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2016-2017 Annual Report Counseling and Psychological Services

D I V ISI ON OF ST UD EN T D E V E LO P M E N T A N D E N R O L L ME N T S E RV I C E S U N IV ER SIT Y OF C E N TR A L F LO R I DA • O R L A N D O, F L

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 1


Contents 3 Message from the CAPS Director 4 Our Vision/Introduction 5 Section 1: Clinical Services 14 Section 2: Outreach Services 22 Section 3: Training Program 24 Section 4: Staff


Message from the CAPS Director Hello UCF Knights, Colleagues, Partners and Community!

KAREN R. HOFMANN, PH.D.

Thank you for your role in supporting Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the mental and emotional health and wellbeing of our students. We believe it is important for our UCF community to see the outcomes of services CAPS provides as a way of dispelling myths and reducing the stigma of seeking help for mental health and stage of life challenges. We want to show what you helped us accomplish this past year in 2016—17:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CAPS utilization continues to increase every year. This past academic year, CAPS served 5,245 students, for a total of 26,377 appointments. This is an 18% increase in both students served and appointments compared to the prior year. It is a 36% increase in students served and appointments compared to two years ago. Over 50% of CAPS clients reported Anxiety and Depression as their main area of concerns. CAPS continues to see students reporting high risk, 21% of students reporting significant thoughts of suicidal in the last two weeks and 15% seriously considered attempting suicide within the last year.

Average Initial Assessment Wait Time: 3 days ( from 5.47 the year prior)

High Risk Safety Plans conducted: 133 (23% )

from year prior)

After-Hours Crisis Line Use: 468 calls (29% last year)

2,656 (2%

from

from last year)

Total Groups Offered: 70 (17% )

Total Group Clients Served: 363 (28%

Baker Acts: 59 (3%

Crisis Appointments:

)

Total Workshops offered: 96 (92%

from last year)

Workshop Attendees: 86% were non-clients and 60% never visited CAPS (n=) 298

Crisis-Related CAPS reached 28,094 people in our outreach efforts through our signature events and developmental programming. This is an 8% increase from last year (n= 26,120).

Students reported that CAPS helped them stay in school. 98% of our students reported that CAPS has been very helpful and effective overall, 78% reported that it made it easier to remain enrolled at UCF, and that counseling helped or would help their academic performance.

What is new this coming year: CAPS now offers On-line Screening for mental health issues on our website. CAPS continues to expand web-based treatment and psycho-education options. This year, Therapist-Assisted Online (TAO) web based program has launched a selfenrollment self-help option for students, faculty and staff. This option is for students who may not want to come to CAPS at this time, who are taking online-classes or who may not have time to come to therapy. Now, both clients and non-clients can benefit from important information about deceasing their depression and anxiety and other issues. Go to the CAPS website to enroll. CAPS received a suicide prevention grant from SAMSA and CAPS will be launching “Kognito” which is a game based simulation training program to help our community engage in important conversations through online practice with an avatar experience. With success there are always great collaborations with our partners. CAPS wishes to thank all our SDES departments and faculty collaborations. It takes a village to keep our students succeeding in their academic and co-curricular endeavors. On behalf of all of us at CAPS, we hope you have another great year! Go Knights! Charge On! — Karen R. Hofmann, Ph.D. 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 3


Counseling and Psychological Services

Our Vision To enhance the lives of students by reducing the impact of mental health and phase of life challenges, elevating well-being and resiliency and minimizing the interruption of their academic pursuits.Â

Our Mission To serve as an essential mental health resource for UCF students by providing high quality, culturally competent, clinical and outreach services, and a nationally renowned training program.

Our Values 1.

Accessibility

2. Collaboration 3. Equity and Inclusion 4. Student Centered 5. Professional Excellence 6. Positive Work Environment 7.

Mindful Innovation

8. Holistic Wellness

CAPS Strategic Goals/Initiatives

1

2 3 4 5 6 7

Provide high quality, barrier-free clinical services that minimize interruptions to student learning and aid in the development of skills needed to function optimally. Foster meaningful and collaborative liaison and consultative relationships with relevant offices, colleges, and student leaders and organizations. Contribute to a highly inclusive campus as a beacon for equity, inclusion, social justice in programming, service provision, recruitment, curriculum involvement, consultation, and advocacy. Provide excellent primary outreach and prevention through mental health education and student development programming.

To develop and train emerging professionals who are ethical, versatile, clinically and culturally competent and aware and who provide highly skilled services to a wide range of clients. Provide a work environment infused with creativity, professional satisfaction, positivity, growth opportunities, and strong intra-unit communication. Promote practitioner-scholar-identity by developing and expanding CAPS scholarly activities that inform our clinical practices and contributes to the field of collegiate mental health.


SECTION 1

Clinical Services students in total received services in the 2016-2017 academic year.

4,226 students served

1,019 students served were

were new clients.

returning clients.

