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Annual Report 2014 - 2015

A department of Student Development and Enrollment Services

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 1


Contents 3 4 5 7 8 9 12 15 16 18 20 24 25

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Message from the Director Our Mission / Vision / Values CAPS Strategic Goals / Initiatives Clinical Services CAPS Utilization Trends Presenting Problems Treatment Outcomes Bodhi Groups Outreach Summary Suicide Prevention Training Program Staff Notable Mentions


Message from the CAPS Director Hello UCF Knights Colleagues, Partners and Community! Thank you for your role in supporting Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the mental health of our students. We believe it is important for our UCF community to see the outcome of services CAPS provides as a way of dispelling myths, and reducing the stigma of seeking help for mental health and stage of life challenges. We want to show what you helped us accomplish this past year 2014 - 15:

Executive Summary: CAPS utilization continues to increase every year. This past academic year, CAPS served 3,903 students, for a total of 19,972 appointments. This is a 17.7% increase in students served and a 14.3% increase in appointments compared to last year.

96% of our students continue to report that CAPS helped them better cope with concerns and 87% reported that it made it easier to remain enrolled at UCF.

CAPS continues to assess our students’ psychological symptoms before each session. Results continue to show that our students’

CAPS launched our Therapist-assisted Online (TAO) web based program that has been shown to be effective in reducing anxiety.

CAPS continues to have a robust training program that is now led by our new training director, Dr. Jocelyn Buhain.

We are always working on ways to improve accessibility to better serve our students. CAPS is committed to working on offering an assessment and letter for transgender students looking to begin hormone therapy.

psychological symptoms reduced even after one therapy session, and continued to reduce the more sessions attended. Our positive outcomes were even greater for students with elevated levels of distress who attended 4 or more sessions.

Ms. Barbara Sherwood and Dr. Tamalia Hanchell were recognized for their outstanding

CAPS served 19,092 people in our outreach efforts through several of our signature events such

Conditions for Well-Being and Success” about Campus. He also co-edited a book on Positive Psychology and wrote a chapter on coaching.

as PAWs-a-tively, Bodhi Time; Field of Memories suicide awareness, Healing Arts Exhibit, and B.L.A.C.K. series just to name a few. It is because of these programs that students interact with CAPS staff outside the therapy room that may allow students to reach out for help.

CAPS received some national attention by being featured in a New York Times article in April, focused on how CAPS is handling the influx of anxious students on campus.

achievements at the SDES awards banquet.

Dr. Larry Marks co-authored a journal article: “Positive Psychology on Campus: Creating the

Success comes with great collaborations with our partners. Counseling and Psychological Services looks forward to our continued collaboration, so that our students keep succeeding in their academic and co-curricular endeavors. On behalf of all of us at CAPS, we hope you have a great year! Go Knights! Charge On! — Karen R. Hofmann, Ph.D. 2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 3


Our Vision

To enhance the lives of students by reducing the impact of mental health and phase of life challenges, elevating well-being and resiliency and minimizing the interruption of their academic pursuits.Â

Our Mission

To serve as an essential mental health resource for UCF students by providing high quality, culturally competent, clinical and outreach services, and a nationally renowned training program.

Our Values 1. Accessibility

2. Collaboration 3. Equity and Inclusion 4. Student Centered 5. Professional Excellence 6. Positive Work Environment 7. Mindful Innovation 8. Holistic Wellness

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CAPS Strategic Goals/Initiatives 1. Provide high quality, barrier-free clinical services that minimize interruptions to student learning and aid in the development of skills needed to function optimally. Â 2. Foster meaningful and collaborative liaison and consultative relationships with relevant offices, colleges, and student leaders and organizations. 3. Contribute to a highly inclusive campus as a beacon for equity, inclusion, and social justice in programming, service provision, recruitment, curriculum involvement, consultation, and advocacy. 4. Provide excellent primary outreach and prevention through mental health education and student development programming. 5. To develop and train emerging professionals who are ethical, versatile, clinically and culturally competent and aware and who provide highly skilled services to a wide range of clients. 6. Provide a work environment infused with creativity, professional satisfaction, positivity, growth opportunities, and strong intra-unit communication. 7. Promote practitioner-scholar- identity by developing and expanding CAPS scholarly activities that inform our clinical practices and contributes to the field of collegiate mental health.

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 5


introduction 3903 students

52.6% generalized anxiety

CAPS provided services to 3903 students during Academic Year 2014-2015, presenting with a wide range of concerns and levels of severity.

