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UCD ARCHI TECTURE 2008


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Introduction

This catalogue is a snapshot record of work being undertaken at all levels in the undergraduate and graduate programmes in UCD Architecture during the past year. It also reflects the change to a more interdisciplinary approach to architectural education in this university. As well as documenting the Architecture End-of-Year exhibition it contains a brief review of research activity and a selection of work from the graduate programmes in Urban Design and Urban and Building Conservation and from associated programmes in Landscape Architecture and Civil Engineering. A selection of work from the UCD Architecture programme at CESUGA in Galicia, Spain, now in its fourth year, is also included. The End-of-Year exhibition in Architecture is a significant event in the academic calendar. It provides an opportunity for the students and staff to reflect on and celebrate their collective achievement in work carried out in the design studios. Learning from one another and collaborative endeavour are highly valued in the educational philosophy of the discipline, and the exercise of hanging an exhibition and reflecting on it are important aspects of that philosophy for both staff and students. The exhibition is also an opportunity to show the work to family and friends, the wider university community, the profession and the public. The past year has seen a number of developments at UCD Architecture. With the move of Landscape Architecture and Civil Engineering to Newstead, a new building on the expanded Richview campus, there is greater opportunity for collaboration between Architecture and these disciplines. Some subject modules are now taken jointly by Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Structural Engineering with Architecture, and Planning students. There are also greater opportunities for short joint design projects with Structural Engineering and Landscape Architecture students where interdisciplinary design and group work skills are encouraged. Professor Loughlin Kealy, retired from the Chair in Architecture in early September 2007. Loughlin held this post with distinction since 1997 and has made an important contribution to the academic and cultural life of the School of Architecture over many years as teacher, scholar and academic leader. In recent years he led Architecture through a period of considerable development and change with wise and thoughtful stewardship. He continues to guide the new course at CESUGA in Galicia, where the UCD Architecture programmes are taught, to contribute to international developments in relation to architectural education, and nationally to chair a task group for the development of new government policy on architecture. Two new Professorship posts in Architecture have been approved by the University. One of these is a full-time Professorship in Architecture and the other a halftime Professorship in Architectural Design. It is hoped that the filling of these posts, before the next academic year, will lead to further strengthening of the discipline in the critical areas of architectural research and architectural design. Jim Murphy Dean of Architecture


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BSc Architecture


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First Year Design Studio The programme introduces students to architecture and seeks to awaken individual creativity. Students are encouraged to develop a method for their creative work. They are asked to discover, to craft, to reflect and to judge their own way of working. This process is supported by teaching a broad range of skills, including various drawing techniques and model making, by motivating the student's response and invention, and is informed by inviting students to apply analytical skills to diverse contexts. The idea that constructional technique and understanding of materials are embedded in the design process is encouraged through the strategic integration of design and technology studio. Moving through a series of projects of varying length, the programme begins with a close consideration of things and places, and gradually introduces a wider range of constructional, social, cultural and environmental concerns. Studio Programme In the first project students undertake the intense observation of an object through drawings, collage and photography. Then students observe, record and analyse various spaces and buildings in the urban environment. They are introduced to architectural texts debating constructional, social, environmental and cultural concerns. There follows a design project for a bench in an urban space, exploring material and construction. The first semester culminates in a long design project for the design of a bookshop within an existing building. Issues of scale, light and movement are addressed. At the beginning of the second semester, students make studies of particular pieces of architecture, using collated information to create a model and a representative drawing. The students are then introduced to the challenges of designing a building which responds to its context. This year they were asked to design a market for street traders in an urban setting, requiring them to think about both the city as public domain and within that framework, a work space for interaction, thus creating various layers of privacy. The final design project allows an in-depth study of building in the landscape. After precedent study of a related building type and a field-trip to Dunquin, the students were asked to design a contemplation space on a headland over the coastline. The project invited the creation of an architecture for the senses, thereby focussing attention on construction methods. Studio Staff Elizabeth Burns, Sarah Cremin, Miriam Delaney, Tiago Faria, Irena Kondratenko, Mark Price, Peter Tansey Guest Lecturers & Critics Roisin Lewis, Noel Dowley, Jim Murphy, Samantha Martin-Mcauliffe, Silvia Forlati, Adam Hall, John Tuomey, Tom Maher, Brian Ward, Jamie Doyle

Students Suzanne Betts, Darran Brennan, Donal Browne, Henry Browne, Amy Bulman, Jo Ann Butler, Aiden Carty, Dara Challoner, Mark Choi, Robert Coleman, Patrick Conway, Keith Cormack, Alan Coughlan, Donal Crowe, Alice Devenney, Aisling Donnelly, Elaine Fanning, Andrew Flood, Robert Francis, Garrett Fullam, Garrett Garvey, Seamus Guidera, Sarah Halpenny, Nicole Hardy, Lloyd Helen, Edwin Jebb ,Laura Keating, Vadim Kelly, David Kennedy, Tara Kennedy, Neil Keogh, Kate

Laffan, Stephen Laverty, Ciana March, Jennifer Martin, Helena McCarthy, Caitriona McGilp, Jennifer Martin, Conor McGowan, Jennifer McLoughlin, David McMillan, Barbara McShane, Caoimhe Merrick, Cathal Monaghan, Orla Monaghan, David Morgan, Melanie O’Brien, Eileen O’Connor, Dawn Parke, Sandra Plantos, Sharon Quigley,Sharon Sugrue, Shane Twohig, Brona Waldron, Rebecca Wallace, Amy Widdis, Adrian Wong,


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Bench Design Robert Coleman


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Bookshop Seamus Guidera


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Nicholas House Keith Cormack

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Market Project Brona Waldron

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Contemplation space Tara Kennedy