TAO Treatment since the program began

1,190 clients were provided

The Outcome AVERAGE IMPROVEMENT AFTER FOUR SESSIONS

total appointments were conducted in the 2016-2017 academic year.

Initial Appointment of clients reported elevated levels of Generalized Anxiety symptoms

33 clients were provided

the TAO Self-Help since the program began

26,377 55%

Therapy Assisted Online (TAO)

54%

of clients reported elevated levels of Depression symptoms

After four counseling sessions, UCF CAPS’ average improved change for clients with elevated distress on the following CCAPS subscales: generalized anxiety, social anxiety, depression, and hostility was greater than the change achieved by 97.4%, 94.9%, 94.9%, and 97.4%, respectively, of counseling centers in the national sample.

Client Surveys 55%

51%

of clients reported elevated levels of Social Anxiety symptoms

of clients reported elevated levels of Hostility symptoms

18% increase in students served

18% increase in

+

appointments provided

them to feel better about themselves.

99.8% said CAPS is a

Demand & Utilization +

100% said CAPS helped

necessary service at UCF.

29% increase in use

+

of after-hours crisis line

98%

said CAPS has been very effective and helpful overall. RESULTS

*Compared to the previous year

Overall, students that sought out CAPS services reported positive outcomes on the Individual Counseling Evaluations. 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 5


CAPS Client Demographics Gender Identity 65% 33%

WOMAN

18%

FRESHMAN/ FIRST YEAR

MAN

15%

SOPHOMORE

1%

SELF-IDENTIFY

0.7%

TRANSGENDER

Race/Ethnicity 52% 20

AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK

12% 7

WHITE HISPANIC/LATINO

%

Academic Status

31% 24% 9%

1%

PARENT/RELATIVE

SENIOR

5%

OTHER

GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL STUDENT

5%

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

23% 15%

ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

13%

HEALTH & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

0.3%

NATIVE AMERICAN/ PACIFIC ISLANDER

12%

ARTS & HUMANITIES

9%

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

6%

EDUCATION

5%

MEDICINE

4%

ROSEN COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

3%

NURSING

3%

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Sexual Identity 78% 9%

HETEROSEXUAL BISEXUAL

4%

SELF-IDENTIFY

3%

GAY

3%

QUESTIONING

2%

LESBIAN

97

Countries Represented

2%

FACULTY/STAFF

2%

ORIENTATION

0.9%

CAPS PRESENTATION/ OUTREACH

0.3%

RESIDENT ASSISTANT

SCIENCES

SELF-IDENTIFY

AMERICAN INDIAN/ ALASKAN NATIVE

FRIEND

8%

2%

0.1%

21%

SELF

OTHER

MULTI-RACIAL

6%

50%

JUNIOR

College Affiliations

ASIAN/ASIAN AMERICAN

%

Referral Source

1%

THE BURNETT HONORS COLLEGE

0.9%

GRADUATE STUDIES

0.4%

OPTICS & PHOTONICS: CREOL & FPCE

4

%

International Students

Additional Student Demographics 37% 25%

TRANSFER FIRST GENERATION STUDENTS

6%

STUDENTS WITH REGISTERED DISABILITIES

5%

UCF ACADEMIC PROBATION

3%

ATHLETICS PARTICIPATION

1%

STUDENT VETERAN

3.25

Self-reported GPA (Average)


Trends in Clinical Service Utilization Number of Students Served Per Academic Year

Appointments Provided during the Academic Year

6,000

30,000

18%

+

increase since last year

5,000

18%

+

increase since last year

5,245 25,000

22,352

4,446 3,859

4,000

26,377

19,331

20,000

17,538

3,375 15,000

3,000 2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2013-2014

2016-2017

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Presenting Concerns of CAPS Clients Most Common Presenting Concerns at Intake The following chart depicts the Clinician Index of Client Concerns (CLICC) data for intakes during the past academic year representing clients’ most common presenting concerns as identified by the clinician.

60% ANXIETY 50% DEPRESSION 37% STRESS 28% FAMILY 24

%

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

22% RELATIONSHIP PROBLEM

22% SELF-ESTEEM/ CONFIDENCE

20% INTERPERSONAL FUNCTIONING

14% TRAUMA 13% EATING/ BODY IMAGE

12

%

SLEEP

12

%

ADJUSTMENT TO NEW ENVIRONMENT

12% SOCIAL

ISOLATION

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 7


Outcomes for UCF CAPS students Compared to National Averages CAPS outperformed most counseling centers in the nation

This data compares the center’s average change for clients with elevated distress on CCAPS subscales to a national sample of 106 counseling centers representing 47,948 clients. For instance, for the subscale Depression, CAPS’ average change after two sessions is at the 76.7 percentile. UCF CAPS’ average change for this subscale is greater than the change achieved by 76.7% of counseling centers in the national sample. “Elevated range” means that these students report a level of symptoms that impact their daily life.