52.6% of students reported generalized anxiety at their initial appointment.

17.7% demand increase

19,092 served by outreach programs

The demand of services increased 17.7% compared to prior academic years.

14.3% utilization increase The utilization of services increased 14.3% compared to prior academic years.

51.3% depression 51.3% of students reported elevated levels of depression

415 outreach appointments

3 doctoral interns UCF CAPS provided supervision and training to 3 doctoral interns

5 trainees UCF CAPS provided supervision and training to 5 trainees (pre-doctoral practicum students and 2 pre-master’s interns)

Students who sought our services reported positive outcomes. Our assessments of students showed that as a whole students experienced a significant reduction in their symptoms while receiving services at CAPS. Additionally, the data revealed stronger outcomes for students that presented with elevated levels and attended four or more sessions. It should be noted that these findings do not imply causation resulting solely from CAPS services. Students also reported a high satisfaction with our services. Client satisfaction ratings indicated that the following percentages of clients agreed or strongly agreed to the statements; “Coun­seling very effective and helpful overall” (97%), “Made it easier for me to remain en­rolled at UCF by addressing my problems/ concerns” (92%), and “Counseling and Psychological Services is a necessary stu­dent service at UCF” (99.5%).

97%

of clients agreed or strongly agreed to the statement, “Counseling [is] very effective and helpful overall”.

THE VERDICT: These findings suggest that overall, students that received services at CAPS reported high satisfaction and positive outcomes during the 2014-2015 year. Data also suggests that these services likely contributed to increased student success at UCF.

Clinical Services

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Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is committed to continually evaluating our services with the goal of promoting effective practices to meet the needs of the UCF community. We utilize a multidimensional approach to understanding outcomes by using a standardized assessment of psychological symptoms and client satisfaction ratings.


our clients

Our clients represent diverse populations and identities that reflect the diversity at UCF.

Who referred you to the counseling center? 52.3% 18.1%

Race/Ethnicity 55.4% 19.1%

Self Friend

White Hispanic/Latino(a)

10.5%

African American

7.7%

Student Health Services

6%

Asian/Asian American

5.3%

Other

5.8%

Multi-Racial

5%

Parent/Relative

1.9%

Self-identity

2.7%

Faculty/Staff

0.3%

American Indian/Alaskan Native

1.4%

Orientation

0.1%

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

0.3%

CAPS Presentation

0.3%

Resident Assistant

Academic Status 29.5%

Gender Identity

26.2%

64.6% Woman 33%

Man

1.3%

Self-Identity

0.4%

Transgender

Sexual Identity 80.6% 7.1%

Junior

Heterosexual

15%

Sophomore

14.7%

Freshman/First Year

11.8%

Self-Identity

2.8%

Gay

2.3%

Questioning

1.6%

Lesbian

% International 93 Countries 3.2 represented Students The average self-reported GPA of our students was

3.21

Graduate/Professional Degree Student

1.2%

Other

Transfer Students 60.9%

Bisexual

3.2%

Senior

35.6%

Transfer Non-Transfer

Additional Student Demographics 6%

Students with Registered Disabilities

4.8%

UCF Academic Probation

2.3%

Athletics Participation

1.4%

Veteran

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 7


Client Utilization Trends NUMBER OF STUDENTS SERVED

CAPS has seen a significant increase in the number of students seeking services over the past three years. This past year we had an increase of 17.7% in number of students receiving services at CAPS. 4000

3,903

3750

students served in 2014-15

17.7 %

3500

increase from 2013-2014

3250 3000 2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 - 2015

ACADEMIC YEAR

21 %

increase from 2012-2013

Appointments NUMBER OF APPOINTMENTS

The number of appointments we provide during the academic year continues to increase to meet the needs of our students. Trends show a significant increase over past three years. 20000

19,972

19000

appointments provided in 2014-15

18000

14.3%

17000

increase from 2013-2014

16000 2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014 ACADEMIC YEAR

8

2014 - 2015

17.5%

increase from 2012-2013


Presenting Problems Students seek services at CAPS for a variety of reasons. We tailor our clinical services to meet the unique needs of our students and use standard measures to identify trends.

Clinician Index of Client Concerns (CLICC): The following chart depicts CLICC data for intakes during the past academic year. This assessment has the clinician identify the top presenting concerns for each client and is a standardized assessment from the Center for Collegiate Mental Health. Anxiety and Depression were the most frequently identified presenting concerns (all concerns over 10% are depicted).