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Second Year Design Studio The Second year studio programme aims to develop the student's understanding of the role and responsibilities of architecture in the world. Through a series of projects, the interaction of functional, social, technical, aesthetic and environmental factors in architecture is explored. The exploration of materiality and construction is fostered through both the technology and design studio and through joint projects, and the insights of history and theory are brought to bear through tutorials and seminars. The programme is structured to enable the student to develop their design methodology that encompasses both the ability to work strategically and creatively, and the skills to develop a design project through every stage from inception to a good level of completion. Studio Programme The year focuses on the study of particular issues where architecture has a significant social role. In the first semester the students explored the issue of housing, beginning with an analysis of typologies and organisational strategies. Three sites were chosen for the design project dealing with the distinct conditions of urban, inner suburban and outer suburban. The focus of the project was on the mediation between the housing unit and the city. To this end the two scales of 1:500 and 1:50 were used for precedent studies of 20th Century housing and returned to as the requirements for the final presentation, seeking to achieve an exploration of both strategy and detail. The second semester introduced the issue of public space and public building. This began with a short project where the students made a subjective response to a public space of their choice. Three sites were then selected for a public baths project, all of them located beside bodies of water in central Dublin. An initial phase of four weeks dealt with site analysis, concept and outline scheme design. This was followed by a study trip to northern Italy, where a series of important buildings were visited and recorded. The students were then asked to identify a spatial sequence in Venice that could be analysed and applied to their own design project, using the city as a library for their own work. In the final three weeks the students resumed work on their public baths project, making a series of hardline drawings at different scales to explore the themes of relationship to context; structure and organisation; space,light and colour; and materiality and expression. Studio Staff Vivienne Brophy, Gerry Cahill, Kevin Donovan, Anne Gorman, Fiona Hughes, Orla Murphy, Michael Pike, Simon Walker Guest Lecturers, Workshop Leaders & Critics Matthew Beattie, Sinead Bourke, Martin Henchion, Ryan Kennihan, Michael McGarry, Sheila O’Donnell, Sterrin O’Shea, Emmett Scanlon, Derek Tynan

Students David Ahearne, Aisling Ahern, Amine Ait M'hand, Eimear Arthur, Marian Balfe, Leila Budd, Moira Burke, Emma Byrne, Jarlath Cantwell, Rachel Carmody, Niall Carroll, Daniel Collins, Eimear Daly, Christina Devereux, Ray Dinh, Andrea Doyle, Rachel Dudley, PierreEmmanuel Escoffier, Megan Etherton, Edward Feeney, Kate Griffin, James Hayes, Michael Hayes, Leah Hogan, Matthias Horn, William Hutch, Jonathan Jannsens, Fergal Joyce, James Kennedy, Shirley Kenny, Hyung Joon

Kim, Damien King, Donal Lally, Sara Madigan, Alva Maguire, Conor Maguire, Suzanne Maverley, Colm MacEochagain, Ciara McCurtin, Aonghus McDonnell, Kevin McGonigle, Patrick McGrath, Sarah McKendry, Louise Moriarty, Scott Morton, Sorcha Murphy, Stephen Murray, Fiona Nulty, Maurice O’Brien, Catriona O’Connor, Jennifer O’Donnell, Aoife O’Leary, Aisling O’Sullivan, Dina Ryan, Darren Snow, Patrick Stack, Joe Stokes-Kelly Albert Tobin


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Public Baths Megan Etherton


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Housing Precedent Study Jariath Cantwell

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Public Baths Development Stephen Murray

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AAI Competition Entry Stephen Murray


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Study Trip Italy


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Collaborative Project with the Furniture College of GMIT, Letterfrack A collaborative project was proposed to involve students of the Furniture College, Letterfrack, Co. Galway and 2nd year students from the UCD - Architecture. 16 students from UCD travelled to Letterfrack and from 31st March until 4th April 2008 took part in the JOIN workshop with the students of the Furniture College. The aim of the project was to explore the relationship between conceptual consideration of material (and the space that material can create), and the physical act of making. Questions addressed included: What are the tools for these separate skills and how can we learn more about them through collaboration and shared learning? The outcomes of the project show that the knowledge and learning methods of both sets of students coalesced to allow the unexpected to happen. The theme for the first JOIN workshop was Inhabited Wall. Students were assigned material of set dimension and asked to use this material in whatever way they chose to respond to the theme. Materials 1: Rubber bands, 4m x 1.5in PVC pipe. Materials 2: 1 sheet 1.2mx2.4m 4mm plywood, string Materials 3: 2 bales peat briquettes, 1 sheet coloured Perspex, newspaper Materials 4: 1 cubic foot softwood, gold velvet More information can be found on UCD website: www.ucd.ie/arcel Participating Students Salvatore Borza, Darrgh Butler, Jarlath Cantwell, Dina Ryan, Robert Bruton, Ronan Dunne, Donal Lally, Niall Carroll, Sean Dunleavy, Ross Gibbons, Louise Moriarty, Paul Flynn, Russell Jacob, Sue Maverley, Warren Hayes, Ross Lally, Jennifer O’Donnell, Roisin Kilrane, Darren Louth, Leila Budd, Thomas Kinsella, Fiachra McInerney, Matthias Horn, Paul Lenihan, Daniel McNamara, Megan Etherton, Michael Lennon, Darren Moore, Sorcha Murphy, Brendan Lyons, Clodagh O’Brien, Edward Feeney, Stephen Mitchell, Harry O’Doherty, Sarah McKendry, Conor Trawinski, Brendan Scales, Colm MacEochaghain, Eoghan Looney, Oisin White, Jonathan Janssens, Fionn Tynan-O’Mahony, Daniel Wright, Fiona Nulty, Sean Dunleavy, Laura Nugent, Darren Snow Staff Anthony Clare, Laura Mays - GMIT Furniture College, Letterfrack and Orla Murphy, Daniel P. Sudhershan - UCD Architecture