CCAPS Subscales

Percentages of UCF CAPS Clients with an Elevated CCAPS Score Above the National Average

in the top mental health areas after 4 sessions of treatment.

Percentages of Counseling Centers UCF CAPS Outperformed on Average Change for Clients with Elevated Distress on CCAPS

Generalized Anxiety

55%

Social Anxiety

55%

77%

95%

Depression

54%

77%

95%

Academic Distress

51%

Hostility

51%

Eating Concerns Substance Use

80% 97%

44%

80% 83% 98%

50%

73%

44%

80% 96% AFTER 2 SESSIONS

Psychological Symptoms Elevations The data to the right compares the average Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) scores for 3,868 UCF clients who completed an initial assessment this academic year to the national sample, composed of 183,618 participants. UCF students are presenting with similar levels of distress. Based on a scale from 0-4 (4 being the most severe), these scores suggest that UCF students are presenting with similar levels of distress in all subscales as compared to students at other college counseling centers across the nation who are also using the CCAPS.

92%

AFTER 4 SESSIONS

Elevated CCAPS Scores Compared to National Average UCF CAPS

NATIONAL AVERAGE

Depression

Social Anxiety 1.78

2.05 1.88

1.65

Academic Distress 1.78 1.65

Hostility 0.93 0.90

Eating Concerns 0.94 1.96

Substance Use 0.51 0.69


Crisis Services Utilization Crisis-related appointments

Students served for emergency care

2 increase since last year

2 increase since last year

+ %

2,597

3,000 2,000

1,895

2,176

+ %

2,656

1,500

1,393

1,423

2015-2016

2016-2017

1,164

975 750

1,000 0

0 2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

CAPS Clinical Services and Risk over Time Overall, clients that attended two or more appointments for services at CAPS report reductions in these risk categories. This past year, students reported less frequency of suicidal, homicidal, and violent thoughts while receiving services at CAPS. Please note that these students may or may not still be seeking services. There are a number of considerations that may be impacting this change but seeking services certainly plays a role.

Thoughts of Ending Life

2016-2017

29%

since last year

3%

since last year

18 %

since last year

2013-2014

After Hours Crisis Line CAPS provides 24 hours a day, 7 days a week access to students in crisis.

Risk Assessment & Management Procedures When students present with high risk, we take steps to mitigate the risk and can promote safety for the student. This involves a detailed risk assessment, safety planning, and connecting with higher levels of care if needed.

Care Management Services CAPS provides clinical services and specialized case management to our highest risk students. Students assigned to Care Managers present with a level of severity that requires frequent contact, management of risk, and complex referrals to other treatment services.

After Hours Crisis Line Contacts

500

37.0% AT FIRST APPOINTMENT

394

400

19.7% AT LAST APPOINTMENT Fear of Losing Control/ Acting Violently

22.6% AT FIRST APPOINTMENT

300

200

2014-2015

259 227

292

468

363

316

258

Utilization of Care Management Services

11.7% AT LAST APPOINTMENT Thoughts of Hurting Others

10.9% AT FIRST APPOINTMENT 5.5% AT LAST APPOINTMENT

Risk Assessment and Management Procedures

100

0

41 2013-2014

51 2014-2015

61

59

2015-2016

2016-2017

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 9


Therapy Assisted Online (TAO) Treatment Therapist Assisted Online (TAO) is an interactive, online therapy program. TAO is based on well researched and highly effective strategies for helping students. Throughout treatment, participants will watch videos and complete exercises individually for up to 2 hours per week, and then meet with a therapist via videoconferencing for a 10-15 minute appointment. Since the program began in 2015, CAPS has provided treatment to 33 clients.

33 1,190

Client Satisfaction with CAPS Services The Individual Counseling Evaluation (ICE) assesses a client’s experience of CAPS services, with a focus on their perceptions of individual counseling. Any student that received one or more sessions after their initial assessment were eligible to participate. All responses were anonymous and confidential. ICE results are reported in the following percentages of clients who agreed or strongly agreed to the statements.

“ CAPS helped me feel

better about myself.

100%

Therapy Assisted Online (TAO)

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS

“ CAPS is a necessary

service at UCF. ”

STUDENTS PROVIDED TAO TREATMENT

99.8%

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN TAO SELF-HELP

Therapy Assisted Online (TAO) Self-Help TAO Self Help is a web-based, interactive program that provides students with the skills and tools to help address issues, such as anxiety and depression. This program teaches healthy coping skills. TAO Self-Help gives the students access to the TAO resources, including the Mindfulness Library and Mind Elevator, for their own use either without ongoing therapy or as a supplement to ongoing therapy. TAO Self-Help is not therapy on its own but provides resources that can be helpful to students. This year, 1,190 students were enrolled to receive Therapy Assisted Online Self-Help.

