.83%

2.18%

$13.50

$25.8M

Current Policy Index 75% MSCI ACWI IMI net, 25% Fixed Income Policy Index

0.21%

7.42%

7.42%

3.31%

8.01%

4.42%

Beyond Fossil Fuels Balanced Fund 4 65% BFF,34% Fixed Income and 1% C&E

0.14%

6.52%

6.52%

N/A

N/A

N/A

2.68%

$10.09

$89.6M

Current Policy Index 60% MSCI ACWI IMI net, 40% Fixed Income Policy Index

-0.42%

6.82%

6.82%

Alternatives Balanced Fund 3 52% Equity, 24% Fixed Income, 24% Alternatives

-0.10%

5.27%

5.27%

2.89%

6.72%

N/A

N/A

$13.76

$188.6M

Current Policy Index 50% MSCI ACWI IMI net, 30% Fixed Income Policy and 20% Alternatives Policy

-0.14%

6.00%

6.00%

3.49%

7.00%

Inception: October 1, 2005

1

2

Inception: January 1, 2006

Inception: July 1, 2010

3

4

Inception: November 1, 2014

8


2016 Major Financial Events

January Chinese Market Crash After just 10 trading days, global equity markets had lost more than $4 trillion of value, with sentiment hammered by fears about China’s economic slowdown and a depreciating currency. Slumping Oil Price Brent crude hit what proved to be a low for the year of $27.10 a barrel, escalating the selling of energy sector shares and bonds. Negative Interest Rate Policy Bank of Japan embraced a negative interest rate policy, and the reprcussions were immediate, as investors dumped the shares of banks, while Japan’s investors sought higher-yielding Eurozone, UK and U.S. debt.

June Brexit Britain voted to exit the European Union with the ‘Leave’ camp winning, followed by the resignation of David Cameron as Prime Minister. The immediate impact was felt across currency markets, with major equity indices losing 2-10%.

9


November OPEC Oil Cut Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) announced its decision that its 14 member countries would work together to reduce their oil production for the very first time since the 2008 Global Financial Crisis. US Election The shock of Donald Trump winning the electoral college vote for markets was shortlived, as investors rapidly embraced the idea of a Republican-controlled Congress being a game changer by implementing fiscal stimulus, tax cuts and rolling back regulations for US business.

December Crude Oil Breaks $57 Global benchmark Brent crude briefly rose above $57 a barrel for the first time since July 2015. Fed Rate Hike On December 14, the US Federal Reserve raised interest rate by 25 basis points to between 0.50% and 0.75%, and forecast a steeper path for borrowing costs in 2017. Source: Financial Times, December 18, 2016

10


Socially Responsible Investing Fostering a Just and Sustainable Economic System The turmoil that characterized 2016, both in US politics and international conflicts, belied the steady nature of UCF’s social responsibility program. While we were able to use our corporate shareholder position to respond to some of the most pressing justice issues of the year, much of the work of the program continued at the deliberate pace of social change. The Sustainable Development Goals helped frame UCF’s social responsibility actions in 2016. These 17 UNdeveloped goals are the next iteration of the Millennium Development Goals and describe the outcomes the international community must aim for to improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable.

Water and Human Rights As a faith-based investor, we utilize our moral voice in matters of environmental, social and governance (ESG) impacts. In doing so, UCF was compelled to view the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s fight against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline as a moral and operational risk. We hosted a meeting of investors with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman David Archambault II, and co-filed a resolution at Marathon Petroleum Corp., urging the company to disclose to investors its due diligence on environmental and human rights risks, including indigenous rights risks.

Global Health In agreement with the public’s shock, UCF feels that pharmaceutical price gouging is a threat to our economy’s stability and Americans’ health. Poor pricing decisions have the potential impact of negatively influencing shareholder value. For example, Mylan was ordered to pay $465M to settle allegations that Medicaid paid too much for the EpiPen. UCF filed shareholder resolutions with several pharmaceutical companies, calling for disclosure of the reasons for and risks of increasing the price of prescription drugs.

Equality In 2016, UCF was a proud signatory of a statement calling for a full repeal of North Carolina’s notorious House Bill 2. Companies doing business in North Carolina continue to be exposed to the uncertainty of operating in an unjust environment. Like our clients, we believe that equality is fundamental to a successful workplace and community.