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Letterfrack Workshop

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Third Year Design Studio The course focuses on developing an understanding of the demands and opportunities for architecture in collective and civic buildings. The course deals with buildings at many levels - from materiality and detailed design to analysis of intention and meaning. There is an emphasis on development and refinement of skills and design technique in the studio course, in particular drawing, model making, analysis of context and analysis of buildings and building types in the form of precedent studies. A number of short projects deal with observation and visual interpretation. Students are encouraged to use a wide range of descriptive and interpretative models and drawings. Studio Programme The year objectives were pursued principally through three design projects in Cork city. These consisted of a short introductory project, involving urban analysis and design interventions in the existing city context, and two major design projects. The first of these major design projects used the standard brief for an eight-class primary school and addressed issues of functional analysis, repetition, ordinariness, the social role of architecture, appropriate expression and relationship to context. As a primer to the main project there was then a short competition in collaboration with fourth year engineering students for the design of an aviation museum to focus students on integrating structure into projects at the concept stage and to give experience for the first time of working with structural engineers. This was followed by the main design project, a National Maritime Museum incorporating conservation and research facilities, which required the design of a major exhibition space with complex functional demands and the careful consideration of the appropriate expression of a public building in the city. Technology studio studies were integrated with the detailed design development of the major design projects. Selected precedent studies were carried out in relation to each of the design projects. The course was supplemented by lectures and seminars on survey and landscape drawings, model making as a design tool, the role of drawing in design and presentation, and structure and form in architecture. Parallel themes on the city, utopian ideas and sustainability were covered in the History and Theory and Ecology lecture courses. Studio Staff Wendy Barrett, Will Dimond, Eileen Fitzgerald, Mary Laheen, John-Barry Lowe, Stephen Mulhall, Jim Murphy, Ruth O’Herlihy Guest Lecturers & Critics Dermot Boyd, Jim Coady, Tiago Faria Seán Harrington, MJ Long, Pierre Long, Donal Lynch, Niall McLaughlin, Andrew Morrison, Ciaran O’Connor, Padraig O’Duineen, Pat Ruane, Stephen Tierney, Darina Tully, Mark Turpin, Brian Ward

Students Salma Abdel Rahman, Amin AitmHand, Brain Barber, Timothy Brick, Lisa Cassidy, Claire Chawke, Ciaran Conlon, Alex Crean, John Crowley, Brendan Dalton, Michael Doherty, Pierre-Emmaneul Escoffier, Sean Finegan, Leonie Fitzgerald, Padraig Flynn, Denis Forrest, Alessandra Fugazzi, Katy Giblin, David Hannon, Riona Hartman, Carla-Harte Hayes, Eoin Horner, Mary Hughes, Alison Hyland, Rachael Jennings, Ralphie Keane, Sorcha Kenneally, Oriana Kraemer, Elspeth Lee, Meabh McCarthy, Dermot McGlade, Philip McGlade, Padraigh

McMorrough, Cillian Magee, Brian Massey, Caitiona Moloney, Laura Moran, Conor Morrissey, Maria Mulcahy, Mark Murphy, Kieran Murray, Banbha NicCanna, Aine Nic an Riogh, Aisling NiDonnchu, Aedamair NiGallchoir, Donncha O’Brien, Luke O’Callaghan, Jennifer O’Leary, Patrick Phelan, Orla Phillips, Sarah Prendergast, Hugh Queenan, Paddy Roche, Conor Rochford, Cian Scanlon, Sean Schoales, Enida Skalonjic, Ruth Stewart, Robert Tobin, David Walsh, Su Wang


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School Project Cork Brian Barber

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Maritime Museum Cork - Interior Perspective Su Wang

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Maritime Museum Cork - View from Kennedy Quay Su Wang


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Maritime Museum - Section Padraig McMorrow


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Maritime Museum - Interior View Raphael Keane

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Maritime Museum - Model Photograph Conor Rochford

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Maritime Museum - Section Seaフ] Finegan

Maritime Museum - Public Space Collage Seaフ] Finegan


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History & Theory of Architecture The course of four modules presents the history and theory of the designed environment in order to build a common knowledge base for future architects, designers, landscape architects, planners and others involved in the procurement and management of the designed physical environment. The first year course of two modules follows the evolution and metamorphosis of architectural form from antiquity to modernism. This narrative is punctuated by lectures dedicated to selected cultural contexts, and diversions and eulogies on particular architects and individual buildings. Central to the course is the exploration and understanding of building forms, their evolution and transformation and the pressures that effected these changes. In this the great pieces of architecture can been seen in relation to traditions of building, and insight gained into how traditions, images and ideas have been assimilated to create new forms that respond to new requirements. The second year course of one module deals with the development of modern architecture from the latter half of the nineteenth century to the latter half of the twentieth. While concentrating on key figures and movements, the course situates changes in architecture over this time in their wider social, cultural and technological context. It firstly analyses the way in which social imperatives and ideals have shaped modern architecture, before changing its focus to the influence of aesthetic theory and cultural critique in its development. The course then examines how modern architecture adapted to changing technologies and structural theories. The lecture course aims to enable students to use history as an integral part of their architectural understanding and of their own design process. The third year course of one module investigates the forces and ideas that have shaped architecture, the city, the landscape and gardens from antiquity to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction and inter-dependencies of the range of different scales, from architectural space of the interior through to the wider landscape. Staff John Olley, Hugh Campbell, Samantha Martin-McAuliffe


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Architecture & its Environment The course introduces the student to the relationship between the built and natural environments in the context of sustainability. It considers architecture in a broad environmental context with emphasis on climatic response. Course topics include: environmental concepts, site ecology, natural resources, comfort, climate, wind and shelter, shading and solar access. Students acquire the ability to develop, represent and articulate environmentally responsible siting of buildings and to utilise analysis techniques to inform and interpret design decisions. The latter is achieved through a major project undertaken as part of the course working through the medium of architectural models and their study using a helidon and wind tunnel. The Indoor Environment The course explores the relationship between the external microclimate, the indoor environment and occupant comfort. It considers the physical role of the building and its components in modifying the internal environment. Subject areas considered include the visual, thermal and auditory environments, ventilation, passive design, indoor air quality and health, comfort and the energy and environmental consequences of related design strategies. Students learn about key concepts of sustainable and healthy design and of generic environmental attributes of contemporary buildings and their indoor spaces. They become familiar with building energy modelling and performance assessment tools and techniques, understand their applicability to informing design decisions and use them to assess comfort, environmental impact and performance of buildings and urban spaces. This is, in part, achieved through a major project undertaken as part of the course work using the Ecotect performance analysis software. Staff Paul Kenny