“ CAPS been very effective

and helpful overall. ”

98%

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS

“ CAPS helped or will help

with my academic performance, directly or indirectly. ” —

78%

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS

“ CAPS made it easier for me to remain

enrolled at UCF by addressing my problems/concerns. ” —

78%

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS


Client Comments “ Counseling was one of the best decisions I could have made. ” “ I cannot stress enough how impactful this program is. I think it is absolutely imperative that programs like this exist in colleges. This program is a resource that should be used far more often and has the potential to help any/all students in some way or another. ”

“ CAPS has positively impacted my life and greatly improved my college experience. ”

“ This is an amazing service. It is helping

me overcome some of the most difficult times I’ve ever faced and brought me back to being able to be productive again. ”

“ Coming to UCF has been a great change for me, and I don’t handle change well. I started with counseling

because I was involved in a bad relationship that was effecting me more than I even saw on the surface. These services have greatly impacted my life, and have helped me get back to who I was—the person I lost 3 years ago when I graduated high school. ”

“ This place is like an oasis.

In the heat of college, it’s wonderful to have somewhere like this to go where people care about you and will help you get through. I can’t express how thankful I am and how important this is to have. ”

“ I love this place, I probably wouldn’t be here without it. ” 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 11


Groups Clients Attended 600

since 27% increase last year

563

+

450

441

Appointments Attended

Groups Offered

4,000

80

since 31% increase last year

+

3,727

2,842

3,000

385

60

60

increase since last year

70

2,307

300

2,000

272

40

1,432

150

1,000

20

0

0 20132014

16%

+

20142015

20152016

20162017

0 20132014

20142015

20152016

20162017

ACT for Life

Graduate Support

Autism Connections

Grief and Loss

Body Wellness

Health Empowerment

Building Deep Relationships

Healthy Emotion Management

Building Social Confidence

Mindfulness for Anxiety

Building Your Toolbox for Depression

Mi Gente

Empowerment through Music Family Group Finding Balance in Life/DBT Getting in Tune with Your ADHD GLB Support

2016-2017

Group Spotlight:

Groups (70 Total)

Creative Connections

2016-2017

Resiliency in Transitions Sister Circle Trans Support Understanding Self & Others USO: Musically Speaking Women’s Empowerment Women’s Group

Trans Support This group is for persons who are seeking support in realization of one’s gender identity. Topics may include coming out, transition concerns, and other relevant issues.

Client Comments

“ One of the best decisions I’ve made at UCF. ”

“ This group was extremely

helpful in finding kin in my fellow students. ”

“ Helped me not crash and burn in school. Feel much better. ”

“ It was a connecting experience!”


The Impact of Groups 100%

of respondents said

“I was able to learn something with the amount of group sessions I had. ”

94%

of respondents said

“Group helped me develop better coping skills. ”

89%

of respondents said

“Group made it easier for me to stay in school. ”

Group Client Comments Group helped me so much. I don’t think I would have made it this semester without it. Thank you for providing this service to UCF students. This has genuinely changed my life for the better.

Loved it and NEED it. I cannot convey how well this helped me. I really needed this group. I am so glad I could be in it. This was magical! I havent felt this connected in a long time.

This group was crucial in managing my first semester of graduate school. Thank you! An experience I’ll remember for the rest of my life!

CAPS Workshops

298

ATTENDEES

96

SESSIONS

1 Hour Sessions for any student

WEEKLY TOPICS • From Stress to Success • Improve Your Mood

OTHER POPULAR TOPICS • Nature Talks • Test Anxiety

99%

OF SURVEYED CLIENTS SAID:

“ I can use this information to improve as a student. ”

86%

OF ATTENDEES WERE NON-CAPS CLIENTS

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 13


SECTION 2

Outreach Services

916 APPOINTMENTS

CAPS PROGRAMMING Developmental Programming, Expo, Paws-itively, etc.

28,094 PEOPLE SERVED (direct/indirect)

PROGRAMMING REQUESTED BY OTHER DEPARTMENTS Tablings/Orientation, Crisis response, Presentations

INDIRECT TIME (Time used to prep for outreach activities, meet with Liaisonships, etc…)

APPOINTMENTS

APPOINTMENTS

APPOINTMENTS

161

405

305

PEOPLE SERVED

PEOPLE SERVED

HOURS

6,443

20,596

371


Outreach Domains To better assess the effectiveness of the outreach developmental programming we do at CAPS, we coded all our various presentations into five domains. Below is the cumulative data we collected in the five domains this year.

“ I learned skills/knowledge that will help me be more successful at...” Academic Success (N=225)

“ I learned skills/knowledge to improve my...”

Academic Success (N=225)

“ I intend to use what I learned in this presentation.”