ANXIETY DEPRESSION STRESS RELATIONSHIP PROBLEMS ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE FAMILY INTERPERSONAL FUNCTIONING SELF ESTEEM/ CONFIDENCE EATING DISORDERS/ BODY IMAGE 0%

15%

30%

45%

60%

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 9


CAPS Outcome Measures Counseling Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) The CCAPS is a standardized measure of psychological symptoms designed to meet the clinical, research, and administrative needs of a counseling center field. The CCAPS 34 provides an indicator of severity level of symptoms and consists of eight subscales, including Depression, Generalized Anxiety, Social Anxiety, Academic Distress, Eating Concerns, Hostility, Alcohol Use, and General Distress. At CAPS, we have all students complete the CCAPS prior to every individual counseling session. The following is a description of the severity levels and reliable change indicator.

SEVERITY LEVEL:

L OW Most consistent with college students who are not in treatment. Indicates no or low distress.

M I LD Indicates mild-moderate distress and a potentially problematic area.

EL EVATE D Indicates high levels of distress and potential impairment in a student’s functioning in a major domain of their life (ex. Social, academic, occupational, or other important area).

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GENERALIZED ANXIETY DEPRESSION

52.6% Counseling Center 51.3%

FAMILY DISTRESS

38.4%

ACADEMIC DISTRESS

35.9%

GENERAL DISTRESS

35.9%

HOSTILITY

33.7%

SOCIAL ANXIETY

32.9%

EATING CONCERNS

18.4%

SUBSTANCE USE

14.5%

Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS): This data summarizes the percentage of elevated concerns using the CCAPS subscales for the clients that completed an initial assessment during the 2014-2015 Academic Year.

Moving forward with TAO • TAO Services are now available for CAPS clients • TAO is a seven-week, interactive web-based program that provides assistance to help decrease anxiety • TAO provides participants with the skills and tools to help overcome • TAO is based on well-researched and highly effective strategies for treating anxiety, with some on-going support and help

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 11


Treatment Outcomes The following data summarizes counseling outcomes using the CCAPS subscales for the 2793 clients that completed an initial assessment and at least one follow up session during the 2014-2015 Academic Year.

1. Symptom Reduction Counseling Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) Clients with One or More Appointments DEPRESSION GENERALIZED ANXIETY SOCIAL ANXIETY ACADEMIC DISTRESS HOSTILITY EATING CONCERNS ALCOHOL ABUSE DISTRESS INDEX 0

1.0

SELF-RATING OF SYMPTOMS FIRST SESSION

LAST SESSION

Summary During Academic Year 2014-2015, a total of 2793 clients completed an initial assessment and at least one follow up individual counseling session. The chart above indicates clients CCAPS scores on the 8 subscales at both their initial assessment and their last counseling session during the semester. The average number of individual counseling sessions in the above sample was 4.5. Above scores represent a statistically significant reduction from initial assessment to last session on all subscales (p<.00). These findings indicate that overall students who sought out CAPS services during the academic year experienced a reduction in psychological symptoms.

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2.0


2. Outcomes for Students Most in Need Percentage of Students No Longer Elevated after Multiple Sessions OVERALL DISTRESS

64%

SUBSTANCE USE

62%

HOSTILITY

62%

DEPRESSION

59%

SOCIAL ANXIETY

49%

GENERALIZED ANXIETY EATING CONCERNS

48% 45%

40%

71% 68% 65%

58% 51%

ACADEMIC DISTRESS

71%

58% 55%

52%

50%

% NO LONGER ELEVATED AFTER 2 OR MORE SESSIONS

60%

70%

80%

% NO LONGER ELEVATED AFTER 4 OR MORE SESSIONS

What students are saying about CAPS: “Not sure if there are more ways to make yourselves known, but coming here has been the best thing I’ve done with my life to date.” “Don’t know where I would be if I hadn’t come to CAPS.”

“So thankful my student fees cover this! It really is life changing and has impacted me as a whole. It was much needed for my health and I wouldn’t have improved without the convenience and affordability of these services! Thank you for help saving my life!”

“Best resource on campus!!”