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Architectural Technologies In the first year Architectural Technologies were taught in its broadest sense, including its principles and applications in order to provide a foundation for an understanding of the construction methods and performance of a building at a domestic scale. The module examined in detail the building envelope: materials, their properties and appropriate applications were introduced; foundations to roof structure were examined through a formal lecture series, which was complemented by demonstrations in the Building Laboratory. In particular, the course focused on the interconnection of materials, construction and maintenance of a domestic scale building at an elementary level. In the Technology studio, technical drawings, simple surveying methods and generic material studies were introduced. In the second year the scale changed from domestic to medium-sized framed residential and public buildings with detailed studies of timber, concrete and steel structures and cladding materials. The focus was on developing the role of Architectural Technologies through understanding of the following: • the impact which building envelope component design, specification and assembly have on the achievement of design intentions, and in particular, good indoor environmental quality. Students were introduced to innovative and renewable energy technologies and their integration into the building envelope. • the development of 3-dimensional structural concepts/strategies explored through precedent studies and developed in the context of students’ individual design studio projects. In the third year the emphasis was placed on medium-rise complex public buildings. This encompassed introduction of modern building components, construction and structural methods as well as related environmental issues and technologies. The scope of the subject area was broadened out to examine the implications of industrialisation, mass production and design intentions, and the processes of assembly. The building economics was introduced, while the principles of fire safety, electrical and mechanical services in buildings were discussed in depth. In the Technology Studio students undertook an extended technical study on timber, concrete and steel, examining their structural and architectural properties, which accommodated structured technology projects in the context of their own design work to emphasise the connection between design and technical drawings. Throughout the course the Building Laboratory continued to complement the lectures with demonstrations of non-domestic trades and technologies. Moreover, the importance of interdisciplinarity was emphasised in the lecture series. The aim of this interconnected approach was to help students to recognise the important role of Architectural Technologies in the creative process of making Architecture. Staff Year 1: Tiago Faria, Brian Gallagher, Irena Kondratenko; Year 2: Vivienne Brophy, Anne Gorman, Seoirse MacCraith; Year 3: Donal Finn, Joseph Gannon, Pierre Long, Andrew Morrison, Rick Watson; Daniel P Sudhershan (Yr1-3), Michael Murphy (Senior Technician – Building Laboratory)


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First Year Technology Studio

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Second Year Technology Studio

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Third Year Technology Studio

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Structures In the first year objectives for satisfactory structural design are addressed to develop an intuitive understanding of structural behaviour and the geometry of structural form. Issues addressed include the properties of structural materials and their appropriate use, the properties of common structural shapes and their appropriate use, the nature and magnitude of loading in building structures, the significance of force equilibrium and Newton’s Laws, the structural consequences of designing for compression, tension, bending, and shear. The course also covers serviceability and deflection and reviews approximate methods of member sizing. In the second year a review of the concepts underlying the limit-state design philosophy is undertaken. Applied topics addressed include; the geotechnical aspects of foundations with a discussion of the appropriate use and preliminary sizing of concentric and eccentric pads, strips, combined bases, rafts and piles; the preliminary sizing of beams, slabs and columns in reinforced concrete framed buildings; precast concrete floor systems and preliminary sizing; preliminary sizing of columns and beams in steel framed buildings; an introduction to trusses and space frames; preliminary sizing of joists, laminated beams and posts in timber structures and finally an introduction to more specific applications such as prestressed and post-tensioned concrete, thin shell structures, cable structures and the stability of tall buildings. In the third year significant systems such as domes, vaults, arches, long-span roofs, high-rise buildings, cable structures and glazed facades are examined affording students the ability to identify the structural system inherent in any building. Staff Holger Falter, Amanda Gibney, Mark Richardson


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Ecology of Architecture The course investigates the complexity of human/environment interactions. It aims to lay the foundations and inform the contemporary debate on sustainability. Sustainability is viewed not only as an environmental issue but also as a social and cultural subject. The ideas of Social and Environmental justice and of inclusive design are introduced and discussed with relationship to the production and conservation of the designed and natural environments. The modes and consequences of the perception of the designed environment through the senses and bodily movement are introduced and their bearing on the quality of life for an inclusive populace are investigated. Aspects of environmental sustainability are explored through a study of: traditional modes of designing with the climate; the water cycle and the consequences on it of development; elements of landscape, urban and rural, and their contribution to the quality of life. Cultural sustainability is explored through the history and theory of architectural, urban and landscape conservation and restoration. Staff John Olley, Paul Arnold, Loughlin Kealy


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Visualisation and Photographic Technique This elective module explores the use of visual images in communication. It introduces the student to digital imagery, focusing primarily on photography. The basis of the module is a project in which the student acquires a broad range of skills including camera technique, image composition, computer manipulation and presentation. The syllabus includes both a historical context and practical application. The course is delivered through a series of lectures with tutorial support. On completion of this module students should be able to: • Demonstrate the ability to develop a contextual story based on a project brief. • Demonstrate the competence to compose original visual imagery using photographic equipment and a palette of computer based tools. • Demonstrate the ability to communicate a storyline through the use of visual and textual content. The skills acquired are transferable to other contexts where generation and presentation of visual imagery is relevant. These specifically include photographic technique and computer based manipulation. Staff Pierre Jolivet

Drawing Systems This module examines the geometries that underlie drawing and design, both in terms of their historical development and their practical construction. The projection of solid form onto surface is the basis of most drawings. Two dimensional drawings are used by artists and designers to invent and represent three dimensional form. The geometries of representation have both cultural and historical significance, as well as everyday practical application. They inform architectural design, fine art, graphic design and typography. Staff Bill Hasting


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BArch


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Fourth Year Design Studio In the fourth year studio, students re-evaluate what has been learnt in the first degree and on their year-out experience. They are encouraged to develop a more personal direction in their own work, drawing on the various debates operating within contemporary architecture. If the first three years were devoted to learning and acquiring design skills, the next two years are about applying knowledge and skills in an increasingly rigorous manner, about engaging with the broader culture of architecture and questioning how architecture can operate in the world. Students are invited to develop a solid intellectual basis for architectural endeavour and to advance ideas through design, writing and research. The focus is on the development of skills in critical thinking, in research analysis and critical evaluation, and in the use of design as a means of investigation and research. Studio Programme The year is divided into two design modules, each based around a broad individual theme, this year also incorporated a joint workshop with fifth year and a field trip to Istanbul, Turkey. Students are encouraged to make their architectural investigation through analysis, planning, building design and detailed design studies. The first module was developed from the theme for Ireland’s submission to the Venice Biennale “Sub-Urban to Super-Rural”. In the spirit of the exhibition the students were required “to evolve new living conditions that are not a sub-genre of the urban but rather a hybrid of the best aspects of both rural and urban – a “super rural” condition”. The proposal was for a new co-operative building, a single entity, or conglomerate, accommodating a diverse community of some 250 people who were generally engaged in some productive capacity with the landscape generating commodities such as food and energy. The second module was developed from the theme for Ireland’s submission to the Lisbon Triennale “The Urban Void.” The exhibition explored the role of the void in the transformation of Dublin. The proposal was to design a counterpoint to both physical and mental absence often experienced in the city in the form of a series of community rooms for an urban void. The schedule of accommodation for the proposed building was established by the East Wall community building in Dublin Docklands by O’Donnell & Tuomey Architects that formed part of the original exhibition. Studio Staff Chris Boyle, Peter Cody, Merlo Kelly, John Tuomey, Emmett Scanlon, Stephen Tierney Guest Lecturers, Workshop Leaders & Critics Michael McGarry, Daniel Rosbottom, David Kohn, Paul Kelly, Gerard Carty, Gary Lysaght, Shane O’Toole, Michael Pike, Peter Carroll Students Roisin Aherne, Jennifer Belton, Maurice Brooks, Myles Burke, William Casey, Shuo Chen,