Academic Success (N=225)

96% of respondents agreed

93% of respondents agreed

96% of respondents agreed

Social Connections

Social Connections

Social Connections

97% of respondents agreed

94% of respondents agreed

97% of respondents agreed

(N=25)

Wellness and Life Skills (N=566)

92% of respondents agreed

Mental Health Awareness (N=439)

(N=25)

Wellness and Life Skills (N=566)

93% of respondents agreed

Mental Health Awareness (N=439)

(N=25)

Wellness and Life Skills (N=566)

90% of respondents agreed

Mental Health Awareness (N=439)

92% of respondents agreed

92% of respondents agreed

94% of respondents agreed

Diversity Awareness

Diversity Awareness

Diversity Awareness

91% of respondents agreed

93%of respondents agreed

89% of respondents agreed

(N=48)

(N=48)

(N=48)

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 15


Healthy Knight Expo (Fall 2016) 568 ATTENDEES | SURVEY RESPONSES: 169

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend UCF’s largest Health Expo. Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Student Health Services (SHS), UCF Cares, Recreation and Wellness (RWC), Wellness and Health Promotions (WHPS), as well as several other campus departments, student organizations and

community partners are on site sharing the available health and wellness resources.

The results show the event met its objectives and showed the overall effectiveness and success of the event.

Survey Results: Before/After Attending the Healthy Knights Expo How knowledgeable are you about UCF health related services?

How likely are you to utilize UCF’s health-related services?

How likely are you to refer a friend to one of UCF’s health-related services?

BEFORE ATTENDING

BEFORE ATTENDING

BEFORE ATTENDING

20%

14%

22%

VERY (33)

67%

SLIGHTLY (114)

13%

NOT AT ALL (22)

VERY (24)

55%

SLIGHTLY (93)

31%

NOT AT ALL (52)

VERY (37)

57%

SLIGHTLY (96)

21%

NOT AT ALL (36)

AFTER ATTENDING

AFTER ATTENDING

AFTER ATTENDING

82%

54%

54%

VERY (139)

16%

SLIGHTLY (27)

2%

NOT AT ALL (3)

VERY (91)

44%

SLIGHTLY (74)

2%

NOT AT ALL (4)

VERY (92)

44%

SLIGHTLY (74)

2%

NOT AT ALL (3)


Paws-a-tively Events The program is designed to increase the visibility and approachability of CAPS, as well as enhance brief therapeutic interventions. The program’s mission is to decrease stigma associated with mental health services and provide students an opportunity to de-stress and interact with their peers. Students were invited to take a break from the demands of the semester, and stop by CAPS to play with fun, friendly therapy dogs. It is known that the human-animal bond can relieve stress, anxiety and depression, and improve mood. In addition to CAPS’ therapy dog, Bodhi, 4-6 certified therapy dogs were available through collaboration with volunteers in the local community.

20

220

PARTICIPANTS AT PAWS EVENT FOR PULSE

PARTICIPANTS AT TWO EVENTS DURING FALL 2016

252

100

PARTICIPANTS AT TWO EVENTS DURING SPRING 2017

PARTICIPANTS DURING NEDA WEEK

97%

600 ALMOST

STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN 6 PAWS-A-TIVELY EVENTS

94% 90% 90%

reported that their mood was positively impacted reported that they felt less stressed reported that they would be more likely to utilize CAPS services reported that they felt more energized

N=428 | Data collected for 4 events

Bodhi

1,125

CONTACTS, APPROX.

35

EVENTS

THESE INCLUDED:

Purrfectly Stress Free 98% of participants were students 2% of were UCF staff members (172 SURVEY RESPONSES)

CAPS signature events

91%

Includes all Pawsatively events

“Bodhi Time” workshops Highlighting the Improve Your Mood and From Stress to Success series

Interviews Various presentation requests and student interviews, as well as an interview for Channel 6 News and photos taken for a Wall Street Journal article

Therapy Groups

ATTENDEES HAD 46% OF NEVER BEEN TO CAPS ATTENDEES WERE 71% OF NON-CAPS CLIENTS

Purrfectly Stress Free events PROMOTE THE VISIBILITY AND APPROACHABILITY OF CAPS

85% 79% 75%

reported that their mood was positively impacted reported that they felt less stressed reported that they would be more likely to utilize CAPS services reported that they felt more energized

Visited several therapy groups as well as participated in several clinical sessions 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 17


Therapeutic Drumming An addition to CAPS outreach services this year included Therapeutic Drumming. The intention for drumming at events on campus is to decrease stress, increase overall mood, and contribute to personal empowerment. By being part of a multiculturally inclusive experience, students often have increased comfort with mental health services and may feel more of a part of the UCF community.

Drumming Events: • Pulse Response

• Unity Through Art tabling and Campus • • • • •

Conversations at LGBTQ Services English Language Institute (ELI) Healthy Knights Expo International Education Week (IEW) Just Be Day with Wellness and Health Promotions Clinical Workshops: Drum Your Stress Away

Field of Memories The Field of Memories is a visual display of the 1,100 college age students lost each year to suicide. We ask students and those passing by to write a message of hope to those who may be struggling with depression or a memorial message to someone they may have lost.

GOAL: Increase awareness around suicide, to create opportunities for people to talk about depression, and promote the QPR program and the QPR a thon.