11


Fair Lending Despite our years-long engagement with Wells Fargo to create a culture of honesty, we were dismayed by the 2016 news of the bank creating false accounts to drive up revenues and fees. The conduct that led Wells and other financial institutions to the banking crisis in 2008 and to rectify any lingering weaknesses proved repeatable. This latest scandal that has rocked the company is in direct violation of the company’s Vision and Values policy, which they heralded in meetings with us. While the company has responded to date by instituting a performance pay clawback and announcing CEO/Chairman John Stumpf’s immediate retirement, UCF believes these measures are not sufficient to prevent a repeat occurrence. In response to this, UCF will be part of a contingent of investors using shareholder resolutions to call for deeper remedies in the 2017 shareholder season. In particular, UCF co-filed a resolution seeking a full accounting of the systemic failures allowing these unethical practices to flourish. Shareholders suggested that changes must strengthen corporate culture and instill a commitment to high ethical standards at all employee levels; incentive systems must be aligned with customers’ best interests; the Board must oversee risk management processes; among other imperative improvements.

Sustainable Investing We are also quite concerned with how those institutions that care for our assets are or are not contributing to sustainability. In 2016, we co-filed a shareholder resolution with BNY Mellon, who is also UCF’s banking custodian, concerning their proxy voting records on ESG issues. Despite the company’s insistence that their investments are managed in a manner that is sensitive to sustainability, there is no evidence that BNY Mellon is using its proxy voting to enforce sustainability. In closing, we were pleased to release our latest Sustainability Report in 2016. This report examines our efforts, operationally and externally, to live into our role as a socially responsible, faithful investing partner on behalf of our clients.

Kathryn O’Neill McCloskey Director, Social Responsibility

12


Clients Our clients’ decision to invest in UCF funds speaks to their commitment to values-aligned investment practices. As a trusted partner, UCF continues to: • Invest in companies that operate in a sustainable manner • Offer a family of diversified funds, managed for prudence and performance • Adhere to the legal guidelines that govern the endowments of faith-based institutions We are proud of our diversified client portfolio and committed to supporting their mission.

Number of UCF Clients None 1-19

80-99

20-39

100+

40-59 60-79

13

Churches

962

National Ministries

10

Conferences & Associations

66

Pension Boards

2

Health & Welfare

20

Colleges and Seminaries

4

Others

22


New Clients We are honored that 29 churches and faith-based organizations selected UCF as their investment manager in 2016. We look forward to helping our clients grow their assets to achieve a mutual goal – providing more funds for ministry and mission. Below is a sampling of our new clients:

Living Legacy Program CC in Deerfield

Community UCC Morton

Congregational UCC Brodhead

Genesee Area Campus Ministries

Wayside United Church of Christ

Mount Tabor UCC: Following Christ, helping people, being good stewards

Two Rivers Association UCC Good Samaritan Church

14


Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion UCF’s staff accomplishes all of its work in a professional and efficient manner, ensuring the timeliness and accuracy of transactions and is dedicated to the growth of the organization.

UCF Staff Diversity In 2016, historically underrepresented populations comprising Asians, African Americans and Hispanics made up 57% of UCF’s staff.

15


We will withhold votes from board nominees if the board, together with the slate, does not include minorities and women. Determining Governance in Our Investments United Church Funds has a robust system for analyzing the corporate governance strengths in the companies in which we invest. Weak governance in corporations, through a less than optimal board structure, overly generous compensation packages or faulty audit processes, could be telltale signs of problematic management and a risk to our investments. Board diversity is a priority for UCF. Companies are realizing that in the face of changing demographics and the rapid globalization of business, greater diversity on their boards of directors is a critical business strategy for both growing shareholder value and managing corporate reputation. An emphasis on board diversity can also be a measure of a company’s organizational commitment to diversity. Although their representation on corporate boards has been increasing slowly over the last 15 years, women and minorities continue to account for only a small percentage of the total number of corporate directors. We will withhold votes from board nominees if the board, together with the slate, does not include minorities and women. We support proposals asking companies to increase board inclusiveness and report on their progress towards this goal, including how the board or its nomination committee ensures that women and minority candidates are routinely sought as part of every board search the company undertakes. The Board of Directors calls on the expertise of both the Investment Committee and the Social Responsibility Committee when determining guidelines for voting our proxy ballots. We take advantage of research services that provide in-depth analyses of governance practices. We are aligned with several organizations that call for the strengthening of governance practices, including US SIF. As a clear signal of our commitment to corporate governance improvement goals, our Corporate Governance Proxy Voting Guidelines are maintained with oversight from UCF’s Investment Committee.