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 13


3. Client Satisfaction Individual Counseling Evaluation (ICE) The ICE assesses a client’s experience of CAPS services, with a focus on their perceptions of individual psychotherapy. A total of 994 completed Individual Counseling Evaluation Surveys were completed during 2014-2015 Academic Year. Any student that received one or more sessions after their initial assessment was eligible to participate. All responses were anonymous and confidential. ICE results are reported in the following percentages of clients agreed or strongly agreed to the statements.

98.6

%

SAID THAT “CAPS HAS A WELCOMING ENVIRONMENT”.

99.5

%

96.1 % 87.2 %

SAID THAT “CAPS IS A NECESSARY STUDENT SERVICE AT UCF”.

SAID THAT “CAPS HAS A BEEN VERY HELPFUL AND EFFECTIVE OVERALL”. SAID THAT “CAPS MADE IT EASIER FOR ME TO REMAIN ENROLLED AT UCF”.

Summary of Client Satisfaction Ratings CAPS counseling services received strong client satisfaction ratings during the 2014-2015 Academic Year. A vast majority of clients reported that they strongly agreed or agreed to most questions about their experience. For example, 96.11% of students felt that individual counseling services were “very effective and helpful overall” and 99.5% of students felt that “CAPS was a necessary service at UCF.” These findings imply that students have a high satisfaction rate with our services and see the benefit of these services for the greater UCF community. Students also felt services would be helpful to others as 98.9% of students indicated that they would “refer a friend” to CAPS.

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Bodhi

OUTREACH & ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY DOG

Launched “Bodhi Time” workshops and 98% of students agreed the workshop was very effective and helpful overall. Bodhi attended 38 events and made over 1400 contacts.

Paws-a-Tively events Over 400 students participated in five Paws-a-tively events, including one event during NEDA week held at the student union (evaluations were not gathered during this event).

400+

292

65%

students attended all 5 Paws-a-tively events

students completed our survey

of respondents had never been to CAPS before

95.5%

96.2%

90%

of respondents indicated that attending this event “positively impacted my mood and overall well-being”

of respondents indicated feeling less stressed after attending this event

indicated that they “are more likely to utilize CAPS services, if needed in the future”

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 15


GROUPS Who comes to groups? SPOTLIGHT:

500

Sister Circle

375

169 ATTENDEES An empowering and supportive group for Black female students. This safe, confidential group allows for exploration of issues such as family, relationships, self-esteem, beauty, body image, and academic difficulties.

250 125 0

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26+

BY AGE

• • • • • • • •

Authentic Connections Autism Connections Body Wellness Creative Connections Family Group Grad/Non-Traditional Grief & Loss Healing the Hurt

• • • • • • •

Change over time

Health Empowerment Keeping Calm & In Control Mindfulness for Depression Questioning & Coming Out Trans* Support Womens’ Empowerment Womens’ Group

Growth since 2013-2014

1,950 1,300 650 0

Groups offered

Clients

Appointments

45 in 2014-2015

340 in 2014-2015

2436 in 2014-2015

43 in 2013-2014

257 in 2013-2014

1571 in 2013-2014

4.6% INCREASE

32.3% INCREASE

55.1% INCREASE

16

2,600

ATTENDANCE

What groups are offered?

‘11-’12

‘12-’13

‘13-’14

ACADEMIC YEAR

‘14-’15


The impact of groups said groups “Helped % me to gain insight into myself and my issues”

100

98%

said groups “Helped me to feel better about myself”

98%

said groups were very effective and helpful overall

96%

said groups “Helped me to improve to problem(s) for which I sought therapy

What students are saying SPOTLIGHT:

Building Social Confidence 332 ATTENDEES This group focuses on identifying fears related to social situations, reducing self-defeating thinking patterns, and strengthening effective social skills.

Before:

66% endorsed moderate or higher symptoms

After:

30% endorsed moderate or higher symptoms

DSM 5 Severity Measure for Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)—Adult

“It really helped my social skills.”

“My group experience was simply phenomenal.” “Group was such a positive and amazing experience. I’m so happy I did it.” “This was an amazing experience to have with everyone and I learned so much about not only myself but the others. This was so helpful that I am extremely grateful.” “I really enjoyed my group experience. After every single group, I wished that the sessions were longer.” “This was my first group experience. It was a great start to my healing process and I look forward to attending another group or more counseling.”

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 17


Outreach Summary Outreach appointments and people served through Outreach services.

Healthy Knight Expo Over 1245 attendees 275 survey responses

OVERALL

415 APPOINTMENTS 19,092 PEOPLE SERVED CAPS PROGRAMMING (SDK, Expo, Paws, etc)

QUESTION 1

158 APPOINTMENTS 5,460 PEOPLE SERVED

“Are you knowledgeable about CAPS?”