Jerome Clairoux, Elizabeth Clyne, Ludo Ditlhong, Tara Doherty, James A Doran, Paul Durcan, Tadeusz Fic, Morwenna Gerrard, Alice Gibson, Faela Guiden, T. J Hartnett, Anna Hellgren, Jack Hogan, Patrick Hunt, Lucas Jollivet, Emmet Kenny, Adrian King, David Ledwith, Aoiffe Magner, Natalie Maras, Anne McGetrick, Michael Nolan, Therese Nolan, Donal O’Herlihy, Lucy O’Reilly, Ekaterina Papakovoska, Andrzej Soloduszkiewicz, Jessica Sturmer, Aisling Walker, Ewelina Walkusz, Hanna

Weber, Brendan Whelan, Richard Yates, Arnau Neus Isart, Breffni Clarke, Elaine Hanna, Laura O’Brien, Brian Hewson, Helen Kelly, Julie Leysen, Joanne Lyons, Aisling Maher, Philipp Sihertler, Timmy Blackwell, Mathias Bastian, Cristina Muros, Neil Glesson, Elaine Ni Donnchadha, Ivan O’Connell, Michael Stack, Kevin Quinlan, Laura O’Brien, Lynn McMahon


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Congolomerate Project Connemara J茅r么me Glairoux


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Congolomoerate Project Tullamore Alice Gibson


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Congolomerate Project Lough Derg Adrian King

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Leeson Street Paul Durcan

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Istanbul Study Trip Maurice Brooks

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Fifth Year Design Thesis The fifth year design thesis requires each student to pursue a course of independent work focused on a particular issue or theme in architecture. By means of a design project and allied research and experiment, students seek to establish a richer understanding of their position in architecture and of architecture’s role and potential in contemporary society. This year the projects being pursued have ranged across scales from the infrastructural to the domestic, across contexts from the remote rural to the densely urban and across themes from the avowedly political to the deeply personal. Over the course of the year, students’ work is guided by year staff and tutors with input from a wide range of visiting critics and contributors. Workshops addressing particular aspects of architecture – environment, economics, material and construction – intersperse the programme at regular intervals. Overall the emphasis is on advancing architectural understanding through design research. Year Staff Hugh Campbell, Marcus Donaghy, John Parker Tutors Teams Mark Price / Tom Maher; Robin Lee / Kevin Donovan; John Olley / Irene Kelly; Tiago Faria / Brian Gallagher; Gerry Cahill / Carmel Murray; Jim Murphy / Esmonde O’Briain; Jimi Sheilds / John Mclaughlin; Shelley Mcnamara / Chris Boyle; John Tuomey / Oran O’Siochain; Roisin Heneghan / Shih-Fu Peng; Samantha MartinMcAuliffe / Dan Sudhershan; Patrick Lynch / Simon Walker Contributors & Visitors Matthias Reese, Irenée Scalbert, Paul Clarke, Elizabeth Hatz, Emmett Scanlon, Michael Pike, Derek Tynan, Dougal Sheridan, David Naessens,

Stuart Mcknight, Mark Pimlott, Tom de Paor, Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Howard Davies, Niall Mclaughlin, Peter Carroll, Dermot Boyd, Brian Ward, Jason O’Shaughnessy, Paul Hegarty, Emer O’Daly, Mary O’Neill, Urs Meister Students Jane Ashe, Deirdre Brophy, Finn Christiansen, Eibhlin Clifford, Brian Collinschristopher Collins, Cathal Curtin, Joaquin Dabeizes, Catherine Degroot, John Dobbin, Hugh Dolan, Michael Duffy, Cormac Fahey, Michael Fingleton, Paul Finn, Piers Floyd, Darren Gill, Brian Guckian, Brian Hagan, Diane Harrington, Clare Heffernan, John Hennigan, Grainne Keane, Orla Kennedy, David Leyden, John Lineen, Matthew Mccrum, Laura Mcdonnell, Sarah-Jane Mcgee, Deirdre

Mckenna, Brendan Money, Elizabeth Mulligan, Emma Murtagh, Grainne Nestor, Celine Ni Chonchuir, Kitty O’Brien, Sorcha O’Higgins, Orla O’Loinsigh, Diarmuid O’Sullivan, Kevin O’Sullivan, Neal Patterson, Emily Power, Patrick Quinlan, John Quinn, Declan Reilly, Shane Reilly, Kate Rhatigan, Janette Scott, Brendan Sexton, Mark Skehill, Laura Sloan, Emma Spierrin, Bryan Tormey, Tim Varian, Mark Walker, Patrick White


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Bus Stop - Performance & Illusion Elizabeth Mulligan


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Shop Conway Street Belfast Night View Grainne Nestor


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Urban Space Model Views Hugh Dolan

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In the valley Grainne Keane

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Power Station Cathal Curtin


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Forty Steps Orla Kennedy

Metro Section Janette Scott


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Gallery Montage Sorcha O’Higgin