550+

FLAGS PLANTED IN MEMORY MALL DURING SPRING 2017

568 ATTENDEES | SURVEY RESPONSES: 169

Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer), is a program designed for everyone to learn what can be done to prevent suicide. The training session is a one hour presentation where participants learn the signs of suicide and three basic principles of how to help save a life. QPR is designed for students, faculty and staff and anyone at UCF. The reason we do this training is to increase the likelihood that attendees will feel more comfortable to talk about suicidal thoughts/feelings with someone who they might be concerned about.

WE TRAINED:

456

21

10

STUDENTS

STAFF

FACULTY

554 TOTAL

AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

94% N=217

“As a result of this training, I feel more comfortable to talk about suicidal thoughts/feelings with someone who I am concerned about. “


National Eating Disorders Awareness (NEDA) Week NEDA Week is an opportunity for students to come together and build a culture of self and body acceptance on this campus. The programming is to also help students become aware that if they are struggling with eating or body concerns, there is help for them here at UCF. CAPS partners with Student Health Services as well as Recreation and Wellness Center and Wellness and Health Promotions.

• Paws-a-tively Me (N=100)

• Kick off in the Student Union (N=200) • Purple Ribbon presentation (N=2) • Blue Jeans for True Jeans (N=30) • Love, Not Labels (N=15)

B.L.A.C.K Institute The 2nd Annual B.L.A.C.K. Institute was held on October 21 and October 22. A total of 37 students registered for the BLACK Institute between online registrations and day of the event registrations, with 20 students

attending the event over 2 days. Attendees of the B.L.A.C.K. Institute event completed evaluation forms following each event data collected from evaluation forms are described below.

Demographics The majority of participants identified as:

71%

71%

100%

43%

71%

100%

Junior

Female

Heterosexual

N=5

N=5

Black/African American

Live off campus

First generation students

N=5

N=7

N=3

N=7

Descriptive Data

100

%

100 86

%

%

86

%

AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“I learned skills and knowledge that will help me be more successful at UCF or in other areas of my life.” AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“I am aware of resources on campus.” AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“This event will in some way help me to graduate.”

86

%

86

%

86

%

AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“I feel more connected to the UCF community after this event.” AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“Attending this event helped to increase my awareness of my cultural identity.” AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“I believe it is important to have events like this at UCF.”

AGREED/STRONGLY AGREED THAT:

“I feel better prepared to be a leader to the UCF community.” 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 19


Peer Educators

CAPS had 18 Peer Educators this year, with a total of 158 volunteer hours.

90

23

VOLUNTEER HOURS IN FALL 2016

EVENTS

68

8

VOLUNTEER HOURS IN SPRING 2017

PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL PRESENTATIONS

7

5

VOLUNTEER HOURS IN SUMMER A 2017

TABLINGS

Social Media Counseling and Psychological Services • Over 1,525 "Likes" • Joined in 2009

UCFCaps • 298 followers • Joined in 2013

@UCFCaps • 565 followers • Joined in 2009

UCF Counseling Center • 24 videos • Over 9,000 views • Joined in 2009

Crisis Response

29

35+

1,449

APPOINTMENTS

HOURS

COMMUNITY MEMBERS SERVED

CAPS staff are trained in Psychological First Aid (PSA) annually. CAPS staff responded to several crisis situations that occurred throughout the year. We had 29 appointments, over 35 hours and served over 1,449 members of our community in assisting with crisis response situations.


SAMHSA Suicide Prevention Grant Program: Healthy Knights 2020 In 2016, UCF was awarded the prestigious SAMHSA Suicide Prevention Grant for the Healthy Knights 2020 program. The purpose of the grant/program is to expand efforts to promote wellness and help-seeking of all students and provide specific outreach to vulnerable students such as veterans, the LGBTQ+ community, and those suffering from co-occurring disorders. The program goals include:

1 Crisis Response Plan 2 Suicide Risk Awareness 3 Prevention and Risk Reduction 4 Public Service Announcements 5 Program Membership

Out of the Darkness Walks CAPS is in the first year of the grant. With funding, we were able to support two Out of the Darkness Walks, one in the Greater Orlando Community and a Campus Out of the Darkness Walk.

Programs Purchased with Grant Kognito

On-Line Screening for Mental Health

Kognito is an aviator/simulation online tool that allows users to enter a virtual environment and engage in roleplay conversations with emotionally-responsive virtual humans. Through practice and receiving personalized feedback, users learn and assess their competency to lead similar conversations in real life.