11%

16%

BEFORE

218 APPOINTMENTS 12,621 PEOPLE SERVED

% Not knowledgable QUESTION 2

73%

% Moderately knowledgable 25%

“Would you refer your peers to this service?

26%

AFTER

73%

PROGRAMMING REQUESTED BY OTHER DEPARTMENTS (Tablings/Orientation, Communication to the public, Presentations):

1%

25%

% Very knowledgable 58%

3%

BEFORE

AFTER

50%

Data from Program Evaluations 94% of participants learned skills and knowledge to be successful at UCF across 4 of the 5 domains of outreach (n=32)

% Not likely

QUESTION 3

“Are you aware of health-related services on campus?” % Not knowledgable

18

% Likely

% Very likely 32%

22%

BEFORE

3%

58%

AFTER 46%

% Moderately knowledgable

39%

% Very knowledgable


Introducing our five overarching domains this year:

SOCIAL CONNECTIONS

ACADEMIC AWARENESS

WELLNESS AND LIFE SKILLS

Missing Home

Time Management

Identity Development CAPS Services

Social Anxiety

Preparing for Finals

Increasing Self Esteem

Career Exploration

Making Peace With Food/Body Image

Conflict Resolution Dating in College Getting Along with Roommates Setting Boundaries Communication Skills Leadership Development

Improving Memory and Concentration Procrastination Study Skills Goal Setting

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS Helping a Friend

“StressBusters” presented by the CAPS Peer Educators

Cross Cultural Relationships

Managing/Identifying Culture Shock Students in Distress Cultural Competency

Improve Your Mood Overcoming Shyness Depression 411 Going Home for the Suicide Awareness Holidays and Prevention Balancing Work, Life and School

DIVERSITY AWARENESS

Alcohol/Drug Abuse Self-Care

Religion and Spirituality Cultural Healing Practices Sexuality Oppression and Prejudice Safe Zone 101

Healing Arts Exhibit 78 people attended the Opening

Reception and completed evaluations (including artists, attendees, students, visitors, staff, and alumni).

74% of all attendees and artists combined

who completed this survey said “they have never been to CAPS before.”

80% of artists who completed our survey indicated that “creating this artwork positively impacted my mood and overall well-being.”

Tina Gardiakos, Artist

105

PIECES SUBMITTED

86

94% of attendees that completed our PIECES CHOSEN FOR DISPLAY

survey indicated that “viewing this artwork positively impacted my mood and overall well-being.” 2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 19


Field of Memories FOM is a visual display of the 1100 college age students lost each year to suicide. We ask students and those passing by to write a message of hope to those who may be struggling with depression or a memorial to someone they may have lost. GOAL Increase awareness around suicide, to create opportunities for people to talk about depression, to promote the QPR program and the QPR-a-thon.

Between 9am and 3pm, we were able to fill Memory Mall with over 1000 flags.

Suicide Prevention Efforts - QPR Evaluation Results August 2014 – June 2015 N=286

92% of certified trainers “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” that: “As a result of this training, I feel more comfortable to talk about suicidal thoughts/feelings with someone who I am concerned about.”

699

25

STUDENTS

STAFF

21

745

FACULTY

TOTAL

NEDA Week “UCF Loves EveryBODY” & “Paws-A-Tively Me” Served approx. 165 students “Every Color, Every Shape, EveryBODY: Multicultural Perspectives on Body Image & Eating Concerns” New Panel Discussion added “Purple Ribbon Program” Reached approx. 70 students and staff “CAPS Webinar” Inaugural event piloted

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The B.L.A.C.K. Series PROGRAMMING AIMED AT • Providing information to students about UCF services

DEMOGRAPHICS 4%

3%

RACE

• Increasing student connection to institution and retention at the university

6

5 events in Fall 2014 and 1 event Spring 2015. Events were supported by student body and well received.