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The UCD - Architecture workshop at Les Grands Ateliers in Villefontaine, France in the final thesis year is a tool used to expose students to matters of structure and material at critical stage of the formation of their thesis. This workshop takes place as part of fifth-year design studio, which is conducted on an exploratory basis to establish the ground of each individual thesis. The Material/Structure Workshop challenges the students to think about their thesis in both conceptual and physical terms before that thesis has developed into a fully-fledged architectural proposition. In the overall pedagogical structure of the year the workshop forms part of the dialogue between intuitive action and empirical research, which forms the basis of the thesis project. The project is framed to ask the students to address an issue or element of architectural culture from the perspective of their own emerging thesis. This ‘question’ is addressed in full scale by groups of students making manifestations of the element in a particular material within the Grands Atelier. The previous three years’ themes were: Wall /Mediation; Chair/2:1:2; Shelter/Roof. The brief emphasises the relationship between concept and making; artefact and culture; intuition and investigation. A door was the theme of this year’s project. A door occurs between two states or conditions. The students were asked to consider the door in the light of their own thesis intentions or emergent project. The door embodies simultaneously the separation and connection of space. It was open to the students to interpret the degree of separation or connection afforded, and whether the door was placed to engage with existing, clearly defined and related spaces, or placed to imply or create new connections or definitions of space. The door may be understood and framed metaphorically, and the students could describe their project in such terms. The artefacts created in les Grands Ateliers had to address the idea of the door in material and phenomenal terms. The focus could be on the frame, the leaf, the hinge, or whatever else was pivotal to the purpose and meaning of the door to be made. The concentration could also be on the moment of threshold, its compression or its attenuation. The form could deviate from any received image of the door, or work through a received image to an elemental understanding of purpose and means. Within the received form of the door the degrees of variation were manifold, from hanging to hinging to handles. The door invites physical bodily engagement and those passing through closely experience thus the attributes, of proportion, balance, movement, and making. Material: The students were given 60 No. 25x50mm battens with which to work in each group. The improbable nature of the battens as door-making-material was deliberate, and designed to provoke lateral thought and invention to create the elements required. It was expected that the students use only the batten, without introducing other materials except fixings. (For more information and images please check the website: www.ucd.ie/arcel) Staff: Hugh Campbell, Marcus Donaghy, Tiago Faria, Michael Murphy, John Parker, Daniel P Sudhershan


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Les Grands Ateliers Workshop


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Research and Innovation in the Designed Environment The aim of this two stage course is to establish individual research skills and develop critical thinking as instruments for appraisal and innovation in the culture of architecture and landscape. The first module taken in fourth year course offers a series of smallgroup thematic seminars. One of these seminars is taken in order to explore, through readings, fieldwork and presentation, the evolution, production, perception, and innovation of the designed environment. A small individually supervised research project will be undertaken in fifth year as a second module. The research will engage with a range of pressures that have moulded the designed environment in the past and demand changes for the future: these may include: the social and cultural, historical, geographical as well as the environmental and technical. Research work in progress will be presented to the group twice before a dissertation of at least 8000 words or an equivalent production in an appropriate medium is prepared. Seminar Groups for 2007/08 Space Framed - Hugh Campbell Spatial Cultures - Hugh Campbell Architecture and Metaphor - Kevin Donovan Memory and the Designed Environment - Samantha Martin-McAuliffe The Productive Landscape - John Olley Context and Representation - Fiona Smyth


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To have and to hold: a study of landscape management and attitudes in the Golden Vale Patrick Quinlan Commendation, RIBA President’s Dissertation Medal 2007

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Design Technologies I Integrated Design Strategies The emphasis of this course is on environmentally based building technologies and structural systems with a view to developing a more integrated and holistic approach to design. The lectures and projects run in parallel to studio design work to enable a synthesis between the design process and the technology programme. The term begins with an overview of sustainable building principles leading to more specific lectures on issues such as embodied energy, life cycle costing, advanced envelope technologies and the appropriate selection/assembly of materials for energy performance. Lectures and projects on preliminary scheme design principles and design tools with respect to both structure and enclosure technologies also form a major part of the course content, including an introduction to performance based specifications, a review of material based criteria in structural design and the evaluation of alternative structural systems. The course is principally project based and includes a shared workshop on Materials | Structure with the design studio. Staff Michael Goan

Design Technologies II Special Topics The Special Topics course varies each year, representing emerging issues in contemporary architectural technologies and research interests of staff. Representative topics include Irish Timbers and Sustainability; Light Perception Experience; Research in Concrete Design; Conservation of Historic Materials; Advanced Envelope Design; Lightweight Structures; and Performance Analysis Methods. Offered in the 2007-08 were: Irish Timbers and Sustainability Research in Concrete Design Staff Marcus Collier, Charles Lyons, Ciaran McNally, Michael Murphy, Simon Walker


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Design Technologies Studio


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Design Technologies Studio


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Design Technologies Studio

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Professional Studies The intention for the course is to enable graduates to be confident, effective, knowledgeable and comfortable in their work and to be able to choose their mode of professional activity. The fourth year course content is designed to engage the interest of the students and to stimulate them to develop their own knowledge and understanding of the architect as a professional. The course provides a picture of the architect at work and of the skills required with which they survive and flourish. The course content deals with these skills which are encompassed under the headings: communicating, leading, managing projects and people, and working effectively. The intention of the fifth year course is to equip graduates with the knowledge skills and attitudes which will enable them to have freedom in choosing their professional mode of activity within their working life. The course provides the outline of the knowledge of the practice of architecture having regard to the graduate’s need to be able to work effectively as a junior member of a team, and to be able to advance to running smaller projects under the supervision of a senior member of the office. Staff Dorothy Jones


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Erasmus


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Erasmus/International Student Exhibition In September 2007 we organised our very first Erasmus / International Architecture exhibition. The exhibition was put together by UCD-Architecture students who studied abroad during the academic year 2006-2007 as part of the BArch course. The aim of the exhibition was first and foremost to show the work undertaken by our students at different architecture schools across Europe and in Hong Kong. A rich variety of projects were presented. For more information on schools and student projects please visit: http://www.ucd.ie/arcel/erasmus.html Daniel P. Sudhershan Erasmus / International Coordinator – Architecture List of our partner schools 1. Belgium - Hoger Instituut voor Architectuurwetenschappen Henry van de Velde, Antwerp 2. Demmark - Det Kgl. Danske Kunstakademi - Kunstakademiets Arkitekstskole, Copenghagen 3. Denmark - Arkitektskolen Aarhus 4. Finland - Oulun Yliopisto, Oulu 5. France - Ecole d’Architecture du Languedoc Roussillon, Montpellier 6. France - Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Saint-Étienne 7. Germany - Hochschule Darmstadt, Darmstadt 8. Germany - Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart 9. Germany - Bauhaus-Universität, Weimar 10. Hong Kong - Chinese University of Hong Kong 11. Liechtenstein - Hochschule Liechtenstein, Institut fuer Architektur und Raumplanung 12. Netherlands - Technische Universiteit Delft 13. Norway - Arkitektur- og designhogskolen i Oslo, Institutt for arkitektur, Oslo 14. Poland - Politechnika Gdanska, Gdansk 15. Spain - Arquitectura La Salle, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona 16. Sweden - Kungl Tekniska Hogskolen, Stockholm 17. United States of America – University of California, Berkley