Key Learning and Assessment Principles • Hands-on-practice • Contextual learning • Personalized feedback

• Storytelling • Case-based approach

1,222

TIMES UTILIZED SINCE PURCHASE OF PROGRAM

82%

USERS REPORTED WILLINGNESSS TO SEEK HELP AFTER SCREENING

Designed to provide a safe and anonymous way students can check in on their mental health, our online selfassessments allow users to screen for mood and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and alcohol use disorders. Online Screenings Provide an Assesssment of: • Student’s mental health • Information on whether their assessment results are consistent with a mental health disorder • An overview of the signs and symptoms of treatable mental health disorders. 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 21


SECTION 3

Training Program UCF CAPS successfully provided supervision and training to 2 post-doctoral fellows, 3 doctoral interns and 6 trainees (3 clinical social work pre-masters interns, 2 pre-masters interns and 1 pre-doctoral practicum student). The training program focused on the development of

SUPERVISION/ TRAINING RECIPIENTS

2

POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS

3

DOCTORAL INTERNS

3

clinical skills, outreach and consultation, supervision and/or program development and evaluation in addition, each doctoral intern and post-doctoral fellow presented a professional development workshop.

Trainees ANDREA DEWITT

CAITI BRADBURY

Rollins College Pre-Practicum Student

Rollins College Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Graduated)

TAYLOR SWEET Rollins College Pre-Practicum Student

ALEXI MINNICK CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER PRE-MASTERS INTERNS (TRAINEES)

University of Central Florida Social Work Generalist

KELLY CHRISTENSEN

2 1

PRE-MASTERS INTERNS (TRAINEES)

PRE-DOCTORAL PRACTICUM STUDENT INTERNS (TRAINEES)

University of Central Florida Clinical Social Work (Graduated)

DANIEL LAVENDER University of Central Florida Clinical Social Work (Graduated)

HAYLEY RODRIGUEZ University of Central Florida, Clinical Psychology Masters (Graduated) Publication: “Examination

of the Contribution of Ruminative Thinking and Maladaptive Self-Beliefs to Social Anxiety.” KEARA WASHINGTON Florida Institute of Technology Clinical Psychology, Psy.D Doctoral Practicum

PRE-MASTERS TRAINEES PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

SOCIAL WORK PRE-MASTERS TRAINEES PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

Christin Saro, Keara Washington, Caiti Bradbury, Hayley Rodriguez & Sydney Boyd

Kelly Christensen, Daniel Lavender, & Alexi Minnick


TRAINING COHORT PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Kelly Christensen, Daniel Lavender, Alexi Minnick, Keara Washington,

Christin Saro, Sydney Boyd, Hayley Rodriguez, Caiti Bradbury, Dr. Jocelyn Buhain (Training Director, 2016), Lara Herman, Janice Delgado, Brittany Lee, Monica Lackups Fuentes & Christine Wojnicz.

Doctoral Interns BRITTANY LEE University of Memphis

• Stereotype Threat, Racial Identity, and Grit in African American Male College Students • Graduated and is in a Clinical Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Tennessee Valley VA Healthcare System

BRITTANY LEE MONICA LACKUPS-FUENTES Eastern Michigan University

• Problematic Cybersex and the University Student • Graduated and accepted staff psychologist position at Grand Valley State University Counseling Center (Michigan).

CHRISTINE WOJNICZ Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia • Working with Childfree Individuals and Couples • Graduated and working as Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton University

DOCTORAL INTERNS PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

Brittany Lee, Monica Lackups Fuentes & Christine Wojnicz

Janice Delgado & Lara Herman

Post-Doctoral Fellows DR. JANICE DELGADO

DR. LARA HERMAN

Ponce Health Sciences University, Ponce, PR

Nova Southeastern University

• Assessment and Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyper activity Disorder in College students

• Entering Private Practice at Counseling Corner Inc.

• Music in Psychotherapy

• Completed Post Doc and is a Staff member at UCF CAPS 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 23


SECTION 4

Staff

Professional Association Leadership

TERESA M. MICHAELSON-CHMELIR, PH.D

Elected as President-Elect Association for University and College Counseling Center Outreach (AUCCCO)

Awarded the SAMHSA Suicide Prevention Grant ($306,000) Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration

Awarded the Interactive Screening Program (ISP) grant ($10,000) American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP)

STEPHANIE PRESTON, M.ED.

Served as Directorate Member

ACPA Commission for Counseling & Psychological Services

Co-chair of Awards Committee (Ongoing) American College Personnel Association (ACPS)

CHRIS HANES, PH.D

Elected Research and Evaluation Chair on the Executive Committee

Association for the Coordination of Counseling Center Clinical Services (ACCCS)

Conference Presentations JOCELYN BUHAIN, PH.D & STEPHANIE PRESTON, M.ED.