15 %

GENDER 89%

Race AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK HISPANIC/LATINO MULTIRACIAL SELF-IDENTIFIED ASIAN-AMERICAN CAUCASIAN

FINDINGS - STRONGLY AGREE/AGREE

87%

77%

89%

gained awareness of their cultural identity

felt they were more likely to graduate

felt more connected to UCF campus

92

90

100

learned skills to improve their diversity awareness

became more aware believe it is important of campus resources to have events like and departments this at UCF

%

%

45%

1%

• Connecting UCF students to campus resources

EVENTS COMPLETED THROUGHOUT THE 2014 – 2015 ACADEMIC YEAR

2% 1% 1%

%

1ST GEN 55%

84%

Gender

Generations

FEMALE GENDER QUEER MALE

1ST GENERATION STUDENT 2ND GENERATION AND UP

About equal attendance of first year students, Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors; 3% graduate students STUDENT TESTIMONIALS “I felt great about it, it really opened my eyes to a lot of issues and resources in the Black community at UCF. Keep having events like this.” “This was a powerful event that had excellent panelist and provided great information.” “Great Info and opportunities.” 2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 21


Growth in our Social Media sites Facebook (JOINED IN 2009)

Over 1070 “Likes”

Instagram (JOINED IN 2013)

Over 172 followers Twitter (JOINED IN 2009)

Over 400 followers YouTube (JOINED IN 2009)

Over 6090 views

Peer Educators Peer Educators are student volunteers who promote CAPS services to UCF students and campus departments. • Help reduce the stigma of seeking mental health services for students • Educate the campus community on mental fitness, stress reduction and other topics by giving presentations • Table on campus to advertise the Peer Educator program & CAPS • Attend CAPS signature events (Healing Art, PAWS, NEDA week) to engage students • Graduate assistant helps coordinate 4 hours a week

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Mental Health Minute: Podcasts • Myths and misconceptions about therapy • Bicultural Identity (GUEST SPEAKER: MELISSA) • Religious Diversity • National Eating Disorder Awareness Week: What you need to know about eating disorders (GUEST SPEAKER: SUSAN)

• What you should know about Resilience

CAPS “O-Teamers”

The CAPS O-teamers provided over 35 transfer and FTIC presentations during the spring and into the summer to over 9,700 families


Outreach accomplishments this past year Domain Structure

B.L.A.C.K. Series

Launched the new Domain structure and related program evaluation tools. Gathered positive data about our outreach services.

B.L.A.C.K. Series launched; was awarded a $5,500 grant to expand the program into the B.L.A.C.K Institute

Other Accomplishments

Website

• Peer Educator Program and Active Minds RSO

Expanded website through increased interactive additions (2 new videos and 5 Podcasts)

• Submitted the SAMHSA Suicide Prevention Grant

Events

• Multicultural Workshop Series

• Initial Assessment forms translated into Spanish • AWAKE program transitioned to Social Justice Department

Several successful events: • Healthy Knight Expo

• QPR-a-thon

• Paws-a-tively

• NEDA Week

• Field of Memories

• Healing Art

• CAPS Accessibility Audit and ongoing changes • Translated brochures for Students of Color into Spanish • GLBTQ Parent Guide (on our website)

MSC, MASS and Prime STEM MSC, MASS and Prime STEM presentation series for drop out prevention and student success

Active Minds Member of the Year

• Partnership grant with Health Services was submitted and subsequently awarded Bounce Back

CAPS Staff

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 23


Training UCF CAPS provided supervision and training to 3 doctoral interns and 5 trainees (pre-doctoral practicum students and 2 pre-masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interns). The training program focused on the development of clinical skills, outreach and consultation skills, supervision, and/or program development and evaluation. In addition, each doctoral intern presented a professional development workshop.

Trainees Dustin Baetz Rollins College Pre-Practicum student

Bri Franklin University of Central Florida Counselor Education (Graduated)

Daniel Garner Rollins College Mental Health Counseling (Graduated and at UCF CAPS)

Lara Herman Nova Southeastern University Doctoral Practicum (Working as a doctoral intern at Florida Gulf Coast)

Interns Irma Campos University of Florida Professional Developmental Presentation: Racial, Gender, and Sexual Orientation Microaggressions as Chronic Discriminatory Stressors Graduated and is working as a consultant in Orlando

Angela Chop

Florida Institute of Technology Doctoral Practicum

Alliant International University, Sacramento Professional Developmental Presentation: Facebook Use and Mental Health Currently still at UCF-CAPS

Xiao Zeng

Rebecca Lowe

Sanchita Sharma

Florida Institute of Technology Doctoral Practicum

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Tennessee State University Professional Developmental Presentation: Therapist Burnout and Self-Care Graduated and is in a post doc at University of South Florida


Staff Notable Mentions Dr. Karen Hofmann presented at the Annual Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) conference. Program entitled, “The Intersection of Collaboration and Power: A Leadership Challenge”.