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‘Bauhaus’ Crit and Exhibition As part of the Erasmus collaboration with the Bauhaus University in Weimar, an interim crit for Prof. Karl-Heinz Schmitz’s international Advanced Architectural Design module took place in Richview on 28th April 2008. The module is jointly run by Peter Cody who teaches the fourth-year BArch studio course and is a guest professor to Bauhaus University for this academic year . As part of the event we hosted an exhibition on “2000ff – contemporary architecture in weimar” which was presented by the Bauhaus University’s Faculty of Architecture and Archiv der Moderne as part of an initiative to encourage the students to engage with and critically analyse the architectural locality where they live and work. Daniel P. Sudhershan Erasmus / International Coordinator – Architecture


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Research & Advanced Studies


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Research Degrees Architecture supports a wide range of research leading to the degrees of PhD, MArchSc, MUBC and MSc(Urban Design) Current doctoral research covers the history of designed landscapes, sustainable development and landscapes, quality of life in the built environment, historical and critical architectural studies, and conservation: Daylight Dynamics Paul Kenny, supervisor: John Olley

Health, Pedagogy and Sustainability: the Quality of the School Environment Sarah Sheridan, supervisor: John Olley

Notating Space: Music, Architecture and Acoustic Performance Fiona Smyth: supervisor: John Olley

Ecological Networks in Designed Landscapes Milena Debrovska, supervisor: John Olley

Landscape, Water and Sustainability

Elizabeth McNicholas, supervisor: John Olley

Irish Medieval Roof Timbers

Charles Lyons, supervisor: John Olley

Methodology for the Appraisal of Pedestrian Environment of Historic Towns in Ireland Siobhan O’Dea, supervisor: John Olley

The Suburban Landscape

Brian Ward, supervisors: John Olley and Hugh Campbell

Mapping the Liffey: Chance and Representation Beth Shotton, supervisor Hugh Campbell

Conservation, Policy and Globalisation Marie Robinson, supervisor: Loughlin Kealy

Life Cycle Energy Performance Evaluation of Building Patxi Hernandez, supervisor: Paul Kenny

Indoor Air Quality in Irish Housing Liyan Guo, supervisor: J. Owen Lewis

Morphology of Urban Building Thermal Performance Julie Futcher, supervisor: J. Owen Lewis

Delivering the Zero Energy House

Vivienne Brophy, supervisor: J. Owen Lewis


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Landscape, Water and Sustainability: Performance, Evolution and Decline of Water Management on Irish Demesnes

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The Suburban Landscape

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Degree of MSc in Urban Design The programme in Urban Design responds to a developing awareness and perceived need for advanced research and skills in urban design. The degree is offered as a modularized two year part-time programme, including a research thesis. Students undertake a programme of taught modules of project work, seminars and lectures, and develop their thesis during the second year. The course addresses current issues in urban design and engages in environmental issues associated with the rapid process of Irish urbanisation. The thesis can be a written or design-led body of research. The course is interdisciplinary and is open to professionals in the fields of architecture, landscape, planning, engineering and surveying. Some modules are open to undergraduate students and others. Staff Alan Mee, Miriam Fitzpatrick, Philip Geoghegan, Derry O Connell Invited Speakers MHugh Brady, Conor Norton, Michael Cregan, Michael Wall, Seamus Mc Gearailt, John Prosser, Aine Ryan, Prof. James Wyckham, Joost Beunderman, Conor Moloney, Dr Mary Gilmartin, Roisin Heneghan, Paula Russell, Martin Colreavy, Sean O'Laoire, Garry Miley, Dr. Mary Corcoran, John Mc Laughlin, Angela Rolfe, Ali Grehan, Ciaran Cuffe, Dick Gleeson, Gerry Cahill, Paul Altman, Siobhan O'Dea

Degree of Master of Urban and Building Conservation Diploma in Urban and Building Conservation Certificate in Urban and Building Conservation

The programme in Urban and Building Conservation prepares students and the professions for an enlarging role in the conservation, rehabilitation and restoration of buildings and the re-vitalisation of urban areas. The degree of MUBC is a research degree. A supporting programme provides an advanced course of study to enable the preparation of a thesis. The programme has an emphasis on methods of recording, researching, analysing and evaluating the heritage of buildings and towns, and on the ability to make considered judgements on the issues involved in their conservation and continuing use. The programme provides a balance between theory and practice through a combination of project work, lectures, seminars and study visits to significant buildings and sites. The course culminates in the preparation of a substantial thesis on a chosen research topic. The purpose of the thesis is to enable each student to develop an in-depth knowledge of a particular area within the field of conservation. Students may undertake one semester of studies leading to the award of a Certificate in Urban and Building Conservation, or follow a two semester programme leading to a Diploma. Staff Paul Arnold, Finola O Kane Crimmins, Susan Roundtree Contributors Loughlin Kealy, John Cahill, Dr. John Olley, Mary Clark, Jackie Donnelly, Lisa Edden, Jason Ellis, Dr Aubrey Flegg, David Griffin, Aideen Ireland, Frank Keohane ,Donal Lennon, Alistair Lindsay, Charlie Lyons, Daniel McInervey, Paul McMahon, M. McParland, Emily Moore, Rachel Moss, Dr. Conor Murphy, Ciaran O’ Brien, Dr Freddie O Dwyer, Mona O’Rourke, Aighleann O Shaughnessy, Sara Pavia, Margaret Quinlan, Noel Riordan, Pat Ruane, Linzi Simpson, David Wall


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Building Sustainable Communities - MSc Urban Design Thesis 2008 Paul Altman

MUBC Students on their Study Trip at Jigginstown


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Affiliated & Associated Courses


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UCD Architecture @ CESUGA UCD Architecture commenced its programme at the Centro de Estudios Superiores Universitarios de Galicia (CESUGA), located in La Corunna in September 2004. CESUGA was established in the early 1990s with a view to providing high quality university level education in Galicia in the north west of Spain. UCD offers three degrees there, the BSc (Architectural Science), the BArch and the BComm in partnership with CESUGA, and other programmes will follow. The first graduates in the BSc (Architectural Science) degree were conferred in November 2007 and the programme is now in its fourth year with the first BArch degree candidates scheduled to graduate in 2009. The staff are drawn from various regions of Spain but with a strong Galician character, and UCD staff contribute to the teaching programme. It is hoped to establish an exchange programme for students and staff as the programme develops. Collaboration in the area of architectural technology research is being established at present and it is hoped that this will lead to collaboration in other fields of architectural research. The benefits for UCD include bringing an international perspective to our programmes in Dublin, and creating further possibilities for postgraduate research and collaboration.