16


Selected Financial Information Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015

Financial Position

2016 (Unaudited)

2015

Assets Investments

$ 759,416,000

Other Assets Total Assets

$

762,370,000

4,519,000

4,483,000

763,935,000

766,853,000

666,797,000

684,894,000

88,160,000

72,709,000

754,957,000

757,603,000

8,978,000

9,250,000

Funds Held for Others Common Investment Funds Endowments & Split-Interest Agreements Total Liabilities Net Assets

Activities Revenues Fees earned on Managed Funds

$

Change in Unrealized Appreciation on Investments

6,114,000

$

6,440,000

268,000

(137,000)

264,000

263,000

6,646,000

6,566,000

Investment Related Expenses

3,220,000

3,057,000

Common Funds Administration

2,295,000

2,293,000

Marketing Expenses

881,000

758,000

Grants Paid from Endowments

269,000

420,000

253,000

222,000

6,918,000

6,750,000

Other revenues Total Revenues

Expenses and Grants

Other expenses Total Expenses and Grants (Decrease) in Net Assets

17

$

(272,000)

$

(184,000)


Board of Directors and Staff Board of Directors Mr. Nesa Joseph, Chair President & CEO Visiting Nurse Association of Greater St. Louis Creve Coeur, Missouri

Ms. Sylvia G. Ferrell-Jones President & CEO YWCA Boston Boston, Massachusetts

Mr. William P. Morgan, MBA, CPA CEO VSI Global Cleveland, Ohio

Rev. Dr. Charles Buck, Vice Chair Conference Minister Hawaii Conference, UCC Honolulu, Hawaii

Ms. Edith Guffey Conference Minister Kansas-Oklahoma Conference, UCC Lawrence, Kansas

Mr. Mark R. Parthemer, AEP Managing Director & Senior Fiduciary Counsel Bessemer Trust West Palm Beach, Florida

Rev. Penny Lowes, Secretary Pastor First Congregational Church UCC Romeo, Michigan

The Honorable Brian F. Holeman Associate Judge Superior Court of the District of Columbia Washington, D.C.

Ms. Darlene Y. Sowell President & CEO Neighborhood Houses St. Louis, Missouri

Rev. Kathy Dwyer Senior Pastor Rock Spring Congregational UCC Romeo, Michigan

Rev. Dr. Sandra Hulse (Retired) Santa Rosa, California

Mr. Wade Zick Managing Director Pilgrim Firs Camp & Conference Center Port Orchard, Washington

Ms. Barbara Everett (Retired) Director of Development Eden Theological Seminary Pleasant Hill, Tennessee

Rev. Gwendolyn V. Kirkland, CFP Managing Principal Kirkland, Turnbo & Associates Matteson, Illinois

Ex-officio Rev. John Dorhauer General Minister & President United Church of Christ Cleveland, Ohio

Member Emeritus Ms. Dale Bonds Chair United Church of Christ Board of Directors New Orleans, Louisiana

Rev. Dr. Harold C. Smith CEO & CIO YMCA Retirement Fund (Retired) New York, New York

Mr. Donald G. Hart President

Mr. Matthew W. Wagner Senior Executive, Business Development

Mr. Gaylord Tang Administrative Assistant, Administration

Mr. Theodore E. Phillips Director, Finance & Administration

Ms. Stacey Pettice Executive, Business Development

Ms. Debbie Wibowo Marketing and Communications Associate

Ms. Kathryn McCloskey Director, Social Responsibility

Ms. Milagros Hernandez Client Services Team Leader

Mr. Howard W. Hawkins III Director, Business Development

Ms. Crysta Selal Client Services Representative

Ms. Karen Sherman-Chang Controller

Ms. Michele Hamilton Staff Accountant

United Church Funds Staff

Mr. Adam Sank Administrative Assistant, Business Development

18


Invest Responsibly. Strengthen Ministry.

475 Riverside Drive, Suite 1020 New York, NY 10115

@UCFunds

877-806-4989

united-church-funds

ucfunds.org

ucfunds

20

United Church Funds 2016 Annual Report  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you