PANEL DISCUSSION:

Training across Developmental Levels in University Counseling Centers PANELISTS:

PANEL DISCUSSION:

Group Issues Training Seminar across Developmental Levels

Stephanie Preston and Jocelyn Buhain (UCF); Dwaine Campbell (University of Michigan), and Amy Cavanaugh (University of North Carolina)

CONFERENCE:

CONFERENCE:

February 2017 | Tampa, FL | American College Counseling Association (ACCA) Annual Convention

March 2017 | Columbus, OH | 2017 ACPA Annual Convention


KAREN HOFMANN, PH.D

KAREN HOFMANN, PH.D & LIZ STEVENSON, MSW

PRESENTATION:

Telling our CAPS Story with Language Administrators Can Understand

PRESENTERS: Karen Hofmann (UCF); Jon Brunner (Florida Gulf Coast University); Cassandra Nichols (Washington State University)

CONFERENCE:

October 2016 | Tampa, FL | 46th Annual National

PRESENTATION:

Using Innovation and Creativity to Reduce Stigma and Barriers to Counseling Services CONFERENCE:

January 2017 | Austin, TX | NASPA Mental Health Conference

Conference for the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD)

PRESENTATION:

Cutting Edge Diversity Trainings at CAPS PANELISTS: Karen Hofmann (UCF); Maggie Gartner (Texas A&M University); Sharon Smith (Aquinas College)

CONFERENCE:

October 2016 | Tampa, FL | 46th Annual National Conference for the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD)

CHRISTOPHER HANES, PH.D

PRESENTATION:

Innovations in Assessing Clinical Outcome Measures: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Counseling Services

PRESENTERS: Eric Wood (Texas Christian University) and Christopher Hanes (UCF)

CONFERENCE: May 2017 | Association for the Coordination of Counseling Center Clinical Services

PRESENTATION:

Directors Discussions with University CAPS Directors (Universities 35,000+) DISCUSSANT LEADER Karen Hofmann

CONFERENCE:

October 2016 | Tampa, FL | 46th Annual National Conference for the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD)

PRESENTATION:

Membership Matters: Facing our Challenges Together PRESENTERS: Richard Reams (Trinity University) and Christopher Hanes (UCF)

CONFERENCE:

May 2017 | Association for the Coordination of Counseling Center Clinical Services

PANEL DISCUSSION:

Tragedies At Home: What Campuses Can Learn From Each Other

VALESKA WILSONCATHCART, M.A. & CHRISTOPHER HANES, PH.D

PANELISTS: Carlos Gomez (Florida State University); Karen Hofmann (UCF); Alvin Lawrence (University of Florida); Amy Falvo (Flagler College); and Joe Sarrubbo (Valencia College)

CONFERENCE:

April 2017 | Gainesville, FL | 1st CWC Annual Turning Point Collegiate Summit- University of Florida

PRESENTATION:

Pursuing Innovation to Meet Demand: Using online therapy to address college mental health trends at a large counseling center CONFERENCE:

March 2017 | Orlando, FL | Southern College Health Association Annual Meeting 2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 25


CHRISTINE DASSOW, MED, EDS

PRESENTATION:

Give Me a Beat: Healing Through Use of Music in Therapy

CONFERENCE:

January 2017 | Orlando, FL | UCF Counselor Education Conference

VANESSA STEIN, MSW

PRESENTATION:

Fostering Resiliency: A buzzword for college mental health

CONFERENCE:

June 2017 | Orlando, FL | NASW Florida Conference

STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS

2

awards won

5

new licensed psychologists

1

new licensed mental health counselor

2

academic journal publications

14 conference presentations


Conference Poster Sessions & Journal Articles JADE GARNEAU-FOURNIER, PH.D

Prevalence and correlates of sexual dysfunction among male and female veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma

Detweiler, L., Garneau-Fournier, J., McBain, S., Torres, T., & Turchik, J. A.

Sexual dysfunction in female college students: Sexual victimization, substance use, and personality factors. Garneau-Fournier, J., McBain, S. Torres, T., & Turchik, J. (2017). Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 43(1), 24-39. doi: 10.1080/0092623X.2015.1113595

PAPER PRESENTED AT:

November 2016 | Dallas, TX | Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Exploring provider gender preference and perceptions of providers in male and female veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma. McBain, S., Garneau-Fournier, J., Torres, T., & Turchik, J. A

Gender-Targeting Health Care Materials: A How-to Guide Using Military Sexual Trauma (MST) as an Example. McBain, S., DuBois, R., Nguyen, H., Garneau-Fournier, J., & Turchik, J. (2016). International Journal of Communication and Health, 10, 73-82.

PAPER PRESENTED AT:

November 2016 | Dallas, TX | Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

Licensure

LARA HERMAN, PH.D

TAMARA WALDEN, PH.D

Obtained licensure as a psychologist

Obtained licensure as a psychologist

Florida Board of Psychology

ANGELA CHOP, PSY.D

MELISSA FERNANDEZ, LMHC

Obtained licensure as a psychologist

Obtained licensure as Mental Health Counselor (LMHC)

BENETTA WHOLUBA, PH.D

Obtained licensure as a psychologist

Florida Board of Psychology

Florida Board of Psychology

Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy and Mental Health Counseling

LAURIE KEMPER, PH.D

Obtained licensure as a psychologist Florida Board of Psychology

Florida Board of Psychology

2016-2017 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 27


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UCF Caps 2016-2017 Annual Report  
UCF Caps 2016-2017 Annual Report  
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