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Housing and Communal Facilities Bernardo Santiago Santiago

House of the Sea Lara Rodriguez Noceda


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Landscape Architecture This four-year undergraduate degree (leading onto the professional accredited MLA) prepares students for careers in landscape architecture or associated professions such as planning. The two main elements of the undergraduate programme are studio work and lectures. The study of landscape architecture involves learning many skills, but design is essential to this specialist degree and site-based projects are the basis of studio. Design methodology is taught and practised in the studio-based modules that make up 50% of this 4-year course. Students learn to inform their design decisions by analysis of information concerning the natural and cultural processes affecting particular case studies. There is an important element of self-direction to these modules. Studio work is supported by lectures providing theoretical material in the areas of biology, ecology and the earth sciences, landscape planning, management, materials and construction techniques. The Schinkel Competition 2008 The Schinkel Competition is a yearly Europe- wide competition, which invites young architects, landscape architects and civil engineers to submit their designs for a variety of projects, each emphasising a different planning issue. The competition is meant to encourage creativity and innovation for the continuing challenges in planning and design. This year, the design submission for the Cottbus site by Fourth Stage UCD students Shirley Lazenby, Danielle Martin, Trevor Ryan and Declan Keane was awarded an Honorable Mention.


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Schinkel Competition Entry (Honourable Mention) by UCD Landscape Architecture students

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Structural Engineering with Architecture This programme focuses primarily on the design of structures. The aim of the programme is to develop an appreciation for architecture and the mathematical ability to challenge the traditional boundaries of structural design. Through the design content of the programme we aim to interlink the language of mathematics with the visual and graphical language encouraging exploration of structural forms and materials. BSc Stage 1: This includes mathematical and science subjects, graphics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanic. History and theory of architecture is introduced in addition to theory and design of structures. Students’ problem solving and lateral thinking skills are developed, they are encouraged to develop creative solutions and to critically evaluate these. Stage 1 Studio Staff: Keith Finglas Stage 1 Students: Samuel Bodiu, Louise Campion, Mark Conlon, Darragh Connolly, John Cooper, Robert Corbally, Arthur Costello, William Delahoyde, Gary Duggan, Niall Eivers, Jack Fanning, Kelly-Ann Farrell, Paul Farrell, Conor Hanney, Rachel Harney, Conor Harrington, Michael Hickey, Ronan Hunt, Paul Kelly, Steven Lawlor, Helen McGarry, Ronan Monahan, Mark O’Reilly, Manus Sweeny, Brian Thomson, Angela Traenor.

BSc Stage 2: In stage 2 the modules providing the main foundation for structural design are introduced, including construction materials, building construction and the mechanics of solids and fluids. Design studio work enhances the creative skills through introduction to model making and 3D computer aided design. Stage 2 Studio Staff: Fiona McDonald, Mark Price, Peter Flynn Stage 2 Students: Ruth Baldwin, Jack Buggy, Julie Clarke, Sean Connon, Daniel Coyne, John Daly, James Forkan, Jason Goldrick, Laura Hannigan, Keelan Hegarty, Barry Kavanagh, Niall Keaveney, Brendan Kelly, Damien Kelly, Colin Long, Catherine McHale, Eoin McPartland, Stephanie Monaghan, Noel Moran, Thomas O’Boyle, Cathal Quinn, Alan Sherry, Peter Wall, Robert Wasson

BSc Stage 3: Stage 3 of the BSc programme takes the design and analysis skills to a more advanced level through both formal lectures and studio and design projects. The integration of building services within structures is also examined. Stage 3 Studio Staff: Martin McGrath, Cormac Woods, Dara McDonnell Stage 3 Project Supervisors: Mark Richardson, Eugene O’Brien, Paul Fanning, Debra Laefer, Ken Gavin, Arturo Gonzalez, Ciaran McNally, Amanda Gibney Stage 3 Students: Orlaith Bermingham, Jack Browne, Rory Burke, Emer Collopy, Bernard Conry, Michael Dowd, William Fadden, Michael Fenton, Michael Fitzgerald, Alan Garvey, Robert Harrington, Susan Keller, Fiona Little, Eoghan Maloney, Orlagh McHugh, Laura McLoughlin, Simon Mitton, Denis Murphy, Cian O’Lionsigh, Aisling O’Shea, Brian Parades, Justin Perry, Conor Whelan

ME Stage 1: Students study advanced design and analysis modules enhancing their skills through lectures, laboratory practical sessions and project work. Students have the opportunity to avail of an organised 8month work placement, in Ireland or abroad, as part of their programme. Stage 1 Work Placement Opportunities: Arup, Barrett Mahony, Buro Happold, Clifton Scannell Emerson, Kavanagh Mansfield, Malone O’Regan, Moylan, O’Connor Sutton Cronin, Skidmore Owings and Merrill, TESS Atelier D’Ingénierie, T.J. O’Connor Stage 1 Students: Rory Beirne, Máire Bradley, Cloragh Byrne, Eoin Casserly, Deborah Condon, Aifric Delahunty, Austin Devin, Kate Fitzgerald, Noel Kennedy, Claire Mullen, Richard Nelson, Blain Newsome, Aodhán Reaney


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Acknowledgements This document was produced and designed by Pierre Jolivet. With special thanks to Jim Murphy, Daniel P. Sudhershan and all the students who submitted material. Addresses UCD Architecture, School of Architecture, Landscape & Civil Engineering, Richview, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland T +353 1 716 2757 F +353 1 283 7778

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UCD Architecture Yearbook 2008