Dr. Teresa Michaelson-Chmelir presented at the Annual National Conference for the Association for University and College Counseling Center Outreach (AUCCCO). Program entitled, “Task and Process Phase II: Assessment and Evaluation of Outreach Efforts”.

Dr. Chris Hanes and Ms. Valeska Wilson-Cathcart, LMHC, presented at the American College Health Association annual conference. Program entitled, “Therapy Dogs and Emotional Support Animals: Innovative Practices and Policies for Making it Work in Your College Counseling Center”.

UCF SDES Institute The following staff presented the following programs at the UCF SDES Institute: DR. LARRY MARKS “Developing Student Success Through Positive Psychology Applications” DR. CHRIS HANES & DR. KAREN HOFMANN “Everyone Can Have an Impact: Evidence-informed ways to help students after a crisis” DR. JOCELYN BUHAIN, MS. LIZ STEVENSON, LCSW (in collaboration with UCF Care Services and Student Accessibility Services) “Autism Connections: Exploring Strategies For Collegiate Success” DR. KAREN HOFMANN (with Ms. Maureen Hawkins and Mr. Michael Freeman of Wellness and Health Promotion Services) “Sorry Not Sorry: Lead like a Girl “

Publications • DR. KAREN HOFMANN, in collaboration with MS. MAUREEN HAWKINS of WHPS and DR. MARY OWENS-SCHMIDT (HS) updated a text book chapter for the UCF SLS class focused on health, mental health and wellness issues

Dr. Jocelyn Buhain, Ms. Stephanie Preston, LMHC, and Dr. Wade Arnold

• DR. LARRY MARKS co-authored a journal article: “Positive psychology on campus: Creating the conditions for well-being and success” in About Campus.

presented at the American College Personnel Association Conference. Program entitled, “Improving Employee Work Life in Counseling Centers”.

• DR. LARRY MARKS co-edited a book on Positive Psychology and wrote a chapter on coaching for the book.

2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 25


Additional Awards • CAPS was awarded the Family Partnership grant for the B.L.A.C.K. Institute ($5,500), created by DR. TAMALIA HANCHELL and MR. KEIRON TIMOTHY, LMHC. • In partnership with SHS and UCF Cares, CAPS was awarded the Family Partnership grant for the Bounce Back Initiative ($5,000), co-led by DR. TERESA MICHELSON-CHMELIR. • MS. STEPHANIE PRESTON was elected and is serving as Vice President of the PRIDE Faculty and Staff Association. • DR. KAREN HOFMANN is on the SDES Director’s Council. (From left to right) Ms. Barbara Sherwood, Dr. Karen Hofmann, & Dr. Tamalia Hanchell

Awards/Recognitions • MS. BARBARA SHERWOOD received the SDES USPS Operational Excellence Award • MS. BARBARA SHERWOOD received the UCF Human Resources USPS Employee of the Month Award • DR. TAMALIA HANCHELL received the SDES Outstanding New Professional Award

Licensing The following staff members successfully passed their licensing exams: • DR. TIFFANY MISRA, Licensed Psychologist • MR. KEIRON TIMOTHY, Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) • MR. ROBERT DWYER, Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) • DR. SUSAN TWEETEN, Licensed Psychologist

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• DR. TERESA MICHAELSON-CHMELIR was reelected to serve as Treasurer to the AUCCCO Executive Board. • DR. JOCELYN BUHAIN is on the Asian American Psychological board as well as a Directorate member of the American College Personnel Association Commission. • DR. CHRIS HANES is on the Executive Board of ACCCCS, as an ex-officio member for 2015-2016.

Other • New York Times reporter, Ms. Jan Hoffman, spent 2 days with CAPS for an article she wrote about college mental health: Anxious Student Strain College Mental Health Centers. • Fox 35 visited CAPS and created a news story about CAPS services and anxious students. • CAPS received re-accreditation through the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc. • UCF-CAPS, led by Dr. Karen Hofmann, hosted the annual conference for the Florida Directors Conference.


2014-2015 CAPS ANNUAL REPORT 27


4090 Libra Drive P.O. Box 163170 Orlando, FL 32816-3170 www.caps.sdes.ucf.edu councntr@ucf.edu | 407-823-2811

A department of Student Development and Enrollment Services

UCF CAPS 2014-15 Annual Report  
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